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Chattanooga's Municipal Network Doubles Down On Fiber Speeds

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the choo-choo-is-not-the-right-sound-for-this dept.

Networking 165

tetrahedrassface writes "The first city in the U.S. to offer a screaming fast fiber network has now announced customers will get a free 60% boost in speed. If you had the 30 MB/sec service you now will get 50. Mid-range customers get a doubling for free, while the high end consumers of fiber get an average 250% boost. The fiber network recently passed 40,000 members and judging from a test of my business, we are currently over 300 MB/sec." What's the fastest service actually available where you live, and what does it cost?

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What do you do with this speed? (4, Interesting)

ugen (93902) | about 2 years ago | (#41428041)

On an end-user end - what exactly do you do with these speeds? I have fairly ho-hum Comcast running at about 15mbit/s. Frankly, I am not sure what to use that speed for. Web page opening speed is now governed by remote server processing capacity, files download instantly, movies stream (and in any case my movie consumption capacity is limited by low information to noise ratio :) ). What else? Am I missing something people really do with this?

Re:What do you do with this speed? (2)

BLKMGK (34057) | about 2 years ago | (#41428089)

In my case I'm working on setting up an Open VPN connection between myself and another so that my media library is accessible remotely. I'm already able to stream to my phone. Lots of potential!

Re:What do you do with this speed? (3, Informative)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 2 years ago | (#41428293)

you know that 15 Mbit down on a cable connection is not the rate at which you upload right? upload speeds are typically 1 Mbit, 2 if you pay extra.

Upgrade to fiber (5, Informative)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | about 2 years ago | (#41428461)

you know that 15 Mbit down on a cable connection is not the rate at which you upload right? upload speeds are typically 1 Mbit, 2 if you pay extra.

So true. We have a 100/100 Mbps symmetric link on fiber at home. It's also uncapped, etc. Apparently a couple of km from here, there is a 200Mbps or 350Mbps service available, but not where we live.

What do we use it for? Well, there are generally two adults and two teenagers at home, and the need for bandwidth adds up. Downloading an ISO does happen occasionally (reaching speeds up to 60Mbps from sites within Finland, dropping to 5Mbps from overseas), but mostly it's just web surfing and viewing youtube or vimeo.

We also have a web server at home, which delivers - according to its stats package - 15-30 GByte per month, and mostly serves pictures and videos of the kids and adults performing in the local dance school and in the local riding school. Although the average bandwidth is not huge, we get two or three videos being viewed simultaneously just after the server is updated for some new event, and the videos typically require 2Mbps to 4Mbps for streaming.

The alternative for us would be a 40/10 Mbps link, which would be quite inadequate.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429385)

I get 3 down with COX and .5 up. it is 39.99 frankly I cant afford to buy more.

I think I might be better off with a hotspot cell phone 4g on T-Mobile 30 month and a 10 dollar a month seedbox.me to up laod and down load.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41428395)

In my case I'm working on setting up an Open VPN connection between myself and another so that my media library is accessible remotely. I'm already able to stream to my phone. Lots of potential!

You can do that with Plex outta the box with the integrated myplex service. Takes about 5 minutes to set up, assuming you've already got Plex as a media server or you're willing to run in parallel with mythtv (which is what I do). The fact that I can stream my videos over a slow CELL PHONE connection indicates I have absolutely no idea what to do with 50 megs.

I know what a business could do with that. What I'm mystified about is given likely "no servers" terms of service, what can a end user do with it?

Re:What do you do with this speed? (2)

Joehonkie (665142) | about 2 years ago | (#41428097)

Yes. Yes you are. I do a lot of downloading and uploading of decently sized files, as well as streaming HD video and playing online games, and I'd like to be able to do the latter without it being affected by the former, and I'd like the former to happen as fast as possible to make it more convenient.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

ugen (93902) | about 2 years ago | (#41428109)

So what you are saying is that there are additional lifestyle choices I would need to make (like watching more video content and playing online games) to make full use of higher speeds? That can't be healthy, but oh well, I see your point.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428185)

a.) Backing up remote servers (in addition to the backups running within the data center)
b.) Trying to stay ahead of the bandwidth consumption of my kids!

The latter is the difficult part. If it was just me it would be enough to have about 10-15 Mbit/sec. Add in some kids and you're suddenly in a world of pain!

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

fast turtle (1118037) | about 2 years ago | (#41428587)

B) Don't I know it. If there weren't 4 computers on the home network I'd be able to get by with a meager 512k u/d speed. What I want is lower ping times insted of the ever growing crap I've been seeing to various servers. Hell this would even improve the VOIP experience (triple play package) if they'd fix the damn Lag. Proper QoS might be of help there.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

LinkX39 (1100879) | about 2 years ago | (#41428737)

I don't get your hang-up here. That's like saying "Yeah, my car can do 65 miles an hour but I only ever drive in the city where the speed limit is typically 45 or lower. Do cars actually need to be able to go faster than that?" Just because YOU only do things that make use of the lower end of the spectrum doesn't mean it's "unhealthy" for other people to take advantage of the higher end, or even "unhealthy" for YOU to take advantage of them at times. Your reaction to their explanations confuse me......

Re:What do you do with this speed? (3, Insightful)

MightyYar (622222) | about 2 years ago | (#41428137)

For me, it would be remote backup and video streaming. Video streaming lets me get rid of cable (or would, if it weren't for live sports). Before you say, "but 15 Mbps is fast enough for HD video", consider that there are 4 people living in this house - and a remote backup could kick off at any time as well. Remote backup is awesome at high speed if your upstream can handle it. For my roughly 2TB of data from 3 computers, it takes (best case) 3 months to upload on a Comcast 2Mbps uplink. The 50 Mbps minimum speed that they quote in TFA applies upstream as well, so that's only 4 days!

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

buglista (1967502) | about 2 years ago | (#41428241)

I've got 20mb/s down - ISOs for example do NOT download "instantly" as you put it. On Virgin cable (what I'm on), you can get 120mb/s - which I don't need, but the upstream bandwidth that goes with that would be welcome - takes ages for me to upload a VM to someone else.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about 2 years ago | (#41428419)

I had the WORST time with Virgin... 3 are faster - and more stable - and are not picky about the amount of bandwidth you use, unlike a certain cable provider.

2010 I kicked Virgin to the kerb for the last time as I was getting 50% uptime at a VERY generous estimate (having to restart the fucking router every half an hour did NOTHING for my disposition nor my work rate) and never any more than 2MBit down. On a 30MBit contract.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

petermgreen (876956) | about 2 years ago | (#41428425)

One of the big problems with DSL and to a lesser extent cable connections is they often have lousy upstream. Fine if all you do is consume content but painful when you produce something big and want to upload it.

Also while small files may download "instantly" at 15 mbit/s large files certainly don't. Grabbing a new version of an install CD/DVD still takes noticable time.

Having said all that I don't do any of theese things often enough to justify the higher cost of a faster connection.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about 2 years ago | (#41428447)

I was directly interrogating massive databases for massive amounts of information on a very frequent basis. A fast connection was, at the time, absolutely essential to maintaining my work rate.

Unfortunately, Virgin Media did not deliver. Looking elsewhere, I found a cellular provider that did. In spades.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428657)

As a consultant I do reliability and performance analysis and engineering for major manufacturers' production data centers. Right now, one of my biggest gating factors on how many clients I can handle, and how well I can handle them, is network bandwidth. In a 500 server data center, I can consume a billion data points (time-series data) in one day. I would prefer to host the analytics and database locally, but I have to host it on-site right now, and extract the data for post analysis (vs real-time analysis) which is very slow, hence the constraint on my ability to grow my business. With a 300-500Mbps connection I could easily fork the data stream so I can do better real-time analytics on server behavior and performance locally on my own machines. Making adjustments to the algorithms used to predict system failure and service levels would be much easier. If I make a mistake, then I only risk taking down one of my own servers, and not the customer's.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about 2 years ago | (#41429947)

As a consultant I do reliability and performance analysis and engineering for major manufacturers' production data centers. Right now, one of my biggest gating factors on how many clients I can handle, and how well I can handle them, is network bandwidth. In a 500 server data center, I can consume a billion data points (time-series data) in one day. I would prefer to host the analytics and database locally, but I have to host it on-site right now, and extract the data for post analysis (vs real-time analysis) which is very slow, hence the constraint on my ability to grow my business. With a 300-500Mbps connection I could easily fork the data stream so I can do better real-time analytics on server behavior and performance locally on my own machines. Making adjustments to the algorithms used to predict system failure and service levels would be much easier. If I make a mistake, then I only risk taking down one of my own servers, and not the customer's.

Why wouldn't you just rent a sever in a coloc somewhere to do the work? Then you get redundant internet connections with as much bandwidth as you're willing to pay for, redundant cooling, UPS power, generator backup, etc, which becomes awfully expensive in a home network. Maybe one of your customers with a 500 server datacenter would be willing to give you a few U for your server in return for a small discount on your services. They're apparently providing you with a server for you to run your analysis on, so they may as well give you some rack space and let you run your own server.

Running any business critical infrastructure at home sounds risky unless you're willing to build out a reliable datacenter at home.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (2)

Shinobi (19308) | about 2 years ago | (#41428821)

As an end-user, me and my family uses our 100Mbit/s connection to watch HD streams, play games(including downloading them.... it's at the point where installing straight from the net is faster than from DVD's), I also use it in my work, downloading huge datasets from clients etc, as well as uploading.

I am actually considering upgrading to the 1Gbit/s option.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428959)

Try living with 1.5Mbps with occasional static causing dropped packets to interfere with down/up continuity. Oh, & with a vendor (Centurylink) that doesn't seem to give a crap about improving it. Don't you just love that privatization uber alles business model? Works really well without true competition, doesn't it?

I s'pose I could try Comcast (or whatever they are trying to call themselves today) but they really aren't competing - their pricing structure would gouge me in order that they can afford to buy NBC creating greater monopolization. I have a fundamental philosophical difference with that concept.

The smart thing is for the data pipe to be "socialized" like water & sewer, & let small private businesses provide the attach points.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429039)

Am I missing something people really do with this?

Apparently. You may have a movie that streams fine. Somebody with far more capacity streams more than one. Useful if you're not the only person in the house.

Not to mention the dozens of other things that one can do.

Does this matter to you? Maybe as much as driving a car matters to somebody who is hardcore Amish.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (4, Insightful)

Kookus (653170) | about 2 years ago | (#41429127)

I just don't get why memory manufacturers are making such large capacity modules. Why would anyone ever need more than 64kb of memory?

I don't get why people make short-sighted statements about why an existing limitation isn't a problem,

People don't build sites, or applications, or services very often that have requirements that exceed things like memory, or network speed. If they do, they learn real fast that people call their product a piece of crap.

If network speeds were fast enough, then there'd be a way for us to store all of our information in "the cloud", and not have to worry about things like backups, or virus scanning on a at home basis. We could write operating systems that were designed to be run centrally, just like the good old mainframe era and dumb terminals. Then we wouldn't have as many grandma's out there running windows 95 in the year 2010.

Hell, you could ask the browser makers if they like the sounds of that! (Not the windows 95 crap, but the operating system in a cloud, aka web browser with apps).

Seriously. Everyone with a desk job (or student) doesn't need to drive into work. Get some good video conferencing solutions, a huge pipe to your office files, a cheap-as-dirt dumb terminal in your living room (or home-office), and now you actually have a fighting chance at staving off unimportant things like global warming (less gas for travel).

No need for schools to pay for buses, more money for teachers. Unfortunately, probably a lot less teachers). More stay-at-home professionals, everyone get's to gain an extra hour of their life back per day (less travel). An extra hour means later wake-up times, which would probably have a better impact than daylight savings time.

So what could people do with a fatter pipe? Oh, man, I don't know. Let's go back to 64kb of main memory. Or how about something a little easier to think of, let's go back to pre-cellphone times. Everyone doesn't need a cell phone. What can people not do with their existing land-lines?

I'd rather think on the order of, if it's not infinite/instant, it's not good enough. Once you get there, then you can question why anyone would need anything more.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about 2 years ago | (#41430023)

If network speeds were fast enough, then there'd be a way for us to store all of our information in "the cloud", and not have to worry about things like backups, or virus scanning on a at home basis. We could write operating systems that were designed to be run centrally, just like the good old mainframe era and dumb terminals. Then we wouldn't have as many grandma's out there running windows 95 in the year 2010.

My 15mbit connection speed is already fast enough to let me store my data in "the cloud", 100mbit or 1gig wouldn't make any difference. The cost of cloud storage, plus the question of how I can access my data when my high speed internet connection is down for a week is what keeps me from storing all of my data in the cloud.

Seriously. Everyone with a desk job (or student) doesn't need to drive into work. Get some good video conferencing solutions, a huge pipe to your office files, a cheap-as-dirt dumb terminal in your living room (or home-office), and now you actually have a fighting chance at staving off unimportant things like global warming (less gas for travel).

No need for schools to pay for buses, more money for teachers. Unfortunately, probably a lot less teachers). More stay-at-home professionals, everyone get's to gain an extra hour of their life back per day (less travel). An extra hour means later wake-up times, which would probably have a better impact than daylight savings time.

There are lots of good video conference systems that don't need 100mbit or more -- there were decent video conference systems 10 years ago that ran on 256kbit bonded ISDN lines. Bandwidth isn't the limiting factor that's preventing video conference systems from taking over from real life interactions.

So what could people do with a fatter pipe? Oh, man, I don't know. Let's go back to 64kb of main memory. Or how about something a little easier to think of, let's go back to pre-cellphone times. Everyone doesn't need a cell phone. What can people not do with their existing land-lines?

So what can people do with a fatter pipe? My company has multiple gigabit connections to the internet, but we don't do anything significantly different with the internet than I do at home.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429151)

On an end-user end - what exactly do you do with these speeds? I have fairly ho-hum Comcast running at about 15mbit/s. Frankly, I am not sure what to use that speed for. Web page opening speed is now governed by remote server processing capacity, files download instantly, movies stream (and in any case my movie consumption capacity is limited by low information to noise ratio :) ). What else? Am I missing something people really do with this?

give me the speed and I'll figure out what to do with it soon enough... probably something I can't do now.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

rbasham (737419) | about 2 years ago | (#41429303)

A big question is what speed do you get from 8pm - 10 pm. I've had FIOS 25 Mbps for several years. Although it always hits the rated speed for 22 hours a day, it drops to around 3 Mbps, occasionally only 1 Mbps, during prime Netflix viewing hours. Since I like HD movie streams, which can require between 6 Mbps and 9 Mbps, my connection becomes worthless to me in the evening. I briefly tried Comcast, only to learn that they throttle back download speed after a certain number of MBs of download, to something like 20% of the rated speed. Since most speedtest apps run just brief download tests, that throttling back often gets overlooked. Too bad I don't watch movies in the morning. Does anyone suffer from this same Netflix effect? Or do I have more Netflix neighbors than most?

Re:What do you do with this speed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429555)

You must be a single user living alone. Try multiplying your computer by 3 or 4 and then see how your bandwidth feels.

Re:What do you do with this speed? (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 2 years ago | (#41429609)

Frankly, I am not sure what to use that speed for.

Sounds like a solution in search of a problem...

I Hate You! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428043)

50Mbps Async- $100 monthly
50Mbps Sync - $300 monthly

Fastest here? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428063)

3mbit down. Just doubled from from 1.5mbit. $30/month.

Central California.

Verizon FiOS in Boston (1)

BingmanO (1365957) | about 2 years ago | (#41428069)

I have FiOS and the fastest we can get (residential) is 300mbps down with 65mbps up. This is part of their new FiOS quantum package it seems. In Boston MA.

Re:Verizon FiOS in Boston (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428141)

FIOS in PG county, Maryland

$214 / mo :: 300/65
$105 / mo :: 150/65
$95 / mo :: 75/35
$85 / mo :: 50/25
$75 / mo :: 15/5

* The top 4 are branded "Quantum"
* This is for bare internet, the price per service drops substantially in bundles (i.e. TV/Internet, or TV/Internet/Phone)... i.e. 50/25 + 210 TV channels is only $89 + rental for STB

Re:Verizon FiOS in Boston (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429343)

The last 5 years I paid 39 EUR/month for 100/100 Mbps. New subscribers pay 45 EUR. Top tier is 60 for 500/500. Thanks to a local coop: http://on.nl/ [on.nl]

Fastest (1)

dentree4 (1424693) | about 2 years ago | (#41428073)

200Mbps/30Mbps upload, at $200 per month for the first three months. Other than that, 100Mbps/50Mbps upload Oh, don't forget about the 250GB Cap (Combined upload and download), it's $1 /GB after that. My ISP called me out of the blue and said they were changing their pricing, and I was using 450GB of data. My next bill "was going to be $300" but they were waiving it where it was a new policy. Fucking Canadian Duopoly.

Re:Fastest (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about 2 years ago | (#41428541)

heeh... that's where they get you on contracts... cellular is worst for this. 3 have unlimited data on prepay for £15 a month, but if you go contract, that same £15/mo gets you 3GB data - go over that and you're charged 1p/MB (remember this is overflow data on contract but you are getting a guarantee of service which you do not get on prepay - anywhere). That's £10/GB - $16 Can. You pull 450GB on a plan like that, you're looking at over seven thousand Dollars. With "normal" usage on contract you're not going to burn 450GB in a decade. Sometimes it's better to go prepay.

Re:Fastest (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429517)

Télébec, cable internet. It's only 25$/month for 2Mbps, but it's a very low 35GB combined cap. I asked them for a higher monthly cap and they tried to sell me a faster service at more than twice the price, with only a 50GB cap. So I would still be better off, with a lower overall price and 20GB higher cap, to get their basic service twice rather than upgrading my current service.

There's a bunch of idiots in their accounting department, that's for sure.

Still not fast enough (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428081)

To get the First Post.

EBP Fiber is great. Love my service.

My town sucks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428091)

5 Mb/s down
1 Mb/s up
$70/month lol

Re:My town sucks! (1)

morari (1080535) | about 2 years ago | (#41429337)

Don't feel too bad.
7 Mb/s down.
768 Kb/s up.
$40/month.

That's assuming fastest is meant to say "only" option.

Re:My town sucks! (1)

jjjhs (2009156) | about 2 years ago | (#41429635)

I can't even get cable or DSL. Stuck with 3G, $80 for just one line w/ mobile hotspot & 7GB of data.

Damn rural monopoly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428127)

10 Mbps/Sec, $59.95/Month plus a telephone line. Adds up to about $75/Month. They're the only game in town and they know it. What's worse, they actually own the phone lines and will not lease to other carriers for a reasonable rate, making competition effectively impossible.

I suppose that's the price I pay for living in a rural area. I guess I could move to the city and get faster/cheaper/better but I think I'll stay put. I like it here.

Fastest speed (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41428135)

For $90 my local WISP will sell me 1.5 Mbps bursting to 3 Mbps for a psuedorandom period of time they will not explain which is limited not just by availability but also by some bullshit criteria they have invented to try to motivate me to pay for more access. Even at 0200h they still cut me down to the base 768k (bursting to 1.5 Mbps) after 20 minutes-ish. I pay $46/mo for this.

I live within a bowshot of mediacom cable and AT&T DSL, but I can't get either.

Re:Fastest speed (1)

jwm2pi (2737163) | about 2 years ago | (#41428163)

wow and I thought I had it bad at 5Mb down for $70 per month. It was like pulling teeth to get that kind of speed out of our local municipal utilities. You gotta love a monopoly its good for everyone :)

Re:Fastest speed (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41428357)

I felt compelled to comment because of all the people who can get something better than satellite, I'm probably one of the worst-off in the USA... but I'm willing to be proven wrong

Re:Fastest speed (1)

volmtech (769154) | about 2 years ago | (#41428767)

I feel your pain. I live one mile from the end of dsl and cable service. I pay $80 a month for 1.5 Mb capped at 475 MB a day. I have lived in the same house for forty one years. There is no prospect of growth in my area so I will be long dead before any new services are available on my road.

Re:Fastest speed (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41429081)

Ouch, with that cap, you "win".

I'm gradually collecting access points that run Linux, solar panels and charge controllers, etc. I hope to move way into the boonies and build a mesh network one day soon :p

Re:Fastest speed (1)

Jessified (1150003) | about 2 years ago | (#41428237)

I pay $20, for 50mbps down and 25 up, 250Gb per month. I use Novus, which is available in select buildings in Vancouver.

Re:Fastest speed (1)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41428459)

I pay $20, for 50mbps down and 25 up, 250Gb per month. I use Novus, which is available in select buildings in Vancouver.

So you can only use it for eleven hours per month. Which brings up the question of what you can do for "less than 10 hours per month" at that high speed.

A new "super duper WOW like MMORPG" that requires 50 megs complete with smell-o-vision sounds cool, but you can only play for 10 hours a month, so maybe not so cool... Watch extra super triple resolution streamed hi def TV? Sure... just keep it under 20 minutes per day...

The good news about the future is eventually we'll all have 10Gig ethernet fiber to our homes... the bad news is the cap of 1 gig / month to discourage piracy/abuse/file sharing. 800 milliseconds per month of full speed service....

Re:Fastest speed (1)

Jessified (1150003) | about 2 years ago | (#41428651)

Good perspective. Thanks!

Being From Chattanooga... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428143)

I am really amazed at how the city has really gotten on the ball with this. I was back home a couple of years ago and wandered around downtown. I was really surprised to see the buses running around broadcasting wifi. What's more, with a population of less than 200,000 in the city and less than 500k in the metro area, as well as being one of the most conservative places you could ever visit in the U.S., I am truly amazed. Now... if only Baltimore could do this...

Re:Being From Chattanooga... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428483)

Indeed, the conservative editorials in the paper vent about EPB's wasted money on their smart grid, and how it is so terrible a burden on tax-payers with some regularity.

Nobody pays attention. Apparently the rest of the citizenry don't agree with being beholden to Comcast. We'd rather enjoy local investment for local needs.

I'm more curious... (3, Funny)

pnot (96038) | about 2 years ago | (#41428149)

... as to how much of a boost you get for your business when you manage to sneak a link to it into a /. summary.

Well played sir.

Re:I'm more curious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428619)

At least one. Wife and I will try it next weekend.

Re:I'm more curious... (1)

watice (1347709) | about 2 years ago | (#41428667)

i'm more curious as to why you need 300mbits for a restaurant that doesn't accept reservations because they seat "family style". I sincerely hope you're some kind of webhost and all that broadband isn't going to waste.

Re:I'm more curious... (2)

LinkX39 (1100879) | about 2 years ago | (#41428753)

Well, since no one actually ever clicks the links no boost whatsoever. ZING!

400 Mbit/s up and down (1)

FaxeTheCat (1394763) | about 2 years ago | (#41428151)

Where I live I can get 400 Mb/s up and down (symmetric).
The price? $1000/mo. I guess you will really have to need it to spend that kind of money...

What I have available is... (5, Informative)

carlhaagen (1021273) | about 2 years ago | (#41428159)

...an ethernet socket in my apartment. The maximum I can subscribe to is 1000/100 - yes, that's gigabit ethernet down - for 70 EUR/month. What I'm currently buying via the same socket is 25/10 mbit/s, which costs me about 24 EUR/month, which is just over $30. I get this through this building being connected to my municipal city network in which multiple operators can do business. This method is getting very common here in Sweden.

Fastest here? (1)

rbprbp (2731083) | about 2 years ago | (#41428215)

100Mbps/10Mbps fiber for R$ 500/month (about USD 250/month). Currently I have 10Mbps/1Mbps ADSL, but then I need to pay for a phone line that I do not use. Totals about USD 60/month. And then, I still consider myself lucky: some smaller cities have nothing better than WISPs which cost an arm and a leg and provide very bad service.

Time-Warner crawls for $63/month (1)

quixote9 (999874) | about 2 years ago | (#41428219)

TW is the only ISP in my neighborhood. Officially we get 1MB/s up, 8Mb/s down. And ever since I signed up for the federal SAM speed testing program I heard about here on /., I've actually seen those speeds more than half the time. Before that, and now on weekends, we're generally at 50Kbytes/s (so 400 Kb/s) down, around 5% of the advertised "speed."

People say you get what you pay for, but not with Time Warner.

And those of you pissing about "well, whaddya need it for?" That's not the point. (In my case, it's mainly for downloading GBs of Debian distros....) The point is that we should get what we pay for.

Re:Time-Warner crawls for $63/month (1)

Rob_Bryerton (606093) | about 2 years ago | (#41429687)

I have a 50Mb/s down Time Warner connection in Charlotte, NC and get the full throughput on torrets/ISOs/etc. It will sustain 5+ MB/sec on ISO downloads for example.

There's something wrong with your connection. There is no conspiracy.

Umeå, Sweden (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428243)

I have 100Mbps/100Mbps for about 75 sek (~11$ usd) per month though my housing cooperative.
Could probably get substantially faster if I wanted to pay for a business-connection but it would probably cost a lot more.

Re:Umeå, Sweden (2)

shking (125052) | about 2 years ago | (#41428337)

I was just about to post something like "wait until the Europeans, Koreans or Japanese start posting their speeds". The USA is so far behind that average speeds elsewhere seems screaming fast at home... Then there's Canada, which was amoung the fastest 10 years ago, but then stopped improving. Now they're trailing.

Re:Umeå, Sweden (2)

rbprbp (2731083) | about 2 years ago | (#41428359)

Then there's Brazil, which makes the USA look very good.

Re:Umeå, Sweden (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429161)

Some Europeans.

Belgium is the internet Somalia.

Fastest I can get... (2)

momikey (1220614) | about 2 years ago | (#41428259)

I can get 1 Gbps fiber for $300/month through EPB, as stated in TFA. But I'm happy with the 50 Mbps (formerly 30) for about $60, since my only alternative is AT&T, as Comcast never wired this part of the county.

It's really funny when AT&T calls to "win us back", usually with an offer for something like 5 Mbps at about the same price as EPB's 50. One guy wanted to know how we were using that much bandwidth, and another just kind of sputtered and apologized for calling.

Spectrum Networks and Condo Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428261)

In Seattle we have a residential provider by the name of CondoInternet that sells FastE for $60/mo and GigE for $200/mo. No limitations. You can even get a static IP. CondoInternet is owned by Spectrum Networks, another local company.

Nearly getting 350Mbps, stuck with 2.5Mbps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428287)

Down my street I am stuck with 2.5Mbps yet 3 streets away they get 350Mbps fibre ( http://lightstream.kc.co.uk/products/specialist/ ). They missed a few streets out when installing the fibre in my area. And its a monopoly in my area so I cannot switch provider either. Time to move I think!

Stockholm, Sweden (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428299)

ADSL, from www.prisjakt.nu, for Stockholm, Sweden:

1000 Mbit/sec: 750-900 SEK/month (USD 115-140/month)
250 Mbit/sec: 350-400 SEK/month (USD 65/month)
200 Mbit/sec: 370 SEK/month (USD 65/month)
100 Mbit/sec: 225-400 SEK/month (USD 35-60/month)

Conversion 6.55 SEK = 1 USD

Municipal broadband is socialism! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428341)

I hope your city is sued.

Fastest available AFAIK in Montreal. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428343)

Fastest for consumers.. 200Mbit/s Down, 30 Mbit/s UP. for $199.95, through cable.
Businesses have access to proper fiber network with Gbp/s speeds, none yet for the regular folks

In 10 years you might catch up with 2007 Korea (2)

ReallyEvilCanine (991886) | about 2 years ago | (#41428345)

These sorts of speeds are something to be ashamed of.

I thought this was impressive... (1)

ebcdic (39948) | about 2 years ago | (#41428363)

... until I realised that "30 MB/sec" should have been "30 Mb/sec". Bits, not bytes.

I assume small b, not capital B? (1)

Aphrika (756248) | about 2 years ago | (#41428367)

Megabits, not megabytes? A minor point, but when it comes to network speeds, it makes all the difference...

Re:I assume small b, not capital B? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429055)

All hardware connection speeds (aka layer 1) are specified in bits. Anyone that uses 'B' has no clue that there is a factor of 8 difference.

Editors should do their work.

my speed (1)

Jaktar (975138) | about 2 years ago | (#41428371)

I get 768k/512k for $90/mo with a 600MB/day cap over WISP. Alternately I could get satellite for the same price, but I'd have to deal with the 2000ms latency.

The best phone service for my area is 2G with the choice of AT&T or T-mobile.

Go 10 miles in any direction and you could have 5MB/sec cable.

The broadband initiative did provide funding for infrastructure building in my area. 1 year of planning and 1 year of work and they're not done yet. I expect that I won't see any physical connection to my home, though I'm only around 100 yards from the main line through town. Likely I'll get some form of WISP. From what little has been published, I may end up with between 5-10MB WISP when it's done. No word on price.

Telenet Belgium (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428373)

I personally have Telenet Fibernet (which is actually just EuroDOCSIS 3.0 cable, not fiber to home) here in Belgium, which is 60Mbps down, 4Mbps up (with "fair use policy") which boils down to unlimited with reduced speed in peak hours somewhere between 250GB and 512GB bandwidth use). That comes down to €44.95 (about $60). I have to add that price goes down a bit if you combine it with digital television and/or phone services.

They also have Basic Internet at €24.95 (€33) which is 30Mbps down/2.5Mbps up and Fibernet XL which is 120Mbps down/5Mbps up at €64.95 ($85).

I have to say that although the prices here are way too high imo (compared to countries like the Netherlands), but service is very good and the theoretical speeds are also the actual speeds on cable. DSL in Belgium has much lower speeds (even in VDSL) and actual speeds rarely come even remotely close to the theoretical speeds they try to seduce you with.

Re:Telenet Belgium (1)

wimpy (39015) | about 2 years ago | (#41428591)

Here in the Netherlands I pay 52 euro for 60 Mbps down, 6 Mbps up, with television + telephone included. Doesn't seem to be a lot cheaper than what you have so Belgium might have caught up :-)

Believe it or not... 3G cellular plan on 3 (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about 2 years ago | (#41428375)

Pay as you Go on 3 UK:

300 minutes any network voice (excluding 101 and premium numbers)
3,000 SMS texts (excluding 5-digit text codes)
the only truly unlimited data plan of ANY carrier in the UK (and free MSN/Facebook/Skype (which doesn't count toward any data even if you use your gear for video calls!) ...on top of that you're allowed to tether!

All for £15 a month.

I have about 0 downtime on it (not including computer restarts and moving around and occasionally rebooting my phone), and I can (and do most of the time) saturate at 3.8MBit. For an all you can eat wireless plan at that price, I'll never go back to a fixed line.

It doesn't even bother me that I use probably 15 minutes talk a month and I've sent three SMS texts in four years. It's worth the fifteen quid just for the data.

Bandwidth is great (4, Interesting)

Meeni (1815694) | about 2 years ago | (#41428409)

Latency is better.

I have comcast, I can download at some 20Mbit/s, for around $65/mo. Its expensive but if it worked properly, I'd be happy. But...

Latency is catastrophic. On benchmarks it's great, on anything real it sucks. Actually, that's the story of that Comcast subscription. It does everything useless fast, but anything useful feels crippled. Skype? Unusable. Netflix? Never in HD. Youtube? Choppy. ssh? horrible latency. Web pages? super fast, but who cares?

Re:Bandwidth is great (1)

aktiveradio (851043) | about 2 years ago | (#41429351)

Comcast does very heavy packet shaping, so things like speedtest.net look great but everything else is "shaped" so you don't actually get what you expect or pay for.

Beware of FTTx (in some situations) (1)

cianduffy (742890) | about 2 years ago | (#41428415)

My house has FTTH. Except its dark, ever since the firm providing it went bankrupt and was bought by another that promptly went bankrupt itself. It *was* sold at 10mbits and 20mbits when they were in business, at a time when DSL was usually 512k or 1mbit. So I'm stuck with 3mbit DSL, due to the estate having been connected to a second-string exchange as the telco never thought anyone would want DSL with FTTH. The rest of the town gets either 8mbit or 24mbit depending on who they get service from. Then, to make it worse, as the FTTH provider had an early IPTV package, the cable company never cabled this estate. They legally could (totally unregulated market) but they decided it wasn't worth it. They have the rest of the town cabled. They now offer 150/10mbit. I've decided its time to move house!

Re:Beware of FTTx (in some situations) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428571)

This is where Chattanooga has an advantage, as the Electric Power Board is a municipal company, it's also the source for electric power. That's a service they have to offer to everybody in their service area. So since they have to run electric lines, why not string a fiber alongside it? The cost is next to inconsequential.

So...why not buy a house in Chattanooga? Sure, you'll have to put up with Rednecks and Church Biddies, but that's solved by more Internet Access.

It's actually better than advertised (1)

topher_k (622399) | about 2 years ago | (#41428465)

My SpeedTest after the announcement had me at 60 Mbps down and 30 Mbps up. More importantly, in two years I have had exactly zero downtime, as compared to my former monthly visits from Comcast. Topher

1Gb/s in Ukraine for $18/month with 75 TV channels (4, Interesting)

OneMadMuppet (1329291) | about 2 years ago | (#41428477)

...though real-world benchmarks give me ~800Mb/s both ways. It's also native IPv6, so I don't need my tunnel anymore. Internet is dirt cheap here, you can get 30MB/s for about $3/month with TV and phone.

crappiest deal evah (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428539)

Living among the Canadian sticks, (Fiber / Fibe / DSL isn't available here, so I use Fido's 3G) and upon having a craptastic LOS to the tower, I can pull about 200KB/s down, can't really upload crap (A 2MB picture to FB times out on upload) and for about 10GB/mo equates to $100. Better than dial-up, sure, but wow. It's quicker (and cheaper!) to mail somebody a USB key if you need to get a chunk of data out.

Having an Autodesk Flame here (it was a gift!) I'd certainly have fun with some of the speeds and caps that you guys are raving about. (Always in search of high bit-rate/bit-depth HD sources, such as REDraw) If I do want to download a torrent / distro, I go to the village and tap into free wifi for the price of a regular coffee. (16Mbps down, 1Mbps up, unlimited cap) Perform a quick ifconfig, log into the router with default uname and password, set QOS to favour my IP, however yet leave the cafe's POS terminals to have priority over me. That way, everyone is happy! ;D

Canada: 250 Mb/s, $110/mo for 1TB (1)

rbrander (73222) | about 2 years ago | (#41428611)

Shaw covers quite a lot of Canada and the prices are the same wherever they cover:

http://shaw.ca/Internet/Broadband-250/ [shaw.ca]

and $190/mo for "unlimited" though you'll want to check the fine print on that word. And speaking of loopholes, for this you get "up to" 250 Mb/s...where "up to" includes the number zero, not to mention every number lower than 250.

This isn't bad, but whatever is decent in Canadian services are due to regulation as the competition is pretty thin. There are perhaps two services in any large city, which amazingly have about the same prices and services.

As somebody who watches the costs on maintaining municipal networks of big heavy water and sewer pipes we have to expensively bury 10 feet down to stay below the frost line, it's painfully obvious what a bonanza providing Internet has been for these companies. The big bucks aren't in the little black boxes at the ends of wires that get upgraded every few years anyway; the big bucks are keeping all those thousands of miles of line maintained. And since we never got fibre-to-the-home out of the commercial world, they've been able to supply this whole new service down the same wires that paid for themselves in the 50's (for POTS copper wires) and the 80's (for TV coax cable).

Every city on the continent should have just declared Internet to be a municipal network, too important to the public to leave to private hands, and built FTTH that way a decade ago. There are private water/sewer utilities (many very good), but in most places, voters get very nervous at the very suggestion of privatizing water - because you gotta have it and privatized utilities in various places have doubled and tripled rates in the past.

A public utility is basically owned by its own customers and has no interest of its own, just theirs. Private utilities love gaming the pricing model. Every utility network has fixed costs (maintaining those lines cost the same whether more or less product is flowing through) and product-relative costs: the amount of water or power or gas or bytes. Netflix figures have shown that the real incremental cost of bandwidth in large bulk is only about 2-3 cents per gigabyte. Keeping a set of lines to you house running that are lightweight and do not have to be deeply buried costs maybe $25/month in most large cities. And if it's fibre you chose to bury rather than a 40 or 70 year-old network for a different kind of communication, everybody gets hundreds of MB/s. Then your cost is all about the number of gigabytes you care to buy - at a quarter or so per Blu-Ray grade movie. $25+ two movies a day = $40/month.

Instead, you get the fixed and product costs blended together into $110 per month and a bandwidth cap. Note the healthy profit.

OpenCape on Cape Cod - 100 gig/sec (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428719)

We are in the middle of the construction of the OpenCape fiber backbone being built on Cape Cod & The Islands. It will connect every town, most of the libraries, schools with a 100 gig pipe. Construction will be completed by Jan. 1, 2013. It is available to private companies to lease and offer commercial service to residents. Many businesses are getting their laterals connected as well as neighborhood associations. Anyone want to move their business here? We are typically ten degrees warmer than Boston in the winter and 10 degrees cooler in the summer with lots of beaches and year round towns.

My worst fear... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41428793)

I remember hearing about people rant about this, because they considered it unfair government competition against private industry. (Cue calls of "socialism".)

I wish this town luck, but it may only be a matter of time before telcos and cable companies sue and win, similar to how mesh networking was killed in most towns a few years back.

Megabytes? (3, Insightful)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | about 2 years ago | (#41428841)

Submitter needs to turn in his geek card for confusing Mb with MB multiple times in the summary.

In reply to Timothy's question about options (1)

Shinobi (19308) | about 2 years ago | (#41428867)

In the area I live in, there are multiple options:

Multiple *DSL options
Cable up to 500Mbit/s down/200 up
FTTP/ethernet up to Gbit/s down and 250-500Mbit/s up

I'm currently on 100Mbit/s symmetrical, and pay SEK379/month(roughly $57/month), but I'm considering the Gbit/s option, which is SEK899/month(roughly $137/month)

Meanwhile... (1)

Nemyst (1383049) | about 2 years ago | (#41429071)

The best plan I could get is 200/30 for 200$/month, and that's when combined with another service from the ISP like TV or mobile.

The kicker though is that it also has a 200gb down/50gb up monthly cap. Yes, you read that right: you can bust your cap by saturating your connection for less than 3 hours. You can then buy up to three packages of 60gb per month for 12.50$ each.

It's absurd.

Verizon FiOS (SE Virginia) (1)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | about 2 years ago | (#41429231)

15/5 @ $70
50/25 @ $80
75/35 @ $90
150/65 @ $100
300/65 @ $210

Bundling TV and/or phone brings down the price significantly. Next summer, when my 2 year price lock-in runs out, I'll switch from 25/25 to 50/25, for about the same price. Currently, our 25/25+phone+TV is $125/mo. And currently, Verizon has no bandwidth cap.

38€ for 100/10Mbps download/upload in Madrid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429233)

38€ is because one of the householders is employee of Telefonica (the main telecommunications company in Spain), normal price is about 75€.

The line is very stable and worked almost flawlessly for about 1 year.

bla (1)

Ruede (824831) | about 2 years ago | (#41429235)

flatrate 100mbit down/2,5mbit up ( :( ) + 1 telephone line without flatrate 30€/month

Rural is still slow (1)

homesteader (585925) | about 2 years ago | (#41429243)

I pay $60/month for 1mbit dsl and my only other option is satellite. Local telco still has a regulated monopoly because we are classified as rural. I have high hopes for cellular, but those speeds are currently slower than my 1mbit dsl and they are capped.

Meanwhile, In Nawth Ca'lina (1)

Toad-san (64810) | about 2 years ago | (#41429369)

Howling Wilderness of Computerdom [tm], they passed a law against any such shenanigans. The godz forbid we should actually have a CHOICE in our broadband!

http://www.wired.com/business/2011/05/nc-gov-anti-muni-broadband/ [wired.com]

http://www.indyweek.com/indyweek/cities-consumers-lose-municipal-broadband-fight/Content?oid=2440390 [indyweek.com]

Of course they also passed laws forbidding any study of global rising seawater .. outside the limits they felt were politically correct, that is.

Gotta love 'em.

Speed and latency are important (1)

Conficio (832978) | about 2 years ago | (#41429465)

How about latency and bufferbloat effects? Since the discovery of bufferbloat (http://gettys.wordpress.com/bufferbloat-faq/) I have become increasingly aware that raw speed is not all there is to Internet quality.

My Verizon FIOS 20/5 should be plenty to do remote screen sessions to work, but it does slow down considerably in the afternoon and becomes painful in the prime time evening hours.

Damn it! (1)

cfkboyz (1129423) | about 2 years ago | (#41429493)

I moved to TN a few years ago. I was just about to move to Chattanooga, but found a super cheap home just north of there. Damn did I screw myself. LOL I see the EPB Fiber ads all the time on TV since I get it from Chatt. Now I am stuck with my little Telephone Co-Op with the max speed of 10mbit/1mbit and you can only get the 10/1 if you do not have their IPTV which I do. The max with TV is 6mbit/768kbit and if you are watching HD channels your speed fluctuates between 4-5mbits :(.. Best part is that I pay $69.95 a month just for the Internet.... Should have moved to Chatt... Anyone want to buy a House? LOL

I pay... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429511)

I pay $70/month for 512K DSL, which is the fastest speed available. I live in semi-rural Missouri.

Meanwhile, in South Carolina (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41429689)

The legislature just granted AT&T a statewide monopoly on network services, meaning that my county had to stop rolling out its own fiber network that it is legally required by federal law to implement.

It's getting interesting, thank you NIkki Haley, you useless piece of shit, and the teapublicans who are being idiots and violating federal law.

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