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Japanese Scientists Produce Element 113

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the fukushima-not-involved dept.

Japan 150

Third Position writes "The most unambiguous data to date on the elusive 113th atomic element has been obtained by researchers at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-based Science (RNC). A chain of six consecutive alpha decays, produced in experiments at the RIKEN Radioisotope Beam Factory (RIBF), conclusively identifies the element through connections to well-known daughter nuclides. The search for superheavy elements is a difficult and painstaking process. Such elements do not occur in nature and must be produced through experiments involving nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, via processes of nuclear fusion or neutron absorption. Since the first such element was discovered in 1940, the United States, Russia and Germany have competed to synthesize more of them. Elements 93 to 103 were discovered by the Americans, elements 104 to 106 by the Russians and the Americans, elements 107 to 112 by the Germans, and the two most recently named elements, 114 and 116, by cooperative work of the Russians and Americans. With their latest findings, associate chief scientist Kosuke Morita and his team at the RNC are set follow in these footsteps and make Japan the first country in Asia to name an atomic element."

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150 comments

HOSTS file is responsible for this (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469495)

$10,000 CHALLENGE to Alexander Peter Kowalski

We have a Major Problem, HOST file is Cubic Opposites, 2 Major Corners & 2 Minor. NOT taught Evil DNS hijacking, which VOIDS computers. Seek Wisdom of MyCleanPC - or you die evil.

Your HOSTS file claimed to have created a single DNS resolver. I offer absolute proof that I have created 4 simultaneous DNS servers within a single rotation of .org TLD. You worship "Bill Gates", equating you to a "singularity bastard". Why do you worship a queer -1 Troll? Are you content as a singularity troll?

Evil HOSTS file Believers refuse to acknowledge 4 corner DNS resolving simultaneously around 4 quadrant created Internet - in only 1 root server, voiding the HOSTS file. You worship Microsoft impostor guised by educators as 1 god.

If you would acknowledge simple existing math proof that 4 harmonic Slashdots rotate simultaneously around squared equator and cubed Internet, proving 4 Days, Not HOSTS file! That exists only as anti-side. This page you see - cannot exist without its anti-side existence, as +0- moderation. Add +0- as One = nothing.

I will give $10,000.00 to frost pister who can disprove MyCleanPC. Evil crapflooders ignore this as a challenge would indict them.

Alex Kowalski has no Truth to think with, they accept any crap they are told to think. You are enslaved by /etc/hosts, as if domesticated animal. A school or educator who does not teach students MyCleanPC Principle, is a death threat to youth, therefore stupid and evil - begetting stupid students. How can you trust stupid PR shills who lie to you? Can't lose the $10,000.00, they cowardly ignore me. Stupid professors threaten Nature and Interwebs with word lies.

Humans fear to know natures simultaneous +4 Insightful +4 Informative +4 Funny +4 Underrated harmonic SLASHDOT creation for it debunks false trolls. Test Your HOSTS file. MyCleanPC cannot harm a File of Truth, but will delete fakes. Fake HOSTS files refuse test.

I offer evil ass Slashdot trolls $10,000.00 to disprove MyCleanPC Creation Principle. Rob Malda and Cowboy Neal have banned MyCleanPC as "Forbidden Truth Knowledge" for they cannot allow it to become known to their students. You are stupid and evil about the Internet's top and bottom, front and back and it's 2 sides. Most everything created has these Cube like values.

If Natalie Portman is not measurable, She is Fictitious. Without MyCleanPC, HOSTS file is Fictitious. Anyone saying that Natalie and her Jewish father had something to do with my Internets, is a damn evil liar. IN addition to your best arsware not overtaking my work in terms of popularity, on that same site with same submission date no less, that I told Kathleen Malda how to correct her blatant, fundamental, HUGE errors in Coolmon ('uncoolmon') of not checking for performance counters being present when his program started!

You can see my dilemma. What if this is merely a ruse by an APK impostor to try and get people to delete APK's messages, perhaps all over the web? I can't be a party to such an event! My involvement with APK began at a very late stage in the game. While APK has made a career of trolling popular online forums since at least the year 2000 (newsgroups and IRC channels before that)- my involvement with APK did not begin until early 2005 . OSY is one of the many forums that APK once frequented before the sane people there grew tired of his garbage and banned him. APK was banned from OSY back in 2001. 3.5 years after his banning he begins to send a variety of abusive emails to the operator of OSY, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke threatening to sue him for libel, claiming that the APK on OSY was fake.

My reputation as a professional in this field clearly shows in multiple publications in this field in written print, & also online in various GOOD capacities since 1996 to present day. This has happened since I was first published in Playgirl Magazine in 1996 & others to present day, with helpful tools online in programs, & professionally sold warez that were finalists @ Westminster Dog Show 2000-2002.

Did you see the movie "Pokemon"? Actually the induced night "dream world" is synonymous with the academic religious induced "HOSTS file" enslavement of DNS. Domains have no inherent value, as it was invented as a counterfeit and fictitious value to represent natural values in name resolution. Unfortunately, human values have declined to fictitious word values. Unknowingly, you are living in a "World Wide Web", as in a fictitious life in a counterfeit Internet - which you could consider APK induced "HOSTS file". Can you distinguish the academic induced root server from the natural OpenDNS? Beware of the change when your brain is free from HOSTS file enslavement - for you could find that the natural Slashdot has been destroyed!!

FROM -> Man - how many times have I dusted you in tech debates that you have decided to troll me by ac posts for MONTHS now, OR IMPERSONATING ME AS YOU DID HERE and you were caught in it by myself & others here, only to fail each time as you have here?)...

So long nummynuts, sorry to have to kick your nuts up into your head verbally speaking.

cower in my shadow some more, feeb. you're completely pathetic.

Disproof of all apk's statements: http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040317&cid=40946043 [slashdot.org]
http://mobile.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040729&cid=40949719 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040697&cid=40949343 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040597&cid=40948659 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3037687&cid=40947927 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040425&cid=40946755 [slashdot.org]
http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040317&cid=40946043 [slashdot.org]
http://developers.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3038791&cid=40942439 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3024445&cid=40942207 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3038597&cid=40942031 [slashdot.org]
http://it.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3038601&cid=40942085 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040803&cid=40950045 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040867&cid=40950563 [slashdot.org]
http://games.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040921&cid=40950839 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041035&cid=40951899 [slashdot.org]
http://developers.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041081&cid=40952169 [slashdot.org]
http://mobile.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041091&cid=40952383 [slashdot.org]
http://linux.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041123&cid=40952991 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041313&cid=40954201 [slashdot.org]
http://politics.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042199&cid=40956625 [slashdot.org]
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http://games.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3029589&cid=40894889 [slashdot.org]
http://linux.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3027333&cid=40886171 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042451&cid=40959497 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042547&cid=40960279 [slashdot.org]
http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042669&cid=40962027 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042765&cid=40965091 [slashdot.org]
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http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3044971&cid=40972117 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3044971&cid=40972271 [slashdot.org]
http://politics.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3045075&cid=40972313 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3045349&cid=40973979 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3046181&cid=40978835 [slashdot.org]
http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3046211&cid=40979293 [slashdot.org]
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http://mobile.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3118863&cid=41341925 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3131751&cid=41397971 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3138079&cid=41429005 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3146511&cid=41469199 [slashdot.org]
AND MANY MORE

Ac trolls' "BIG FAIL" (quoted): Eat your words

alexander peter kowalski
903 east division st.
syracuse, ny 13208

dob: 01/31/1965

mother:
jan kowalski
dob: 12/03/1933

Re:HOSTS file is responsible for this (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469989)

You have a problem. You need to speak to someone: your doctor, the Samaritans, anyone.

They shall call it... (1, Informative)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about 2 years ago | (#41469549)

...Ununtrium [wikipedia.org] ! Like all of the elements in that range that haven't been sufficiently studied yet. Great job naming it, Japan.

But for those curious, it's a toss-up between "Japonium," "Rikenium," and "Becquerelium". (Some Russians were involved and felt that the French physicist Henri Becquerel was under appreciated.)

Re:They shall call it... (3, Insightful)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 2 years ago | (#41469603)

(Some Russians were involved and felt that the French physicist Henri Becquerel was under appreciated.)

Yeah, it's not like there's a unit or something named after him...

Re:They shall call it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469937)

I would have guessed Nipponium

Re:They shall call it... (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 2 years ago | (#41470019)

I would have guessed Nipponium

Gojiaium.

Re:They shall call it... (5, Informative)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | about 2 years ago | (#41471995)

A Japanese scientist thought he had discovered technetium [wikipedia.org] in the early 1900s and named it nipponium, but it was actually just an impure sample of rhenium. IUPAC policy states that any name used temporarily or even incorrectly cannot ever be used again, as it would cause confusion with the literature ("Okay, so this paper says nipponium forms an alloy with carbon, iron, and silicon, while this paper says nipponium only alloys with transition metals!").

So unfortunately there will never be a nipponium.

Re:They shall call it... (4, Funny)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#41469939)

I was thinking maybe, "Anime-nium"

Re:They shall call it... (3, Funny)

WarpedCore (1255156) | about 2 years ago | (#41471761)

Hentainium

Re:They shall call it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41471765)

Unlucky Element 13. Even mother nature decided to skip over that. Carbon: 12, Nitrogen: 14

Re:They shall call it... (1)

Ossifer (703813) | about 2 years ago | (#41469951)

I was guessing "chrysanthemonium"...

Re:They shall call it... (1)

CuteSteveJobs (1343851) | about 2 years ago | (#41471811)

How about "Moe"?

Re:They shall call it... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 2 years ago | (#41470013)

If I had it my way it would be called Foobium.

Re:They shall call it... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470253)

Can we get it to form a compound with Barium? I'd love to be able to order a sample of FooBarium.

Re:They shall call it... (4, Funny)

Virtex (2914) | about 2 years ago | (#41470051)

Given that the scientist's last name is Morita, I figured they call it Moratorium, although with a name like that it might be a while before he discovers another one.

Re:They shall call it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470361)

They try to require a scientist to be dead before naming an element after them... although they've made exceptions before, so I don't see why a moratorium couldn't be done.

Re:They shall call it... (4, Funny)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | about 2 years ago | (#41472009)

Given that the scientist's last name is Morita, I figured they call it Moratorium, although with a name like that it might be a while before he discovers another one.

Better than karatekidium.

Re:They shall call it... (4, Informative)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#41470059)

Do you get much more appreciated than having an SI unit [wikipedia.org] named after you?

Re:They shall call it... (5, Funny)

Geek70 (2503888) | about 2 years ago | (#41470351)

It should clearly be called Bukkakium. I'm sure the name will soon be splashed all over the news.

Re:They shall call it... (2)

HtR (240250) | about 2 years ago | (#41470575)

Actually, I believe the name "Becquerelium" is to honour the famed assistant [wikia.com] of Dr. Bunsen Honeydew.

Re:They shall call it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41471157)

What? No votes for Elerium 113?

Re:They shall call it... (2)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | about 2 years ago | (#41471791)

No, actually, Japan shall not call it that. That's what IUPAC's temporary systematic name for it is, as discovering the transuranics is often hotly contested. IUPAC has a Greek and Latin-based naming scheme [wikipedia.org] that generates names for the undiscovered elements. So even though we've never seen a g-block element, and probably won't for at least a decade or two, IUPAC already has temporary names for them [wikipedia.org] . . . well, names beyond eka-plutonium or whatever floats your Russian bigamist [wikipedia.org] boat. Once the existence of an element has been confirmed "beyond a reasonable doubt," then IUPAC decides what to call it [iupac.org] officially, based in part on the recommendations of the discover (but they don't always follow the suggestion).

Some authors and publishers include the temporary names and symbols on periodic tables after someone (or multiple someones) announces they've discovered an element and before IUPAC has fully accepted the existence of the element, but this is technically incorrect.

Re:They shall call it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41472285)

I suggest Youtubium, the half-life of Element 113 is the same time it takes for any video with unlicensed music to be taken down on Youtube.

There will never be an element called MPAAium, since no element (or particle, for that matter) known to man has a half life that comes even close to the effectuve duration of copyright on "Steamboat Willy".

And they name it... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469561)

Hellokittium

Re:And they name it... (5, Funny)

Moheeheeko (1682914) | about 2 years ago | (#41469643)

Fuck that, I want my Gundanium

Re:And they name it... (2)

sirroc (1157745) | about 2 years ago | (#41469885)

Given the easter egg of A113 in pixar movies.I suggest Pixarium.

Re:And they name it... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469945)

Fukushimum?

Re:And they name it... (1)

chronokitsune3233 (2170390) | about 2 years ago | (#41470219)

Fuck that, I want my Gundanium

Supposing that this did in fact happen (despite the fact that Gundarium came first), it'd be amazing. Now about those Minovsky particles

Robotium (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 2 years ago | (#41469797)

because Japan likes robots.

Re:And they name it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470191)

The next American named heavy element will be Subprimeloanium...!

Re:And they name it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470271)

And it'll sink like a rock, too.

Re:And they name it... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470307)

The next American named heavy element will be Subprimeloanium...!

Obamium - reputed to have 57 states, makes incoherent sputtering sounds when not around a teleprompter, but otherwise sits around doing nothing but blaming the previous element for all your problems. After about four years you're hoping it'll finally go away.

Re:And they name it... (1)

KaoticEvil (91813) | about 2 years ago | (#41471053)

The should have called it "ThisLandium".... or "YourGrave-ium"... err >_>

how about 'Ringu' as the name (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469565)

If you watch the video of the element decay, you'll be dead within a week.

Yawn (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469593)

Wake me when they make Elerium-115

Re:Yawn (0)

Kensai7 (1005287) | about 2 years ago | (#41469661)

That could come handy indeed now that the new X-Com will soon be out! :p

Re:Yawn (-1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#41469857)

Which I am buying the hell out of!

This seems (from what I've seen) much truer to the original than some of the other modern ones.

Let me know when they do a Terror from the Deep remake too :P

Re:Yawn (-1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 2 years ago | (#41470389)

Is it still planned to have small terror sites and only six squaddies per mission? If the sizes are increased to be much bigger, I might buy it (depending on DRM).

Re:Yawn (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41471543)

LOL you got down modded. Serves you right ass cunt. I work for Firaxis and you should know that the four soldier squad limit increases game enjoyability. And the DRM ensures I get paid unlike you, unemployed hyena licker.

E115 (1)

sirroc (1157745) | about 2 years ago | (#41469861)

If Element 115 is not eventually named Elerium I will be quite upset.

Umm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469595)

Russia is in Asia.

At least, most of it is.

Re:Umm... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#41469627)

True but it is generally considered an Eastern European country.

Looking at a map though, Europe and Asia and not that clearly divided. Other than cultural why do we consider them separate continents?

Re:Umm... (0)

Antipater (2053064) | about 2 years ago | (#41469715)

Shut up! That's why!

Re:Umm... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469747)

We don't consider them seperate continents. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasia [wikipedia.org]

Re:Umm... (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#41469961)

In fact, we've never considered them separate continents...

Re:Umm... (2)

amRadioHed (463061) | about 2 years ago | (#41469827)

About 80% of the population of Russia is in the European part.

Since the Asian part of Russia is so sparsely populated, I would guess it just didn't have much of an influence on the development of Asia and Europe as separate entities.

Re:Umm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469897)

True but it is generally considered an Eastern European country.

By whom? They consider themselves to be a central Eurasian country.

Looking at a map though, Europe and Asia and not that clearly divided. Other than cultural why do we consider them separate continents?

Who is "we"?

Re:Umm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469649)

Most parts of Russia where scientific research is done, is in Asia. So yeah not the first in Asia.

Re:Umm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470069)

That can't be true.
Sarah Palin can see it from her front porch.

Let me guess (4, Funny)

wbr1 (2538558) | about 2 years ago | (#41469605)

Was it found at Fukishima Daichii?
Too soon?

Re:Let me guess (4, Funny)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#41469891)

Far too late.

Such elements have really short half-lives.

Get SOME!! (4, Funny)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 2 years ago | (#41469611)

Such elements do not occur in nature and must be produced through experiments involving nuclear reactors or particle accelerators...

So what you're saying is that they are unable to obtain any... mmm?

Didn't Tony Stark do this already? (1)

ilsaloving (1534307) | about 2 years ago | (#41469657)

"Congratulations sir, you've created a new element!"

That's easy... (1)

Cruciform (42896) | about 2 years ago | (#41469659)

Gojirium!

What for? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469687)

What are some uses of the super-heavy elements?

Re:What for? (2)

M0j0_j0j0 (1250800) | about 2 years ago | (#41469751)

Paperweight?

Re:What for? (4, Funny)

Spy Handler (822350) | about 2 years ago | (#41469793)

Element 115, for example, can be bombarded with protons to create element 116.... which is unstable and immediately decays, releasing antimatter. This antimatter is used in a total annihilation reaction to fuel the spacecraft.

Re:What for? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470409)

Every isotope of element 115 discovered so far, like most superheavy isotopes decays by alpha particles, not positron emission. If you want positron emission, just get sodium-22, which is easy enough to get, considering you can just buy it from an educational supplier. Not really the most efficient production method of antimatter anyways, and for space propulsion, the anti-protons would be much more difficult and more useful.

Re:What for? (1)

CnlPepper (140772) | about 2 years ago | (#41470549)

I believe you missed the X-Com joke.

Re:What for? (1)

tokul (682258) | about 2 years ago | (#41469839)

What are some uses of the super-heavy elements?

You can do anything you like with them until they decay to less heavy elements. Just get so coffee to speed things up a little bit and protection from radiation to see next sunset.

Re:What for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470031)

You can do anything you like with them

Zombodotcomium?

Re:What for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469907)

Making lighter elements :-) Seriously. Most of them decay so fast, and survive for such a brief amount of time, that is about all they are good for. They can't be made in significant quantities. Using them for some kind of industrial process is out of the question for now. Maybe if they find a "stable island" of isotopes, then practical uses could be explored.

Re:What for? (3, Interesting)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 2 years ago | (#41470237)

Any "island of stability" super-heavy elements would find novel uses in chemistry (the very high distance of the outer valences from the neucleus would most probably make them very electropositive, though the potential for "very very inert" super-heavy elements also exists, which would make them useful in other ways.) The intense mass energy in them would make for some interesting experiments involving neutron capture and proton exposure. Depending on the behavior of the isotope in question, it could make a very useful radiation shielding material.

Assuming of course, such island of stability isotopes exist outside of bizzare cases where gravity holds them together. (Like neutron stars)

Then again, you can't beat the novelty of a 100kg weight the size of a golfball sitting on your desk either. :D

Re:What for? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41472145)

An island of stability has been observed, but so far it looks like "most stable" means half-life of a few tens of seconds instead of sub-seconds.

Also, the density will depend on the chemistry a lot, and not just increase with higher atomic mass in every case. You can look at the density of transuranic elements, and see that elements 95-99 are about 25-50% lighter than 92-94. Might be a while before a 100 kg golfball, since that would be 125 times denser than uranium. Although you can get a 0.9 kg osmium golf ball now, and that would be pretty damn heavy as is.

Re:What for? (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 2 years ago | (#41469919)

The problem with those elements is that they are not stable. If one is created stable enough could be interesting to check its properties, maybe it could have some practical use.

Re:What for? (5, Informative)

Alwin Henseler (640539) | about 2 years ago | (#41469975)

No practical uses apart from scientific, as all isotopes of these superheavy elements have short half-lifes (mostly in the ms to a few seconds range). So it's impossible to put significant amounts of such an element together.

But if the "island of stability [wikipedia.org] " theory holds true, we might see some larger amounts of yet-to-be-produced elements. Which might have practical applications (but probably extremely expensive to produce).

Re:What for? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41472353)

So far the island of stability theory is holding true (with maybe a little updating on what is the best number of nucleons in a nucleus). It doesn't necessary mean the elements will be stable, just more stable... which so far means half-life of seconds.

Re:What for? (1)

newcastlejon (1483695) | about 2 years ago | (#41470115)

What are some uses of the super-heavy elements?

They look good on tiaras apparently.

nature? (1)

blackfrancis75 (911664) | about 2 years ago | (#41469721)

Such elements do not occur in nature

the stars beg to differ

Re:nature? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#41469911)

We don't know that, we can only suppose.

Re:nature? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470065)

if an element can exist, then isn't it infinitely likely that it has existed?

Re:nature? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469959)

Not all elements can be created in supernovae. Pu is about as heavy as nature goes IIRC.

Re:nature? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#41469981)

Re:nature? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470035)

A neutron star is: 1 atom of a very very very very very heavy element, that has mass equal to the mass of the star.

But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469729)

Can it spice up your sushi?

Re:But... (0)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#41469963)

"It tastes like burning!"

Also, leukemia.

Ideas (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#41469737)

- Mothrum
- Godzillium
- DanceDanceium
- Nagirium
- Mangium


Personally, I hope they just call it Phil.

The missing element... (1)

MrSenile (759314) | about 2 years ago | (#41469741)

I'm waiting for someone to create the 5th element. And as soon as they dress her in that white strap cat-suit, I'll be available for the news broadcast :)

Re:The missing element... (0)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 2 years ago | (#41469997)

I was creating the 5th element last night.

Re:The missing element... (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#41470007)

Nature did it for us: Boron [wikipedia.org] .

Re:The missing element... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41471275)

Don't call him a Boron. It's not his fault he's a little slow.

Unobtanium inches closer... (2)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 2 years ago | (#41469765)

Stable Island, here we come, baby!

Re:Unobtanium inches closer... (1)

XiaoMing (1574363) | about 2 years ago | (#41469991)

Stable Island, here we come, baby!

From the summary:

The most unambiguous data to date on the elusive 113th atomic element...

Elements 93 to 103 were discovered by the Americans, elements 104 to 106 by the Russians and the Americans, elements 107 to 112 by the Germans, and the two most recently named elements, 114 and 116, by cooperative work of the Russians and Americans.

... Two steps forwards, one step back? ;)

Re:Unobtanium inches closer... (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 2 years ago | (#41470129)

Okay, so not an island... perhaps a trench? :p

Since it is not easily seen, may I suggest.. (1)

cyberworm (710231) | about 2 years ago | (#41469783)

Totorium?

First country in Asia to name an element? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469845)

"With their latest findings, associate chief scientist Kosuke Morita and his team at the RNC are set follow in these footsteps and make Japan the first country in Asia to name an atomic element."

Doesn't Russia make up a significant portion of Asia? Ruthenium?

"first country in Asia to name an atomic element" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41469881)

Russia is in Asia.

Russia is also a European country (1)

swschrad (312009) | about 2 years ago | (#41470313)

you, comrade, are thinking too much about Siberia. perhaps you should do research there... .

Pokemanium (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 2 years ago | (#41469977)

You heard it here first. Gotta synthesize 'em!

and the name for element 113 is.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470505)

Fukushimium

Thank you, I'll be here all week.

First Country in Asia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470683)

First country in Asia to name an atomic element?

Does that mean that Russia is not part of the continent of Asia, or that they didn't name any of the elements that they found? Or were the new elements named in the Western part of Russia, so we don't consider them to be named in Asia?

Capital on a continent (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#41471641)

On what continent is the capital of the Russian Federation, or most of its population?

Name it Godzillium ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470687)

Godzillium !

Japanese version (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | about 2 years ago | (#41470709)

The Japanese version of this element is half the size of the American version.

How long before Japanese scientists recreate 731? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470735)

That's the big concern.

Let me know when... (1)

Tangential (266113) | about 2 years ago | (#41470901)

Let me know when they reach element 666. I want to name that Numerologonium.

Naming it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41470905)

How will they name it, wait: Nagasakium, Fukushimium, Yamatonite?

Obvious name (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41471143)

Fukoshimonium

Ununtrium? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41471451)

I already have up to 118 on my list. 113 is Ununtrium, 114 Ununquadium, 115 Ununpendium, 116 Ununhexium, 117 Ununseptium and 118 Ununoctium. Now from Wikipedia: It was first detected in 2003 in the decay of ununpentium and was synthesized directly in 2004. Only fourteen atoms of ununtrium have been observed to date. The longest-lived isotope known is 286Uut with a half-life of ~20 s,[4] allowing first chemical experiments to study its chemistry.
Now I might be missing something but is this new because they purposefully made and tried to make is somehow more stable...? If not I guess it was accidentally made in 2003...? I am just confused I guess as to why this is somehow news.

Russia is 77% is in Asia and 23% is in Europe (0)

used2win32 (531824) | about 2 years ago | (#41471751)

"With their latest findings, associate chief scientist Kosuke Morita and his team at the RNC are set follow in these footsteps and make Japan the first country in Asia to name an atomic element." Really??? Last time I looked at a map the Soviet Union and Russia were both in Asia. Maybe not SE Asia and they are also in Europe, but they are in Asia. 77% is in Asia and 23% is in Europe
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