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New York Plans World's Largest Ferris Wheel

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the if-you-build-it-they-will-ride dept.

Entertainment 170

justelite writes "It is an old trend to build "The World's largest..." something. One of the latest somethings is a 630-foot tall Ferris wheel planned for Staten Island. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said 'The New York Wheel will be an attraction unlike any other in New York City even unlike any other on the planet.' Designed to carry 1,440 passengers at a time, it's expected to draw 4.5 million people a year to a setting that also would include a 100-shop outlet mall and a 200-room hotel."

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170 comments

My biggest fear (5, Interesting)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516015)

This would scare the crap out of me. I can do any ride in an amusement park. Tallest, fastest, upside down... doesn't matter. Put me on a Ferris wheet and I'm grabbing the bar with white knuckles. I think it is the fact that I just have time to look out at the world and wonder about the minimum wage carnie who maintains the machine. That and the person sitting next to me can decide to start rocking the damn thing...

No, it doesn't make a lot of sense, but I'd rather be on the 70mph dragster than on a small Ferris wheel.

Re:My biggest fear (1)

tgd (2822) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516409)

This would scare the crap out of me. I can do any ride in an amusement park. Tallest, fastest, upside down... doesn't matter. Put me on a Ferris wheet and I'm grabbing the bar with white knuckles. I think it is the fact that I just have time to look out at the world and wonder about the minimum wage carnie who maintains the machine. That and the person sitting next to me can decide to start rocking the damn thing...

No, it doesn't make a lot of sense, but I'd rather be on the 70mph dragster than on a small Ferris wheel.

I'm like that, but its very different (in my experience) when its fully enclosed and not spinning willy-nilly. The London Eye was something I really enjoyed, as an example. But the kind they've got at amusement parts makes me want to hurl. (And, for the benefit of those on it with me, hopefully not while I'm on it.)

Re:My biggest fear (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516423)

I'm totally with you. Part of it too is getting a good, close look at all the literal nuts and bolts as you go around and hang at the top while they're loading more cars.

Re:My biggest fear (5, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516475)

I think it is the fact that I just have time to look out at the world and wonder about the minimum wage carnie who maintains the machine.

The manufacture of amusement and carnival rides is regulated at the Federal level.
The set up, maintanence, and operation of traveling carnival rides is regulated at the Federal level.

The set up, maintanence, and operation of permanent amusement and carnival rides is regulated at the State level.
Your safety may vary.

Alabama, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming have no regulation at all.
New York has a strong regulatory environment.
Would you like to know more? [saferparks.org]

I have friends in low places (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517067)

A common summer gig in the midwest is working at state fairs. Concerning carnival rides I will paraphrase my friend:

These guys have only a couple days to move from event to event. That means disassembling rides after closing time, putting it on a truck in the middle of the night, then start reassembling it at three in the morning the next day to make the nine AM opening time. All for around ten dollars an hour.

If you hear a loose bolt rattling across the floor on your next ride, it isn't your imagination.

Re:My biggest fear (-1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516543)

I notice you seem to be an educated, erudite individual. How is it, then, that you feel comfortable inserting an epithet like 'carny' into your conversation? It sounds like gypsy, pickaninny, or redneck. On what planet is this acceptable?

Re:My biggest fear (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516599)

Earth.

Re:My biggest fear (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517209)

The couple of "carnival employees" I knew were self described carnies. There didn't seem anything inherently derogatory about it. It was just the tip of the iceberg of jargon they used, which at times could put Cockney rhyming slang to shame. (Gypsy is about the same, depending which Romani group you talk to.)

Re:My biggest fear (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517283)

I've heard carnival workers referring to each other with this term. I had no idea it was offensive nor was any offense meant.

Re:My biggest fear (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516673)

Those wheels are made by the Dutch company StarNeth
http://www.starneth.com/ [starneth.com]

They also did the London one. They probably are quite reliable.

Re:My biggest fear (3, Informative)

RicktheBrick (588466) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516885)

Maybe the Ferris wheel will somehow get loose and start rolling and run over the prettiest female and you will safe her by grabbing her. Than she will sit on your lap and hug you until the wheel stops. By the time you are safely removed from the wheel, she will be madly in love with you. I mean if you are going to imagine something at least make it interesting. The odds of that happening are about the same as you being injured.

Re:My biggest fear (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517233)

Here here. I'm a total wuss when it comes to ANY ride, Ferris Wheel or not (I'm not implying that you are, okay?). At the aquarium in Houston, for example, my little son (I think he was 8, 9, 10, I forget) was thoroughly enjoying the Ferris Wheel (it seemed to go up to half the height of the tallest buildings there), but I was clutching him and screaming bloody murder the whole time. I get easily scared like a big baby (BTW, I'm a grown man in my early 40's).

Re:My biggest fear (1)

BenEnglishAtHome (449670) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517321)

Same here. I've always been able to ride anything with no fear. I actually find serious g-forces relaxing. Ferris wheels, though, are a completely different matter. The ONLY ride that has ever made me throw up was a ferris wheel.

Re:My biggest fear (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517325)

I'm very much the same way. For those who are familiar with Canada's Wonderland, I really feel uneasy on the viking boat [wikipedia.org], but had no problems on the jet scream [themeparkreview.com]. I really don't like not being secured in. I have no problem rock climbing or bungee jumping, but really don't like standing near the edge of a cliff if I'm not strapped in. Similarly carnival rides kind of freak me out. They often look really badly maintained and like they could break at any moment.

Re:My biggest fear (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517571)

Like the Singapore Flyer [wikipedia.org], this wouldn't be open-air cages with bars holding you in your seat. These would be encapsulated cars with windows. As I recall when I rode in it, there were even dining cars with tables and chairs, since the ride takes about 30 minutes. The ride itself is very smooth, with almost no swaying/rocking and no stopping to let people on/off (you get on and off while the car is moving, slowly, along a platform.

Why? (1)

realsilly (186931) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516027)

Doesn't New York have enough there to already draw millions of tourists there each year?

It seems to be a bit over the top to me with everything else New York already has to offer.

I'd almost rather see something like that in another state here in America.

Re:Why? (1)

longacre (1090157) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516123)

The wheel is to be built in a wasteland section of NYC which currently attracts zero tourists.

Re:Why? (1)

realsilly (186931) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516219)

This still makes no sense to me. Why must every part of New York become a tourist / terrorist trap? New Yorkers are glutton's for punishment it would seem.

I realize that tourist dollars help a state's coffers, but there are negative downfalls to that much attention to one city as well. Most of Florida and California are the same way, and as soon as something drastic happens there, then all those shops and the entertainment in that area suffer.

Besides during this horrible economy, is it really sensible to spend so much money on such a project? How much will New Yorkers have to pay for such a project (like every sports stadium)?

Re:Why? (1)

longacre (1090157) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516329)

Nope, you're right. In addition to the construction costs, the security cost will be massive and ongoing forever, and I don't buy the idea that tourists want to take a 30 minute ferry ride to ride a ferris wheel with okay views of the harbor and skyline.

Re:Why? (1)

91degrees (207121) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516981)

The Staten Island Ferry is itself a tourist attraction. Get a great view of the Manhattan skyline. Most tourists get on the boat and then go straight back.

Re:Why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517273)

It's the cheapest way to get a ride past Lady Liberty

Re:Why? (1)

guises (2423402) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516509)

Why must every part of New York become a tourist / terrorist trap?

It doesn't have to be a tourist trap, but it needs to be something. Staten Island is a virtual wasteland compared to the rest of the city, it's the perfect place for something large and mostly useless. The view should be nice from there as well.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516631)

Nice view? You'll still be able to smell the stench of Mob Wives from that high up.

Re:Why? (1)

M. Baranczak (726671) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517475)

Besides during this horrible economy, is it really sensible to spend so much money on such a project?

Maybe building this monstrosity is a good idea, maybe it isn't. But if you do decide to build it, then now is the perfect time. Real estate prices are low (compared to NYC 12 years ago, at least). Interest rates are low. And there's thousands of construction workers looking for jobs.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517621)

as soon as something drastic happens there, then all those shops and the entertainment in that area suffer.

Isn't that true of just about any place? Any place you put an attraction could lose visitors if something makes the place look bad to visitors or takes away the main draw of the area. Likewise though, things that make the areas look good can also gain visitors. If they built this in some tiny town, how many people would travel far to see a Ferris versus how many people would be willing to travel to Orlando/NYC/LA and be interested in going to a Ferris wheel in addition to what they came there for?

Re:Why? (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516143)

I wasn't aware that there was a Presidential review and only one location made the cut. Any location can do this, but ultimately I think it works better in a more populated area that already has a draw. I can't see flying to Idaho just to ride this (even if I weren't deathly afraid of Ferris wheels) and to get some potatos.

Re:Why? (1)

alen (225700) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516253)

this for staten island

its a useless piece of land that most people never go to. driving through it on my way to New Jersey is the only time i go there

Re:Why? (1)

Darth Snowshoe (1434515) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516511)

Hey! I stop in Staten Island whenever I go through. Great bagels!

Also, George Washington Gale Ferris, Jr. was a graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, for the record. As am I, and I can still recommend it.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516347)

it's probably designed to stimulate staten island....most tourists just take the ferry there, and almost immediately take the ferry back---now they'll have a good incentive to stick around staten island for a few hours (and shop there!).

Re:Why? (1)

GLMDesigns (2044134) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516773)

From a tourist's perspective - they will have spectacular views of lower manhattan, jersey city, brooklyn, the statue of liberty and the hudson/east rivers. From NYC's perspective it will be one more tourist attraction, bring tourists and funds to another borough AND help revitalize one of the most beautiful waterfronts in the city. For all it's beauty that area of Staten Island has been a dump. Revitalize it and NYC has more primo real estate.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516963)

My first thought was actually 'will this even draw tourists to begin with?'

Like seriously, who even goes on ferris wheels any more? If an exhibition or faire comes to town and involves there being a ferris wheel, you can absolutely guarantee that the ferris wheel will be the one with the shortest line.

In fact, in my personal experience (and with talking to those with me, or hearing conversations of those also there), the single only reason we GO to the ferris wheel (if we bother) is because we don't feel like waiting in line for a 'good' ride. After all, not like there's going to be a wait for more than like... 5 minutes for the ferris wheel.

The fact that people are willing to waiting in line AN HOUR OR TWO for one ride, instead of the either zero, or 5 minute wait for the ferris wheel should say enough.

Re:Why? (1)

bws111 (1216812) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517547)

Wow, that is some seriously good logic you have there. "People don't want to go on a rickety, 40-ft high ferris wheel at a carnival (with a view of - nothing), therefore a 630-ft high wheel with a great view of NYC, Statue of Liberty, etc, will not attract anybody". Do you also suppose that the idea of a 'cruise industry' will fail because the line for the 'boat' kiddie ride at the same carnival is very short?

1,440 People on it at one time ??? (5, Interesting)

FlyHelicopters (1540845) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516037)

My first thought on reading that it would hold 1,440 people at once... in New York City... What a tempting target for a terrorist... Yea, I've been brainwashed, I know it...

Loads/unloads constantly (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516139)

If you ever went to such a wheel (I'm thinking London Eye now) , you'd know that they never really stop rotating so that they can _constantly_ load and unload passengers, one car at a time, each time one of the cars passes near the floor.

Are we really on Slashdot as you seem to have never heard of "pipelining" ????? ^_^

Re:1,440 People on it at one time ??? (-1, Troll)

Master Moose (1243274) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516713)

My first thought on reading that it would hold 1,440 people at once..

Church groups plan to build 100 of these around the world in preparation for the fulfilment of the revelations so that the 144,000 can be at pre-designated pick up points.

http://bible.cc/revelation/7-4.htm [bible.cc]

Re:1,440 People on it at one time ??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516843)

yah, this means security checks before you enter, perhaps xray (just in case you have something sharp in an enclosed bubble, or want to bring water bottle with you---if you're thirsty, you'll buy some overpriced kind later), also security check of the pod between loadings (what if previous group left something attached to the underside of a seat?).

Re:1,440 People on it at one time ??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517199)

I was on the London Eye a few years back. There may have been a metal detector but I do remember them sweeping the pods with mirrors after people exited... Seemed like a good idea as it was just a couple years after 9/11..

Re:1,440 People on it at one time ??? (2)

eth1 (94901) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516901)

My first thought on reading that it would hold 1,440 people at once... in New York City... What a tempting target for a terrorist... Yea, I've been brainwashed, I know it...

That was the first thing that jumped out at me, also, but not in the context of terrorism. As a resident of Dallas, home of one of the previous "tallest ferris wheels" (480 seating capacity), I can say the damn thing spends the majority of it's time loading/unloading instead of moving already. Guess it gives you time to look at stuff from up there, but if something happens, you'll be stuck for a LONG time.

Re:1,440 People on it at one time ??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517141)

it would hold 1,440 people at once

Which is somewhat less than the L train at rush hour.

Loading (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516061)

How long would it take to load 1,440 passengers? Given loading and unloading delays, would anyone want to waste enough time to go around more than once? Sounds like very little thought went into the actual logistics of this thing.

Re:Loading (3, Informative)

Scootin159 (557129) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516099)

Ferris wheels like this don't stop for loading - they just have a mobile loading platform that moves with the wheel. Also remember that it's not 1440 people per car, but only 40 people that need to be loaded at once.

Re:Loading (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516185)

TFA says the ride takes 38 minutes. If that's just for one rotation, the cars will be moving at less than 1 ft/s; slow enough to load and unload without stopping the wheel.

Re:Loading (1)

vlm (69642) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516729)

TFA says the ride takes 38 minutes. If that's just for one rotation, the cars will be moving at less than 1 ft/s; slow enough to load and unload without stopping the wheel.

Yikes that's a long time to not have air conditioning or heating. So it'll have full HVAC, I'm guessing. You can't have a tourist trap in NYC without selling $5 bottled water. Then you wanna take a leak (thats a long time!), so you put in bathrooms. Suddenly I'm thinking the "630 foot high club". In fact why not rent rooms for an integer number of rotations... This might actually be fun.

So I read the wiki and its going to be open from 10am to 10pm which is 12 hours, at 38 minutes/rotation that's a hair short of 19 rotations. At 19 rotations and 36 capsules and each capsule rated at 40 people thats 27360 people per day absolute maximum. Every day operation and by a miracle no maint or inclement weather means 9,986,400 people absolute maximum.

"Bloomber's office said it would expect up to 30,000 riders per day and about 4.5 million passengers per year"

Hmm so about a 50% annual load factor or a 110% daily load factor. Pick one?

Re:Loading (2)

91degrees (207121) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516891)

In fact why not rent rooms for an integer number of rotations... This might actually be fun.

The Singapore flyer offers a dinner service for two revolutions. Not quite what you have in mind I realise but along the same lines.

Hmm so about a 50% annual load factor or a 110% daily load factor. Pick one?

Not sure about the daily load factor. I guess they rounded up. I imagine it will be less popular in the winter though. I presume they have quite a good idea about seasonal variations in tourist attractions based on other New York attractions.

Re:Loading (2)

bws111 (1216812) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517197)

It says 10am to 10pm in the Spring, Fall, and Winter, and til 2AM 'or even all night' in the summer. It also says 'up to 30000/day'. There is nothing incompatible with '30000 people on a busy day in the summer, average of 12300 per day (which is 4.5 miilion per year) over the course of a year'. Both of those figures fit easily into the numbers provided, and leave plenty of room for maintenance and weather.

Re:Loading (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517719)

In fact why not rent rooms for an integer number of rotations

Your explicitly stating this implying that you thought some people might otherwise have considered renting them for a NON-integer number of rotations?! :-)

This might actually be fun.

More "interesting" than fun if one had stupidly rented a room for 4 1/2 rotations and they kicked you out of the room when your time was up :-O

A big circle? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516077)

Will it be painted to look like a target?

Re:A big circle? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516097)

Slow-clap.

Re:A big circle? (1)

vlm (69642) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516751)

Slow-clap.

Slow clap would be paint it to look like a giant rotating goatse.

I should have entered that as an animated gif for the /. anniversary logo contest.

Re:A big circle? (1)

kaizendojo (956951) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516403)

Wishing I had mod points I had last week and didn't know what to do with. I would mod this up as insightful....

Not as big as the original (3, Informative)

Relayman (1068986) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516085)

It still won't be as big as the original Ferris Wheel [wikipedia.org] which could hold 2,160 people at a time. Also, will a 9-minute ride still be 50 cents?

Yes, Taller (2)

dcollins (135727) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516149)

I think most people would measure how "big" it is by height, and yes, the new one will be about 3 times taller.

You're correct that the old one had greater capacity.

Re:Not as big as the original (2)

54mc (897170) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517029)

Also, will a 9-minute ride still be 50 cents?

Inflation adjusted, that's just under $12.00 ... so yea, probably.

Re:Not as big as the original (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517691)

Admission to the London Eye is about 20 GBP, which is around $32 US. That's for a 30 minute ride, or just over $1 per minute. If the one in New York is any more expensive (which it might well be, at least at first) it could well be over $12 per nine minutes, and will definitely be more than $12 per ride.

WHY??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516163)

I didn't know there was a smoldering "Ferris Wheel War" between the US and the UK. I'd love to see the real numbers of actual riders for the one in London. The Eye? Aye! I'd be impressed if there are that many visitors to it. I hope I'm wrong but...

Follow the money (2)

operagost (62405) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516181)

Who is paying for this?

Who profits?

How many 16 ounce soft drinks will I need to take with me to stay hydrated during the 38 minute ride?

Re:Follow the money (2)

Artifakt (700173) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516451)

1. They won't sell 16 oz. drinks - Either they will gouge for tiny 8 oz. drinks or they will go standard American and sell small 24 oz. - medium 36 oz. - large 55 gallon drum (and they will be named Medium-Large-Supersized - you won't see the word 'small' on the menu).
2. However many you were going to get, get one less. Your bladder will thank you, or perhaps the people in the cars below will. (Yeah, I went there - Eeewwwww!).

Re:Follow the money (1)

YttriumOxide (837412) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517125)

tiny 8 oz. drinks

I am honestly appalled that anyone could call 237ml a "tiny" drink. 16 oz is 473ml - more than I would usually consider purchasing to drink in one go unless ridiculously thirsty or planning to drink it over the course of quite some time (e.g. a sipper bottle; or a beer with friends (I buy beer at pubs by the half-litre, but it usually takes me a good 30 minutes to drink one)).

In fact, I was thinking about that I generally treat recipes that say "1 cup" to be "just a bit under 250ml" and so looked it up on a converter. It turns out 8 fluid ounces is exactly "1 cup". I fail to understand how someone could consider the standard unit for holding a drinkable liquid (a cup) to be an inadequate amount of liquid for drinking!

Re:Follow the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517391)

Seriously? I would agree that 16 ounces of soda is nothing to laugh at given the calories involved, but 16 ounces of liquid is nothing. Eight ounces is hardly even worth the time it takes to get the drink. Have you ever physically exerted yourself in a hot/humid environment? When working outside during the summer I frequently go through about two to three liters of water an hour.

Re:Follow the money (0)

YttriumOxide (837412) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517605)

Seriously? I would agree that 16 ounces of soda is nothing to laugh at given the calories involved, but 16 ounces of liquid is nothing. Eight ounces is hardly even worth the time it takes to get the drink. Have you ever physically exerted yourself in a hot/humid environment? When working outside during the summer I frequently go through about two to three liters of water an hour.

I tend to avoid exerting myself in hot/humid environments; but yes, I'll grant that under extreme circumstances, one can (and should) drink significantly more.

However, going on a ferris wheel (the activity mentioned in reference to the drink size) is hardly a strenuous task that requires significant liquid intake.

Per day, I tend to drink about 2 to 3 litres of cold drinks (soda/pop/fizz/whatever-you-call-it (however, the sugar-free varieties) or plain water), and about half a litre of coffee (with sugar and milk). The cold drinks are fairly evenly spaced throughout the day in the general, so I drink about "a cup" of something every hour and a half or so (assuming 8 hours sleep where I'm not drinking anything).

New York trying to copycat London? (3, Insightful)

Cito (1725214) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516197)

Come on New York be original build another tower, or build world's largest roller coaster...

No sense copycatting London

Re:New York trying to copycat London? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516321)

The Ferris Wheel is an American invention, after all. Who was copying whom?

Re:New York trying to copycat London? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516657)

I think you will find that the Ferris Wheel is a particularly named version of a concept that had already existed. It wasn't "invented" by an American, just extended and enhanced, and now you all (y'all?) claim it as your own property. Sound familiar?

The TSA experience in 3, 2, 1... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516229)

Get ready for a full body scan before you are allowed on this thing.

Being a resident of Staten Island... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516455)

I really don't want tourists on my island.

The ferry is packed as it is with tourists in the way of peoples commutes.
The public transportation barely accommodates the people who live here. We don't have taxis or subways, so they are stuck to buses, walking (goodluck with all the hills) or taking a crappy cab service.

And there's nothing to look at here anyway. A shitty mall, dubbed "The Mall", full of teenage girls wanting to be jersey shore girls and the boys who follow, along with senior citizens during the day crowding the food court.
The main commercial roads have a bunch of businesses but nothing desirable to just look at.

The rest is just suburban mixed with urbanization roads and a deli on every corner.

Maybe that's why Bloomberg wants the "Worlds Largest Ferris Wheel" here, so people actually have something to look at when they come here off the ferry besides the 2'x2' "Staten Island" Yankee Stadium right outside the ferry terminal.

The worst street on the island crime wise is a 5 minute walk. You can't miss it, walk down Bay street towards the west and you'll see a huge house project, the street at the light. Take a nice walk up it and greet the people, ask them how their day was.
You might get a hand shake, or a handgun. Depends on your actions, because they have both waiting.

Staten Island in a nutshell. From someone who lives here, and surprisingly doesn't want to leave.

Re:Being a resident of Staten Island... (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516787)

I really don't want tourists on my island.

No worries. We're going to turn you into a prison anyway. :-) We scrapped the whole Manhattan plan.

Re:Being a resident of Staten Island... (1)

YttriumOxide (837412) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517219)

I really don't want tourists on my island.

And there's nothing to look at here anyway.

Your tourist website [visitstatenisland.com] sadly seems to agree with you. It really doesn't look to be a great deal there that would interest me as a tourist. However reading up on it, if I HAD to live in New York City for whatever reason, it seems like a good choice on places to live.

Staten Island? (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516467)

The Ferris Wheel would only be second in popularity to the Line Ride at any of the borough's fine bridges!

World's Largest Ferris Wheel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516565)

http://www.forbes.com/sites/bethgreenfield/2012/07/27/worlds-largest-ferris-wheel-the-high-roller-is-on-its-way-to-las-vegas/
Step in line

Have they thought through the logistics? (1)

wcrowe (94389) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516661)

How are those 4.5 million people supposed to get to Staten Island? I realize there are three bridges and a ferry, but from what I saw this summer they seem barely adequate for current needs.

Re:Have they thought through the logistics? (1)

jackbird (721605) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517069)

You're supposed to just leave your car running in the middle of I-287, saunter over to the Ferris wheel and take a ride, and traffic may have moved 5 feet by the time you get back.

Amused to Death (1, Funny)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516681)

"Bread and circuses will also be provided to further help destract from the decline and fall."

Re:Amused to Death (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517477)

The problem with bread and circuses is that it gets all the malcontents in one spot and they start talking to each other and they start looking at how to bring the whole thing down because the bread and circuses are keeping them down.

Welfare and basic cable, now there is a distraction!

unlike anything (4, Insightful)

j00r0m4nc3r (959816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516703)

The New York Wheel will be an attraction unlike any other in New York City even unlike any other on the planet

I guess that's true if you don't count London or Shanghai as being on this planet...

Re:unlike anything (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517043)

Not to mention Singapore.. Seems like it'll be the exact same thing, only taller.

Monorail! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516753)

A giant Ferris wheel, good idea! That is exactly the kind of forward thinking NYC needs. But what NYC really needs is a monorail! Put the lack of affordable housing, etc issues on the back burner, we have a monorail to build.

1440 people? (1)

wiedzmin (1269816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516793)

I counted what, 38 cabins on that rendering... that means that each one will have nearly 40 people in it? That's a freaking subway car!

What, a New York Eye? (1)

AllanL5 (814677) | about a year and a half ago | (#41516835)

Okay, since the London Eye is so popular, New York will do it one better?

Original it is not. And I liked the comment that the original, original Ferris Wheel (in Chicago I think that was) was bigger than this.

No wonder they banned large, sugary drinks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516859)

No wonder they banned large, sugary drinks. If all of those people are 'extra-beefy', they won't be able to fit as many people on it.

Leave me out of it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516919)

As a New York taxpayer - I want the option to opt out of this.

OT: Am I dyslexic today (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41516965)

It looks like every other word on Slashdot is mixed up except edit fields and the "Slashdot" graphic at the top of the screen. Is it Dyslexia awareness week or something?

What does "little It's-you endian clod insensitive" mean anyways?

Dang, even the message preview is all messed up.

I hope the carriages are en suite... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41517097)

Designed to carry 1,440 passengers at a time, it's expected to draw 4.5 million people a year to a setting that also would include a 100-shop outlet mall and a 200-room hotel.

Think about the absurdity of that for a second. Unless that hotel is putting up over 7 people on average per room, the wheel can hold more people.

Maybe we can just sleep in the wheel. If they leave it running, everyone gets a room with a view. Besides, I want to try drive-thru room service.

 

Re:I hope the carriages are en suite... (1)

bws111 (1216812) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517703)

Oh, yes, Quite absurd. I mean every tourist attraction there is has a single hotel attached to it that can hold more people than the attraction can. For instance, stadiums always have a 30000 room hotel attached to them.

The Biggest ? for how long ? (1)

vlad30 (44644) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517149)

The problem with making the biggest is that someone just has to make something bigger then your tourist attraction loses its all-important title

Re:The Biggest ? for how long ? (1)

bws111 (1216812) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517779)

Only a problem if the only thing your attraction has going for it is the title. If the worlds biggest ferris wheel was in the middle of Kansas, that would be a concern. If someone builds a bigger wheel than this one, this one will still be in NYC, and will still offer the same views, etc.

Interesting to note. (4, Interesting)

Daryen (1138567) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517163)

I used to run a much smaller ferris wheel. We only had 40 cars, 8 people per car. Even so, we had to very carefully balance the weight of people to opposing cars. The entire thing had very limited torque, it only took about 1,000 lbs without an equal weight on the opposite side for us to lose control of the wheel. It would spin on it's own, eventually reaching equilibrium.

To load the whole thing, you had to load 1 set of cars "light" with just a few people, then the opposite side, then one set ahead of that, then one set behind the other set. It actually took a fair amount of training to transition from "20 cars light" to "40 cars heavy." Most of the operators were not skilled enough, and we even lost control of the wheel once when I took a day off. The entire park staff had to turn out and turn the wheel by hand (yes, I'm almost sorry I missed it).

I'm sure such a large wheel will have much more torque, but it will be interesting to see how they load it.

Bread... (1)

Woodmeister (7487) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517405)

Given all the issues with the American economy, this is bread and circuses if there was ever one.

I know Staten Island. (1)

MMC Monster (602931) | about a year and a half ago | (#41517417)

I grew up on Staten Island and still visit there quite frequently. They have enough traffic already.

4.5 million new visitors to a tourist spot on the island would need some significant infrastructure improvements. They have three bridges to NJ and one to Brooklyn, causing bottleneck problems even on the best of days. I can't imagine adding a few million visitors a year expressly for an amusement park.

Though having a second mall on the island may be worth while. Just make it right off one of the highways, this time.

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