Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

The Man Who Hacked the Bank of France

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the whereas-6-5-4-3-2-1-would-have-stopped-him dept.

Security 184

First time accepted submitter David Off writes "In 2008 a Skype user looking for cheap rate gateway numbers found himself connected to the Bank of France where he was asked for a password. He typed 1 2 3 4 5 6 and found himself connected to their computer system. The intrusion was rapidly detected but led to the system being frozen for 48 hours as a security measure. Two years of extensive international police inquiries eventually traced the 37-year-old unemployed Breton despite the fact he'd used his real address when he registered with Skype. The man was found not guilty in court today (Original, in French) of maliciously breaking into the bank."

cancel ×

184 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

amazing (5, Funny)

masternerdguy (2468142) | about 2 years ago | (#41401921)

i have the same combination on my luggage!

Re:amazing (1)

Makels (2735185) | about 2 years ago | (#41401969)

Luggage is four numbers. You cannot have six numbers. Therefore it is not possible!

Re:amazing (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402073)

In space, luggage combinations have 5 numbers.

Re:amazing (3, Funny)

g0bshiTe (596213) | about 2 years ago | (#41402963)

1 2 3 4 5 6

In Hyper Space, luggage has 6 digits.

Re:amazing (3, Funny)

Guignol (159087) | about 2 years ago | (#41403183)

In death, luggage has a name, its name is Bob Paulson

Sure it is (5, Funny)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#41402285)

Luggage is four numbers. You cannot have six numbers.

Sure it is. You just start working backwards after you reach the fourth number.

It's a brilliantly easy way to remember

1265

Re:Sure it is (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402371)

Go watch Spaceballs you insensitive clod.

Re:Sure it is (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403603)

If you're trying to be funny, you're failing miserably.

If you're trying to be informative ... umm, ok. Your post doesn't even make grammatical sense.

Re:amazing (1)

smithmc (451373) | about 2 years ago | (#41402393)

<sigh> It's from a movie [imdb.com] !

Re:amazing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402497)

Yeah and people should really shut the fuck up about it. It's not even funny.

Re:amazing (5, Funny)

michelcolman (1208008) | about 2 years ago | (#41402525)

Three digits on the lock on the left, and three on the lock on the right, makes 6 digits on my luggage. I had been trying to open it for years, unsuccessfully, and guess what!

Hacking? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402399)

If this is "hacking" then opening an unlocked front door by turning the handle is lock-picking

Re:amazing (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402405)

The surprising thing about this story is the court in France was found not guilty. In the United States of Amerika he would have been sentenced under the anti-terrorism laws. The person responsible for IS security at the Bank of France, however, should be terminated with prejudice.

Re:amazing (0)

thephydes (727739) | about 2 years ago | (#41403231)

how is this flaimebait? - there is an element of truth in it and the IS person must have been a complete dick.

Re:amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402439)

Well yes, but you still need to make sure your luggage runs Skype! So we can all call and unlock your luggage anytime!

Re:amazing (5, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 2 years ago | (#41402469)

i have the same combination on my luggage!

It's a bit harder to defend breaking into your luggage than randomly dialing phone numbers and entering what is widely considered a "default" password in to get access. In the former case, it's reasonable to conclude that, regardless of password, if your luggage has a lock on it, it's meant to be private. In the digital world, however, access control mechanisms frequently are assigned a default password because the access mechanism itself is integral to the system -- ie, you can choose not to put a pad lock on a door, you can't disable the login screen. In the minds of a lot of people, assigning a password of "password", "1234" (or variant), "letmein", or "admin", is equivalent to not putting a pad lock on a door.

In other words, it's not breaking and entering if you leave the door to your house unlocked. It's simple trespass and there are numerous legal defenses and excuses for that. The French court merely (and correctly, IMO) said there is an electronic analogue to this legal reasoning. That said, change your luggage combo dude, or I'm klepto'ing that hawaiian shirt you love so much. :P

Re:amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402841)

A potentially valid point. Another way to look at is as a doorknob or latch. It's not really breaking in if you twist the doorknob or raise a latch, since they're not really locks.

I may be missing something (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403269)

But the man was asked to give a password for HIS new login.

The system accepted 123456 (silly password for him to use, but if this was just to get in to see what rate he'd get then cancel, not a problem), but then changed his login credentials to one that gave him admin rights.

This is like opening the door on your own car and then it openeing, you driving off and then discovering that, despite a supposedly unique id and unlock, you have driven away with a bank managers own car with a sack full of money on the back seat, then being charged with bank robbery.

Re:amazing (0)

pspahn (1175617) | about 2 years ago | (#41403579)

But what if it a "slide-to-open" type of latch?

If the mechanism is patented, does this mean there is no analog?

Re:amazing (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402891)

That seems a little Sheldon-esque: "Five pin tumbler system, single circuit alarm - child's play." I certainly wouldn't grant anyone recourse against someone who got in by guessing a weak password. But I'm not sure whether letting the "hacker" off the hook completely is right. A password prompt is as clear as an "authorized personnel only" sign. Do you go around checking if those doors are locked?

Re:amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403535)

"Do you go around checking if those doors are locked?"

Yes I do damnit and if they are unlocked that is someone else's fault!

Re:amazing (2)

Vellmont (569020) | about 2 years ago | (#41403701)

Only on slashdot would an off handed Spaceballs reference be replied to not as the joke it is, but as if it were an analogy and critique of whether there was any real breakin or not.

In any case, the article is in French, and I'm sure as hell not going to trust an automated translation engine to interpret what happened. I will point out that in most countries (No idea about France) intent is required to commit a crime.

NEVER NEVER NEVER (0)

Larryish (1215510) | about 2 years ago | (#41402509)

The lesson to be gained from this is:

Never hire someone who has a degree.

Their heads are wedged up their asses, and held in place with sheets of parchment.

Re:amazing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402517)

Quick! Somebody change the combination to my luggage!

Re:amazing (1)

cvtan (752695) | about 2 years ago | (#41403235)

You rat! I was going to post this! ARRRRGH! (with apologies to Talk Like a Pirate Day).

He just used a German name... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41401941)

and the French bank raised its arms in defeat and let him right on in to loot and pillage.

Re:He just used a German name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402047)

Although I laughed at your joke I do wonder if or when we'll let that go.

Re:He just used a German name... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402157)

When it stops being funny. No one laughs about William of Orange.

Re:He just used a German name... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402263)

Probably when France stops being the land of the cunts.

Re:He just used a German name... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402429)

Probably when France stops being the land of the cunts.

I'll take it over Slashdot: Land of the geeky sausage fest

Re:He just used a German name... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402455)

So you're more of a San Francisco gay bar macho man, eh?

Re:He just used a German name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402473)

"Macho man"? Lol! Is all your knowledge of gay culture still based on 1970's stereotypes?

Re:He just used a German name... (4, Funny)

pnot (96038) | about 2 years ago | (#41402581)

Heaven forfend that anyone should resort to stereotypes in a thread about a "the French always surrender LOL" joke.

Re:He just used a German name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402711)

If these ignoramuses would read a little history, they would learn you should mock the French for relying on the Maginot line, not for surrendering.

Re:He just used a German name... (0)

turbidostato (878842) | about 2 years ago | (#41403175)

"If these ignoramuses would read a little history, they would learn you should mock the French for relying on the Maginot line, not for surrendering."

Well, Agincourt (1415), as it was Roncesvaux (778), were a bit before WWII don't you think so?

I'd say last time French got a heavy victory was Poitiers (732).

OK, OK, Now I duck... like a petty French :)

Re:He just used a German name... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403399)

Napoleon was French, right? While it didn't last, he had many victories. They also won WWI without any major surrendering. They only reason why the french are so 'dispised' is that right winger on the radio have been filling up air time for the last 30 years whining about them. When the Dems are in power they leave the french largely alone, but once the GOP is in full control, they have hours of airtime to fill.

Re:He just used a German name... (1)

pnot (96038) | about 2 years ago | (#41403657)

I'd say last time French got a heavy victory was Poitiers (732).

<cough>Napoleon</cough>

Re:He just used a German name... (1)

drkim (1559875) | about 2 years ago | (#41403699)

If these ignoramuses would read a little history, they would learn you should mock the French for relying on the Maginot line, not for surrendering.

Yeah, but they set the admin password to the Maginot line to "123456."

Re:He just used a German name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402877)

cunt (knt)

—n

1. offensive, slang a mean or obnoxious person, especially French

Re:He just used a German name... (1)

smithmc (451373) | about 2 years ago | (#41402419)

Although I laughed at your joke I do wonder if or when we'll let that go.

That meme will be around as long as human beings need someone to feel superior to. I.e., forever.

Re:He just used a German name... (3, Funny)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 2 years ago | (#41402475)

When the frogs repel an invasion. So never.

Re:He just used a German name... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402615)

Probably when they develop a record of standing up for themselves.

Re:He just used a German name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402607)

You must be British.

Re:He just used a German name... (1)

TechMouse (1096513) | about 2 years ago | (#41402829)

You don't have to be British to appreciate the phrase cheese-eating surrender monkeys [wikipedia.org] . (But it helps).

This reminds me of the time (4, Interesting)

The MAZZTer (911996) | about 2 years ago | (#41401995)

At high-school, someone set a network share as IE's homepage and when I logged in and launched IE I got in trouble for it.

Oh, and permissions weren't even properly configured on the share, but they could read logs apparently.

Re:This reminds me of the time (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402113)

I really hoped you learned your lesson after that. Do not ever use IE.

This reminds me of the time (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402189)

This also reminds me of the time you were at band camp and stuck a flute in your asshole.

Re:This reminds me of the time (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402601)

Boy, that escalated quickly.

Re:This reminds me of the time (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402845)

I got into trouble at a job once (customer service), because I shared a folder on my hard drive with read-only access for everyone. Somehow, they noticed it was being accessed from the Internet. They suspected me of stealing valuable company data. I had to point out that the contents of the folder were publicly available, and I had only shared them as a convenience for my coworkers. I also tried to point out the idiocy of allowing MS file sharing protocols across the firewall, and assigning public IPs to end-user workstations, but they didn't listen. They had an MSCE on staff who knew all about that sort of thing, and I was just a customer service rep. I quit a short time later.

I still get kind of mad thinking about it, but I am sure they are long gone, as the entire industry moved overseas shortly thereafter. This was in the 90s.

Re:This reminds me of the time (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402971)

I got suspended for a week for deleting some 2000+ expired cookies from a machine. A librarian/student saw me, thought God knows what, and reported me for "hacking" and the like.

Naturally that was a more severe punishment than the time I found spreadsheets of all the district's students' and teachers' information - names, addresses, birthdates, SSNs... On a public share, of course. Reported it to a teacher I trusted and I'll bet the files are still there today.

Re:This reminds me of the time (4, Interesting)

Quirkz (1206400) | about 2 years ago | (#41403279)

A buddy of mine once got detention because he took a teacher's documents folder and placed it about five layers deep inside a set of folders with names like "look inside" "click me" and "keep going". The top level folder was put exactly where the old documents folder was, and other than being nested nothing was renamed, harmed, or anything else. The teacher still went ballistic when she couldn't figure out how to click through a couple of extra folders to find her documents.

I once got a stern talking-to by the journalism teacher when I replaced the standard Mac OS startup screen with a custom image of a badly-drawn bomb (we're talking paintshop in the early 90's here) and the message "this system will self destruct in 10 seconds." Someone outside the department had sat down to use the computer for a minute and apparently panicked when they thought the computer had been turned into an actual bomb.

That is not reasonable security (3, Interesting)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 2 years ago | (#41402019)

In the US I think we'd have class action lawyers going after them immediately for lack of security due diligence. They would deserve it, too.

What's the EU equivalent action?

Re:That is not reasonable security (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402063)

its frenchies so probably a surrender.

Re:That is not reasonable security (5, Informative)

AGMW (594303) | about 2 years ago | (#41402293)

In the US I think we'd have class action lawyers going after them immediately for lack of security due diligence. They would deserve it, too.

Oh, you mean like when Gary McKinnon [wikipedia.org] , who similarly walked into unsecured US military and NASA computer. The difference - oh yes, no one noticed for ages!

Re:That is not reasonable security (3, Interesting)

drummerboybac (1003077) | about 2 years ago | (#41402591)

What that Gary McKinnon wiki proves to me is that NASA reads /.

In 2006, a Freedom of Information Act request was filed with NASA for all documents pertaining to Gary McKinnon. NASA's documents consisted of printed news articles from the Slashdot website, but no other related documents. This is consistent with NASA employees browsing internet articles about Gary McKinnon; the records of such browsing activity are in the public domain. The FOIA documents have been uploaded to the internet for review, and can be downloaded.[45]

Re:That is not reasonable security (1)

jittles (1613415) | about 2 years ago | (#41403441)

Well if the claims are true, then he intentionally caused damage, deleted files, and otherwise caused mayhem to the US Government. IT wasn't like he logged in, had a quick look around and then GTFO'd. No he left threats and harassing messages. I'd say there is a world of difference.

Re:That is not reasonable security (1)

Schmorgluck (1293264) | about 2 years ago | (#41403227)

I don't know about the rest of the EU, but in France there's basically no equivalent to class actions. There have been talks about putting them into law, but it has been deemed "bad for the economy" (under the previous administration - maybe the new one will bring it back on the table). There's still ground for individual action, though, if only on the basis of privacy protection.

Why! These thieving banksters.... (2)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 2 years ago | (#41402039)

Not only they stole all my money, they stole my secret password too. 1 2 3 4 5 6 is mine. Now go away thieves. I am not giving it back to you.

Re:Why! These thieving banksters.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402289)

Hah! My precious "hunter2" is safe!

Re:Why! These thieving banksters.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402861)

I'm afraid I already patented that password.

Re:Why! These thieving banksters.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403445)

I have the business model patent on patenting passwords and I'll be seeing you in court!

NSFW link (4, Funny)

jdastrup (1075795) | about 2 years ago | (#41402079)

I guess "Original, in French" should have warned me

Re:NSFW link (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402207)

I wouldn't have followed the link without having seen your warning. I know it isn't, today, but the pictures of topless french women waging a naked war should be safe for work - we are still way to puritanical in the US (I don't know where you are)...

Re:NSFW link (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402265)

Damn you! I couldnt resist opening the link now that I know it is NSFW. Now I have sinned by RTFAing.

Note to editors: how to get /. to read the article (3, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 2 years ago | (#41402973)

Just knowing the article (sidebar?) is NSFW probably resulted in an order or magnitude more /.ers clicking through the link.

Re:Note to editors: how to get /. to read the arti (1)

Jeng (926980) | about 2 years ago | (#41403101)

Shit, that is the only reason I clicked on the french link, it's not like I can understand the language.

Re:NSFW link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403109)

Naked French women...

So happy.

Re:NSFW link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403349)

Wow - women really do have breasts. I thought it was only Royal princesses who had those. Darn, must get out of the basement more. Mommmm, can I go out now!

Re:NSFW link (1)

Cormacus (976625) | about 2 years ago | (#41403379)

Yup, whups... I wanted to read the French language version to see if I could follow what the article was saying. Got a few lines in then I saw the sidebar. D'oh.

Re:NSFW link (3, Insightful)

phme (1501991) | about 2 years ago | (#41403567)

Really, this is NSFW for you guys? Time to move back across the pond...

1 2 3 4 5 6 (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 2 years ago | (#41402091)

Ha! Another chapter in great security waitasec, that's my password, too...

I remember back when some clowns in Milwaukee , the 414's, who wanted to sell their story to Hollywood for a movie, books, etcs. All they did was use default passwords on DEC systems to log in ([1,2] was SYSTEM unless you changed it on first day.) Even our Digital field techs would set the Field Service operator account password to DECAPR, DECMAY or whatever the month was.

Reminds me.. (1)

trevc (1471197) | about 2 years ago | (#41402093)

"Do you have a licence for your minky?"

NSFW (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402127)

NSFW photo in sidebar, thanks to Femen.

Holy Crap . . . . (1)

sgt_doom (655561) | about 2 years ago | (#41402143)

. . . .that's the same password I always use????? I knew I should have banked with the Bank of France!

This guy should get a meddle for showing stupid .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402223)

This guy should get a meddle for showing stupid bank behaviour all that security and what ?
hahaha
lily the pink - the saviour of the human race ......medicinal compounds.....

Re:This guy should get a meddle for showing stupid (4, Funny)

RenderSeven (938535) | about 2 years ago | (#41402297)

Why would you give someone a Pink Floyd album for that?

Re:This guy should get a meddle for showing stupid (0)

BryanL (93656) | about 2 years ago | (#41402807)

I am sure that once he hack in he already had a saucerful of secrets.

Why is there no liability on the part of the Bank? (3, Interesting)

macbeth66 (204889) | about 2 years ago | (#41402267)

The idiot that initially typed in that password should be the one charged in this matter. It would have been more secure with 'Joshua' or 'CPE1704TKS'.

And yes, I am being sarcastic. Those passwords suck too.

Re:Why is there no liability on the part of the Ba (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402343)

The idiot that initially typed in that password should be the one charged in this matter. It would have been more secure with 'Joshua' or 'CPE1704TKS'.

And yes, I am being sarcastic. Those passwords suck too.

Apparently it's not an issue if you leave the door open, but it is if someone stumbles in.

Re:Why is there no liability on the part of the Ba (1)

characterZer0 (138196) | about 2 years ago | (#41402421)

Maybe it was a random 6 character password from the entire UTF16 space?

Re:Why is there no liability on the part of the Ba (1)

smithmc (451373) | about 2 years ago | (#41402457)

The idiot that initially typed in that password should be the one charged in this matter. It would have been more secure with 'Joshua' or 'CPE1704TKS'

Ah, but in the book, it was Joshua 5 , much more secure...

Re:Why is there no liability on the part of the Ba (1)

tnk1 (899206) | about 2 years ago | (#41403207)

Ah, but in the book, it was Joshua 5 , much more secure...

Your sarcasm would be warranted, if he actually used a password cracker on the password. Since all he actually did was guess it, that password almost as effective as 8 random characters would have been.

Re:Why is there no liability on the part of the Ba (4, Funny)

purpledinoz (573045) | about 2 years ago | (#41402999)

Well, at least he didn't use '12345'. But he could have put in a bit more effort and used '1234567'...

Re:Why is there no liability on the part of the Ba (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403443)

The original password was "correct horse battery staple" but somebody published it.

123456? Damn! (-1, Redundant)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 2 years ago | (#41402299)

That's the same password I have on my luggage!

Re:123456? Damn! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402409)

FIRST POST!

Lucky Man (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402351)

In the United States, he'd have been sentenced to at least five years in federal prison -- where he'd be subject to rape and torture (solitary confinement), often at the hands of a private corporation.

Re:Lucky Man (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403063)

Solitary rape?

Re:Lucky Man (1)

Schmorgluck (1293264) | about 2 years ago | (#41403687)

I sincerely hope you're exaggerating on the outcome in the US, but yeah, as a French, I'm kinda proud of my country's courts on that one.

Even the prosecutor was pretty lenient, it seems: calling for 70 euros worth of community service is rather symbolic. Although, that's probably a case of misreporting. IANAL, but I'm familiar with French procedures (out of curiosity), and as far I know matters like community service is none of the business of a prosecutor: it's a substitution to classic penalties that must be approved by the condemned (otherwise it would be forced work), and it's up to the judges to supervise that, not the prosecutor. I suppose the prosecutor required a 70 euros fine as the official requisition of the public ministry (which is in their attributions) and advanced in their speach before the courts that it could be turned into community service (something a prosecutor is perfectly entitled to say if they feel so).

Anyway, I like the (overall) sanity of my country's courts.

Sartre Cipher? (2)

Penurious Penguin (2687307) | about 2 years ago | (#41402397)

Maybe they expected all attempts would be foiled by eternal debates on the meaning of each digit and whether they really existed or not. If so, (Infinity ^6) is pretty strong and they were probably on to something, at least existentially.

NSFW? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402431)

That article needs to be marked NSFW. Some of the side advertisements have nudity in them.

The FEMEN land in Paris! (1)

hoggoth (414195) | about 2 years ago | (#41402449)

But more importantly, did you hear the Femen have landed in Paris?!

Re:The FEMEN land in Paris! (1)

TechMouse (1096513) | about 2 years ago | (#41402979)

The Harkonnens must be nervous.

No... wait...

Re:The FEMEN land in Paris! (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#41403195)

Wuad'dib, hear us roar!

Re:The FEMEN land in Paris! (1)

tnk1 (899206) | about 2 years ago | (#41403147)

And this is why my next vacation destination is going to be Paris.

654321 (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402743)

A note to Timothy
> from the whereas-6-5-4-3-2-1-would-have-stopped-him dept.

actually 654321 was an alternative password that also worked !

Timothy was afraid to click the link (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403019)

Being gay, Timothy was afraid to click the link since he heard there were boobies shown on the site.

ironic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41402883)

a man enters a bank system in mere minutes. the police figure finds that man... in 2 years lmao.

Sorry, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403167)

but simply entering a password is NOT hacking . . . particularly when it has not been set. And before any one says RTFM . . . . OMG WTH is up with that translation??

The Banque de France was not hacked (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41403571)

Read in French : http://www.pcinpact.com/news/73975-non-systeme-informatique-banque-france-na-pas-ete-pirate.htm
He phoned to a technical service used a bad code that resulted an alarm.
Due to this overrated alarm the site was closed during 48h...

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>