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Microsoft's Hand-Gesture Sensor Bracelet

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the can-you-build-in-a-laser-pistol dept.

Input Devices 86

another random user tips this quote from the BBC: "A wrist-worn sensor that creates 3D-models of the user's hand movements in real-time has been built by Microsoft. The Digits prototype is part of an effort to create a mobile device that would allow its owner to control a range of equipment using hand gestures. The firm said it could be used as a virtual TV control, a way to operate a smartphone while it is in the user's pocket, and to play video games. It is designed to be less cumbersome and uncomfortable than sensor gloves. However, some experts question whether consumers would want to wear such a device during their day-to-day activities." ACM has the research paper (PDF) describing this device and its use.

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Some Experts Suck. (5, Interesting)

localman57 (1340533) | about 2 years ago | (#41599611)

However, some experts question whether consumers would want to wear such a device during their day-to-day activities.

If you showed those same "experts" the bulky brick style cell phones lots of people carried in the mid-90's, they'd probably also question whether anyone would bother to lug such a thing around, while doing their day-to-day activities. Especially since all they did was take phone calls. But hey, if you can't make something cool, piss on what somebody else is doing, right?

Re:Some Slashdotters Suck Too! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41600073)

bulky brick style cell phones lots of people carried in the mid-90's

I worked in a store that sold those phones and nobody ever actually carried them. 90% of the time they were a car phone.

I can tell you from experience that motion controls like this item (and even Kinect) are just fads that will never find productive uses.

Re:Some Slashdotters Suck Too! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41601603)

Wow, way to put that arrow in the dirt about 30ft short.

The kinect has already been used in a crazy array of stuff Microsoft didn't even imagine, and this is obviously a prototype that you could pack into a much smaller device... already making it far more useful than it appears now, in a photo, to someone with zero imagination.

But do try again on the next one.

Re:Some Experts Suck. (1)

bobcat7677 (561727) | about 2 years ago | (#41600083)

Can't be any worse then those hideous looking Google goggles...

Re:Some Experts Suck. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41600351)

Steve Jobs might have been able to make this tech cool but I wouldn't count on the useless assortment of dorks and suits running Microsoft to pull it off.

Re:Some Experts Suck. (2)

trashcoder (1839814) | about 2 years ago | (#41601101)

No, especially not the guys running the xbox department. - After selling a total of 8 million units in its first 60 days, the Kinect holds the Guinness World Record of being the "fastest selling consumer electronics device". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinect [wikipedia.org]

Re:Some Experts Suck. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41603551)

So did they manage to actually make any money or did they have to sell them at a loss to move the units? No need to answer that, we've all seen Microsoft's stock chart, lmao.

Re:Some Experts Suck. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41622205)

So did they manage to actually make any money or did they have to sell them at a loss to move the units? No need to answer that, we've all seen Microsoft's stock chart, lmao.

http://www.lazygamer.net/xbox-360/microsoft-will-make-a-profit-on-every-kinect-sold/

From the "appropriate domain name" department, for those too lazy to check facts themselves.

Re:Some Experts Suck. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41622239)

Also for those too lazy to check facts:

https://www.google.com/finance?client=ob&q=NASDAQ:MSFT

They've had ups and downs, but it's been a fairly reliable (if volatile) long-term stock. And even on a downtrend right now, is higher than it started the year.

Re:Some Experts Suck. (2)

Dan East (318230) | about 2 years ago | (#41600459)

Exactly. I never imaged so many people would walk around with a bluetooth earpiece sticking out the side of their head (especially people who, for all obvious appearances, have absolutely no reason to be grocery shopping like that). A bracelet is much less imposing and restrictive, so it would be adopted even more than an earpiece (at least you can actually hear your environment with both ears like a normal human being).

Re:Some Experts Suck. (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 2 years ago | (#41600569)

Personally, I'd make it part of the feature set up the Pebble [kickstarter.com] watch, or something similar.

bracelet or RING!!!! (5, Funny)

iplayfast (166447) | about 2 years ago | (#41599613)

A Ring would be so much better. One ring to rule all my appliances,

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599731)

No it must be a bracelet, coupled with some kind of wearable visor. After all, the mark of the beast is on the hand and the forehead...

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599781)

A Ring would be so much better. One ring to rule all my appliances,

*absolutely*

a way to operate a smartphone while it is in the user's pocket

Because there's no way I'm going to be standing in a room full of people making wrist-sized gestures in my pocket!

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599833)

My precious! [wikipedia.org]

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41600001)

Agree. Who wants to wave their arm around when they can just wag a finger?

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41600329)

Yeah, the thing needs to read one gesture with one finger anyway...

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (1)

iplayfast (166447) | about 2 years ago | (#41601103)

I see, hadn't thought about which finger to put the ring on, but you've made it so clear.

So I says to the guy
"Hey, turn that music up!" ... That's when I lost it!!!

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (1)

damien_kane (519267) | about 2 years ago | (#41611075)

So I says to the guy
"Hey, turn that music up!" ... That's when I lost it!!!

And ever since I've been The Champ...

Kudos

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (1)

iplayfast (166447) | about 2 years ago | (#41623023)

I wasn't sure anyone would get the reference. You must live in southern Ontario or perhaps Michigan.

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41601257)

It will probably never be produced, but The O.R.B. [hybratech.com] would be cool.

Re:bracelet or RING!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41614963)

A Ring would be so much better. One ring to rule all my appliances,

lord of the rings nerd much.

hopefully it's patented (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599625)

because this is one technology i don't want to spread. just like amazon saved us all from one-click asshatery on every website if this is patented it could save us all from dorky techno bracelets.

Tools (4, Funny)

Frag-A-Muffin (5490) | about 2 years ago | (#41599641)

Like people who do the bluetooth headset thing while walking down the street don't look like tools as it is. Let's just throw in hand gestures for good measure! Yay society!

P.S. How on earth are we going to separate the crazies from people who are just on the phone now?!! :)

Re:Tools (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599849)

For a while we already have crazy people talking to invisible people/ghost. Now we have hand gesture mimes too!

Re:Tools (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41600859)

Finally, mobile communication for Italians!

Re:Tools (2)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#41599915)

P.S. How on earth are we going to separate the crazies from people who are just on the phone now?!! :)

Are they mutually exclusive?

You can be crazy and on the phone too.

Hell, if the crazies ever figure out to put a fake bluetooth headset on (a real one would actually allow them to control your mind ;-), then nobody will notice them any more until they do something really special.

Re:Tools (3, Funny)

CdBee (742846) | about 2 years ago | (#41600005)

I think thats already happened judging from some of the stuff I overhear.

"Yeah? Well we've got triangular bees" - from a passing guy with a phone headset, never did get to the bottom of that one...

Re:Tools (1)

localman57 (1340533) | about 2 years ago | (#41599959)

Like people who do the bluetooth headset thing while walking down the street don't look like tools as it is. Let's just throw in hand gestures for good measure! Yay society!

The really, really, really sad thing is that you already see people doing this while they're on a normal cell phone. And some of them are driving.

Re:Tools (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#41600015)

The really, really, really sad thing is that you already see people doing this while they're on a normal cell phone.

LOL, for some of us, the hand moving is part of talking.

I work from home, and on conference calls, I pace around and gesture as I'm speaking -- I simply couldn't not do it.

Though, admittedly, I don't preclude the possibility that I'm also crazy. ;-)

Re:Tools (2)

Frag-A-Muffin (5490) | about 2 years ago | (#41600797)

The really, really, really sad thing is that you already see people doing this while they're on a normal cell phone.

LOL, for some of us, the hand moving is part of talking.

I work from home, and on conference calls, I pace around and gesture as I'm speaking -- I simply couldn't not do it.

Though, admittedly, I don't preclude the possibility that I'm also crazy. ;-)

Hahahaha .. dude .. I just thought of something funny. :) For people who DO like to talk with their hands (I do sometimes myself!) how do you know you're not going to inadvertently start a porn vid on your phone or something while on the phone with your boss! HAHAHAHA.

P.S. @localman57: The worst I've seen while driving, dude next to me was making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich while on the highway going 120km/h!! I mean, full on jars of PB and J, knifing it out and spreading it on bread! I really wish I had a video of it. At least I had a passenger as a witness.

Heeeeey Macarena!!!! (1)

Slugster (635830) | about 2 years ago | (#41601133)

...Exactly. People talking too loud on their phones may be annoying, but at least none of them have tried to poke my eye out (at least, not since they got rid of the phones with the little antennas...).

Re:Tools (1)

mug funky (910186) | about 2 years ago | (#41602631)

as if talking to yourself and wildly gesturing were a good predictor of crazy. ever been to Italy?

Re:Tools (1)

trdrstv (986999) | about 2 years ago | (#41705311)

Like people who do the bluetooth headset thing while walking down the street don't look like tools as it is. Let's just throw in hand gestures for good measure! Yay society!

I have an Italian Friend who does this all the time anyway, he simply can't talk without gesturing so slapping a bracelet on his wrist would only make him "look less crazy" while walking down the street miming his calls over Bluetooth.

Try loggiing ver on right hand of Mark Zuckerberg (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599655)

as it would be interesting to confirm if he's a bigger user of his right hand as I think he is....

More comfortable than gloves... (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 2 years ago | (#41599669)

... because we all know how uncumbersome a 2-inch camera is going to feel strapped onto the inside of your wrist.

<eyeroll/>

Re:More comfortable than gloves... (3, Informative)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#41599977)

... because we all know how uncumbersome a 2-inch camera is going to feel strapped onto the inside of your wrist.

You know, you'd probably get used to it ... and it will probably get smaller over time.

But, as someone with a fair few wrist watches, I actually have a watch that weighs in at around 300 grams, and one or two that weigh in at around 200 grams.

It takes surprisingly little time to go from "holy crap is this thing heavy" to not even noticing it.

And, in this case, you can go around pointing your wrist like Spider Man going *pchew* *pchew*. At least, I would. ;-)

Re:More comfortable than gloves... (2)

inputdev (1252080) | about 2 years ago | (#41600147)

You know, you'd probably get used to it ... and it will probably get smaller over time.

I'm sure you are right, but it seems like the distance of the camera off of the wrist is essential to get a good view of the fingers, which would limit the ability to make it flush like a watch band. I think a camera embedded where your eyes are will be the most intuitive to the user - it sees what you see, more or less, so it's easy to aim and understand why it is or isn't working well.

Re:More comfortable than gloves... (1)

citizenr (871508) | about 2 years ago | (#41600175)

it cant get smaller because it needs to see the hand = needs to stick out of your wrist

Re:More comfortable than gloves... (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | about 2 years ago | (#41600523)

I'm sure I'm in the minority but years ago I stopped wearing watches because they just irritated the bejeebers outta me. It's all about the way I rest my forearms on the table I when I'm typing, the watchband would rub on the desk surface and generally get on my nerves. (I'm probably not using the "best" form in typing, but 20 years in and no carpal tunnel yet.) I kinda wish it didn't but it does. Plus these days, with computers around and cell phones, I always know the time anyway.
So this thing probably wouldn't work for me either, but, it is a neat concept I suppose. As to being implemented in a ring, it slightly reminds me of this specialty gizmo [sourceaudio.net] for guitarists.

Dear God... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599679)

A wrist-worn sensor that [...will] allow its owner to control a range of equipment using hand gestures.

Well, there goes the rest of what I laughingly refer to as my "life". At least I'll die with a smile on my face. Kind of.

OMG what about pron!? (1)

Ashenkase (2008188) | about 2 years ago | (#41599681)

That "bracelet" is definitely going to get in the way, although it may help cure my carpel tunnel.

Re:OMG what about pron!? (1)

symes (835608) | about 2 years ago | (#41599961)

I would imagine that with time and tweaking it will shrink. If it does, I would quite like this... I am wondering whether I could play a virtual keyboard with it.

Re:OMG what about pron!? (1)

funwithBSD (245349) | about 2 years ago | (#41601589)

And this motion opens the Natlie Portman folder...

Stirring hot grits motion? (2)

Dareth (47614) | about 2 years ago | (#41609983)

Stirring hot grits motion?

I already have a few gestures in mind. (2)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about 2 years ago | (#41599723)

Oh, c'mon. You thought it too.

Re:I already have a few gestures in mind. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41602109)

Oh, c'mon. You thought it too.

"It looks you're pleasuring yourself. Would you like help?"

even their best promo art shows it doesn't work (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599733)

Take a close look at the 2 images. The CGI doesn't match the finger position.

Marketing fail

Re:even their best promo art shows it doesn't work (3, Interesting)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 2 years ago | (#41599859)

Take a close look at the 2 images. The CGI doesn't match the finger position.

And it doesn't have to, either. It's actually probably better that it doesn't: you want the matches to be close enough to the correct gesture, rather than the exact gesture itself, as exact matching would create endless frustration for the user. Rough matching, OTOH, if done decently well, is vastly easier to use. That's why speech recognition is so hard for computers: because humans don't pronounce the same word the exact same way every time (well, that and some words sound identical).

Re:even their best promo art shows it doesn't work (1)

citizenr (871508) | about 2 years ago | (#41600265)

And it doesn't have to, either. It's actually probably better that it doesn't: you want the matches to be close enough to the correct gesture, rather than the exact gesture itself, as exact matching would create endless frustration for the user

Yes, I just love when UI interpolates and guesses what I want instead of letting me point where I really want to.

Re:even their best promo art shows it doesn't work (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41600967)

Yes, I just love when UI interpolates and guesses what I want instead of letting me point where I really want to.

The copy was explicit. This device is only designed to work with a specific range of gestures, and the graphic indicated the UI wasn't designed to pay much attention to the position of the middle finger. So at least its consistent with some of Microsoft's other attempts at developing UI.

ME, Vista and Metro all come to mind.

You have to give Microsoftsome credit. No matter how many times people tell them they missed it when you raised your middle finger, they keep finding new and different ways to ignore it.

Re:even their best promo art shows it doesn't work (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41600863)

and some words/syllables sound different depending on which syllables come before and/or after them. And some words are run together in speech, depending on the syllables and the dialect, enunciation, and intent of the speaker. If we could just get computers recognizing sign language...

place a magnet in it for healing powers (2)

bigpickle (2647701) | about 2 years ago | (#41599737)

I just took it to the next level.

Sign Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599763)

Has no one else thought of sign language recognition as the main useful application for this technology?
It could be faster and more natural than typing to ever hearing people!

Re:Sign Language (1)

tilante (2547392) | about 2 years ago | (#41600923)

Unfortunately, sign languages are natural languages, with the full complexity of natural languages - so you'd need to have good translation of natural languages first. To give a quick example, in ASL, the equivalent to the English "I went to Sarah's house," would be signed as something that could be represented in words as "*past-tense* Sarah possessive house I go". (The asterisks there are to indicate that ASL's past-tense indicator is a single sign, but doesn't really correspond directly to any single word in English.)

For extra fun in translation, it's common in ASL to indicate people who are around you by pointing to them with the appropriate sign. Thus, if Sarah was in the room with me, I'd sign "*past-tense* possessive house I go", making the "possessive" sign toward Sarah. (And note too that the same "possessive" hand position can mean English's "my", "your", "his", "her", "their", "our", etc., depending on who you gesture toward while making it.) For still more fun, arbitrary positions can be used as pronouns in ASL. For example, if I was going to be mentioning Sarah a lot in a conversation, but she wasn't there, I might sign "Sarah" off to my left, then later gesture in that direction to indicate that I'm talking about Sarah -- assuming, of course, that there wasn't someone standing there that you might confuse my gesture as being toward.

There is such a thing as "Signed English", which is essentially English "signed out" by using slightly modified versions of the ASL signs. Deaf people who have grown up with ASL often find Signed English to be cumbersome and slow, though - for them, it's still speaking a foreign language, since the signs are slightly different from what they're used to, and the sentence structure is completely different.

And that's just ASL -- linguists count somewhere upward of 50 different sign languages in use in the world. About two-thirds of them fall into five major families, and there's some mutual intelligibility between languages in the same family. Family relationships aren't always what you'd expect going by analogy with spoken languages, though - for example ASL (American Sign Language) and BSL (British Sign Language) are in two different families, and bear about as much relationship to each other as, say, Japanese and English.

There are groups working on the idea, though - one group that was mentioned in a story recently here on Slashdot has created a system using a glove to track finger positions which "understands" ASL-based manual spelling. That's still a long way from full ASL understanding, though - manual spelling is where the speaker signs out each letter, spelling out each word in English that way. While ASL users are used to doing that for names, it's comparatively slow. In general, it's slower than simply typing out the same message for even an average typist.

Re:Sign Language (1)

narcc (412956) | about 2 years ago | (#41601783)

Unfortunately, sign languages are natural languages, with the full complexity of natural languages

Thanks, I needed a laugh! Sign languages are primitive and lack precision and expressivity. An advanced form of pointing and grunting, just without the grunting.

There's a reason that we don't have any great sign-language story-tellers. Sign languages are the bare minimum needed to communicate simple ideas. Check out some of the deaf YouTube channels and you'll see what I mean -- outside a personal setting, sign languages quickly fall apart. (Well, at least ASL does.)

one group that was mentioned in a story recently here on Slashdot has created a system using a glove to track finger positions which "understands" ASL-based manual spelling. That's still a long way from full ASL understanding

It's unlikely that we'll ever see system capable of understanding ASL or any other sign language. After all, identifying the signs alone is insufficient! (That is, a system that can recognize signs with 100% accuracy isn't good enough, for obvious reasons. That's a bad way to put it, but you get my meaning. There's a reason, after all, that there still isn't a usable sign-writing system.)

While there are other serious problems with deaf education, I have little doubt that the primacy of sign contributes significantly to the astonishingly poor level of education you'll find in the deaf community.

3 finger salut? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599831)

My question is, does it under the famed "three finger salute", or would just holding up a middle finger accomplish the same result in Windows?

Another creation by our Goa-uld masters. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599861)

Just you wait, you'll be surprised what kinds of technology those things control [wikia.com] .

Mty question is.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41599875)

Does it under the famed "three finger salute", or would just holding up a middle finger accomplish the same result in Windows?

These aren't... (2)

TodoRojo (1106857) | about 2 years ago | (#41600081)

....the droids you're looking for.

Congo... (1)

CommieLib (468883) | about 2 years ago | (#41600155)

UGLY...GORILLA
UGLY...GORILLA

Does NOT create 3D-models, hard coded. (0)

citizenr (871508) | about 2 years ago | (#41600231)

This thing is HARD CODED. Just look at pictures at
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19884218 [bbc.co.uk]
every gesture is "recognized", but 3D model doesnt fit real hand.
Finger movements are not recreated, there is no 3D model recreation. This is M$ so Im guessing learned NN recognizing few patterns and pretending to be magic.
  Just like Kinect games that promise movement tracking, but end up recognizing 2 hard coded gestures (or dont use cameras at all and you feel scammed for buying $200 Mass Effect microphone).

Re:Does NOT create 3D-models, hard coded. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41600937)

That's the fault of the game developer, not Microsoft. At least place the blame where appropriately due.

You know it's gotten bad when... (3, Interesting)

tilante (2547392) | about 2 years ago | (#41600243)

even the "experts" apparently aren't reading TFA.

He added that the prototype had been built using existing off-the-shelf components, but there was scope to improve the equipment with customised parts.

"Ultimately we would like to reduce Digits to the size of a watch that can be worn all the time," he said.

Lots of people wear watches all the time - so when they can get it down to watch size (not if, when, given the way miniaturization of computers, cameras, etc. has progressed), I don't see any reason to suppose that people would find wearing a gesture sensor to be a burden.

And, for that matter, since the actual workings of a digital watch are tiny now, the gesture sensor could also be a watch.

Re:You know it's gotten bad when... (1)

narcc (412956) | about 2 years ago | (#41600833)

Watches are about fashion more than they're about function. Not everyone walks around with a battered $10 water-resistant Timex with the band cleverly repaired with masking tape, strapped to their wrist.

I, like many others, have different watches for different dressing occasions -- some are dressier, some are more casual.

If I were to wear a hand-gesture sensor bracelet as I went about my regular day, I expect that I'd want a number of different bracelets, in a number of different styles.

Knowing that I'm in a tiny minority among men, imagine how women must feel about this sort of thing!

Re:You know it's gotten bad when... (1)

funwithBSD (245349) | about 2 years ago | (#41601605)

I use a pocket watch, you insensitive clod!

Re:You know it's gotten bad when... (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#41612041)

You're not a tiny minority among men. Most men I know also consider wristwatches to be primarily fashion accessories today.

As GP noted, however, if it can be scaled down to fit in a watch, it might as well be a watch at some point - and there's no reason why it couldn't be externally designed as one, too.

Leap Motion looks Better (1)

ilikenwf (1139495) | about 2 years ago | (#41600295)

Build sensor arrays where needed, no Micro$oft jewelry required...

I just hope we get holograms soon enough to be able to use leap motion sensors with them.

Ridiculous, ha ha!!! (2)

cheesecake23 (1110663) | about 2 years ago | (#41600405)

Who would EVER want to wear some kind of useful device on their WRIST? That's just crazy talk!

What the fuck?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41600509)

How DARE Micro$oft invent something without checking with Apple first. How are they still in business??

Here's a gesture for Microsoft... (1)

Mister Liberty (769145) | about 2 years ago | (#41600757)

...

Clippy (1)

Flere Imsaho (786612) | about 2 years ago | (#41600919)

It looks like you're masturbating. Would you like help?

Obsoleted already (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41601019)

There are already gesture sensors on the market that can be embedded in products that do not require the user to wear anything on their hands in order to be recognized.

Context (2)

gmuslera (3436) | about 2 years ago | (#41601175)

This have the same problems than speech recognition, you say/do something that is not meant for the computer/program, and it does something that you don't mean to do. At least in Star Trek they had the "Computer" prefix in phrases meant for the computer, but adding a prefix for gestures could make their use more complex.

And, of course, doing it in public will have the problem when people is not the intended target for the gesture/speech, and if well you could use low volume (or subvocalization?) in voice, gestures should be broad enough to be able to tell them apart from i.e. casual changes of position. And innocent gestures for one culture could be very offensive for others.

Re:Context (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#41601777)

I know just the gesture...

New leaf for microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41601333)

A new meaning for "Embrace, extend, extinguish" ?

Clippy (0)

PPH (736903) | about 2 years ago | (#41601373)

"I see you are making a gang sign inappropriate for this part of Oakland. Would you like me to calculate a quick route out of this neighborhood?"

[Loading Apple Maps ....]

Screw this! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41601505)

Bring back the Nintendo Power Glove!

this may be too obvious... (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#41601587)

Why not build it into a wristwatch?

Re:this may be too obvious... (1)

chrismcb (983081) | about 2 years ago | (#41604775)

Quick. Patent that before anyone else thinks of it!

Leonard Nimoy should be a rich man. (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | about 2 years ago | (#41601857)

Leonard Nimoy should be a rich man.

In the second episode of the original Star Trek series ("The Man Trap",1966), Spock is standing next to the main view screen on the bridge of the Enterprise and uses a hand-swipe gesture ("slicing" his hand from right to left at waist level) to change the image on the main view screen.

This predates both Kinect-based systems and touchpad gesture systems by about 35 years.

I wonder if any of that has been brought up in all these lawsuits brought by Nokia, Microsoft, Samsung and Apple regarding those technologies.

Mass Effect (1)

tru3ntropy (1632547) | about 2 years ago | (#41602741)

The first thing I thought of when I saw this is the Mass Effect omni tool. Always wanted one of those.

Come on now... (1)

Press2ToContinue (2424598) | about 2 years ago | (#41603801)

Vouge. Let your body go with the flow. Don't just stand there, let's get to it Strike a pose, there's nothing to it.

First Fap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41609391)

Fap....
Fap....
Fap....

Middle finger action is already developed... (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | about 2 years ago | (#41620887)

User gestures middle finger, device initiates silent IP voice feed to NSA.

games (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41641537)

It takes surprisingly little time to go from "holy crap is this thing heavy" to not even noticing it. http://mannypacquiaovsmarquezlive.com/ [mannypacqu...ezlive.com]
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