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Did Metro UX Elements Come From a 2009 Demo?

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the gesture-grammar dept.

GUI 68

First time accepted submitter oso2k writes "In 2009, as reported by gizmag, Robert Clayton Miller proposed a UI that borrowed from familiar iPhone gestures and translated them to a multi-tasking data-input rich desktop UI. It would seem, however, Microsoft was paying attention. Elements in Miller's design seem to have been lifted for Metro UI, such as dynamic sized widgets (tiles in Metro UI) on the home screen, swipes alternate between open, fullscreened apps, left tap for the app context menu, right tap for the system context menu. And in Miller's video at [5:41], it would seem Microsoft used the same or nearly the same font [4:30]." It's interesting to spot resemblances here, but how many UI ideas don't have more than one inventor?

cancel ×

68 comments

Metro? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41480773)

Don't you mean the interface formally known as Metro?

Original Ideas Stream Forth from Redmond (4, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 2 years ago | (#41481045)

Just like a flood of Athenas - flooding from the forehead of Zeus!

We are awash in the innovations and creativity gushing from Microsoft. One simple antecedent in the case of the Metro interface hardly mars the unbroken record of stunning inventiveness and groundbreaking vision that can be directly attributed to the far-sighted leadership of Ballmer's Microsoft.

Someday, the humble Zune will be recognized as the beginning of the post-PC era, which Microsoft ushered, leading from behind.

Re:Original Ideas Stream Forth from Redmond (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 2 years ago | (#41481211)

Someday, the humble Zune will be recognized as the beginning of the post-PC era...

You forgot about "Utopia"... the prequel to Metro.

Re:Original Ideas Stream Forth from Redmond (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481823)

I realize this is heresy on Slashdot, but the Zune and particularly the Zune HD were and are great devices. Microsoft was late to the game and a huge marketing flop, but I've personally found them superior to iPods, at any rate.

Re:Original Ideas Stream Forth from Redmond (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 2 years ago | (#41481869)

ZuneHD got it "right" for UI.

The entire device+store copy of iPod business model was doomed to failure. The market was big enough for EXACTLY ONE of those - and it was already occupied by Apple.

Of course, ZuneHD was binned, for Windows Mobile 7. Microsoft. Occasionally getting something right, and then executing on the exactly wrong thing...

Re:Original Ideas Stream Forth from Redmond (1)

tragedy (27079) | about 2 years ago | (#41482461)

My sister had a Zune. On the PC side, the UI of the software was virtually unusable. Maybe it was just because it was an early, buggy version. I recall having to go through some bizarre gymnastics to get playlists of music to load onto it.

Re:Original Ideas Stream Forth from Redmond (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41482449)

It's interesting to spot resemblances here, but how many UI ideas don't have more than one inventor?

The problem is your definition of "inventor".

Re:Metro? (2)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 2 years ago | (#41481165)

Either Slashdot didn't get the memo that the name is now "Windows Store Apps", or else they can't believe any company would pick such a dumb name and are waiting for the "ha ha you almost fell for it - it's really still called Metro" announcement from Redmond.

Re:Metro? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481951)

It is called "Modern UI" by Redmond.

Re:Metro? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#41481177)

Don't you mean the interface formally known as Metro?

Right. Which is written as an incomprehensible collection of primary colored squares.

Re:Metro? (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41481569)

It's not called metro, After showing Windows 8 to several people the interface is actually called, "Jeebus, what the hell is that?"

and no my name is not Jeebus... I wonder how all these users know that it's called "what the hell is that"?

Re:Metro? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41482773)

Don't you mean the interface formally known as Metro?

*formerly, unless Metro is wearing a tuxedo

OMG, time to sue! (1, Insightful)

Qwavel (733416) | about 2 years ago | (#41480781)

They should be sued and shamed - they are supposed to do their design and development in a bubble!

Re:OMG, time to sue! (0)

fm6 (162816) | about 2 years ago | (#41480871)

Yeah, really.

Whenever I argue that Apple's crusade against Android vendors will give them a smartphone monopoly, somebody says, "No, there's still Windows 8." The good news here is that I no longer have to point out how lame that alternative is.

Re:OMG, time to sue! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481111)

There are plenty of other alternatives. Secondly, Apple's patents aren't necessary to make a smartphone and can easily be worked around unless the Android developers at Google and at the OEMs are incompetent. Apple would never have a monopoly.

Re:OMG, time to sue! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481535)

How do you work around having a rectangular phone with rounded edges? BTW, do you think that Apple A) actually "innovated" that shape or B) chose that shape out of necessity because LCD touchscreens are straight-edged and four-sided with four corners. Your comment that "Android developers at Google and at the OEMs are incompetent" is just a message from a troll. Notice how frequently Crapple-loving ACs dis Android. As for me, I'm only responding to the likes of you.

Re:OMG, time to sue! (2)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | about 2 years ago | (#41484183)

This doesn't even deserve the obligatory defense of "nothing is invented in a bubble".

There's no real similarity between Windows 8 and the Con10uum interface beyond the fact that both support multi-touch.

Dynamic sized widgets (tiles in Metro UI) on the home screen.

Wow widgets you say? On the desktop? You mean like "gadgets" in Windows Vista (shipping 3 years prior) and pretty much every theme since the 90s? The 'tile' innovation isn't that it's a widget it's that it's both a widget and an icon to launch an application. Which also in of itself isn't much of an innovation since icons previously carried information (gmail/outlook notifier changing colors when you had new emails etc) but it's certainly different from a pure RSS widget on your desktop.

swipes alternate between open, fullscreened apps,

4 fingered swipes in Con10uum, and the entire point of con10uum is that every window is always open. Swiping from off screen in Windows 8 is essentially a gesture for Windows Vista's Flip3D (again from 2006). Windows 8 for better or for worse pushes a full screen window manager or split screen. There are essentially no similarities between con10uum and Windows 8 as far as window management philosophies are concerned... and the gesture is completely different.

If there is any similarity it should be to Palm's webOS which was announced in January 2009 about 10 months before Con10uum.

left tap for the app context menu,

In windows 8 it's a bottom of the screen swipe.

right tap for the system context menu.

In Con10uum the "system context menu" is essentially the start menu. In Windows 8 it's actually a menu. And again it's a swipe not a button.

And in Miller's video at [5:41], it would seem Microsoft used the same or nearly the same font [4:30]."

Yes I'm sure Microsoft went back in time to 2002 to create a font for their devices and operating systems in order to avoid the legal implications of ripping off some random web video in 2009.

Zune circa 2006 (5, Informative)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | about 2 years ago | (#41480837)

Metro design elements date back to at least 2006 with the Zune and evolved in 2008 with the new Xbox 360 UI. The font Microsoft uses for Metro is Segoe and dates back to 2004. Seriously, I know Slashdot is anti MS, but this is just getting ridiculous... first a post about how only 25% of Windows 8 prefer the OS to other versions of Windows, when 74% of those polled say they never even used Windows 8, and now this?

Re:Zune circa 2006 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481035)

You've only mentioned style and appearance. (Yeah, I guess flat squares and a shitty font is a style)

This is about the function of the UI.

A duck is a duck. Metro is an unoriginal half baked pile of shit.

Re:Zune circa 2006 (4, Informative)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | about 2 years ago | (#41481409)

No, the point is that Microsoft has been thinking about the metro UI for a very long time. To say that they pilfered elements from this specific video in 2009 and then rushed to implement them into Windows 8 with absolutely zero evidence is pretty underhanded. Where are all the commentors on the Apple v. Samsung stories right about now, who profess that touch-based user interface interactions that are obvious should not be patented and freely copied?

I mean, it's pretty easy to tell "first time accepted submitter oso2k" (by the way oso2k, what exactly are we supposed to infer at 4:30 in Microsoft's video, which is a black screen with a copyright notice? Great job doing your job Slashdot editors) doesn't have much experience with Windows 8, as the similarities he or she draws between the two GUIs are tenuous at best. The whole point of this "con10uum" interface is a 1D window manager which arranges open windows in a line. You essentially pan back and forth in this window list and you can resize and reorder windows using multi touch gestures. This is nothing like Windows 8, which essentially allows you to only swipe through windows in order and place at most two side by side.

The only real similarity between the two GUIs is the existence of a global menu (not novel) an application specific menu (not novel) and a gesture to activate them (not novel). 10/GUI suggest this gesture is tapping on a specialized region separate from the touch screen, while Windows 8 uses a swipe in gesture from the edge of a touch screen. These are very different operations and require specialized algorithms and technology for each case (gesture recognition, edge to edge touch detection etc).

Re:Zune circa 2006 (1)

tjstork (137384) | about 2 years ago | (#41482107)

Well that and all the touch changes they made - with the WM_GESTURE stuff, has been around since Vista... how long ago was that?

Re:Zune circa 2006 (1)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | about 2 years ago | (#41484377)

Yep. Everything in Windows 8 is if anything pilfered from previous Microsoft products.

App Context menu a swipe from the bottom: WP7
Swapping between maximized windows: Alt+Tab
Global "Charms" menu: WP7 'sharing' menu/hardware search button.
Segoe Font: Media Center, WP7, Zune etc.
Live Tiles: WP7 and kind of Media Center and Zune HD before that.
Metro Design: Zune

WP7 was supposed to be out by October 2009 and was announced in early spring 2010 so unless Microsoft redesigned key parts of WP7 in a couple months right before announcing the project based on a web video that probably nobody saw... unlikely.

Re:Zune circa 2006 (1)

ameen.ross (2498000) | about 2 years ago | (#41486303)

Not that it is applicable in this case (not at all IMO), but using the arguments of patent trolls against them is a way to point out their hypocrisy.

Apple only has to convince a jury (1)

Dareth (47614) | about 2 years ago | (#41487815)

Apple only has to convince a jury. Then Microsoft will have "samsung" that same sad tune.

Re:Zune circa 2006 (3, Interesting)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | about 2 years ago | (#41484271)

You've only mentioned style and appearance. This is about the function of the UI.

Con10uum: Every window should be always open and you just scroll left to right between them. Dynamically scaling each window with pinch/zoom.
Windows 8: Only 1 or 2 apps should ever be open and you swap the one currently on the screen.
Functional comparison: Fingers are involved in both gestures. Functionally completely different windowing philosophy.

Con10uum: You should click a button off to the left side of the screen to bring up the app context menu.
Windows 8: You swipe from the bottom of the screen.
Functional comparison: Both acknowledge the fact that applications have menus and provide a means of accessing said menu.

Con10uum: You should click a button off to the right side of the screen to open the launcher.
Windows 8: You should swipe from the side of the screen to reveal an onscreen button to open the launcher. You also reveal global actions such as sharing or printing the current page.
Functional comparison: Both involve clicking on the right area of the screen. Seeing as there are only 3 usable sides to a touchscreen it's a stretch to say that this was a rip-off. Especially since Microsoft's explanation of "It's where your thumb is when you hold a tablet" is a perfectly good rationale and makes more sense than "because some web video that nobody saw put it there."
Con10uum has no equivalent to Microsoft's global sharing button. In Con10uum that would be part of the application's file menu and would be in a different menu.

Con10uum: Desktop widgets.
Windows 8: No desktop in Metro. The launcher icons though can display extended information.
Functional Comparison: Widgets have been around for decades. Every customized windows theme included an RSS/News widget on the desktop. It's just "what you do". But functionally a widget and a metro tile are completely different. A widget is an enhanced part of the desktop and was in Windows Vista as part of the OS for years before Con10uum. A tile though serves dual purposes as primarily an icon but a secondary duty as a widget.

Re:Zune circa 2006 (2)

metrometro (1092237) | about 2 years ago | (#41481219)

This. How about a post on the battery issue in the last OSX update? Or, failing that... news?

Re:Zune circa 2006 (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 2 years ago | (#41481243)

"Bob" called. He wants his house back

Re:Zune circa 2006 (1)

kiriath (2670145) | about 2 years ago | (#41481281)

Microsoft didn't switch the Xbox UI over to the metro style UI till late last year / early this year. Prior to that it looked less like metro and more like shelves at a video store.

Honestly the video seems a lot more like the Apple full screen app movement in OS X... sliding back and forth between apps with multitouch gestures.

Haters will hate, don't let them ruin your day...

Re:Zune circa 2006 (1)

Dahamma (304068) | about 2 years ago | (#41481297)

And Microsoft has already stated/admitted they borrowed major parts of the design language from the King Country Metro system maps in Seattle (hence the name Metro, get it?)

Hmm, maybe this developer DID THE SAME?

Re:Zune circa 2006 (1)

poity (465672) | about 2 years ago | (#41481443)

That's what I thought. I remember seeing this video back when the squircle Zunes were coming out, and Courier concept video had just been released a few months earlier. People's reaction to it was "yeah, I like it, but Courier is coming out man!" Ha! what a disappointment that was...

Re:Zune circa 2006 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481497)

Metro (Modern) is different than Zune.

Modern is just the front page, the tiles.

Zune is the GUI for application.

Modern is new idea from Microsoft, but it is clone for old GUI's and technics in totally different systems.

Slashdot comedy gold... (3, Funny)

mystikkman (1487801) | about 2 years ago | (#41481509)

Metro design elements date back to at least 2006 with the Zune and evolved in 2008 with the new Xbox 360 UI. The font Microsoft uses for Metro is Segoe and dates back to 2004. Seriously, I know Slashdot is anti MS, but this is just getting ridiculous... first a post about how only 25% of Windows 8 prefer the OS to other versions of Windows, when 74% of those polled say they never even used Windows 8, and now this?

If you want to see some Slashdot comedy gold, you should go back and read some of the past anti-Microsoft stories and comments on Slashdot.

For example take this one http://tech.slashdot.org/story/09/02/16/2259257/Draconian-DRM-Revealed-In-Windows-7 [slashdot.org]

If these kind of retarded stories were run on some other company, it would be called a FUD campaign secretly sponsored by some evil corp.

Re:Zune circa 2006 (1)

ninjacut (1938862) | about 2 years ago | (#41481707)

Yes, completely agree. Lack of objectivity and strong opinions without even using it in the first place is common on this forum

How many? (2, Funny)

sconeu (64226) | about 2 years ago | (#41480887)

"... how many UI ideas don't have more than one inventor?"

Anything "invented" by Apple. Duh! Just ask their legal team!

Re:How many? (1)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | about 2 years ago | (#41481123)

"Alan Kay is on line 2 for you..."

Re:How many? (1)

sconeu (64226) | about 2 years ago | (#41481231)

Whoosh. Please see Apple v. Samsung

Re:How many? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41483121)

The Alan Kay who used to work for Apple?

Re:How many? (1)

sconeu (64226) | about 2 years ago | (#41481257)

Offtopic? I quoted TFS for goodness sakes!!!!

Re:How many? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481483)

That is a good idea. From now on whenever I want to post an off topic rant I'll preface it with an unrelated quote from the summary.

Brilliant.

Re:How many? (2)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 2 years ago | (#41481815)

"... how many UI ideas don't have more than one inventor?"

Anything "invented" by Apple. Duh! Just ask their legal team!

Woz basically invented overlapping windows - he was puzzling over how the Alto did it, and worked out regions (patented Woz) for how to handle when windows overlapped each other. It wasn't until much later that the Alto guys admitted that they didn't allow overlapping windows.

After his plane crash (but before he had a chance to code it or patent it) the first thing Woz said to Jobs in the hospital was "Relax, I remember regions".

Re:How many? (1)

dysfunct (940221) | about 2 years ago | (#41486413)

I think you got this story a little mixed up [folklore.org]

Service Manuals Auto Repair (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41480935)

Service Manuals Auto Repair
http://www.bidapan.com

Happy to see non-stacking approaches get notice (2)

Ranguvar (1924024) | about 2 years ago | (#41481023)

This is actually an interesting concept.
As one who enjoys tiled window interfaces, I'd like to see more concepts that avoid the stacking window management we've had for so long.
I do think the model posed is a bit more restrictive than I'd like, though.

Is This Still True? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481089)

I thought we weren't supposed to call it "Metro" anymore. Is that still true?

Stupid jargon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481173)

Which is it? UI? UX? GUI?

Why do we need so many names for the same damn thing? It's not like we switched back to text mode and had to drop that "G".

Re:Stupid jargon (2, Interesting)

ShogunTux (1236014) | about 2 years ago | (#41482025)

They're not the same thing.

UI is user interface. This can be a CLI (command line interface), GUI, touchscreen, or really whatever sort of way in which you can think to interact with a computer. As such, conflating it to a GUI, a graphical user interface, is narrowing things down too much, since it's much more general by definition. Each different input method is then going to have different things in which it's good for or not good for, and will need to be taken into consideration when designing.

For instance, a CLI is going to almost always be the most powerful input method, although it suffers from low discoverability, since you need to learn some basic commands to interact with it first before you can become too proficient at it. And the best CLIs are going to be ones in which you can infinitely chain commands together and even string them out in its own programming interface, so that you can then set up a batch of jobs together with a few clicks of the keyboard. Heck, I'd even classify voice command interfaces as CLIs as well, like Dragon NaturalSpeaking or even Siri, since while they don't involve keyboards, they have the same strengths and weaknesses as user interfaces (although the voice input could be seen as a fuzzier input method, much like how touchscreens are to GUIs, since you lose a bit of precision in the interaction, due to voice recognition software having to figure out what you intend to say).

While for UX, that stands for user experience, which is a completely different concept entirely. UI only designates how someone interacts with a computer, while UX is more so about whether that interface is optimal for the task at hand, or even whether there's consistency between the user interface interaction. So in essence, the UI designates the what, but the UX is how.

For instance, let's focus on using a touchscreen interface, which is one GUI implementation, and compare it to a mouse input. For starters, a touchscreen is never going to be a precision interaction method, because while you might be able to increase the screen size, you'll never match a mouse without lowering the DPI of the screen drastically, which then makes interaction a bit clumsier. Likewise, a mouse is going to be confined to a single input, while a touchscreen doesn't have to be, but can take in multiple inputs simultaneously, and as such, the mouse will never be able to quite match a touchscreen on this front. As such, while they both do represent graphical user interfaces, they do not share the same user experience, which is part of the reason why you hear complaints from people who don't like having to use one for a desktop, because forcing one UI for both then requires that in order to not completely suck on one input method, it needs to make compromises in the other.

Of course, there are some people who seem to believe that designing for the fuzzier interface while providing ways of doing tasks with single inputs will automatically make it optimal for both (I'm looking at you GNOME 3 and Windows 8), but this is sheer lunacy. Much like a CLI interface is not the most optimal for all cases (e.g. graphical manipulation), despite being the more powerful alternative, a touchscreen is not going to be a replacement for the old tried and true mouse and keyboard, which then allows for you to cram and browse through more information on one screen than a touch interface would, since a touch interface can't handle as much precision as the mouse can, and needs to be fuzzier by default in order to be useful.

So perhaps you might not care about all of this, since it does at least appear like you aren't within the industry since you dismissed all of this as being names for the same things, but at least you've had a brief 101 excerpt of HCI (human computer interaction), and can't claim ignorance to these terms as a defense any more. Because surely you likewise wouldn't say "CPU? GPU? RAM? Why do we need so many names for the same damn thing? It's not like we're using desktops anymore, so what difference does the C or G make."

Wait a minute (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481209)

While it looks cool and all lets consider this for a minute. Mouse one point, hand 10 points? Wrong! mouse and keyboard 3+3 and one pointer. But wait the 3 keyboard say shift alt ctrl and 3 mouse can be differentiated! that means 6+6 combos fro touch for total of 12 different interaction modes that too can be combined for 1*2*3*4*5*6 = 720 combos. so ten gui has what 2*(3+3 pinch) plus 2 pointing areas gee.. doesn't sound so great now does it. granted the FIRST pointer of the flour sliders makes sense tough realistically only 3 sliders possible little finger doesn't have so good manual control... And they are neglecting the tactile feedback and the thumb. Then theres the 2 pointers how often do you actually draw with your other hand? Maybe roll the paer etc but hell the keyboard could sense this by sliding against the lower rail.

So no not better just different. Basically until they develop the tactile feedback pixel they will suck.

Silly question... (1)

osu-neko (2604) | about 2 years ago | (#41481333)

The last time anything in history had a single inventor... well, is unknown. If it ever happened, it happened during prehistoric times.

Re:Silly question... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#41482075)

I take it you've never heard of Eli Whitney [wikipedia.org] , Ben Franklin [wikipedia.org] , or Charles Babbage? [wikipedia.org]

Re:Silly question... (2)

tragedy (27079) | about 2 years ago | (#41482637)

Well, let me reply to this with Eli Whitney [wikipedia.org] , Ben Franklin [wikipedia.org] , and Charles Babbage [wikipedia.org] . Those first two links are to the same articles you linked to, just specific sections. The first one talks about all the previous versions of the cotton gin and then about Eli Whitney's version and competing claims to the invention. The second talks about Benjamin Franklin inventing the lightning rod in the Americas in 1749, then goes on to talk about previous lightning rods from thousands of years before that. The third link isn't a link to the same article, but is directly linked to from the article you linked to. It talks about all the previous inventions and ideas that pre-dated Babbage's work. Now, none of those people ever actually managed to build one, but neither did Babbage.

Now, all of those people are important inventors, but none of them are examples of single inventors who didn't draw from other sources.

Re:Silly question... (1)

narcc (412956) | about 2 years ago | (#41482775)

All three of your inventors built on existing technology.

Babbage didn't invent the cam/ratchet/gear/etc., the logic behind the operations either the difference engine or the analytical engine, nor did he conceive the concept of a mechanical computing device.

Whitney didn't invent the concept of interchangeable parts nor invented all or even a majority of the constituent components of the cotton gin -- even the main unit that separates the cotton from the seeds is alleged to have been inspired by an overly ambitious cat.

Pick anything from Franklin and I'll tell you why he didn't invent it completely on his own.

Re:Silly question... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#41486931)

A thing is more than the sum of its parts.

Re:Silly question... (1)

narcc (412956) | about 2 years ago | (#41491739)

True enough, but that misses the point: they built on the work of others.

Re:Silly question... (1)

tragedy (27079) | about 2 years ago | (#41510693)

Even if a thing is more than the sum of its parts, a lightning rod invented thousands of years ago trumps invention a few hundred years ago.

Tap = Click (1)

meerling (1487879) | about 2 years ago | (#41481361)

"left tap for the app context menu, right tap for the system context menu"
So just like Left Click and Right Click then.
Except with a finger instead of a mouse button...

Actually, they do... (1)

tilante (2547392) | about 2 years ago | (#41481375)

All decent UI ideas were already done by Douglas Englebart.

You'll have to pardon me, though, I don't have time to elaborate -- speaking His name reminds me that I have to go dust the shrine and do my ritual obeisance again.

(To meet Poe's law requirements: :-) )

Really? (1)

Murdoch5 (1563847) | about 2 years ago | (#41481407)

The article calls out TUI's ( text based interfaces ) and then claims that the GUI is the ultimate replacement. Based off the introduction the article was written by someone with a mild amount of computer literacy. In many cases a properly designed TUI will destroy a GUI any day of the week all day long. The GUI has it's place but so does the TUI, anyone who disregards either has no right to write technical reviews.

If only windows 8 UI was this good.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481463)

Its a shame they didnt use this idea in its totality, a lot of people would be much happier with windows 8 I would think.

2009 demo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41481487)

If they had watched the right demo Metro would have had 7800 PHONG polys.

Evolutionary not revolutionary! (1)

uslurper (459546) | about 2 years ago | (#41481811)

This is evolutionary not revolutionary. Aspects that were designed for one platform are moving to another. Big deal. The Dinosaurs are not inheriting the earth.

There is an obvious explanation for this (1)

dgharmon (2564621) | about 2 years ago | (#41481841)

It's obvious Miller went forward in time and stole Microsoft's innovations ..

Zune was around in 2006 (1, Informative)

Blakey Rat (99501) | about 2 years ago | (#41482051)

Zune was around in 2006, and Metro is obviously just an evolution of the ideas in Zune. So no, Microsoft didn't steal anything from a 2009 video, and Slashdot editors are idiots for posting this without even doing the most cursory examination of the claim.

Re:Zune was around in 2006 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41482357)

... and Slashdot editors are idiots for posting this without even doing the most cursory examination of the claim.

Posted by timothy...

enough said

Re:Zune was around in 2006 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41483069)

You're clearly a troll or a still for Microsoft. Don't blame Slashdot for reporting on what some else said. Blame the correcr person, the source; if you disagree. You're the idiot, I hope you know that.

Metro is from Windows Media Center (1)

nitzmahone (164842) | about 2 years ago | (#41482327)

Nice thought, but a majority of the Metro UI has been around since at least 2007 on Windows Media Center/Vista (including the fonts, a proto-version of the tiles, and many other familiar elements).

looks like Palm's WebOS deck (1)

nazsco (695026) | about 2 years ago | (#41482457)

the demo is exactly like webOS.... except in webOS it looks good, and is useful.

the demo fells kinda retarted showing the side apps instead of giving the full screen to the app... also, dragging in from the bottom of the screen to enter "window selection mode" instead of dozen fingers gesture...

BORING ! (1)

Darkling-MHCN (222524) | about 2 years ago | (#41484917)

Who copied who arguments....

Really how boring is this argument?

People have ideas, ideas that are derivatives of other ideas. When it comes to user interface design these ideas have to be derivative as otherwise people wouldn't find them intuitive, communication is all about expressing things in terms people understand, e.g. alphabets, left to right writing systems, touch, gestures.

You change the paradigm too much and no one will understand it, this doesn't leave a whole lot of options, repetition in amongst people trying to create an incremental shift in a communication paradigm is going to happen all the time, we should just get use to this and stop being surprised/suspicious of plagiary whenever two things like this look remarkably similar.

The metro UI comes from the Zune UI called 'metro' (0)

Captain.Abrecan (1926372) | about 2 years ago | (#41486657)

This is bullshit. The metro UI comes from the Zune, and everyone knows it. They have known it for years. How the hell does this crap get posted as an article? I demand the fucking idiot who did it step forward and atone for his sins.
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