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Apple's Secret Plan To Join iPhones With Airport Security

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the do-you-consent-to-an-isearch dept.

Government 232

Hugh Pickens writes "Currently — as most of us know — TSA agents briefly examine government ID and boarding passes as each passenger presents their documents at a checkpoint at the end of a security line. Thom Patterson writes at CNN that under a 2008 Apple patent application that was approved in July and filed under the working title "iTravel," a traveler's phone would automatically send electronic identification to a TSA agent as soon as the traveler got in line and as each traveler waits in line. TSA agents would examine the electronic ID at an electronic viewing station. Next, at the X-ray stations, a traveler's phone would confirm to security agents that the traveler's ID had already been checked. Apple's patent calls for the placement of special kiosks (PDF) around the airport which will automatically exchange data with your phone via a close range wireless technology called near field communication (NFC). Throughout the process, the phone photo could be displayed on a screen for comparison with the traveler. Facial recognition software could be included in the process. Several experts say a key question that must be answered is: How would you prove that the phone is yours? To get around this problem, future phones or electronic ID may require some form of biometric security function including photo, fingerprint and photo retinal scan comparisons. Of course, there is still a ways to go. If consumers, airlines, airports and the TSA don't embrace the NFC kiosks, experts say it's unlikely Apple's vision would become reality. 'First you would have to sell industry on Apple's idea. Then you'd have to sell it to travel consumers,' says Neil Hughes of Apple Insider. 'It's a chicken-and-egg problem.'"

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232 comments

A 1984 device ? (5, Interesting)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about a year and a half ago | (#41393981)

The irony is that the "1984" theme became one of the most successful ad campaign for Apple back then ...

Re:A 1984 device ? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394177)

how about they just fuck the TSA right off, and everyone can go back to being chilled and not freaking out about being on a plane. TSA has stopped 0 terrorists, but has sexually assulted millions.

Re:A 1984 device ? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394705)

I don't know if I mind if millions of terrorist get sexually assualted.

Re:A 1984 device ? (5, Funny)

0100010001010011 (652467) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394757)

The TSA is actually a wonderful institution that has brought cheap healthcare to thousands in America.

Now if I take a fall and am afraid I broke something rather than go to the ER and get an X-Ray ($500). Pay the hospital for their time ($500) and then pay the Doctor. ($1000) I just buy the cheapest plane ticket ($200) I can find and go through security with change in my pockets. Enough times that I can get a few good views of the problem.

Re:A 1984 device ? (5, Insightful)

aurispector (530273) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394249)

Cell phones are becoming less about communications and more about tracking and identification. Pretty soon big brother isn't going to let you leave home without it.

1984 was a warning, not an instruction manual.

Re:A 1984 device ? (4, Interesting)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394403)

Cell phones are becoming less about communications and more about tracking and identification.

It's a good thing that not every phone is an iPhone then, huh.
If their patent works out, they are sure to make this iTravel thing a permanent and non-removable staple of iPhone 6S or whatever it'll be by then.

Re:A 1984 device ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41395025)

1984 was a warning, not an instruction manual.

And Apple used it to try to scare people away from flexible PCs to Macs, fast-forward to now and aside from colour there's not much differentiating iPhones, everyone has the same.

Re:A 1984 device ? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394395)

Oh for fuck's sake. When you buy an airline ticket your entire life history is available for the taking. You are not traveling anonymously or privately. You are known to the TSA before you ever step into the airline terminal. If you want to blame someone, start with DHS and the TSA. Apple isn't selling you out, your government sold you out.

Re:A 1984 device ? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394727)

If you want to blame someone, start with DHS and the TSA. Apple isn't selling you out, your government sold you out.

Close but you're one level too shallow which is .. typical. DHS and TSA are effects. Not causes.

The causes are a bunch of Americans who think being fat and stupid is acceptable. They care a LOT more about who the next American Idol will be, or which football team wins a game (athletes == the really rich people nobody hates) than they do about our progress along a path to our own brand of fascism. Ever see mindless football fans jumping up and down, yelling and screaming etc. over a touchdown? If they got half that concerned and excited about freedom (real freedom, not the "freedom to tell other people how to live" bullshit) we wouldn't HAVE a TSA.

Fat stupid people who aren't terribly aware of what's going on is an environment. Government tyranny is an organism that thrives in this particular environment. It is not hard to understand. It's just hard for immature minds to accept because there is no nice fluffy-bunny way to say it that will never offend anybody. And to immature minds, being inoffensive no matter how low of a priority that should be in the face of bigger problems, is much more important than dealing with reality.

Re:A 1984 device ? (5, Insightful)

EricThribb (2670171) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394619)

Apple always makes me think of George Orwell - just that it's Animal Farm rather than 1984 that springs to mind

Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (5, Insightful)

swschrad (312009) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394001)

which hasn't happened yet.

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (5, Funny)

Severus Snape (2376318) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394217)

iPhone 6, duh. Apple's phones are pretty predictable these days, new tech comes a cycle late.

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (3, Interesting)

pnot (96038) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394373)

iPhone 6, duh. Apple's phones are pretty predictable these days, new tech comes a cycle late.

The first phone with NFC was the Nokia 6131, which came out a year before the first iPhone. So maybe new tech comes six cycles late...

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (1)

Severus Snape (2376318) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394429)

Nice fact but you know what I mean, NFC is now a expected feature for the top of the range smart phones but Apple have done LTE this cycle, NFC next cycle.

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (1)

pnot (96038) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394487)

Well yes, I was half-joking. But I feel as though they're more like two cycles behind on this -- 2011 was when NFC really hit the mainstream, there was a fair bit of speculation [computerworld.com] that the 4S would have it.

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (2, Insightful)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394603)

Nice fact but you know what I mean, NFC is now a expected feature for the top of the range smart phones

Why? I've never seen a place where you can use it. Similar schemes for cards/devices to replace small change etc. have failed to find any traction many times before.

As it stands for those phones that have it, at best it's a pointless novelty.

If Apple introduce it it'll be when and if it gains traction, or if before that, it'll be when Apple themselves can put together enough partners to make it worthwhile.

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (1)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394225)

You could do it without NFC. You could use WiFi or Bluetooth or many other technologies. Personally I think it would work even better without any of those.

The PreCheck system in airports just relies on uploading your photo ID. In fact that seems like the easiest and most secure system all around. But it would require all of the states opening up their ID photos to one database. Then when you walk up to the airport. The facial recognition could confirm that you're on the list of airline tickets registered for the day.

It would be 100x more reliable than the current system where you print off a ticket that looks authentic and hand them a driver's license which can be easily forged.

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (1)

icebike (68054) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394441)

No, you can't do it with wifi or bluetooth. The range is too great, and its too easy to hack.

Actually you can't do any of this stuff at all, because as soon as TSA authorizes any of this stuff, the other
phone makers are going to be in court demanding no special favors to one company.

Its a useless patent, because government wouldn't dare try to implement it.

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (2, Informative)

EGSonikku (519478) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394621)

As opposed to non-hackable NFC?

"Summary: Using a pair of zero day vulnerabilities, a team of security researchers from U.K.-based MWR Labs hacked into a Samsung Galaxy S3 phone running Android 4.0.4 by beaming an exploit via NFC"

http://www.zdnet.com/exploit-beamed-via-nfc-to-hack-samsung-galaxy-s3-android-4-0-4-7000004510/ [zdnet.com]

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (4, Informative)

icebike (68054) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394711)

They were 1 centimeter away from the back side of the phone.

Don't you think someone would notice that? The exploit was not NFC specific, and BOTH sender and receiver had to be manipulated to authorizet the transmission. Way to troll.

Re:Also, Apple would need NFC in their phones (1)

djdanlib (732853) | about a year and a half ago | (#41395011)

You could have it in a bag and run into someone at the store, library, subway, airport... heck, even out on the street. When was the last time you thought twice about someone bumping into you accidentally?

fanboys (0, Troll)

masternerdguy (2468142) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394003)

keep buying apple

the righteous (0)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394209)

don't see their own hypocrisy

the idiot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394285)

thinks that the hipocrisy of others justifies their own

The jackass (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394407)

is smug but can't even spell "hypocrisy."

again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394413)

oblivious hypocrisy strikes.

Fandroids (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394325)

Just keep eating all the FUD they can serve up.

I am glad NFC is available on iPhones (1)

thammoud (193905) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394015)

Apple's patent calls for the placement of special kiosks (PDF) around the airport which will automatically exchange data with your phone via a close range wireless technology called near field communication (NFC).

shrug. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394017)

well, patenting it is a good way to ensure it won't happen for 20 years. Patents retard innovation, as is well understood [ucla.edu] by now.

Re:shrug. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394091)

well, patenting it is a good way to ensure it won't happen for 20 years. Patents retard innovation, as is well understood [ucla.edu] by now.

Umm, no. That's NOT what that says:

We show through theory and example that intellectual monopoly is not necessary for innovation and as a practical matter is damaging to growth, prosperity and liberty.

Where's the "retard innovation" there?

Even if you accept the authors' claims, they're not claiming patents retard innovation. So how the hell can you claim that's "well understood" when your documentation doesn't even say that?

Re:shrug. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394193)

Its not the same...

Patents retard innovation
Retards patent innovation
Retards patent retard innovations
Patent retards retard innovation

Companies: Apple isn't forever (5, Insightful)

Kittenman (971447) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394033)

I've attended a couple of Tech conferences where the presenters seem to assume that
- everyone is, or will be on Facebook
- everyone has, or will have an Apple device (iphone or ipad)

All rather short-sighted. In the past we've seen new ideas come along and be embraced by society and then abandoned. Skateboard parks, CB radios, kung fu ...

Not to say that Apple doesn't have a large customer base now - but it won't always. Is it really that worthwhile to introduce special handling for people with a special type of device?

Re:Companies: Apple isn't forever (3, Funny)

0123456 (636235) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394051)

Clearly once this technology was introduced, owning an iPhone would become compulsory for travellers who didn't want to be butt probed.

The iProbe (1)

bdwoolman (561635) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394269)

iThought of it first. Mine!

But will it also photograph and then lase the polyps it finds. Put that in your Instagram.

Okay. I am going no further with this.

Re:Companies: Apple isn't forever (1)

mjwx (966435) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394943)

Clearly once this technology was introduced, owning an iPhone would become compulsory for travellers who didn't want to be butt probed.

Actually, it prepares travelers to be probed. They already take it up the Jacksie from Apple, why not the TSA too.

Everything is temporary (2)

MrEricSir (398214) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394069)

Not to say that Apple doesn't have a large customer base now - but it won't always. Is it really that worthwhile to introduce special handling for people with a special type of device?

You mean for the security theater that didn't exist a decade years ago in a type of travel terminal that didn't exist a century ago? Stop kidding yourself: nothing lasts forever.

Re:Companies: Apple isn't forever (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394223)

Well, everyone IS on Facebook. OK, not every single last individual, but in the 18-35 demo, it's 90%, and it doesn't fall off THAT much once you get outside that demo. Grandmothers are on Facebook. Infants have Facebook pages set up for them before they can walk.

Assuming everyone is on Facebook is not a bad assumption. Reaching the ones who aren't isn't worth the extra time or trouble, for both companies and individuals. How many people have you seen say that their social life is run off FB? That they don't get invited to things except through FB? And so on. It isn't worth the trouble for people to separately email those few who don't use FB, so naturally, that segment of the population is more and more excluded.

Re:Companies: Apple isn't forever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394421)

Assuming everyone is on Facebook is not a bad assumption.

Assumption is bad, but that assumption is one of the worst.

Re:Companies: Apple isn't forever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394263)

Apple has out lasted,

Alliant Computer Systems, Altos Computer Systems, Amdahl Corporation, Amiga, Apollo Computer, Apricot Computers, Ardent Computer, AST Computers, Austin, Computer Systems, Burroughs, Be, Celerity Computing, Commodore International, Compaq, CompuAdd, Computer Automation, Control Data Corporation (CDC), Convex Computer, Corona Data Systems, Cromemco, Data General, Digital Equipment Corporation, e-WIS computers, Eagle Computer, Encore Computer, English Electric, Everex, Evesham, Fountain Technologies, International Computers and Tabulators (ICT), International Computers Limited (ICL), Kaypro, Leading Edge, Liebermann Computers, Luxor AB, Magnuson Computer Systems, Maxdata, Mitsubishi Electronics, MPC, Multiflow Computer, Nixdorf Computer, Northgate Computer Systems, Osborne Computer, Packard Bell, PC Brand, Printaform, Processor Technology, Psystar, Pyramid Technology, Radio Shack, RCA, Remington Rand, Scientific Data Systems, Sequent Computer Systems, SGI, Simply Computers, Sinclair Research, Solbourne Computer, Sperry, Sperry Rand, Stardent, Stellar Computer, Sun Microsystems, Systems Engineering Laboratories, Tandy Corporation, Tiny Computers, Wang Laboratories, XByte Computers, Zeos, Zepto Computers, Amstrad, Data General, Tulip Computers, Gladius Computer, Domtech multimedia communication ltd, Egenera, Vigor Gaming (USA), e-WIS Computers, VoodooPC

In short Apple isn't going anywhere any time soon. But I will tell some compaines that will either be out of business or no longer selling android phones in 5 years.
LG, HTC, Motorola, Blackberry, Nokia, ZTC, Sony Ericsson, etc...

Re:Companies: Apple isn't forever (3, Informative)

trout007 (975317) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394685)

It depends. Consumers had abandoned General Motors and drove them into bankruptcy. But luckily for them they own enough politicians so they just stole $50 Billion from Bond holders and another $50 Billion from the same people that won't buy their cars and BOOM back in business making cars nobody wants.

Re:Companies: Apple isn't forever (1)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394703)

Not to say that Apple doesn't have a large customer base now - but it won't always

But between time period A and time period B, the customer base is getting larger, not smaller.

Re:Companies: Apple isn't forever (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394865)

I've noticed that trend as well. It is like you are talking to a newly converted religious zealot that fails to grasp the notion that many people do not use Facebook nor Apple. Google was started in a garage by a couple of maths grads that build a search engine and Facebook by some students that has a simplistic idea. The notion that these companies are the final evolution in terms of how we use the Internet is laughable - we have only scratched the surface. The evolution will continue and new business models will emerge.

Chicken and egg problem (2)

pokoteng (2729771) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394053)

... that shouldn't even be a problem in the first place. What's so wrong with passports again? They already have various other security (like RFID chips, iirc), and they're much more tightly controlled than phones you can buy off ebay.

USA government already ahead of industry on this (5, Interesting)

Scowler (667000) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394105)

We have RFID tags in our passports already, so they are already moving us towards electronic IDs. It's a foregone conclusion that the type of ID done for international flights will eventually crop up in domestic travel as well, for better or worse.

Consumers won't fight phone ID provided there is some added convenience that comes with it. Perhaps if we didn't have to remove shoes, for example (even though that security theatre seems unrelated to digital identification).

Re:USA government already ahead of industry on thi (3, Funny)

Tough Love (215404) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394123)

Why should Apple allow the US government to own a monopoly on creepiness?

Re:USA government already ahead of industry on thi (2)

Scowler (667000) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394341)

Ask any big defense company. Government contracts are fabulous things.

Re:USA government already ahead of industry on thi (1)

mgbastard (612419) | about a year and a half ago | (#41395037)

We have RFID tags in our passports already, so they are already moving us towards electronic IDs. It's a foregone conclusion that the type of ID done for international flights will eventually crop up in domestic travel as well, for better or worse.

I microwave any RFID they dare to put in my papers. So should you.

"oh? no workee? I have a magnetic personality. Electronics just fail around my person."

Haven't they seen Touch? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394113)

On the first episode, the guy picks boxes and boxes of lost phones in the airport for his kid!

iTravel. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394129)

Because Microsoft already tried to trademark "Passport."

Elephant Broadcast System Test (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394135)

Ever urinate on a mirror while laughing and shoving a donut in your anus while making random animal noises, especially elephant and shouting, "Now THIS is a test of the ELEPHANT broadcast system, but this is ONLY a test!" The OBEY tones will follow and you'll have the donut in your rectum, if you think hard enough, can you taste the donut or do you whip it out and suck it down knowing it had been a part of you and now it is again!

EBS - Elephant Broadcast System "THEY ARE READING MINDS"

better late or never (1)

harvey the nerd (582806) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394139)

Time to move to a nice "backward" country, where this might be 10-20 years late or completely derailed by other considerations. This serves the system, not the consumer or citizen.

Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (4, Informative)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394147)

Apple submitted the patent in 2008, it was approved in July, and both Slashdot and CNN are talking about it today, so this is "secret" HOW?

In all likelihood, it would be a service that would be available *IF YOU WANT IT*

Christ, people, if you suffer from this type of PARANOIA regularly, seek professional help.

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394271)

> In all likelihood, it would be a service that would be available *IF YOU WANT IT*
Just like using SSN for anything but social security...oh wait...

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394977)

Just like using SSN for anything but social security...oh wait...

I'm sorry, we're all required to carry Smart Phones now?

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (4, Insightful)

mounthood (993037) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394297)

In all likelihood, it would be a service that would be available *IF YOU WANT IT*

Christ, people, if you suffer from this type of PARANOIA regularly, seek professional help.

Optional today, required tomorrow. But don't worry because it'll work with Android and Windows Phone 8, and you'll get to choose the software you like best!

Swearing about PARANOIA seems more than a little unfair since the government has tried this strategy -- but without the iPhone -- before. It looks like they're currently calling it TSA PreCheck [tsa.gov] but they'll probably change it to "PhoneCheck".

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (2)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394995)

Optional today, required tomorrow.

Last time I checked, Smart Phones were not required by government decree.

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394305)

Well said.

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (5, Insightful)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394439)

In all likelihood, it would be a service that would be available *IF YOU WANT IT*

Indeed. To give a more recent example (than SSN given by someone else), consider the electronic toll-booths.

First, it was a discount pilot program for those who want it

Then it was a normal-price convenience

Then the cash-booths dwindled to one or two per road

And I have already ran into some booths in Illinois with "no human operator present". And ran into something like that in Canada (no cash payment option, apparently, but they can charge and fine you later with plate recognition)

It doesn't even take that long to go from "optional convenience" to "optional if you like to suffer and pay extra"

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394609)

The Illinois system is free* to sign up

*$10 refundable deposit/$40 prepaid tolls you do get the prepaid tolls back when you close your account.

You do need to buy a cell phone + data plan to use it.

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394843)

What about people driving across country? They wouldn't want to sign up for that.

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394931)

The Illinois system is free* to sign up

Some people don't want to be in yet another tracking and easily accessible database. Other people like to easily determine how much they pay per passage and notice any price changes right away. It's not about the cost, it's about having the option of "thank you, not interested".

Re:Secret HOW? Nice Headline Slashdot... (3, Funny)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394737)

if you suffer from this type of PARANOIA regularly, seek professional help.

Trust a psychiatrist? .. that's crazy talk!

This is getting silly.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394201)

What was wrong with a passport? KISS!

iPapers please! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394227)

Destination 1984

Chicken and egg? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394239)

. 'First you would have to sell industry on Apple's idea. Then you'd have to sell it to travel consumers,' says Neil Hughes of Apple Insider. 'It's a chicken-and-egg problem.'"

How is the above a chicken & egg problem? FTA's author outlines the steps.

Not saying I think it's a good idea, but please, write non-garbage for once.

Nice way to spread FUD (2)

Guspaz (556486) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394319)

Somehow a publicly published idea about how to get people through airport security faster and easier is now a "secret plan for searching you at the airport" and comments equating it to all sorts of nasty things...

It's a public patent, and the goal of the thing is clearly the opposite of what everybody seems to be claiming...

Re:Nice way to spread FUD (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394607)

The goal of the thing is for Apple to profit from yet another erosion of your liberty.

Optional tomorrow, compulsory the day after.

You. Fucking. Moron.

Attention Obama Drones! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394321)

What is it we call collusion between the state and industry?

It's not freedom people. Wake up and smell the tyranny.

Patent Attroneys (2)

kromozone (817261) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394381)

I've spent most of my life reading patents for money. No one, at any company, gives a crap about right and wrong. If it's a novel idea and you think there's some chance of making money on it, you patent it. I'd be reviewing applications for Zyklon B if there was a way to monetize murder.

seems like a slam dunk to me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394385)

let's see:

will it cost a lot of $ to implement? check!

will it further erode privacy/civil rights? check!

will it be completely ineffective, demonstrably useless & not improve actual security (vs theatre)? check!

seems like all Apple need to do is hire Chertoff, misplace a couple of briefcases full of $ and this is a done deal...

am I missing something?

And then (1)

cvtan (752695) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394411)

And then you would have to sell me an iPhone. Urrp.

Re:And then (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394649)

Or get Congress to force you to buy one. They can do that now according to the Supremes (assuming you're American).

Re:And then (1)

causality (777677) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394895)

(assuming you're American)

Don't worry, they have some of the best working on that one. All they have to do is raise a big enough stink over enough time and artificially generate enough of an outcry. Then they will manage to "harmonize" all of the "security laws" the same way they have internationally harmonized so many copyright laws.

After all, you don't want the terrorists to win.

Finally! A good Apple patent! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394419)

Thanks to Apple patenting this idea, there is no way this crap will ever make it's way to other devices. Thankyou Apple!

Just what we need (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394433)

... another way to avoid being screened or interrogated. Thanks, Apple!

Love, Al-Qaeda

Tin foil hat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394451)

Apple's patent calls for the placement of special kiosks around the airport which will automatically exchange data with your phone via a close range wireless technology called near field communication (NFC)

Tin foil hat bullshit.

NFC has a range of less than an inch, if you're lucky. It often requires physical contact.

There is nothing "automatic" about a security checkin where I have to take out my phone and hold/tap it against a scanner.

Better solution (1)

t1oracle (1908404) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394465)

Face recognizing cameras. They already have it and it doesn't require a phone that could be hacked. An iPhone ID would only punish the innocent while letting guilty in through the front door.

Sheeple (1)

Eyezen (548114) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394477)

While there will be those of us that know otherwise the masses will eat it up and not think one iota about the consequences.

Re:Sheeple (1)

hyades1 (1149581) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394765)

Damn...never a mod point around when I want one. I used to object to the term "sheeple". Not anymore.

Or do the right thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394485)

Stop checking IDs at all and only search for explosives. Stop the police state. I flew for decades with either no ID or a drivers license. Including to Mexico and Canada.

The overlords own us.

Trusted Travler Programs already exists (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394527)

The TSA has several "Trusted Traveler" programs already. Global Entry, SENTRI, and NEXUS are three of them for "rapid" entry into the US and TSA Preâoe" works in conus.

I travel a lot but mainly through 5 or 6 different airports. I know which checkpoints are better than others at each airport. That knowledge can easily save me 30-60 minutes each time going through security even through I may have to walk a little further once through.

Sounds like iOS 6's Passbook (1)

EGSonikku (519478) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394613)

This sounds like a "Proto" version of Apple's "Passbook" app that launched today, alongside iOS6. Not the security part, but flight boarding passes, and expanded beyond travel for movie theater tickets, gift cards and what not.

http://www.apple.com/ios/whats-new/#passbook [apple.com]

I'm not seeing a secret apple conspiracy plan, and even if there was one, they decided against NFC and went with Passbook.

Lake In Salt Lake City (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394623)

Lake In Salt Lake City: http://lakeinsaltlakecity.com/

Friendly public reminder. (2)

Yaztromo (655250) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394695)

Before too many more people go off half-cocked, please allow me to remind everyone that every major tech company, particularly Apple, patents all sorts of crazy stuff that they never use. Here is an article [maclife.com] detailing 10 patents from the last few years (the article is a year old) of crazy things that had /.ers (and others) predicting all sorts of weird and crazy stuff -- and not a single product has been released using any of them.

Remember when Apple patented touch gestures for the rear of an iPhone-like device? In the four or five iPhones released since then, have they ever implemented it? No. Seems doubtful they ever will at this point.

I'd wait until such a device actually exists in the wild before getting excited about it. Like a lot of companies, Apple simply builds up their patent portfolio for offensive and defensive purposes.

Yaz

This FP for GNAA! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394719)

WWOT!?

As seen on the commerical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41394813)

maybe it is possible to replace all the TSA with Apple genius, I think one of the commercial already giving us a hints.

Your Unique Voice Print (1)

dos4who (564592) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394913)

I'm guessing they plan to use your unique voice signature... which is probably already in their database. C'mon... you telling me that every time you use Apple's Siri or Google's voice-to-text, etc that those giants are not saving all that data? My money's on the fact that they're building a massive biometric database on every single one of us. Thanks, Siri ;)

We all know (1)

kiriath (2670145) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394927)

Apple just patented that so it can sue the pants off of any company that tries to do that...

No conspiracy here, move along...

Makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41395079)

Makes sense, since the phone is a tightly controlled tracking system.
It is the way that people with an agenda in power can find not just your location but do an extremely sensitive psychological profile and human network analysis with optional real time wiretapping.
What people don't understand is that to a supercomputer, keeping tabs on the movements, communications and activities of a measly hundred million people or so is really easy, especially when police, traffic control and data carriers are all funneling information into it patriotically. It's really easy. Not anywhere near the realm of simulating nuclear fusion or whatever. You just maintain a huge rolling archive, and then can data mine to your heart's content with a user-friendly interface.
Of course posting anonymously is most likely not a major barrier to finding someone's identity but since I am having a bad day I figure why not just post what I think today, instead of what I usually do which is to think twice about whether I want what I write to be stored and analyzed forever, either by the government, a potential employer or customer, a friend, etc.. Usually I hit the cancel button before I finish a post. The world is really quite a nastier place than it used to be and the people everyone lets run the place seem to be a lot more cynical and rapacious.

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