Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

First Community Release of Diaspora

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the triple-encoded-smoked-salmon dept.

Social Networks 111

New submitter Jalfro writes "Following premature rumors of its demise, the Diaspora core team announce the release of 0.0.1.0. 'It's been a couple of exciting months for us as we've shifted over to a model of community governance. After switching over to SemVer for our versioning system, and plugging away at fixing code through our new unstable branch, we're excited to make our first release beyond the Alpha/Beta labels.'"

cancel ×

111 comments

Yawn... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591405)

Yeah this will go nowhere.

I'll give them points for trying though.

Re:Yawn... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591441)

I know nothing about Diaspora, but I'm sure it's a hell of a lot more than you have ever done.

Re:Yawn... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591447)

Hey now, it's not my fault it's useless and will never gain any traction. Don't be so mad bro.

Re:Yawn... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591677)

I'm sorry, but this is just too easy.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grbSQ6O6kbs [youtube.com]

"I'm not dead yet!"

Re:Yawn... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591533)

Yeah, they made a branch and changed to the "basic logic" version system. Hard to keep up with them when they're doing so much more than me!

If only they had a product and wrote some code!

Re:Yawn... (2)

IANAAC (692242) | about 2 years ago | (#41591539)

I know nothing about Diaspora, but I'm sure it's a hell of a lot more than you have ever done.

How can you be so sure? S/He's an AC, just like you.

Re:Yawn... (4, Funny)

Bill Dimm (463823) | about 2 years ago | (#41591623)

I know nothing about Diaspora, but I'm sure it's a hell of a lot more than you have ever done.

How can you be so sure? S/He's an AC, just like you.

He is sure because he is replying to himself.

Re:Yawn... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591625)

Because if s/he had actually ever done something worth anything, s/he wouldn't be sitting around sneering at the perceived uselessness of other people's projects. It's just a way of making him/herself feel better.

Re:Yawn... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41592355)

hush now little one. no tears, only dreams.

Re:Yawn... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41595911)

The Diaspora people, on the other hand, accomplished as much as the AC *while* spending the effort to do something worthwhile.

That's twice the failure and uselessness if you ask me. How must it feel for them to work constantly on something people will never use?

Re:Yawn... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591633)

I know nothing about Diaspora, but I'm sure it's a hell of a lot more than you have ever done.

How can you be so sure? S/He's an AC, just like you.

Is that somehow implying that an identity increases the chances of productivity on /.?

If anything, the opposite is true.

Re:Yawn... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591837)

Is that somehow implying that an identity increases the chances of productivity on /.?

If anything, the opposite is true.

What do you mean the opposite? Productivity increases the chances of an identity on /. ?

Re:Yawn... (5, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | about 2 years ago | (#41592037)

Not really. As someone who kicked a few bucks into the Diaspora Kickstarter project, I have to say that for all the hype and excitement and promises of the project (which sought $10,000 and received more than $200,000), they have basically accomplished fuck-all in the last two years.

To be fair, part of that is due to the difficulty of proposing a social network that by nature is only going to interest serious geeks (you have to either host a server running a seed or find someone who is to run your stuff through). Another part is due to the abysmal insecurities in their first released code (though, granted, it was extremely early code and probably deserved a little more slack than it got). And then there's the part where one of the Ilya (the founder of the Diaspora project) died almost one year ago.

It's never really going to accomplish something, but it caught a lot of attention early on and may be one of those fruitless endeavors that must be forged for its own sake, even if it's not ever actually going to supplant Facebook.

Re:Yawn... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41592169)

How does it feel to spend 10 bucks on some shit project when you could have used it down at the bus terminal to find some junkie to pound you in your ass? Open source is totally gay.

Re:Yawn... (0)

Lillebo (1561251) | about 2 years ago | (#41594343)

How does it feel to spend 10 bucks on some shit project when you could have used it down at the bus terminal to find some junkie to pound you in your ass? Open source is totally gay.

Best comment I've read today. Across all websites.

Re:Yawn... (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about 2 years ago | (#41596403)

No, No, No. If you really care about privacy, you have to have security as your number one goal. Everything else is just frosting on top. They screwed up securty so badly in the first release, it was clear they had no idea what the hell they were doing.

Re:Yawn... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41596847)

Actually, I think they just mismarketed it.

Diaspora is like social networking as OpenID is to logins.

And OpenID is taking off. Has taken off.

Re:Yawn... (1)

Jalfro (1025153) | about 2 years ago | (#41596927)

you have to either host a server running a seed or find someone who is to run your stuff through

You obviously lost track... signing up couldn't be simpler: http://podupti.me/ [podupti.me]

Re:Yawn... (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#41591557)

"This week we're releasing almost completely unusable alpha code, but on the bright side, the tshirts with our new logo should be shipping within a month!"

Re:Yawn... (1)

Seumas (6865) | about 2 years ago | (#41592041)

"This week we're releasing almost completely unusable alpha code, but on the bright side, the tshirts with our new logo should be shipping within a month!"

That sounds pretty much like what could be said in September of 2010 [techcrunch.com] .

Re:Yawn... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41593961)

Are you unaware that Diaspora is not only usable, but has a number of federated pod servers such as diasp.org?

I'm sick of people assuming that Diaspora is the same as the first alpha release. That's like judging Linux 3.6 by looking the very first Linux tarball. It's had an entire community contributing to it since the code was made public on Github two years ago.

Re:Yawn... (1)

Seumas (6865) | about 2 years ago | (#41594667)

Agreed, but the significant difference is that people actually use linux.

Both, however, face a similar sort of uphill battle with features on their side, but complexity against them.

Re:Yawn... (1)

DrXym (126579) | about 2 years ago | (#41595045)

Diaspora would get a LOT more pods if it was a no-brainer to set up and install. That's what they need to hammer on. The more schools, universities, companies, libraries, groups and individuals they have running pods, the faster and more popular it will become.

Re:Yawn... (1)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | about 2 years ago | (#41591611)

Meh. It looks like Google+ to me if I didn't care or know about the backend.

Romney takes the lead, never to look back (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591407)

All the people that pay no taxes, the entitlement society, the freeloaders and leeches that take money from the rest of us, are quaking in fear. The Socialist agenda will be destroyed and we will round up the moochers and send them to Canada or Europe to be with their own kind. America will regain its greatness, our military will become a shining example to the world, and we will no longer tolerate laziness and listlessness. America will be great once again.

Re:Romney takes the lead, never to look back (0)

JustOK (667959) | about 2 years ago | (#41591471)

again?

DAMN right (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591485)

And when Charlie Fuqua gets elected to the House of Representatives, he will deport all the Muslims dirtying up our glorious country. And he will institute the death penalty for bad children. [arktimes.com]

Re:Romney takes the lead, never to look back (0)

MrEricSir (398214) | about 2 years ago | (#41591545)

All the people that pay no taxes...

You mean the people who have benefited from the Republican agenda the most? Funny how they're now enemies of the Neo-Republican agenda.

Re:Romney takes the lead, never to look back (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591781)

Meanwhile, the conservatives who actually want their Constitution back as opposed to the Republican party's neocon "Goddamned piece of paper" bullshit will vote Libertarian or Constitution party and Romney will clutch defeat from the jaws of victory.

Re:Romney takes the lead, never to look back (0)

alci63 (1856480) | about 2 years ago | (#41593989)

Is this supposed to be some kind of funny parody, or are you, anonymous coward, any serious about what you're saying ? Someone from the USA, do you really have that kind of people around you ???

Yah (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591457)

Yawn, I'm still hung over from the last one.

Version numbers are like body language (4, Insightful)

humanrev (2606607) | about 2 years ago | (#41591559)

I know version numbers are all relative and aren't supposed to have much meaning on their own, but their first official non alpha/beta release being marked as version 0.0.1.0 kinda tells me a lot about what confidence the developers have in terms of the security and functionality of their code.

Re:Version numbers are like body language (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591651)

That's totally ridiculous.

That would imply America On-Line had an elite crack development team

Re:Version numbers are like body language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591851)

No, it tells us America On-Line had either (a) an over-confident development team or (b) an overzealous marketing department. And I think we all already knew (b).

GP said version numbers tell us what the people deciding them think about the quality of the code, not what the actual quality is.

Re:Version numbers are like body language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591771)

I know version numbers are all relative and aren't supposed to have much meaning on their own, but their first official non alpha/beta release being marked as version 0.0.1.0 kinda tells me a lot about what confidence the developers have in terms of the security and functionality of their code.

Re-read the summary. It says they switched to using a different versioning system, and this is the first release that isn't labelled as alpha/beta.

So actually the version numbers are indeed meant to mean something from this release onwards.

Re:Version numbers are like body language (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41592399)

Couldn't they at least have gone for 0.1?

0.0.1.0 is the sort of number I'd expect for them to have the day after starting.

Re:Version numbers are like body language (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591815)

Having googled semver, I think the version number may have something to do with this.

http://semver.org/ [semver.org]

Re:Version numbers are like body language (2)

humanrev (2606607) | about 2 years ago | (#41592363)

Thanks for that. Seems to explain a lot and rid me of my ignorance.

Thought somehow I got modded to (Score:5, Insightful) in the space of around 10 minutes so I can't complain either way. :)

Re:Version numbers are like body language (1)

Lost Race (681080) | about 2 years ago | (#41596413)

You were right, version numbers really are like body language: whatever you "read" from them is your imagination, projection, or wishful thinking.

Re:Version numbers are like body language (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 2 years ago | (#41598551)

You were right, version numbers really are like body language: whatever you "read" from them is your imagination, projection, or wishful thinking.

Really? Body language actually says nothing about what the person is feeling or thinking? That should be news to behavioral scientists around the world, you should spread your knowledge.

Re:Version numbers are like body language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41597847)

And 0.0.1.0 doesn't even seem to be an allowed version number in the SemVer system. The actual version number can only have three components, any additional info such as 'alpha', 'beta.3' or build identifiers may have any number of components but they must be separated from the main version number with a '-' or a '+'.

Re:Version numbers are like body language (1)

stephanruby (542433) | about 2 years ago | (#41592305)

Either that, or version 0.0.1.0 could mean version 2 in binary, and in that case, that could help us foretell how usable the application will be for the average Joe-the-plumber on Facebook.

Re:Version numbers are like body language (1)

humanrev (2606607) | about 2 years ago | (#41592383)

But wait... Joe-the-plumber wouldn't even be aware of Diaspora, much less have any need to use anything other than Facebook. Think we're getting our audiences mixed up there - this would be strictly for nerds.

Great! (3, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | about 2 years ago | (#41591597)

I think.. wtf is Diaspora? I know i could go look it up but i shouldn't have to.

Re:Great! (4, Informative)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#41591627)

not that the summary or the blog care to tell you, but after googling its a open source facebook wanna be.

I really hate it when people want to tell everyone about their new whatever, and dont even bother to tell you WTF it even does

Re:Great! (4, Informative)

LordLucless (582312) | about 2 years ago | (#41591751)

A little more than that; it's also supposed to be a decentralized facebook wannabe. The idea is that people can run their own node (I forget what the diaspora term is), and the system as a whole is composed of those interconnected nodes. Because you control your own node, it's impossible for any of your personal information to escape without your explicit permission.

Personally, I think the initiative and work involved in setting up a node (even if they get it to the relatively trivial, it's always going to be harder than just signing up) is going to necessarily impact adoption, and it'll never get off the ground. Unless, of course, you have someone configuring and hosting your node for you, in which case all advantage is lost (you're still placing control of your information in the hands of a third party).

Re:Great! (1)

Dekker3D (989692) | about 2 years ago | (#41591987)

The advantage is that you can choose to do either-... set up your own node for security, or use someone else's to connect to your Diaspora-using friends.

Re:Great! (2)

dudpixel (1429789) | about 2 years ago | (#41592753)

As I understand it, there only needs to be 1 technical person to set it up for each community. So once it is set up, the rest of the community can use it without any technical knowledge at all.

I really like that aspect of it, and the fact that you have your data in-house (or at least in your control).

Even non-techies care about the privacy aspects of social networks - when the risks are explained to them.

Re:Great! (2)

fikx (704101) | about 2 years ago | (#41592853)

if someone else sets up the node for you, you at least have a choice of who to pick to do it....kinda like how email works : I don't run my own email server, I let my ISP do it for me. If they don't do a good job, dump 'em and get a new email address

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41595391)

Which is part of the problem. Your ISP can sell you out at any time. Whereas you would control your data on Diaspora. It wouldn't guarantee you perfect control, but at least in theory, it would make it that much harder for the FBI to get their hands on your data. They would have to serve either you directly or the people you're connecting with in order to gain access.

Of course the reality may turn out to be different, depending upon how well they do the implementing of the idea and what the governments do in terms of laws.

Re:Great! (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41594755)

Personally, I think the initiative and work involved in setting up a node (even if they get it to the relatively trivial, it's always going to be harder than just signing up) is going to necessarily impact adoption, and it'll never get off the ground

There's a whole bunch of reasons why Diaspora is a non-starter.

First, they're moving to a community release NOW. They should have made the community release at the same time that they brought up their site. Second, the requirements [stackexchange.com] are offensive. Social networking is relatively simple, it's the amount of data to deal with that makes it complex, not the actual tasks. We've had fora and the like for ages. Everything the typical social networking site does could be handled by a typical PHP CMS (e.g. Drupal or Wordpress) and a module or three, using existing methods of syndication. Third, nobody knows or cares what it is.

Re:Great! (2)

LordLucless (582312) | about 2 years ago | (#41594815)

Those requirements look pretty modest to me. They can all be installed on any half-decent linux distro with a single apt-get install command, or similar. Yeah, your average PHP shared-host won't be able to run it. That's because your average PHP shared-host blows, not because the requirements are particularly exotic. They're all freely available, well-known projects, with well-supported packages.

And trying to build anything more than what it was designed for (ie: a simple, content-based website) on top of Drupal is a lesson in pain. Drupal is incrementally approaching professional frameworks like Rails and Django with each revision, but its doing so slowly, and it is still very much a CMS trying to be a framework.

Re:Great! (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41595419)

Drupal is incrementally approaching professional frameworks like Rails and Django with each revision, but its doing so slowly, and it is still very much a CMS trying to be a framework.

I don't disagree with that, but nearly all the functionality is already there (or I wouldn't suggest it.)

Re:Great! (0)

Rogerborg (306625) | about 2 years ago | (#41597405)

people can run their own node (I forget what the diaspora term is)

Clusterfuck.

You can buy them with bitcoins.

Re:Great! (4, Informative)

Dagger2 (1177377) | about 2 years ago | (#41591679)

It's an AGPLed [wikipedia.org] , federated [wikipedia.org] social network/protocol [wikipedia.org] , kinda like a cross between Facebook [wikipedia.org] and e-mail [wikipedia.org] or XMPP [wikipedia.org] .

Can anyone explain to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591739)

...who needs this and why should I care?

Re:Can anyone explain to me (5, Insightful)

Dagger2 (1177377) | about 2 years ago | (#41592253)

Everybody; because it's federated.

Think about email. When you want to send mail to somebody, you just pull up your email account and do it. No fuss. You don't need to sign up for a Gmail account, a Hotmail account, an Outlook account, a Yahoo account, a gmx.net account and so on for every provider just to be able to send email to that provider's users. One account with one of them is enough to email a user of any of them.

Social networking isn't like that at the moment. You have to sign up for separate Facebook, Google+, Twitter, Nexopia, Badoo, Bebo and so on accounts just to interact with the users of those networks. This is bad.

To see why, just look at Gmail. Back when that was introduced, Hotmail was the go-to provider for free webmail. I don't know if you remember, but at the time Hotmail kinda sucked. It had an ugly, slow interface and an allowance of 2-4 MB. That was standard. Then Gmail comes along with a clean, responsive interface and a 1 GB allowance, and of course it's massively popular. Suddenly every other provider was cleaning up their UI and offering much larger allowances. Outlook.com, for instance, now has the clean, responsive interface and it doesn't even have a cap on the amount of mail you can store.

If email wasn't federated, none of that would have happened. Nobody would have used or cared about Gmail back when it had no users because, well, it had no users. You'd still be using Hotmail with its 2 MB inbox. You couldn't even set up your own server to avoid all that, because your own server would be useless for mailing Hotmail users.

Diaspora aims to bring federation to social networks, and that's why you should care about it.

Re:Can anyone explain to me (1)

westyvw (653833) | about 2 years ago | (#41592557)

This is a good explanation, even though I did know what Diaspora was. I usually prefer the privacy angle, but your definition really applies to a broad number of potential users.

Re:Can anyone explain to me (-1, Redundant)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 2 years ago | (#41592953)

You couldn't even set up your own server to avoid all that, because your own server would be useless for mailing Hotmail users.

You were right on, except for this part. Of course you could email hotmail users if you set up your own email server. Thats how email works. You send a message through your server, it does an MX lookup for hotmail, and sends your message through their inbound SMTP servers.

Re:Can anyone explain to me (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41593099)

You completely missed his point. You can only do that because email is a *federated* system. If it wasn't, your email server wouldn't talk to hotmail's email server. There would be islands of completely separate email networks, much like there is with social networks at the moment.

Re:Can anyone explain to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41593581)

>Diaspora aims to bring federation to social networks, and that's why you should care about it.

Do you really think no one has ever thought about this?

And while we are at it, maybe you should read Google+ and Facebook EULAs. They explicitly forbid the use of software like Diaspora for federation.

Re:Can anyone explain to me (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | about 2 years ago | (#41595267)

And while we are at it, maybe you should read Google+ and Facebook EULAs.

They have EULAs?

Re:Can anyone explain to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41593999)

They already made a product-killing mistake, so no, you shouldn't care about it.

NEVER name a product that you want to have mass appeal "diaspora", which sounds like a fungal infection and means, literally in greek, dispersion. There is a reason that "facebook" is named facebook, and I'm amazed that the dev team didn't realize that no casual internet user will tell his/her friends: "Add me as a friend on DIASPORA".

Call it FriendMe or SocialX or Crank, or ANYTHING other than a fungal infection.

shennanigans...marketing word alert (1)

globaljustin (574257) | about 2 years ago | (#41594005)

Everybody; because it's federated.

Just like Windows Zune is 'interoperable'...

'Federated' is not a technical term with a concrete definition. Like the term 'the cloud.' It is useful in some contexts but if it is not specified further it will always just confound a discussion.

Yes, Diaspora may be 'federated'...but that doesn't mean it is an 'online social networking alternative to facebook'...Diaspora requires an additional step...the local node...for every node in the network.

That step is enough. It will *never* compete against facebook.com or google+ because the billions out there just **don't want to set up a fucking social networking server**

Everyday users would rather go without than have to use Diaspora.

It must be just as easy to access as facebook...just from a browser or it will **never** compete on scale.

That said, I appreciate their effort.

 

Re:shennanigans...marketing word alert (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41595139)

I think you missed parents point. Here, let me put some words into your mouth:

Yes, SMTP may be 'federated'...but that doesn't mean it is a replacement for provider-internal usenet groups...SMTP requires an additional step...the server...for every node in the network.

That step is enough. It will *never* compete against usenet because the billions out there just **don't want to set up a fucking SMTP server**

Re:Can anyone explain to me (1)

Fnord666 (889225) | about 2 years ago | (#41594859)

Think about email. When you want to send mail to somebody, you just pull up your email account and do it. No fuss. You don't need to sign up for a Gmail account, a Hotmail account, an Outlook account, a Yahoo account, a gmx.net account and so on for every provider just to be able to send email to that provider's users. One account with one of them is enough to email a user of any of them.

I do like your analogy. I think it spells out fairly well the problem that Diaspora is trying to solve. To extend that a bit, email also exemplifies what can go wrong with such a system. For certain definitions of the word, email is a "federated" system as well. The problem is that the "federation" was not baked in from the beginning but was added on as icing later. I don't consider that the fault of the designers. These things just weren't particularly relevant when email was conceived. As a result of this however a high percentage of the email flowing through the system is spam with forged headers, etc. with little to no actual authentication. Any attempts to lock it down are mostly a case of "closing the barn door after the horses are out". A federated social media network will need to take this into account as a number one priority item. The first pass at Diaspora by its creators failed badly in this and many other aspects. Hopefully this next version will address this.

Re:Great! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41592039)

Social networking for uptight open source faggots. Got it.
 
No one really gives a fuck tho. This thing will be dead in about 8 months due to lack of interest. A couple open source fags will try to keep it afloat but they'll be the only people using it. Plus maybe a couple of helpless neckbeards who don't have friends anyway.

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41592311)

Who is this "No one" you are talking about?
I tend to agree that it won't be ubiquitious any time soon, but if it can be implemented as part of a stand alone 'freedom box', it might make a few bitcoins for the company selling it as a product.

Re:Great! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41591787)

It's been in and out of the news for a couple of years now. Most regular readers probably know about it. You don't, but that's your fault, not the editors'.

PS - Booth was a assassin fighting for the cause of evil, you slimy fuck.

Re:Great! (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 2 years ago | (#41591925)

I have to totally disagree, its 100% the editors fault. This is a sign of being rank amateur, and they should have their credentials ( if any ) yanked..

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41592513)

Editor?! Where????

They're an endangered species around these parts.

Re:Great! (0)

elloGov (1217998) | about 2 years ago | (#41591887)

Diaspora is a group of inexperienced kids selling an utopian verbal solution of a decentralized social network without having written a single line of code.

Call me a pessimist, but, having lived in the NYC, the Big Apple is the capital of hype and bull-shitting hustlers. With that said, I'd like nothing more than for these kids to succeed as a decentralized social network would be awesome. However, with every passing day it seems that they've opened their mouths too soon.

Re:Great! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41593337)

Did you not understand something about the term "community release"? They're no longer in control of the project, dipshit.

At any rate, this is only coming after the kids delivered on their promise. It already works. Get some up-to-date info before deciding to act like an asshole.

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41594043)

Did you not understand something about the term "community release"?

Of course he does. It means "We've blown the $200k we lifted through Kickstarter and are bored with the project now, so here's some code. Bye".

Re:Great! (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 2 years ago | (#41594081)

They have written code. What they haven't done is documented their protocol. They've used AGPL, which barely meets the definition of F/OSS, meaning that most people wanting to do an independent implementation can't look at their code, and their ad-hoc protocol has never had any kind of even half-arsed peer review, let alone the kind that would be required to ensure that it actually enforces the kinds of privacy guarantees that they want.

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41594771)

Diaspora is a group of inexperienced kids selling an utopian...

I don't mean to be a grammar Nazi, but I see this all too often. With words that begin with a consonant sound sound such as Utopian, Universe, Unicycle, the proper indefinite article is "A", not "An". With words like Umpire, Umbrella, Uncle, the proper indefinite article is "An" because they begin with a vowel sound. You are looking at the word instead of listening to the sound. So, you should have wrote:

Diaspora is a ground of inexperienced kids selling a utopian...

Re:Great! (0)

garbut (1990152) | about 2 years ago | (#41596579)

you should have wrote

have written

Re:Great! (1)

humanrev (2606607) | about 2 years ago | (#41592429)

I think.. wtf is Diaspora? I know i could go look it up but i shouldn't have to.

Really? You're a Slashdotter and haven't glanced at or read at least one other Diaspora story here?

That's like me asking for clarification on what BitCoins are. Some things you should just KNOW by now. :)

Re:Great! (1)

rbrausse (1319883) | about 2 years ago | (#41594593)

I think.. wtf is Diaspora?

TFS is wrong and should have used the product name correctly. You wouldn't be baffled if the submitter (or editor) just wrote "diaspora*" :)

How hard can it be... (3, Funny)

itsdapead (734413) | about 2 years ago | (#41591655)

...when announcing that Version X of something is released, to actually spare 3-4 words in the summary to give us readers a clue what the flying fuck the "something" you're talking about is, so we can decide whether we want to read further?

Even TFA manages to avoid saying what 'Diaspora [diasporaproject.org] ' actually is or offering a link back to a descriptive page.

(To save others the trouble of Googling it's either an open-source social network, a freeware Battlestar Galactica game, a migraine-inducing SF Novel by Greg Egan or something to do with Jewish history... By a process of deduction, I'm going with the former...)

Come on guys, the point of a news site is to tell people things they don't know,.

Re:How hard can it be... (1)

cerberusss (660701) | about 2 years ago | (#41596439)

Actually, it's all of the above. It's an open-source social network of migraine-inducing jews who all play the Battlestar Galactica game. Currently, there's only one member, Greg Egan.

Re:How hard can it be... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41596825)

It's a project that's been going on for years. Have you been on the fucking moon or something to have missed this. Ugh, complaining on slashdot of all places about tech. Get off here you old fart, this place is for people that fucking know things, not wannabe hipsters.

Grammar? (2)

fieldstone (985598) | about 2 years ago | (#41592017)

Come on. "It's" means "it is". The article should say "its" instead, since that is the possessive.

I realize I may be a bit of a stickler here, but Slashdot is a major news site (the only one I personally check with any regularity), and professionalism means not mangling the language. Especially not in ways that make already common mistakes look acceptable. Copy-editing is important.

Re:Grammar? (1)

fieldstone (985598) | about 2 years ago | (#41592031)

For reference, I mean when saying "it's demise" (sic), which should be "its demise". Saying "it's been", as in "it has been", is fine.

Redundancy Department. (4, Insightful)

Cruciform (42896) | about 2 years ago | (#41592425)

Most of the visible posts are complaints about the summary not including a description.
That would indicate that the posters are too lazy to check to see if someone else had already posted it.
Pots meet kettle.

You're not perfect.

And Diaspora has been covered on here many times, so at least the submitter and the editor have an excuse.

Re:Redundancy Department. (1)

Cruciform (42896) | about 2 years ago | (#41594303)

PS. Articles come with tags. Some are jokes but others are quite useful in seeing the history of coverage, or explain the topic in depth. Click and enjoy.

First "who cares?"! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41592449)

Really, by now, who cares anymore?

Dia-what-a-waste-of-kickstarter-funds... I think I heard of it a long time ago.

Are there a lot of grognards around lately? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41592999)

So maybe I'm just getting lucky and seeing a lot of posts of the flavor of "What is X that they're talking about in the article? The summary doesn't explain it!!!". You know what? You didn't become one of the supposed enlightened by having all of your information spoon fed to you. Don't know what something is? Look it the fuck up. It's so easy these days: just type it into your favorite search engine (there are a crap ton out there) and figure it out. I'm not going to be one of these people that assumes that people "should just know" everything, but there's no excuse for being lazy. The alternative is that we explain everything all the way down. "Diaspora is a social network", "a social network is... runs on computers", "a computer is... electrons", "an electron is...". It gets absurd really quickly.

What's it look like? (4, Interesting)

kwerle (39371) | about 2 years ago | (#41593449)

I know what a facebook page looks like. I know what a G+ page looks like. I know what a myspace page looks like.

What does a diaspora page look like?

Do I have to create an account to see one?

I really am asking for something that simple. I'd like to see the public portion of a diaspora page. That's it.

Re:What's it look like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41594181)

What does a web page look like?

Re:What's it look like? (1)

Fnord666 (889225) | about 2 years ago | (#41595135)

What does a diaspora page look like?

It looks like whatever the owner of the pod you are on wants it to look like. Pages on the diasp.org [diasp.org] pod look very similar to Facebook. Other pods might appear differently. I would expect that eventually the pod code will support themes so that the pod owner can have his site appear however he wants. The point is that you aren't stuck with a single social media overlord. Don't like the terms of service or the terms have changed for the pod you are on? Move your profile to a different pod. Worst case scenario is that you stand up your own pod. The hope though is that there will be enough pods that you won't need to do that, but you will have the option if you wish. Right now I'm wondering if you could build out and stand up a small pod for a few users on an EC2 instance and still stay in the "free" category. If so, then once an image has been built it would be nothing to stand up your own pod and tweak it to however you wanted.

Re:What's it look like? (1)

kwerle (39371) | about 2 years ago | (#41598075)

Really? Not one, simple, concrete example? That's all I'm looking for. Just one.

Setup a server and let us know! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41595281)

Setup a server and let us know!
Come on, this is /. - you should know to BYOS already.

BTW, there are other 100% F/LOSS competitors already out and connecting servers together into their federated service.
* http://buddycloud.com/ [buddycloud.com]
* Friendica
* Libertree

Also check out the Twitter replacement Tent.io (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41593687)

http://seanmonstar.com/post/32876503398/tent-io [seanmonstar.com]
"I can run my own Tent server, and host and publish my own status messages on my own property. You can do the same. And our friends who aren’t as technically-savvy can use a hosted provider that’s perhaps offset by ads. We can all subscribe to each other, and see each others statuses, just like we currently can on Twitter.

The first client to consume this new Tent protocol is Tent.is. They describe the both of these like so:"

It's been so long... (1)

Phoenix (2762) | about 2 years ago | (#41594553)

It's been so long now that I honestly forgot what it is supposed to be. I mean I now know what it is thanks to the comments here and some research on my own, but all I can remember from the first time they announced it's creation was I was so disappointed that all I could see is a webpage with vague promises and platitudes and an email update feature that was not working. So from then till now, I honestly forgot what it was supposed to be.

For that matter I even forgot the name.

Installation is a royal pain in the ass (2)

cerberusss (660701) | about 2 years ago | (#41594897)

Chrissake, this installation is a royal pain in the ass. The number of convoluted steps is just plain crazy.

First, I have to walk through a long, loooong installation instruction for Debian here [github.com] . Then I turn to the Notes on installing and running [github.com] , only to end halfway with a crazy error message.


diaspora@sirius:~/diaspora$ bundle install --without development test heroku
Fetching gem metadata from http://rubygems.org/ [rubygems.org] ......
Fetching gem metadata from http://rubygems.org/ [rubygems.org] ..
Fetching https://github.com/plataformatec/markerb.git [github.com]
error: while accessing https://github.com/plataformatec/markerb.git/info/refs [github.com]

fatal: HTTP request failed
Git error: command `git clone 'https://github.com/plataformatec/markerb.git' "/home/diaspora/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p194@diaspora/cache/bundler/git/markerb-6697fe76410a3ed08ce3f5fd8ee64ebddd200665" --bare --no-hardlinks` in directory /home/diaspora/diaspora has failed.

Compiling Ruby from scratch, installing cruft in /usr/local, installing something weird called RVM.... What the fuck happened to ./configure && make && make install?

Re:Installation is a royal pain in the ass (1)

cerberusss (660701) | about 2 years ago | (#41595249)

The first problem was that for some reason, I had to re-run "sudo dpkg-reconfigure ca-certificates".

Then I got an error "markerb ArgumentError: invalid byte sequence in US-ASCII" after the command "bundle install --without development test heroku" tells me:

Using markerb (1.0.0) from https://github.com/plataformatec/markerb.git [github.com] (at master)
ArgumentError: invalid byte sequence in US-ASCII
An error occurred while installing markerb (1.0.0), and Bundler cannot continue.
Make sure that `gem install markerb -v '1.0.0'` succeeds before bundling.

Solution turned out here to add the following to .bashrc:

export LANG="en_US.UTF-8"
export LC_ALL="en_US.UTF-8"

I stopped at the point where you configure the webserver, because SSL is required and I don't have an SSL certificate yet for my private webserver.

Re:Installation is a royal pain in the ass (2)

jandrese (485) | about 2 years ago | (#41596581)

You could just self sign a cert for now. If it's just for you and your close buddies they can accept the self-signed cert, just warn them that their browser is going to call you a thieving lying scumbag before they go to your site.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...