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Slackware 14.0 Arrives

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the significant-digits dept.

Operating Systems 183

First time accepted submitter SgtKeeling writes "After 5 release candidates, a new version of Slackware has been released. From the website: 'Yes, it is that time again! After well over a year of planning, development, and testing, the Slackware Linux Project is proud to announce the latest stable release of the longest running distribution of the Linux operating system, Slackware version 14.0! We are sure you'll enjoy the many improvements. We've done our best to bring the latest technology to Slackware while still maintaining the stability and security that you have come to expect. Slackware is well known for its simplicity and the fact that we try to bring software to you in the condition that the authors intended. We will be setting up BitTorrent downloads for the official ISO images. Stay tuned to http://slackware.com/ for the latest updates.'"

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183 comments

slackware (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41495603)

...more like snackware.

Torrents are up now (5, Informative)

SgtKeeling (717065) | about 2 years ago | (#41495615)

Torrent files are now available here: http://www.slackware.com/getslack/torrents.php [slackware.com]

Re:Torrents are up now (1, Informative)

staticsafe (1756212) | about 2 years ago | (#41495651)

Torrent files are now available here: http://www.slackware.com/getslack/torrents.php [slackware.com]

Thanks, put both 32 and 64 bit DVD ISOs up to seed on the 100mbit box.

Re:Torrents are up now (5, Funny)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 2 years ago | (#41495883)

Shhh, don't tell Google. Their bots will block it.

Re:Torrents are up now (4, Funny)

epyT-R (613989) | about 2 years ago | (#41495717)

torrents? you filthy pirate!

Re:Torrents are up now (5, Funny)

fibonacci8 (260615) | about 2 years ago | (#41495831)

The trouble with torrents for Slackware is having to switch floppies so often.

Re:Torrents are up now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496367)

Soooooooooooooooo many floppies.

Re:Torrents are up now (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496517)

According to my math, the 2410528768 B install disk for the 64-bit version would take 1654 floppy disks.

Re:Torrents are up now (2)

Cinder6 (894572) | about 2 years ago | (#41496727)

According to my math, the 2410528768 B install disk for the 64-bit version would take 1654 floppy disks.

So, things haven't changed much, despite the intervening years...

Re:Torrents are up now (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496581)

This is was SO much easier to download and install... I remember the nightmare that was installing Slackware 1.0 RC 2, and how sore my fingers were afterwards...

"Okay, let's see... I have to start with the boot loader... dit dit dah dit dah dah dit dit dah dit dit dah dah...

Aw crap! That last dah was supposed to be a dit! Ah well, guess I'll start over...

By the time I got it all keyed in and running, Slackware 2.1 was released, and I felt like a fool for wasting all that time installing V1. I know when they went away from punched cards to paper tape for 3.0 it made everybody's lives SO much better. Paper tape is like, WAY faster. The transition to a stack of 25 single sided, single density 180kB, 5.25" floppy disks was mind blowing, and helped gather many fans to Slackware at its pivotal 4.0 release.

Here's to you, Pat!

Re:Torrents are up now (4, Funny)

legojenn (462946) | about 2 years ago | (#41495915)

Thanks but I won't bother. I'll just find my 2000-era CDs of Slackware 7 and install it twice.

As long as Slackware keeps being released... (5, Interesting)

Mr Foobar (11230) | about 2 years ago | (#41495637)

Then I know all is well with the world.

Thank you, Patrick!

Installing the new version... (1)

Empiric (675968) | about 2 years ago | (#41495673)

Can I still use my "boot" and "root" floppies...?

Though I've moved... not "up", really, but more "over" to Ubuntu, you're the source of many fond memories.

Here's to hopefully many more fine releases to come. And, to be clear, I switched to another distro about the same time Patrick announced his intended "retirement", so it wasn't due to a lack of well-earned loyalty...

Re:Installing the new version... (5, Interesting)

yellowcord (607995) | about 2 years ago | (#41495721)

You can still install via floppies... In fact looking at the FAQ page it looks like they haven't changed anything in the 16 years since my first install of Slackware. You can install through serial if your heart so desires.

Re:Installing the new version... (4, Interesting)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#41495967)

You can still install via floppies

LOL, I wonder just how many of us have installed it from floppies?

It's only within the last 3-5 years that I threw out the 100 or so Slackware floppies from the very first time I installed Linux way back in '92 or '93 -- a 0.99a kernel, a huge pile of floppies, and the best fun to be had at the time.

Ah ... installing Slackware with X-windows onto a 486-DX33 with 8MB of RAM and 320MB HDD. Good times that was.

Xv for porn^H^H^H^Himages, slip to multi-task on a dialup connection, xdvi to preview output from LaTeX, gcc for coding, netscape for the few wbe sites that existed, usenet, ftp, and all the goodies to go along with it. I still remember the sheer awesome of having that environment.

At one point, my computer had more CPU and RAM than the Sun workstations my friend could access at school ... of course, we had it tough, we only had VT100 access to old VAXen and printers with green-bar paper. And the DOS/Windows machines of the day were largely useless and crashy.

The fact that everything is now mostly three orders of magnitude bigger is kind of amusing in retrospect. But at the time, it was some pretty cool stuff.

Knowing UNIX and C got me my first job out of school. I may need to spool up a VM to put this on, my Ubuntu box is getting a little creaky and I've been hearing some things that make me want to find another distro anyway.

Re:Installing the new version... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41495999)

Oh lordy, I'm getting the shakes over here.

I recall all the time spent swapping floppies and trying to get a dial-up connection working. If I remember correctly, I was kicking around with Red Hat at the time too (this was before fedora, I'm sure). Even when they did release cd images, you couldn't reliably boot from CD, depending on the machine's bios.

Fun stuff. Well, not really... more like war stories.

Re:Installing the new version... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41496031)

I managed the A, N, and D sets and most of X in 120 MB (8MB of which was swap!) on a 386DX25 with 8MB RAM :)

Re:Installing the new version... (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 2 years ago | (#41496309)

386-16, 4MB of RAM

I win !

Since we're sharing Slack stories (5, Interesting)

Weaselmancer (533834) | about 2 years ago | (#41496337)

A friend of mine in college gave me my first slack. He built his own computer (very cutting-edge in those days) 486-33. Got slack running on it. And used it for one of the greatest pranks I've ever seen.

Two other friends of ours were roommates. One worked day shift, the other worked night shift. The only communication they had for months on end was a chessboard. First roomie was a chess nut, and quite a good player. Second roomie wasn't so great.

So the Slackbox was devoted to running Gnuchess turned up to max. It would take 10 hours to compute a move. Second roomie would call Slackbox, get his move, and go to work. When he would come home from work he would dial up Slackbox and input First roomie's move.

This went on for months. First roomie had no idea how he was getting his ass handed to him. Was a great laugh when everyone came clean about the prank.

Re:Installing the new version... (1)

jbolden (176878) | about 2 years ago | (#41496471)

I never did a fully Linux install from floppies but I did use distributions like Debian which required floppy boot. So you got the CD and that contained disk images you had to burn to 2 floppies to get the kernel booted enough to install the rest from CD.

Re:Installing the new version... (3, Funny)

fm6 (162816) | about 2 years ago | (#41496409)

The FAQ page also notes that Slackware is Y2K compliant. Good to know, just in case time ever starts moving backwards.

Re:Installing the new version... (1)

Cinder6 (894572) | about 2 years ago | (#41496755)

Who really knows what will really happen when we hit December 21 this year?

Re:Installing the new version... (4, Funny)

fm6 (162816) | about 2 years ago | (#41496941)

So you're saying that Slackware is Mayan Calendar Rollover compliant?

Re:Installing the new version... (1)

GaryOlson (737642) | about 2 years ago | (#41496555)

You can still install via floppies...

I installed OS/2 first, pulled the distro from a BBS, then installed Slackware from boot floppies and the FAT partition where I downloaded the distro. If I remember correctly, this required significantly fewer floppies. And the 9600 baud modem could spend all night pulling down the distro for the next morning.

What a nightmare

Re:Installing the new version... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496925)

No, you can't. The linux kernel will no longer fit on a floppy with the rest of /boot. If you want to install from physical media, you must use an optical disk or a usb drive. Failing that, PXE.

Re:Installing the new version... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41495751)

Patrick never suggested he was retiring. When he was sick, he maintained the distro best he could, until he went to the hospital, and then he let trusted individuals do security releases. This is when the announcement came.

Although I do admit, at the time it did not look good, and it could have meant he had to let the project go. But the guy did all he could to pull through it quickly. The project has continued to excel since then.

Re:Installing the new version... (1)

spauldo (118058) | about 2 years ago | (#41496135)

I switched because I got sick of waiting on glibc. Once Slack 7 came out, Debian's package management had me hooked. Something about Slack 7 just never felt right to me - I was too used to 3.x.

(Of course, back then I was downloading and compiling the X and GNOME source about once a month, but at least I didn't have to worry about the main system).

Sing it (5, Funny)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | about 2 years ago | (#41495687)

For slack's a jolly good distro...

For slack's a jolly good distro...

For slack's a jolly good diiiiistrooo...

Which nobody can deny!

Wh00t Ch00 Ch00 (1)

NSN A392-99-964-5927 (1559367) | about 2 years ago | (#41495711)

I love slack; but there again my favorites are Slack, Debian, NetBSD, FreeBSD

Very Disappointed! (5, Funny)

AntEater (16627) | about 2 years ago | (#41495725)

I downloaded and installed it onto my system from DVD. The system booted up. It found my network card and configured itself via DHCP. I didn't edit xorg.conf but startx loaded up the KDE desktop using the full resolution of my monitor. Plugged in a USB stick and it opened up a file manager with it's contents loaded. I used the system for quite a while and I only had to fire up the terminal to edit /etc/inittab to change the default runlevel to 4 so KDM would load at boot time. Fully an hour into this and I only had to edit one text file?!? What is this? I wanted Slackware, not Yoobuntoo or some other watered down, hand-holding, pick-out-my-clothes-for-me distro! Where's the pain? Where's the challenge? How can I project my true alpha-geek status by casually mentioning that I run Slackware if it's going to be this easy?? If this keeps up I'm going to have to switch to one of the BSDs or Linux from scratch. With my luck, they'll probably automate that process with shell scripts or something as well.

BSD (2)

nurb432 (527695) | about 2 years ago | (#41495761)

Hate to break it to you but us in the BSD camp haven't been hand editing much lately either to get the basics going. I haven't edited a xorg.conf in years, or ttys to get x/kdm to run..

Many ports even add themselves to rc.conf to auto start....

Re:BSD (1)

NSN A392-99-964-5927 (1559367) | about 2 years ago | (#41495865)

Hate to break it to you but us in the BSD camp haven't been hand editing much lately either to get the basics going. I haven't edited a xorg.conf in years, or ttys to get x/kdm to run..

Many ports even add themselves to rc.conf to auto start....

Leave those Gentoo stealing BSD ports alone.

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 2 years ago | (#41495773)

Download the source and compile from scratch...

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

John Bokma (834313) | about 2 years ago | (#41496087)

Guess (again) what "Linux from scratch" means....

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

snikulin (889460) | about 2 years ago | (#41496159)

Then do it again, in Cygwin.!

I successfully did it (CLFS x86), BTW.
The trick is to switch NTFS into case sensitive mode and be patient during all the ./configure scripts (cygwin's fork is like molasses).

Re:Very Disappointed! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496495)

To install Linux from scratch, you must first install the universe...

Re:Very Disappointed! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41495779)

All jokes aside automated Linux from scratch has been around for years...

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 2 years ago | (#41495787)

Bummer, I guess the *nix hipsters will have to migrate to BSD.

Re:Very Disappointed! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41495875)

Nah, I migrated to OS X instead but I guess that's sort of BSDish.

Re:Very Disappointed! (2, Interesting)

AntEater (16627) | about 2 years ago | (#41496035)

The funny thing here is that I'm actually in the process of replacing my iMac with a Slackware system. Is that ironic enough for a hipster?

Re:Very Disappointed! (4, Funny)

diego.viola (1104521) | about 2 years ago | (#41495835)

If you want pain go and use Windows.

Re:Very Disappointed! (4, Interesting)

ThePeices (635180) | about 2 years ago | (#41495953)

If you want pain go and use Windows.

Yeah im using Win7 and the pain is unbearable. Im constantly having to....umm...well, ill think of it later im sure.

Oh yeah and then it is a right pain in the arse having to constantly put up with ...umm....well actually, nothing yet.

hmm having to think hard here...oh yeah, It runs so poorly on all of my ....actually, no it runs fast.

umm....Out of the box after a fresh install i have to always...actually do nothing, it just...umm...works.

and then theres all the obscure configuration of......errr.....well, nothing, it just works...again.

Sorry OP im having a hard time here, what was your point again?

Re:Very Disappointed! (5, Funny)

AntEater (16627) | about 2 years ago | (#41496029)

If you want pain go and use Windows.

Sorry OP im having a hard time here, what was your point again?

The point is that using Windows is painful. Your post reminded me of this thing I read about... I think it was called Stockholdm syndrome.

Re:Very Disappointed! (1, Troll)

diego.viola (1104521) | about 2 years ago | (#41496075)

Yeah, well, tell me how it goes again when Windows 8 comes out and annoys all the non-tech savvy peole (read: your 60 years old grandparents, etc).

I want to see people saying that Windows isn't a PITA when that happens.

I'll give you some tips:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4boTbv9_nU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyc1RVCXvAk

Re:Very Disappointed! (3, Funny)

Jaktar (975138) | about 2 years ago | (#41496199)

The people who have problems with Win8 are the same people that have 12:00 flashing on every digital device they own.

Re:Very Disappointed! (2)

diego.viola (1104521) | about 2 years ago | (#41496257)

Not everyone is a computer geek/nerd and have the same inclinations or priorities that you do. Surpise.

Re:Very Disappointed! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496335)

Of course. And they then have problems with Win8 and have 12:00 flashing on every digital device they own. Your point?

Re:Very Disappointed! (1, Troll)

diego.viola (1104521) | about 2 years ago | (#41496653)

My point is that Windows 8 will be a disaster, and it'll be painful for the non-tech savvy crowd.

Re:Very Disappointed! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496725)

Then what the fuck are they doing on slashdot?!?!?!

Re:Very Disappointed! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496789)

The people who have problems with Win8 are the same people that have 12:00 flashing on every digital device they own.

Everybody?

Re:Very Disappointed! (1, Troll)

rubycodez (864176) | about 2 years ago | (#41496505)

And then the rug gets pulled out from you with windows 8 which is crapware, just like Vista was. with linux if I find I don't like the UI in latest version of my distro I can change it with a single command. And of course Microsot sells variously crippled versions of Windows, from Starter to Home to Premium to Enterprise to Ultimate......changing my Linux from a "starter" to an Ultmate is just loading packages. software updates never take control and tell me they will reboot in 5 minutes. there is no activation process or Genuine Advantage check if I change my machine in a major way. Everythiing I need to do is covered by 25,000+ available packages.

Re:Very Disappointed! (4, Informative)

fredgiblet (1063752) | about 2 years ago | (#41495871)

Install Gentoo

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

DecimalMan (2705599) | about 2 years ago | (#41496541)

Gentoo may well be the last bastion of mandatory text editing. Hopefully they never aim for "elegant" package management, because the current way is great. And so help me, if I can update Qt painlessly, I'm switching to LFS.

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

corychristison (951993) | about 2 years ago | (#41496651)

+1. Install gentoo if you want to edit files and play with the terminal.

I think there is a GUI installer on the LiveDVD :-/. Download the minimal CD instead (also works as a pretty competent rescue disc if you don't have SystemRescueCD kicking around).

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

corychristison (951993) | about 2 years ago | (#41496691)

I lied... Gentoo minimal CD is only ~150MB depending on architecture.

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

MrDoh! (71235) | about 2 years ago | (#41496173)

Ha! Someone who's used Slackware a lot before I can see!

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

cykros (2538372) | about 2 years ago | (#41496389)

Err, it's SLACKware. The idea has ALWAYS been that it was to be user-friendly, and not involve unnecessary work. They just never joined the camp that decided to mangle a good vanilla Linux install with all sorts of upstream changes.

If you really want l33t points, for every package you want to install, write your own slackbuild script. For those more geared toward efficiency, however, there's checkinstall.

Oh, and of course, in the meantime, I wouldn't worry too much about not seeming l33t by using slackware. That it's an ncurses based installation process is l33t enough to frighten off most noobs these days, who've been spoiled by GUI livecd's with a single-click to "install". Arch seems to be the only other mainstream distro whose primary installation method is non-GUI...even Gentoo has a livecd these days.

Re:Very Disappointed! (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 2 years ago | (#41496603)

If this keeps up I'm going to have to switch to one of the BSDs or Linux from scratch.

That's nothing; you should try playing FarmVille with Lynx.

Network Manager (1)

armanox (826486) | about 2 years ago | (#41495951)

I was surprised to see Network Manager added to Slackware. I think I might be moving my laptop back to Slackware.

Re:Network Manager (1)

UnresolvedExternal (665288) | about 2 years ago | (#41495995)

Hmm - not too sure I will take the plunge - might just run it as a virtual machine on my OS/2 Warp box

I like slackware because (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496013)

It's version numbers are not increasing as fast as the national debt.

you know were fucked right?

Pat and Slackware (5, Insightful)

IceNinjaNine (2026774) | about 2 years ago | (#41496015)

My system at work: Redhat Enterprise 6.

My primary system at home for the last sixteen years: Slackware.

If you use it, and you love it, please buy a DVD or contribute if you can. I do.

Remember, Patrick isn't some big conglomerate screwing everybody out of money; he's just a good guy putting out an old school yet quality distro and trying to make a living. He's got a family too.

Re:Pat and Slackware (1)

fm6 (162816) | about 2 years ago | (#41496417)

So, why do you love it?

Re:Pat and Slackware (3, Funny)

FrankDrebin (238464) | about 2 years ago | (#41496473)

My primary system at home for the last sixteen years: Slackware.

All that and a /. id in the 2 millions. Presumably Slackware just got internet support.

WTF again, slashdot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496027)

You may like to read:Torvalds Uses Profanity To Lambaste Romney Remarks

/.how is this relevant to this story? Oh, yeah. your on your way to corporate insignificance/.?

The Only Distro (2)

apharmdq (219181) | about 2 years ago | (#41496053)

I've been waiting for this one for a while. Running Slack on my PC, my netbook, and my 10 year old laptop. I even managed to sneak it onto my work computer! Here's hoping Slackware keeps going for a long time . . .

Why Slackware? (3, Interesting)

JOrgePeixoto (853808) | about 2 years ago | (#41496067)

What advantage does Slackware have that makes up for its inconveniences?

Re:Why Slackware? (4, Informative)

MrDoh! (71235) | about 2 years ago | (#41496167)

Good question. For me, purity, everything being in the 'right' place. After using SCO Unix for so many years (pre-crazyness), slackware felt right. The install was the same, it put things pretty much in the same place, tons of scripts/code I had just worked right off, and when they didn't, it was intuitive to fix. Also used to keep up to date with linux kernels more actively than others (probably because it assumed it's users were more techy and wouldn't have a problem editing what's needed). As to why to use it today compared to more friendly distros? Hmm, tough call. I'm not aware of anything it does that others don't do these days (though it's been a few years since I've used it in anger, probably a VM laying around somewhere with it). I'll download it, set it up in a VM (always useful to have for various reasons), and get back to the thread!

Re:Why Slackware? (5, Insightful)

Seeteufel (1736784) | about 2 years ago | (#41496181)

Tradition, Slackware is the real thing. Nostalgic. It is the oldest distribution out there. It is ported to S/390. It follows the unix principles.

Re:Why Slackware? (2)

fm6 (162816) | about 2 years ago | (#41496425)

So, you like it because of EBCDIC support?

Re:Why Slackware? (2)

ArchieBunker (132337) | about 2 years ago | (#41496339)

Because its more of a barebones distro. You add only the parts you need and maybe learn a bit in the process as well. Today I don't think you could even begin to configure Ubuntu using only a text editor. On a normal day do you even use 10% of the bundled programs on Ubuntu?

Re:Why Slackware? (2)

JOrgePeixoto (853808) | about 2 years ago | (#41496385)

Because its more of a barebones distro. You add only the parts you need and maybe learn a bit in the process as well. Today I don't think you could even begin to configure Ubuntu using only a text editor. On a normal day do you even use 10% of the bundled programs on Ubuntu?

Some bloat is the price for ease to use. And think Ubuntu runs fine even on lousy hardware (not counting very old hardware, but then you have Xubuntu or Lubuntu).

I used to run Gentoo myself, for the fun and the speed-freakery (although throughput was nothing special; only boot time and load times were smaller than a normal distribution). But then I decided to go back to Ubuntu, to help it achieve critical mass.

The Linux market is already very small, and fragmentation makes it worse.

Re:Why Slackware? (4, Insightful)

jbolden (176878) | about 2 years ago | (#41496489)

Well Slackware was in the 2nd generation of distributions before even Debian and RedHat baed on SLS. So an Ubuntu user can't really complain about Slackware causing fragmentation.

Re:Why Slackware? (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | about 2 years ago | (#41496807)

debootstrap won't even install a kernel until it ask it to. That's pretty bare bones.

Re:Why Slackware? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41496935)

And debootstrap is how I tend to install Ubuntu...

Re:Why Slackware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496373)

Stability. Not stability of the applications, that should be more or less the same as elsewhere unless you choose to run alpha software. The distribution simply does not change much from release to release. Do an upgrade once every year or two, find out nothing really changed, then just use it as before. Sometimes you'll wonder why you bothered to update at all. Of course, you get newer versions of libraries and compilers which you'll need eventually.

(Speaking as an XFCE user. GNOME users and KDE users saw some excitement in the last decade.)

You're cooler than every other Linux user. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496455)

What advantage does Slackware have that makes up for its inconveniences?

By using Slackware, you'd be the coolest and toughest Linux user at your local LUG. When you walk in, you hear wispers, "He uses Slackware - and INSTALLS it!"

*GASPS*

You're so cool, when there's a problem with a Linux box, you walk over, and just hit with your fist and it works! Like Fonzi on the old Happy Days tv show!

"Ayyyyyyyyyy!"

The other LUG members try to be cool too, but they fail. While they're arguing about their desktop, you sniff and just say, "Bare XFree for me!"

*more gasps*

You them put your collar on your leather jacket up, go to your bike, kick start it, put a chick on the back, and say "later nerds!" and off you go.

Re:Why Slackware? (1)

DecimalMan (2705599) | about 2 years ago | (#41496521)

It doesn't suck. How many other distros can that be said of?

Expecting the user to know what they're doing doesn't make it inconvenient. My experience with Slack has been that if you know what's going on, it's easier to manage than anything else out there.

Re:Why Slackware? (5, Informative)

apharmdq (219181) | about 2 years ago | (#41496543)

The Slackware documentation has a summary on what makes it stand out:
http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:philosophy [slackware.com]

In other words, it really doesn't have a lot of inconveniences after all. I think the biggest reason I moved to Slackware in the first place was the glut of dependencies that were installed whenever I installed a package in Ubuntu. With Slackware, you start out with a good portion of the packages you need, and manage the rest when you do third party installs. And while that may seem challenging, it ends up being fairly easy, since once you have your install set up and customized the way you like it, you can run it for years without having to make any drastic changes.

Also, the packages are all plain vanilla software, with very few distro-specific patches. While this tends to make the distribution seem less "uniform" out of the box, you also end up with more stability.

Full version upgrades also tend to be easier and more stable overall. Granted there's more work done under the hood, and there's always a chance you can mess up, but I've found that every time I've made a mistake, I've been able to rectify it using some simple method.

And that brings about the most important aspect of Slackware. It's the distro that puts you the closest to working with Linux, without having to delve through layers of "convenience" UI. It may seem harder at first, but after a bit of learning, you'll know Linux better than just about any other distro. (Excluding Linux from Scratch.)

That said, Slackware isn't for everyone. If you just want a distribution that takes the minimum effort to get going, you're probably better off with some of the other big names. But if you have the time and a bit of spare hard drive space, I recommend giving it a try nonetheless. Just be patient.

Re:Why Slackware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496565)

The satisfaction of accomplishment.

resolv.conf (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496743)

It allows easy management of your DNS settings by editing /etc/resolv.conf. *buntu has replaced that with a mess.

Re:Why Slackware? (2)

echogen (1166581) | about 2 years ago | (#41496873)

What advantage does Slackware have that makes up for its inconveniences?

A motorcycle has loads of features not available in a bicycle, yet many of us would choose to buy a bicycle.

I'm happy to see you alive and well... (5, Funny)

VXneko (682884) | about 2 years ago | (#41496085)

I'm sorry I left you for that whore Redhat but she was much easier (she came with the book). I went around the block a few times and am happy with Arch now... I'm sure you wanted to know that. I still think of you and your floppies from time to time...

ahh slackware... (4, Interesting)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#41496165)

at one point I was left with a shitty old laptop, no cd drive, a hard disk with the slackware files on a dos partition, and a copy of "running linux". I learned a LOT over the next few weeks

and would not want to do it again ... but totally suggest that anyone interested in linux does it at least once.

I hate the semantic desktop. (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496323)

I lost my taste for Slackware when they bundled Nepomuk and that other hard drive space hogging semantic desktop application with the stock distribution. My setup requires hundreds of users with all their files on an NFS mount. Yes, I know, terabyte drives are very cheap nowadays but there was a reason I liked the old Slackware: efficiency, control, simple hardware requirements, ease of programming. If Slackware insists I need the latest, fastest and largest server so I can have a semantic desktop then I say, goodbye. I might as well go for a distribution with great package management.

Re:I hate the semantic desktop. (4, Informative)

apharmdq (219181) | about 2 years ago | (#41496461)

This only matters if you use KDE. (In which case you're going to get Nepomuk no matter what distro you use.) Also, Nepomuk is easy enough to disable,
If you prefer not to use KDE, Slackware comes with several other DEs and WMs, like XFCE and Fluxbox, out of the box. In fact, you don't even need to install KDE when you install Slackware. And if you're a Gnome user, there are several Gnome slackbuilds available. This is really a non-issue.

Keep on Slackin' (1)

Indigo (2453) | about 2 years ago | (#41496371)

Congratulations Patrick and crew on another fine release of my first and still favorite Linux distro. Thanks to you guys I never lack Slack. Proud user since... ehmm... 1995... ish.

Just a little FYI (1)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | about 2 years ago | (#41496379)

Slackware is the only distro that supports my HP NetServer [oneeyedman.net] . It may seem trivial, but there is an "old driver" and a "new driver" for the drive controller, and the new one doesn't work. Slackware is the only distro I have found that can boot the "old" (functional) driver. It saves me multitudes of issues

re (-1)

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Ah the joys (3, Interesting)

santax (1541065) | about 2 years ago | (#41496419)

Slackware, you came on a more floppies than wing commander 2 did. And those where a lot of single sided floppies... I liked you, didn't understand much of you but I was young. You thought me well. Then I got a job working for SuSE and so I switched. During me work I discovered that apt-get was a little better than yast. So I switched to Debian. I went on to other employers, sometimes forcing me to use Windows. I still love Debian and use it, but I am typing this on Windows. Because I played a game before checking slashdot. Slackware, you thought me. You got me fired up for linux. And despite being a Debian-man now, I still think about you every so often. I hope you will see version 20. But please, on less floppies.

Re:Ah the joys (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496765)

So Yoda was Irish afterall... and he uses Debian now.

LILO vs GRUB2 (1)

somethingtoremember (1530149) | about 2 years ago | (#41496477)

Does anybody know what inspired the architectural choice of LILO as a bootloader as opposed to GRUB2, in a nutshell?

I am neutral as far as any political choice between my two favorite bootloader candidates are concerned, but I am a little weary of a bootloader I haven't elected to use within the past 4 years.

Should I be afraid of LILO?

Re:LILO vs GRUB2 (2)

apharmdq (219181) | about 2 years ago | (#41496575)

Lilo tends to be easier to get working with less effort. It's simple and does its job well, which follows the concept of using a Unix style environment. I've also found that saving your system from a disaster tends to take less fiddling when using Lilo. The configuration is very straightforward.
However, there are some things that Grub2 can do that Lilo can't. Fancier boot screens, more advanced command line arguments, etc. But if you aren't using those in the first place, then there's really no reason to use Grub2.
That said, Slackware does come with Grub2 in the extra packages directory of the install cd, so it's easy enough to use instead of Lilo.

Installation Disc Size (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496625)

I noticed the size of the DVD disc image has been chopped in half, from ~4GB to about 2.3GB. Anyone know what happened? Did a bunch of packages get removed from the installation disc? A switch to a much better compression format? I didn't see anything about this. I thought Slack changed to .xz compression several versions ago, so if anything, the reduction in size I would think should have occurred a while ago, not now. Unless they changed the packages in the repository, but delayed the packages on the disc for whatever reason (but that wouldn't make much sense).

the sources not included ? (1)

kusmin (1247272) | about 2 years ago | (#41496667)

I guess the sources are no longer included by default.

Re: the sources not included ? (1)

UltraZelda64 (2309504) | about 2 years ago | (#41496711)

Hmmm... actually, that's probably it. I just checked and the source DVD is over 3 gigs alone. The full package set with sources would require a dual-layer DVD just to fit. Seems like to fit on DVD it was probably a required split.

Re:Installation Disc Size (1)

corychristison (951993) | about 2 years ago | (#41496673)

Just the first thought that popped in my head (without checking), but it's possible they are using squashfs or similar. Very efficient and designed for this type of situation. Gentoo uses it for their LiveDVD and it's pretty similar in size.

Slackware means simplicity and trust. (1)

kusmin (1247272) | about 2 years ago | (#41496659)

For me, Slackware means simplicity and trust. You see, Debian, and Arch and Freebsd are probably great. But trusting a "community" sounds a bit odd for me. I can trust a person. I can't trust community, it's too impersonal. After all, it's always a question of trust. And you can't trust something undefined. Hard to explain, but I guess everyone knows this: once you know someone, and you trust him/her - you feel safe.

Congratulations Slackware (2)

felixdzerzhinsky (809662) | about 2 years ago | (#41496679)

I am a Debian user. I have experimented with Slackware. Most recently I installed Slackware 13.37. But after a month I went back to Debian simply because I prefer to work with apt-get. I am personally more efficient with Debian. Having said that Slackware has been around for a long time. People who use it don't just like it...they love it. Slackware must be doing something right. My personal experience is that the community support on IRC #slackware is outstanding and must be one of the reasons for the distro's longevity. So Congratulations to the Slackware community!

Installing onto a virtualbox machine now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41496681)

slackware owns.
Thanks slackware bros for making a non-shitty linux distro!

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