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MPAA Boss Admits SOPA and PIPA Are Dead, Not Coming Back

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the time-to-schedule-the-victory-lap dept.

Piracy 186

concealment points out comments from MPAA CEO Chris Dodd, who has acknowledged that SOPA and PIPA were soundly — and perhaps permanently — defeated. Quoting Ars Technica: "Dodd sounded chastened, with a tone that was a far cry from the rhetoric the MPAA was putting out in January. 'When SOPA-PIPA blew up, it was a transformative event,' said Dodd. 'There were eight million e-mails [to elected representatives] in two days.' That caused senators to run away from the legislation. 'People were dropping their names as co-sponsors within minutes, not hours,' he said. 'These bills are dead, they're not coming back,' said Dodd. 'And they shouldn't.' He said the MPAA isn't focused on getting similar legislation passed in the future, at the moment. 'I think we're better served by sitting down [with the tech sector and SOPA opponents] and seeing what we agree on.' Still, Dodd did say that some of the reaction to SOPA and PIPA was 'over the top' — specifically, the allegations of censorship, implied by the black bar over Google search logo or the complete shutdown of Wikipedia. 'DNS filtering goes on every day on the Internet,' said Dodd. 'Obviously it needs to be done very carefully. But five million pages were taken off Google last year [for IP violations]. To Google's great credit, it recently changed its algorithm to a point where, when there are enough complaints about a site, it moves that site down on their page — which I applaud.'"

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186 comments

Exactly as they want you to think (5, Insightful)

54mc (897170) | about 2 years ago | (#41542113)

Make you think it's dead, that way when they bring it back under another name, you won't notice.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542175)

Its dead until the elections are over, then don't be surprised if it comes back.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (4, Insightful)

Applekid (993327) | about 2 years ago | (#41542547)

Its dead until the elections are over, then don't be surprised if it comes back.

Only if one party controls the legislative branch and the executive and it can get rubber stamped through.

Otherwise, there was enough negative publicity about the effort that I think either side would jump at the opportunity to claim that they are the true defenders of the internet by blocking bad legislation.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (4, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | about 2 years ago | (#41542897)

2 parties, 1 set of bosses. No matter which one of the 2 options you pick, both have the same set of people giving orders behind, at the very least in this particular topic. US constitution should be edited putting "We the lobbyist" at the start of it to describe reality.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (5, Interesting)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | about 2 years ago | (#41542619)

Its dead until the elections are over, then don't be surprised if it comes back.

Oh so innocent; thinks he's so cynical. This is a thing that big media agrees with small (commercial) media agrees with commercial interests. The arms industry doesn't want you getting your information independently; the consumer industries want you to read their ads; the media doesn't want you to compete with them.

At this very moment the Intellectual property provisions of the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership [wikipedia.org] are being negotiated in secret. This is yet another treaty negotiated by the type of people that brought you the WIPO. Their aim is to basically to make it so that SOPA / PIPA is forced upon all nations without any chance of a democratic debate.

This will not be reported on unless people have actually already succeeded in stopping it. The election doesn't matter since nobody will hear about it even if it is going on.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (5, Insightful)

EmperorOfCanada (1332175) | about 2 years ago | (#41542333)

These bozos don't realize that they have lost control of information. Once you put information out it and people want it the information will go everywhere. Before they could release a movie and they controlled the flow of the physical film, then they released the video cassette and again they could mostly control this (some piracy) but now the only control they have is mostly at the film editing level. In the past they abused this control by releasing the films slowly around the world. People in Canada thought it sucked as we got the films after the US but people in Britain really thought it sucked as they got them long after us and much of the world had to wait for video. Places in Africa had theaters that showed video-taped films on big screens.

But now the film companies have put up so many barriers to my seeing their stuff that piracy is logical. I go to the theater for a 9:15 film arriving say 9:05. For those 10 minutes the theater blasts cell phone and car commercials at me. Then at 9:15 they start showing trailers and around 9:30 the film begins but not really it is advertizements for the various levels of production company and more advertisements for the actors and directors so maybe around 9:32 I am seeing a movie that I payed $13 for nearly 30 minutes earlier. Renting a movie is much the same except that I don't know where to rent movies anymore. But if you do get a blue ray most players won't let you skip past the various warnings and even sometimes the trailers.

Now compare that to pirating a movie. Download time 5-10 minutes, cost almost nothing, restrictions: none. So you set the download, get the download and fast forward to the exact moment the real movie starts.

But the one restriction is that it is slightly hard to do. Most people will have difficulty getting a movie onto their computer, finding the file, sending it to a large TV somehow, and then controlling the movie. And this is where the movie industry has a chance. They could make it really easy for most people to use any box (game consoles, apple TV, roku) like netflix and just get the movie for a reasonable price. If the theater charges me $13 don't think you can either charge me more (for my convenience) or anything even close; I know that if you are distributing it directly to me that you have a huge savings so at $2 per movie I will happily watch a zillion movies; at $9.99 a movie I'll find a better use for my money.

This brings me to another point. In this modern age people are finding better uses for their money so don't blame all your dropping revenues on piracy. A blockbuster video game can make billions, that money is coming out of people's entertainment budget which once went to movies and music.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (2)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 2 years ago | (#41542451)

But why would they want to sell you a movie for $2 that you can invite the whole neighbourhood over to watch as many times as you like when they currently charge $13 per person for a one-time viewing and then 6 months later charge you $20 for the DRM protected dvd/bluray full of advertisements?

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (4, Insightful)

dubbreak (623656) | about 2 years ago | (#41542631)

Because of price elasticity. Price it lower more people (will potentially) buy. I think with how things are going with theatres and media sales it's a pretty safe bet.

E.g. Make crappy movies I'd never go to in the theatre or purchase on any medium $0.99 and I might decide it's decent popcorn fodder. Blockbuster that's just out? I'd be willing to pay more. But as long as I don't have advertisements etc shoved down my throat before getting to watch the film.

I think any worries about inviting the neighbourhood over or sending the file to someone else (if it's drm free) are just that, worries (with no basis in reality). Make it cheap enough and it's not worth someone's time or hassle to save a few bucks. I have a big TV, good sound system, comfortable seating, I can drink booze if I want to (cheaply at that), better popcorn (imho), I can order any type of food I want.. etc etc. The theatre has no draw to me. Why would I want to sit around with a bunch of strangers that talk and text during the movie?

The market has been ready for direct from studio downloads for almost a decade. The studios just have to get with it.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542637)

Because currently charging $13 per person etc. is causing them to not sell their movies anymore. It isn't making as much money. They would make more money doing something else. More money is good, right? The idea behind capitalism is that two parties make mutually beneficial trades. Each party gains something. The more trades you make, the better off everyone is. MPAA can make more money by making customers happier. Like the easy-box thing the GP suggested. I'd buy that. I actually like spending money on things I enjoy, now that I have money. But it's still often easier to just download stuff.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 2 years ago | (#41543041)

But why would they want to sell you a movie for $2 that you can invite the whole neighbourhood over to watch as many times as you like when they currently charge $13 per person for a one-time viewing and then 6 months later charge you $20 for the DRM protected dvd/bluray full of advertisements?

Because cinemas cost money to run, DVDs cost money to distribute....downloads don't cost them anything.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (2)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 2 years ago | (#41542793)

You said you don't know where to rent movies, I borrow dvd's from my library. Not that this helps you if you want to see a new movie asap. If you don't mind waiting a few weeks+, libraries are a great alternative, assuming yours has a decent selection. I've been able to catch up with all the films I deem worthwhile this way, at no cost to me.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (1)

Safety Cap (253500) | about 2 years ago | (#41542999)

Renting a movie is much the same except that I don't know where to rent movies anymore. But if you do get a blue ray most players won't let you skip past the various warnings and even sometimes the trailers.

1. Rent from Red Box [redbox.com] : $1.32/night.

2. Rip it to laptop

3. ???

4. WATCH IT WITH NO RESTRICTIONS!

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41543021)

I go to the theater for a 9:15 film arriving say 9:05. For those 10 minutes the theater blasts cell phone and car commercials at me. Then at 9:15 they start showing trailers and around 9:30 the film begins but not really it is advertizements for the various levels of production company and more advertisements for the actors and directors so maybe around 9:32 I am seeing a movie that I payed $13 for nearly 30 minutes earlier.

Wow! Seriously, where do you go to watch movies with such insanely fast and speedy service? I'm sure I don't live near there, but would make a point to stop when I am there in my travels.

In my town you are Lucky to see a 9:15 film anywhere before 10:30 with all of the commercials and ads and more commercials and trailers and cell phone talking warning videos and then cell phone commercials disguised as no talking videos and more commercials....

I always arrive at the theater 30 minutes after start time, which gives me a nice 15 minutes to leisurely smoke in my car, and still get inside and find a seat before the movie starts

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (2)

innocent_white_lamb (151825) | about 2 years ago | (#41543401)

I own and operate a single-screen movie theatre in a small town.

I try to start my show within five minutes of the advertised start time (depending on how many people are still in the lobby getting their popcorn and whatnot), and I play between zero and three trailers before the start of the actual movie.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (3, Informative)

cdrguru (88047) | about 2 years ago | (#41543377)

The biggest problem with a worldwide release of a movie is the big question - what do you allow in?

In the US a pair of tits will get you an R rating instantly - which is fine, if that is the audience you are shooting for. If you want a PG-13 movie for the US audience, you have to cut the tits. Or, in a R movie in the US you can show female pubic hair - except if you want to release the movie in Japan that would instantly have it blocked. There are other rules for EU countries as well.

And then there are the other markets. Have a scene where someone is holding a Bible in a courtroom? Such a movie cannot be distributed in an Islamic country, or at least most of them. Want a movie where the hero is wearing a turban? Good luck

It gets absurd. They thought they could capture this in eight bits with DVD region coding, but that wasn't really sufficient. What it means today is pretty much anything outside the US gets stuck with everything being cut that could possibly be objectionable to anyone, anywhere. Maybe the US version is less chopped but think about a movie made for an adult EU audience - they are going to have to cut it for the US!

The fact that the entertainment industry at all levels has to deal with this is silly and it throws a lot of extra costs into it. I am pretty sure it is filtering into games today as well. Certainly music has had some run-ins with this sort of issue. The problem is there is no worldwide standard and there isn't going to be any time soon - certainly not until someone like SPECTRE takes over the planet and declares themselves to be Dictator for Life.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (4, Informative)

spikestabber (644578) | about 2 years ago | (#41542345)

You mean just like the TPPA is doing? Its already back, and its as bad/worse as ACTA. They simply shifted their tide to secret trade agreements again.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542393)

...and it's called TPP, Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, should ACTA fail. They can still do it without the EU, since Canada and Europe have CETA with the leaked version identical language to ACTA. After the defeat of ACTA they will have to re-word it a bit, but the gist will remain the same.

Bottom line for US voters: you will not see copyright & patent reform with either the Democrats ("think of the starving artists!") nor the Republicans ("think about the bottom lines!").

 

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (1)

LtGordon (1421725) | about 2 years ago | (#41542891)

Nothing to see here! Just go about your lives as normal...

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542911)

*deep, deep sigh* Look, MPAA, listen. You people were the ones who deluged our pop culture with movies written with shitty stories where the big evil shadowy overlord admits defeat, only to walk into some shadowy back room with other shady people and laugh about how "those fools" have let their guards down and now Plan B will kick in whenever the sequel gets made. You with me here? We've seen this movie a billion times. And you wrote it!

At what point did you expect this plan to work? Are you seriously just as shallow and predictable as the B-movie horse shit you made for us? Or has your entire existence been making movies of what you actually, honestly think is a legitimate reflection of how actual, real people behave?

True, Dat (1)

Safety Cap (253500) | about 2 years ago | (#41542971)

Remember TIA ("Total Information Awareness")? That monster rose from the dead and its zombie maw is chomping at the bit [wired.com] to eat everything it can.

I wish the MPAA/RIAA would hurry up and die already. They are little more than brutish fossils, symbolic of a decayed era gratefully forgotten.

Re:Exactly as they want you to think (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#41543109)

Make you think it's dead, that way when they bring it back under another name, you won't notice.

But some do notice [wikipedia.org]

I'm paranoid (5, Interesting)

DaWhilly (2555136) | about 2 years ago | (#41542123)

SOPA and PIPA were stopped because people found out.. What if this is just misinformation while they prepare something behind the scenes?

Re:I'm paranoid (4, Insightful)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 2 years ago | (#41542799)

You'd call that paranoia? I'd call that "not being born yesterday."

OF COURSE they're preparing something identical behind the scenes. They haven't STOPPED being greedy, stupid, shortsighted, corrupt assholes. Chris Dodd and everyone else who would rather screw over the public domain for a very small theoretical increase in profits, THEY are not the ones who are dead and never coming back. It's a damn shame too that they don't all slowly and simultaneously die of hemorrhoids.

Re:I'm paranoid (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542907)

The behind-the-scenes "thing" that they're hiding is the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement)

https://www.eff.org/issues/tpp

Read and be informed!!!!!!!!

Re:I'm paranoid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542985)

You mean like working directly with ISPs [slashdot.org] to kick you off of the Internet without needing to involve law enforcement or the courts? Nah, they'd never do that.

Re:I'm paranoid (3, Insightful)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#41543141)

SOPA and PIPA were stopped because people found out.. What if this is just misinformation while they prepare something behind the scenes?

If? There is no if [wikipedia.org]

I hate to be that guy, but... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542127)

I have a bad feeling that something worse is waiting for us down the line...

Re:I hate to be that guy, but... (4, Insightful)

drcln (98574) | about 2 years ago | (#41542339)

I have a bad feeling that something worse is waiting for us down the line...

Exactly. That something worse will be the persistent steady erosion of rights and the criminalization of activities with extreme penalties. Bit by bit they will get what they want. Their mistake was grabbing at the powers they wanted too fast.

In the U.S. they've won on the constitutionality of statutory damages that bear no relation to actual harm. Essentially that is a private criminalization of a commercial tort.
They're winning on extradition more than they are loosing.
Megaupload is gone. Everyone else is scared.
In Japan, downloading a song is now a criminal act that can get you two years in jail.
And on, and on . . .

So, do they really need SOPA or PIPA?

Re:I hate to be that guy, but... (1)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 2 years ago | (#41542915)

In Japan, downloading a song is now a criminal act that can get you two years in jail. And on, and on . . .

and or something like $25,000 usd per "offense".

Re:I hate to be that guy, but... (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#41543149)

I have a bad feeling that something worse is waiting for us down the line...

Maybe this? [wikipedia.org]

Re:I hate to be that guy, but... (2)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about 2 years ago | (#41543509)

Down the line? Try Right Now! [stoptpp.org]

Unintentional honesty (5, Insightful)

Tackhead (54550) | about 2 years ago | (#41542155)

"Every studio I deal with has a distribution agreement with Google," said Dodd. "We've divided up this discussion in a way that doesn't really get us moving along as a people."

Translation: Dammit, what part of "cartel" have my clients forgotten they once understood?

No evidence of change (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542157)

I wish I could believe him, but he hasn't given any indication of what his new alternative plan is. I can only imagine he hasn't changed much if at all and the new plan is more of the same under a different name.

Conspiracies (2)

H3xx (662833) | about 2 years ago | (#41542169)

That's just what they *want* you to think. O__O

Doesn't matter (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542171)

Remember the supporters of this kind of thing come November.

Phew (0)

TorrentFox (1046862) | about 2 years ago | (#41542177)

For one terrifying moment, I misread the headline as "SOPA and PIPA Not Dead, Coming Back". Even still, we'll have to stay vigilant.

Re:Phew (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41543373)

For one terrifying moment, I misread the headline as "SOPA and PIPA Not Dead, Coming Back".

Yes I understand that basic literacy is so difficult for some that they feel an irresistable urge to run to the discussion and inform us all of how terriby confused they were. The nice thing about written words is that you can keep them on the page and re-read them over and over as many times as it takes to comprehend what they say. For most of us, that's once. For you, feel free to take your time.

Electronic Democracy (4, Insightful)

jamesl (106902) | about 2 years ago | (#41542197)

'There were eight million e-mails [to elected representatives] in two days.' That caused senators to run away from the legislation.

So, now we know what to do to prevent or get rid of Dodd-Frank and other pieces of idiotic legislation.

Re:Electronic Democracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542327)

Put a notice on Google's front page?

I suppose you can just do that whenever you want?

Re:Electronic Democracy (1)

SirGarlon (845873) | about 2 years ago | (#41542639)

So, now we know what to do to prevent or get rid of Dodd-Frank and other pieces of idiotic legislation.

The same thing we've always done. Use something called "the will of the people." Amazingly, it still works.

Re:Electronic Democracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41543251)

BAAAAHAHAHAHA! Man, have I got a bridge to sell you.

Have you not paid any attention whatsoever for the past decade. In a battle between "the will of the people" and "Oh look, our organization just donated a few million dollars to your campaign", the battle isn't even remotely, slightly close.

Hint: The will of the people don't win the battle.

Re:Electronic Democracy (2)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 2 years ago | (#41542833)

Yes, we need to not be apathetic about our rights being eroded. Knowing is different than doing, sadly.

Re:Electronic Democracy (2)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 2 years ago | (#41542877)

"So, now we know what to do to prevent or get rid of Dodd-Frank and other pieces of idiotic legislation."

What really gets me is that it was totally unnecessary. There was absolutely no need for that last-minute "explosion"... people had been telling their Congresscritters all along what they thought of SOPA and PIPA, they just didn't listen.

It took a BIG, and rather firm, kick in the ass to get them to pay attention. But that's not the way government is supposed to work. We aren't supposed to have to whip them to get them to actually work for us.

Sure we do (1)

Safety Cap (253500) | about 2 years ago | (#41543035)

It took a BIG, and rather firm, kick in the ass to get them to pay attention. But that's not the way government is supposed to work. We aren't supposed to have to whip them to get them to actually work for us.

When there's a friggin 1,600 lb gorilla in the room with "Citizens United" tattooed on its chest, us little people have to whip that cream HARD and LONG before anything will happen.

Read this in Brando mode (1, Offtopic)

paiute (550198) | about 2 years ago | (#41542215)

Don Corleone: So, Dodd will move against you first. He'll set up a meeting with someone that you absolutely trust, guaranteeing your safety, and at that meeting your Internet will be assassinated.

Let's complain... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542219)

about the MPAA web site.

Re:Let's complain... (1)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 2 years ago | (#41542991)

Democracy fights in anger —it fights for the very reason that it was forced to go to war. It fights to punish the power that was rash enough and hostile enough to provoke it —to teach that power a lesson it will not forget, to prevent the thing from happening again. ~ George F. Kennan

They should be happy. (4, Insightful)

ZorinLynx (31751) | about 2 years ago | (#41542235)

These people are making money hands-over-fist. Billions of dollars flowing into their pockets.

Why do they feel they "need" to do anything about piracy? The vast majority of people will pay for their content. Even I, who used to pirate things like crazy when I was a teenager (due to complete lack of funds) now pay for my stuff since I can afford it.

They should instead find ways to make it easier for customers to buy their media. Look what they did for music; it's DRM free now and so convenient to buy from numerous places, and it all plays on pretty much every device out there. They should do the same thing for video content. Make it so when I pay $10 to download a movie, that it's truly MINE, and I'll gladly buy more movies online.

It's not hard. Yet they are stubborn jackasses and continue with this war of theirs. Reminds me of the equally pointless "war on drugs".

Re:They should be happy. (2)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | about 2 years ago | (#41542277)

Reminds me of the equally pointless "war on drugs".

In terms of pointlessness, I'd say it's even worse. They're trying to stop people from copying data, and it's nearly impossible to catch anyone to begin with.

Re:They should be happy. (2)

amRadioHed (463061) | about 2 years ago | (#41542763)

Nothing is worse than the war on drugs. How many people a year are killed due to the war on piracy? How many people are imprisoned for mere possession of pirated materials?

Re:They should be happy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542315)

These people are making money hands-over-fist. Billions of dollars flowing into their pockets.

Are they really? I seem to recall someone saying that the likes of Apple could buy the RIAA with pocket change. I imagine the MPAA aren't that different.

Re:They should be happy. (1)

Grave (8234) | about 2 years ago | (#41542761)

Apple is unique, in that they really could buy damn near anything they wanted with pocket change. Most companies would take out a loan to purchase something worth tens of billions, but Apple could do it without putting much of a dent in their cash reserves. According to Wikipedia, in 04, $30-$40 billion in music was sold. So yeah, they are making billions and billions. And yes, Apple could buy them without much thought.

Re:They should be happy. (1)

queazocotal (915608) | about 2 years ago | (#41542347)

Totally agree.
I regularly pirate content - simply as I can't have it on all my devices otherwise.
For example, I reread books I liked after a few years.
Why on earth would I be happy with a cloud solution that probably is not going to be there in the next decade?
Barring the total collapse of western civilisation, I can pretty much say I'll be able to read epub/html/txt.

Re:They should be happy. (5, Informative)

SirGarlon (845873) | about 2 years ago | (#41542389)

Make it so when I pay $10 to download a movie, that it's truly MINE, and I'll gladly buy more movies online.

But that is what the RIAA and MPAA really want to prevent. "Piracy" is just a pretext that gets the politicians on their side. Their real goal is to revoke the idea of owning a copy of a book or movie, and "monetize" all digital "content;" that is, lock you in to paying them every time you want to review/view/listen to anything.

Re:They should be happy. (3, Interesting)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 2 years ago | (#41542835)

Their real goal is to revoke the idea of owning a copy of a book or movie

Their real real goal is to get rid of "The Printing Press, Second Edition," aka the Internet, at least as we know it.

Re:They should be happy. (1)

baker_tony (621742) | about 2 years ago | (#41542439)

You sir have certainly hurt a nail's head by hitting it.

Re:They should be happy. (1, Interesting)

blackest_k (761565) | about 2 years ago | (#41542673)

Is it a pointless war on drugs?

While the use of cannabis is mostly harmless, when used responsibly, ignoring what the state will do to you if you are caught in possession. Most others do have pretty negative effects in the long to medium term.

Just about every weekend here. There are reports of single vehicle collisions, generally fatal, in the early hours of saturday and sunday mornings. You can probably read that as someone out of their face on something decided to drive somewhere. They tend to be teens to mid twenties, it is a sad waste of life.

There are probably a good number of people here who quit drug use, due to the realisation that it would mess up their lives if caught and maybe mess up their lives if they just over indulge. The present situation at least encourages people to be a little discrete, would open legal use of drugs result in more deaths?

Then again the current situation currently funnels money to some pretty ruthless individuals, and who wouldn't want to see them out of business.

Don't both situations come down to don't take the piss, keep your head down and you'll be able to get what you want. Draw attention to yourself and you will be in trouble. Maybe the 'industry' is coming to the realisation that some tolerance is required or it will resort in damage to the bottom line. Still think it will not be long before greed sets in again.
         

Re:They should be happy. (2)

Nursie (632944) | about 2 years ago | (#41543033)

Those single vehicle collisions are probably drunk people.

The war on drugs causes -
1. Money to be funnelled to cartels
2. Devloping countries to be in permanent states of civil war
3. Users' lives to be wrecked for a crime that harms only them
4. Users to die from impurites, unknown substances and unknown strengths
5. Billions of dollars that could go toward actual harm reduction to be spent on militarising the police
6. People with no relation to the drug war to get shot by those police
7. A myriad of other negative effects

'keep your head down, don't take the piss' is a great way to perpetuate injustice and murder. Just because it's not happning in your back yard doesn't mean much.

I'm not saying legalise everything with no restrictions, but there's got to be a better way than the way we're doing it now.

Re:They should be happy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41543071)

I don't think open legal use will result in more deaths, people will be able to do the drugs in public so it is more likely when someone has too much or something there will be someone around to call for help or possibly do something to help the situation. Whereas otherwise they'd just be with other drug addicts in a back room/alley somewhere and no one around to help if something arises.

Re:They should be happy. (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 2 years ago | (#41543297)

Calling them piracy, and intellectual property are the firsts problems.

Copying and evolving information is in our very nature, in fact, what makes us humans and not weird looking monkeys living in the wild is that we copied, and kept doing so. Civilization, religions, language, cultures, etc, all is copying, and we teach our children to do that since they born.

Digital media and internet just enhanced our ability to copy, is the natural thing for us to do. It can only be improved letting us to evolve that information, to enhance, adapt, specialize or customize that copy. Probably one of the biggest strengths of open source software is that enables that, and shows clearly the potential of it

And this is not about rewarding or not authors or recognizing their work. Probably most if not all of us would be glad at the very least to pay a beer to i.e. the author of a song/book/software we enjoyed, if not a lot more. Maybe would be nice to have a system to donate to the people, group, or even companies that did something you liked or used, for everyone that creates something. That system could have the problem of people falsely claiming owner/authorship of something they didnt, but with the actual system happen the same, a lot of times from the very people/corporations what lobby for laws for "protecting" intelectual property.

What are the alternatives? Stopping evolution of society? Virtual slavery? Oligarchy?

Quack (4, Insightful)

onyxruby (118189) | about 2 years ago | (#41542247)

To paraphrase a politician (who's name I don't know). "If it quakes like a duck, walks like a duck and looks like a duck, it is a duck."

Censorship is censorship, just because it is done by a corporation doesn't some how magically make it better. The fact that they manipulated Google into doing their censoring for them doesn't somehow make it clean just because the government wasn't the one doing it.

I don't buy that they aren't engaging in censorship just because they don't have the government doing it on their behalf. For the average person, they would be hard pressed to find an alternative that isn't censored.

Re:Quack (3, Funny)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 2 years ago | (#41542307)

If it quakes like a duck

I've never met a duck who was capable of even playing Quake, much less having an identifiable style!

Re:Quack (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 2 years ago | (#41542483)

If it quackes like a duck, walks like a duck and looks like a duck, it is a duck, shoot it with your shotgun while it's in the air.

Re:Quack (1)

Dekker3D (989692) | about 2 years ago | (#41542667)

Are duckquakes anything like earthquakes?

Re:Quack (1)

MythMoth (73648) | about 2 years ago | (#41542735)

Joe McCarthy. You probably don't want him on your side of the argument.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_McCarthy [wikipedia.org]

Re:Quack (2)

Raul654 (453029) | about 2 years ago | (#41543045)

Not quite [wikipedia.org] :

Indiana poet James Whitcomb Riley (1849–1916) may have coined the phrase when he wrote "when I see a bird that walks like a duck and swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, I call that bird a duck."[1][2] The phrase may also have originated much later with Emil Mazey, secretary-treasurer of the United Auto Workers, at a labor meeting in 1946 accusing a person of being a communist.[3]

The term was later popularized in the United States by Richard Cunningham Patterson Jr., United States ambassador to Guatemala during the Cold War in 1950, who used the phrase when he accused the Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán government of being Communist. Patterson explained his reasoning as follows:

Suppose you see a bird walking around in a farm yard. This bird has no label that says 'duck'. But the bird certainly looks like a duck. Also, he goes to the pond and you notice that he swims like a duck. Then he opens his beak and quacks like a duck. Well, by this time you have probably reached the conclusion that the bird is a duck, whether he's wearing a label or not."[4]

I wish (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542271)

They stopped trying to push the same bullshit in other countries. These pieces of shit go around the world trying to strongarm countries into SOPA-like bills.

The problem is they have a LOT of money, and to lots of legislators in a lot of countries, a couple of hundred ks is the difference between getting by and "living the life".

I wish I had a testicular cancer gun. I would point it in their general direction.

Reading between the lines (2)

ddd0004 (1984672) | about 2 years ago | (#41542281)

This is going to require a much less direct approach and a larger bag of money

living or dead, both are ok. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542291)

It is the undead you have to fear.

It's a trick... (1)

Fned (43219) | about 2 years ago | (#41542317)

Get an axe.

We can only hope (1)

dosius (230542) | about 2 years ago | (#41542329)

I highly doubt they're dead forever. They WILL be back, and more insidious than ever.

-uso.

Wise man once say... (3, Funny)

ChinggisK (1133009) | about 2 years ago | (#41542337)

It's a trap!

Re:Wise man once say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542629)

A wiser man once say...

Be careful, It's a trap!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrDw1jt-7II

Dodd should be happy. (2)

TsuruchiBrian (2731979) | about 2 years ago | (#41542361)

He is lucky he isn't in jail where he belongs for his role in the financial collapse. This piece of shit was receiving benefits (i.e. bribes) from the mortgage industry in exchange for helping to pass laws to keep a corrupt system going as long as possible at taxpayer expense. It's fitting that he is the head of the MPAA. I am not sure that this organization can be properly administered without a giant douchebag at the helm.

As a magician might do... (1)

Howard Beale (92386) | about 2 years ago | (#41542387)

don't watch the hand he's putting in front of you, watch the hand behind his back. Don't trust them for a second.

The MAFFIAA are licking their wounds... (1)

Sydin (2598829) | about 2 years ago | (#41542403)

Within a year they've had SOPA and PIPA blown out of the water by that every annoying "democracy" thing, and ACTA got slammed from every angle in the EU before floundering in the parliament. The 'AA's realize this approach is failing, so now they're stepping back to consider their options. If you honestly think they've given up on getting SOPA-like legislation passed, you're dead wrong. They've just realized they have to go about it in a much more clever way, and get the laws passed in small enough pieces to not cause another uproar. Dodd isn't saying "Well that didn't work, we give up!" He's saying: "Plan A failed, so now we're switching gears to Plan B."

Kill it with fire. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542417)

It is the only way to know for sure.

Re:Kill it with fire. (1)

desdinova 216 (2000908) | about 2 years ago | (#41543475)

I thought you had to nuke it from orbit to be sure?

can we agree on fair use rights? (1)

swschrad (312009) | about 2 years ago | (#41542423)

like for instance, I have this content here "that I bought," which means "I bought a limited personal use license with a physical copy of the content in one format," and that the copyright acts almost uniformly around the world permit making copies, as many as I want, of the content in alternate formats, as long as I do not lose/sell/toss-to-torrents my original copy and only utilize one copy at a time?

Re:can we agree on fair use rights? (3, Interesting)

jitterman (987991) | about 2 years ago | (#41542809)

That's always been my take on it. Depending on age, one could theoretically have purchased media (let's use music) on each of: vinyl, 8-track, analog tape, CD, digital tape (DAT), MP3 with DRM, then MP3 sans DRM. Probably extreme, but the point here is a sale of the same content, to the same person, could possibly take place seven or so times at retail price each time. I don't now and never have felt this is fair to the consumer.

Especially in the case of vinyl and metallic tape (including video tape), the physical media degrades with time and use; if (as the industry argument goes) I am purchasing the privilege to view/hear the content, then I should only have to purchase it once. If the material breaks down, or a better format emerges, I should be entitled to a copy in that format. I'll grant a small price to cover manufacturing costs if the item is physical, but if it's 100% digital even a small fee is indefensible if I've previously purchased said media rights, and THAT implies that I would be doing nothing wrong in obtaining a copy from alternate sources once I've paid my "right to consume" fee.

False flag (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542429)

False flag, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_flag it is dead in name only. Does a bill by another name smell as shitty?

Search engine (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542477)

I ditched google and am currently using startpage. Is there any alternative that doesn't censor or use googles data set? Information likes to be free, and so do I!

Re:Search engine (2)

causality (777677) | about 2 years ago | (#41543431)

I ditched google and am currently using startpage. Is there any alternative that doesn't censor or use googles data set? Information likes to be free, and so do I!

You can use Startpage's sister company ixquick.com. It's just like Startpage except it's their own search engine that is not dependent on what Google does.

It's not quite as high-quality but it's been more than good enough every time I've tried it.

filter goes on every day (1)

fermion (181285) | about 2 years ago | (#41542513)

DNS filtering goes on every day on the Internet
I agree completely. For instance China is highly skilled in this. Iran is building a whole independent internet. Perhaps the MPAA would be happier making these their primary hubs of operation, places that are skilled in the art, so to speak. I don't think many in the western world would shed a tear if they chose to so do.

DNS Filtering != Google Takedowns (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542525)

" 'DNS filtering goes on every day on the Internet,' said Dodd. 'Obviously it needs to be done very carefully. But five million pages were taken off Google last year [for IP violations]. "

Google takedowns are not the same as DNS filtering. This just shows basic lack of understanding of Internet architecture from those that are in the legislature and how they confuse (intentionally or non-intentionally) far reaching Internet architecture concepts with company control concepts to further their agenda.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2011/05/dns-filtering-absolutely-the-wrong-way-to-defend-copyrights/

They Learned Their Lesson: Avoid Democracy (3, Informative)

Chibi Merrow (226057) | about 2 years ago | (#41542529)

Yeah, the RIAA/MPAA isn't going to try any more "Stop teh pirates!!!1!" bills anytime soon. They will probably try a few more disguised as cybersecurity legislation, tacking on copyright maximalism onto "think of the children!!!" alarmism. But that's all irrelevant.

The important lesson they learned is this: Accomplish your goals in an arena where there's no pesky democratic process to worry about. Instead, they push ACTA (which still isn't dead), and TPP (which looks to be significantly worse than ACTA). And they label them as "trade agreements" (even though they're obviously treaties), that way they don't have to deal with that pesky Senate that seems to respond better to millions of voters than millions of dollars. Yep, now they can do ALL their business in secret, back-room deals, and skip that entire public review phase.

And then, once the U.S. is signed onto these treaties, Congress gets the easy out: "We have to bring our laws into line with our international agreements!"

It's interesting... (1)

DougInNavarre (2736877) | about 2 years ago | (#41542545)

to see what topics the people come together on. I guess being able to freely watch entertainment is more important than the economy :/

Re:It's interesting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542777)

if a few sites could just put up a black page and we'd all get jobs as a result, i'm sure we'd find
some way to make that happen

STFU (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542551)

Dodd is a prime example of everything wrong with government. Being in the tank for MPAA while in office and being promptly rewarded for it when he leaves. Fuck him I don't care what this corrupt asshole thinks or says.

dodd (1)

P-niiice (1703362) | about 2 years ago | (#41542579)

Still, Dodd did say that some of the reaction to SOPA and PIPA was 'over the top' — specifically, the allegations of censorship, implied by the black bar over Google search logo or the complete shutdown of Wikipedia.

"Okay, we lost but you guys are still wrong and you suck for how you did it" doesn't sound like someone who learned their lesson.

Not to give them any ideas, but (1)

Sydin (2598829) | about 2 years ago | (#41542591)

I'm surprised they've yet to just attach similar language from PIPA/SOPA to some "Stop Child Pornography Bill". I don't care how invested they are in internet freedom, I very much doubt Google is going to come out against any bill with such a title.

My eyes, (1)

KraxxxZ01 (2445360) | about 2 years ago | (#41542677)

they hurt from all this dust.

Re:My eyes, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41542949)

Use the goggles.

SOPA and PIPA are dead... (2)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#41542893)

... but you'll love SIPA and POPA!

Dodd? Seriously? His record speaks for itself (1)

Virtucon (127420) | about 2 years ago | (#41542957)

As a Senator this guy was key in screwing up things for us as citizens well beyond his new role with the MPAA. Dodd-Frank and his other forays into trying to bring order where order didn't need to be invested is going to haunt us for years to come. Shit, it would be better if Jack Valenti rose from the dead and ran the MPAA than this idiot. Sorry, this guy is a chode and he wants to screw you over in any way he can. From this. [wikipedia.org]

On January 17, 2012, Dodd released a statement criticizing "the so-called 'Blackout Day' protesting anti-piracy legislation."[26] Referring to the websites participating in the blackout, Dodd said, "It is an irresponsible response and a disservice to people who rely on them for information and use their services. It is also an abuse of power... when the platforms that serve as gateways to information intentionally skew the facts to incite their users in order to further their corporate interests."[26] In further comments, Dodd threatened to cut off campaign contributions to politicians who did not support PIPA and SOPA, legislation supported by the MPAA.[27]

Disservice? PIPA and SOPA are disservices to consumers everywhere and he should be ashamed of himself. Wait, what am I saying, he is a politician and we all know they have no souls and therefore no sense of shame.

Just ask former Congressman Weiner about that.

Dodd.. where have I heard that name before? (1)

h8sg8s (559966) | about 2 years ago | (#41543055)

Chris Dodd can arguably be called the father (or one of them) of the current economic collapse. Hopefully he can do a repeat performance at the MPAA..

he admits nothing.... (1)

night_flyer (453866) | about 2 years ago | (#41543159)

Dodd is a politician, politicians lie, thus Dodd is a liar

I remember doing my part. (1)

GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) | about 2 years ago | (#41543215)

I wrote an email to Bob Casey (Sen PA) telling him it was a matter of free speech to let Hollywood censor the Internet.

Bob Casey wrote back,"No it isn't about free speech."

I wrote back,"Yes, it is about free speech."

Then he sends a form letter out to everyone,"I'm changing my stance on this issue because it is about free speech."

Is there anyway we can retroactively get rid of DMCA? That stuff is being abused now.

trust (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41543305)

we should trust him why?

"Let's talk" (1)

John Jorsett (171560) | about 2 years ago | (#41543413)

He said the MPAA isn't focused on getting similar legislation passed in the future, at the moment. 'I think we're better served by sitting down [with the tech sector and SOPA opponents] and seeing what we agree on.'

How reasonable-sounding. It'd be more convincing if you had tried that approach BEFORE you tried to shove this thing through. Given that your initial approach was to big-foot the opposition and you got your asses handed to you, the other side would be justified in looking at your outstretched hand and spitting in it.
 

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