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A Day in Your Life, Fifteen Years From Now

Soulskill posted about a year and a half ago | from the time-travel dept.

Slashdot.org 687

Fifteen years from now, your alarm goes off at 7:30 AM, pulling you out of a dead sleep. You roll over, grumbling a command, and the alarm obediently shuts up. You drift off again, but ten minutes later the alarm returns, more insistent. It won't be so easily pacified this time; the loose sensory netting inside your pillow will keep the noise going until it detects alpha waves in drastically higher numbers than theta waves. Or until it gets the automated password from the shower. Sighing, you roll out of bed, pull your Computing ID (CID) card from the alarm unit, and stumble out of the bedroom. Pausing briefly to drop your CID into your desktop computer, you make your way to the shower and begin washing. Your alarm triggered the shower's heating unit, so the water comes out at a pleasant 108 degrees, exactly your preference. (42 degrees, you remind yourself — the transition to metric still isn't second nature, after almost two full years.) You wash quickly to avoid exceeding your water quota, and step out refreshed, ready to meet the day. (Read on for more.)

After your shower, you grab a bowl of cereal and head to the living room. Your desktop has already torrented last night's episode of your favorite comedy show, saturating the municipal gigabit fiber connection for almost a full minute to grab the 20-minute program. (You have it set to download in basic 8K, eschewing the 3D and live mashup feeds.) At a spoken command, your TV turns on and begins playback. When a confirmation box pops up on the screen, you state your name to authorize payment for the episode. Unfortunately, because you spent extra time sleeping, you're in too much of a rush to finish the episode. You tell the TV to send the rest to local storage, pull your CID from the desktop, and put it into your phone. While you get dressed, your phone plays back your social streams from last night, filtered to only the closest tier of relationships. After listening to your mother's voice detailing plans for the upcoming holiday, and your best friend summarizing the game he went to, you tell the phone to retrieve streams from one tier further. Ten seconds into yet another political rant from your cousin, you tell it to cancel and you set off for work.

As the door closes behind you, you absently wave your phone by the doorbell panel. The embedded RFID chip triggers the locks and security system, and sends a command to start your car. You climb in and place your phone in its dock. Quickly checking the car's charge and its wireless connection, you say, "Go to work," and lean back into your seat as it rolls out of the driveway. Telling your phone to resume playback, you watch the rest of your show as you wait for your commute to finish. (You're vaguely aware that the car isn't going to the freeway today — there must have been a hack-cident — and you feel irritation yet again at the arbitrarily low speed limits, wishing there was a way to ignore them.) After the show is over, you call up your work email and calendar, and prepare for the rest of the day. It's not until the car comes to a halt and beeps at you that you realize you've arrived in the parking structure. As the induction coils top off your car's charge, you exit the structure and walk over to your building's entrance. After waving your phone past the entry sensor, you stand as still as you can and slowly think your full name. The fMRI sensors process the input quickly and decide you are who you think you are.

Walking into to your office, you drop your phone into its dock and flip on the display, thus interacting with the only two objects on your desk. The display, nearly five feet across (1.5 meters, you mean) scans your CID and instantly restores the projects you were working on yesterday. You notice a handful of button icons are different than they were before. There must have been an OS update overnight. Your mild curiosity over finding a changelog fades when you realize you can't remember the name of the OS to look for it. It's unlikely anyone else at your agency does, either, except perhaps the CTO. Frowning at one of the dead pixels on your display, you remember when you used to have co-workers who dealt with that sort of thing. As your attention returns to your projects, you begin to manipulate the contents of your screen, sometimes moving your hands along the top of your desk, sometimes gesturing in midair. For particularly precise work, you detach a stylus from the side of the display. Occasionally you pause to read or listen to an email and vocalize your response. Pushing your work to the side, you take a moment to check in on your subordinates' screens, watching in real-time as they manipulate data and imagery. When needed, you open the intercom channel and provide direction.

After a couple hours, the advertising campaign your team is working on is nearing completion. You package it up and open a connection to your company's AI provider, working quickly to minimize the fees. Setting the AI to "Human Approximation" (and using "Moderate" fidelity to make it finish in a reasonable amount of time), you run it through the ad campaign and monitor the psychological reactions over a matrix of common phenotypes and personalities. The response from the Super-Rationals isn't good (but then, it never is), and you spot weaknesses in your campaign's ability to reach females in one subculture, and males in two others. You make a quick list of potential improvements to background music and the facial expressions of the computer-generated actors, and send the list off to your team. This project has been particularly stressful; in addition to the legislation currently being debated over how AIs can be used (or whether they can be turned on at all), several patent suits involving advertising methods are hanging over your company's head, and you have to carefully review your team's work to ensure it doesn't cause another. You know far more about patents now than you ever wanted to, but you don't want your company to be one of the early victims. You hope the advertising industry doesn't go through a reckoning as happened with the computer and entertainment industries. There's still money to be made in those sectors, but nobody's getting rich, and you want to retire into one of the planned orbital communities.

Mid-afternoon rolls around before you realize it. Hunger gnaws at your stomach and, perhaps because of that, you're mildly uncomfortable all over. Grabbing your phone and leaving work, you walk down the street to a restaurant. You seat yourself at a booth and call up the menu on the table's display. Finding a likely-sounding sandwich, you browse quickly through pictures, a few reviews, and the nutritional information before confirming your order. Switching the table to browse-mode, you catch up on the news while waiting for your food. It seems another Middle-Eastern country has severed its last wired connection to the outside world as a desperate defense against continual cyberwar. The local police force has been tasked with controlling wireless transmissions, and they're being run ragged trying to construct monitoring stations and conduct wardriving patrols with limited manpower. Nobody is willing to take chances after last year's nuclear incident. Browsing more, you see nothing is new with the coastal flooding situation in Europe, though China has once again increased its level of economic aid. You note with dismay that the U.S. election campaigns, underway for over a year already, are both distancing themselves from the current plans to return to the Moon. The organization that took over for NASA is likely to face budget cuts regardless of who wins.

The server robot finally rolls up to your table and deposits your sandwich, along with a glass of water (soda is a rare treat these days, because of the tax). After eating half your meal and picking at the rest, you realize it's not hunger that's making you feel poorly. You briefly remove the CID from your phone and wave it across the table to pay for your food. You leave a small tip for the robot maintenance engineer, then walk to your car, calling work on your way to notify them you're feeling ill. Once you've instructed the car to go home, you recline the seat and take a short nap. The car gently chimes to wake you when you're safely home. Heading inside, you walk to the bathroom and root around in a drawer for your phone's medical attachment. Once connected, you instruct it to contact the CDC's servers for a virus definition update. You quickly swab your nose and throat, and place the samples on the attachment's sensor, then step into the kitchen to make some tea while you wait. In 20 minutes, the results come back, showing a very strong likelihood that you have the seasonal flu. Your results are automatically sent to the CDC, where their algorithms verify your CID and confirm you had contact with several other people now exhibiting symptoms. An antiviral drug is prescribed for you immediately. You dispatch your car to pick it up.

Laying back down in bed, you pull your CID from your phone and place it into your tablet. Checking your social feeds, you see several get-well-soon messages already from friends and family. You distractedly browse through some of the media your friends have been reading, watching, and playing, but nothing strikes your interest. After your car returns, you take the meds and settle back down with a cup of tea. Undoing the small latches at the corners of the tablet, you pull at the sides, stretching the screen until it's 30 centimeters across. You lay it down and fire up a game of chess. After quickly losing two games, you suspect it won't be good for your rating to play while sick. You briefly consider pulling the CID and playing anonymously, but decide against it. Returning the screen to its default shape, you detach it from the tablet and grab an e-ink screen from the drawer. Once you've firmly seated it on the tablet, the ebook you've been reading appears on the screen right where you'd left off. After reading a while, you begin to nod off. At the increase in theta waves, your pillow's sensor web shuts off the tablet, dims lights throughout the house, and silently monitors your vital signs to see if your symptoms are getting any worse. As you drift off to sleep, you wonder what the next fifteen years will bring.

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687 comments

But... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607439)

But before I get in teh shower I'll jump on Slashdot to try and get first post. Some things never change!

Re:But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607689)

You curse the duplicate articles on Slashdot and the lame "Soviet Russia" posts

Live free or DIE (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607445)

I'd rather put bullets in the oppressors' skulls and fall on my own sword than live a life like that.

-- Ethanol-fueled

Re:Live free or DIE (1, Interesting)

cayenne8 (626475) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607579)

I'd rather put bullets in the oppressors' skulls and fall on my own sword than live a life like that.

No shit.....

"Water Quota"....seriously?!?!?

Re:Live free or DIE (4, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607713)

Why not? Many areas are already under heavy water stress. There are but three ways I can see the future deal with this:
1. Revolutionary new technology. Perhaps a big increase in the use of nuclear energy for desalination.
2. Free-market control of demand: You can use all the water you want, but you pay by the litre. Your usage is limited by what you can afford. May work, may just result in the low-income going unwashed because they can't afford more than drinking water. Depends how the market sets the price.
3. Regulatory control of demand. The water quota.

Re:Live free or DIE (3, Insightful)

Nutria (679911) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607811)

2. Free-market control of demand: You can use all the water you want, but you pay by the litre. Your usage is limited by what you can afford.

Except that where I live we've had water meters since before the 1960s.

Re:Live free or DIE (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607795)

Yup. I've seen some of the reports on water futures; doesn't look good. Still, the great lakes is the Largest single fresh water source on the planet. Buffalo real estate may heat up soon.

Re:Live free or DIE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607829)

Water quotas, calorie quotas, travel quotas, space limits (on;y 400 sq ft for a single adult by the proposed standards) and, in the end, a population quota. Currently thought to be about 500 million for the whole of the planet to maintain sustainability but there are suggestions that it be moved down to 100 million. The problem is how to kill off more than 95% of the current population and how are we going to keep any sort of high tech going with so few people. I'm sure the Agenda 21 folks have it figured out, eh?

Of course, the award winning design for sustainable housing last year was basically a mud hut (called a cobb house) with just a few LED lights run by solar cells so I guess we won't need power plants, wind farms, cell phone systems or computers to generate entertainment or weather reports.

Get used to it. Civilization's moving forward into the stone age in the name of sustainability.

Re:Live free or DIE (4, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607675)

I'd rather put bullets in the oppressors' skulls and fall on my own sword than live a life like that.

I know... 7:30 alarm? And you call that life?

Just too far out (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607465)

No way this is ever going to happen. The US convert to metric? Come on.

Re:Just too far out (4, Insightful)

14erCleaner (745600) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607575)

And shouldn't the car be flying? Remembering back a few decades, the main difference between then and now is that "modern" people play with their phones a lot. I see no reason to think the future will change any faster.

Re:Just too far out (5, Funny)

14erCleaner (745600) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607593)

And Slashdot still won't allow you to edit or delete your posts when you screw up the tags. :P

Re:Just too far out (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607657)

US will switch to metric once the rest of the world demonstrates it's more useful.

Another alternative to demonstrate your commitment to metric would be to switch to metric time.

Until then, metric is demonstrably just as good as any other arbitrary unit of measure (and one could argue less useful, because 10 can't be divided by 3 or 4).

Re:Just too far out (4, Funny)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607749)

I'm slowly writing a scifi story where all the measurements are based on Planck units, combined in various ways with the numbers 20 or 60 to reach human-accessible sizes.

The premise is that humanity was wiped out, and the only survivors are a bunch of pedants.

Re:Just too far out (1)

IT.luddite (1633703) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607875)

what is this crap, kuro5hin? I'm new here, I actually read it and want the time I wasted back. and yes, the US will convert to metric just as soon as the entire adult populace is educated past an 8th grade level.

Rather... (5, Insightful)

war4peace (1628283) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607469)

You wake up suddenly because looters are again banging at your reinforced door, looking for food and something to kill (or both). You shoot your through the door slits to make them go away, then prepare to take off and scavenge neighboring ruins for food.

And so on, and so forth.

Re:Rather... (2)

na1led (1030470) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607505)

The way things are looking, it will probably be Dystopia instead of Utopia, 15 years from now.

Re:Rather... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607529)

sadly if the current political systems manage to hold onto power long enough this is exactly what we are more likely to see

Re:Rather... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607745)

This seems much more realistic but not really applicable for me. I would rather set a trap for the looters and eat them.

Re:Rather... (1)

verifine (685231) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607755)

Makes me wonder if the original poster has a control thing going. This future life is far more controlled than controlling. Can you say "nanny government," "nanny society"?

Re:Rather... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607779)

You must live in Detroit...

7:30am? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607489)

Cool, I get to sleep in! I'm all into the future painted by Soulkill's canvas!

What kind of madness is this? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607499)

I'll be using GNU/Linux and thankful that they finally got a working wireless driver for my 15-year-old wifi card.

15 years from now... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607501)

And /. still won't support unicode...

Re:15 years from now... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607737)

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I read this BS somewhere before.... (4, Insightful)

gweihir (88907) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607515)

Right! When I was a kid, we had these picture-books about "15 years into the future". That was 25 years ago unfortunately, and zero of the predictions came true. Will be the same with this nonsense here.

Re:I read this BS somewhere before.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607561)

What, you don't have massive airplanes, moving sidewalks and 200 floor buildings in your neighbourhood? Oh wait, neither do I, it's just my medication ... no wonder I'm standing still on the street muttering nonsense to passerbys.

Oh, and everyone is white in those books too.

Re:I read this BS somewhere before.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607861)

Oh, and everyone is white in those books too.

You say that as if you think there are any people who aren't white!

Re:I read this BS somewhere before.... (1)

camperdave (969942) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607865)

What, you don't have massive airplanes, moving sidewalks and 200 floor buildings in your neighbourhood? Oh wait, neither do I, it's just my medication ... no wonder I'm standing still on the street muttering nonsense to passerbys.

Oh, and everyone is white in those books too.

We've got the massive airplanes and the moving sidewalks here in Toronto, but no 200 floor buildings yet. The CN Tower is a mere 147 storeys tall.

Re:I read this BS somewhere before.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607663)

They hired the same picture-books guys to make the predictions, but this time they inverted their predictions before publishing them. Beware.

Re:I read this BS somewhere before.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607727)

...posted from my wafer-thin pocket cray on wireless broadband

How did I get here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607519)

If that's me in 15 years, I must have intentionally run over a nun carrying a basket of kittens. Ugh.

Shitty story, bro... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607521)

What a shitty story. *golf clap*

Really? (3, Informative)

Pikoro (844299) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607531)

How about, in 15 years, you'll have the same dead end job where your managers are getting paid more than you are and you have nothing to show in your life except for some bytes on some company's hard drive and you still get up and perform the same routine you always have?

We're really at the top of the curve for technological advancement without some kind of major energy breakthrough. If you want to practice your writing skills, do it somewhere else.

This whole article is tl;dr. Read an Asimov book.

Re:Really? (5, Insightful)

TWX (665546) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607869)

I laugh at the author's assumption that we'll be able to afford this excessive use of technology.

We use cylinder locks and metal keys because they're cheap and good enough.

We use alarm clocks with buttons because they're cheap, easily replaced, and good enough.

We use manually-turned valves to control hot and cold water, again, because they're cheap and good enough.

In short, almost all of our technology is minimalist, because once a technology is developed into a decent working system, there's not a lot of good in changing it for a more expensive system. I like my manual door locks, as there's a certain amount of skill required to pick one that a skr1pt k1dd13 can't download off of the Internet to use.

On top of that, can you imagine the cabling required to control all of these fancy gizmos? A lot of what's described can't operate off of wireless, it needs some physical control. Shower valves, for example.

Plus reliability is always an issue. We have a Clapper to control one of the lights and even it's not perfect, and it's simple.

I stopped at water quota. (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607535)

So Soviet Russia is the future a decade an a half hence? I ignored the CID, but the water quota is ridiculous. Unless we have drastically less water due to using as nuclear fusion fuel, we'll still have all the water we have now.

Re:I stopped at water quota. (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607565)

The *Earth* will still have the same amount of water, but what about the aquifers or ice melt your city depends on?

Re:I stopped at water quota. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607645)

Fresh water shortages are likely to occur in the future (though obviously more likely in more arid climates), and national-scale desalinization would require major changes in our energy infrastructure.

Re:I stopped at water quota. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607709)

Unless we have drastically less water due to using as nuclear fusion fuel, we'll still have all the water we have now.

Yes, "we" collectively will.

Now, how did you find this year's Midwest droughts?

In other words: it's like the difference between weather and climate.

Re:I stopped at water quota. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607791)

Yes, "we" collectively will.

Now, how did you find this year's Midwest droughts?

In other words: it's like the difference between weather and climate.

I found the droughts to be nearly the polar opposite of the extreme flooding we had last year.

"Car"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607539)

In 15 years, who can afford to drive a car? This guy must be filthy rich.

Total fantasy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607541)

Americans will never switch to metric...

This is all totoal BS (2)

adric22 (413850) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607545)

Whoever wrote this is having a very imaginative time, but I don't see any of this stuff ever being a reality. Sorry.

Don't quit your day job (5, Funny)

Desler (1608317) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607553)

So soulskill has found something he's even worse at then editing submissions. Good job, man!

Re:Don't quit your day job (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607863)

Hey, at least he didn't pay for the sandwich with bitcoin!

TL;DR (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607571)

inb4 the dinosaur and bell-air

Based on experience (4, Insightful)

SirGarlon (845873) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607573)

Based on experience, a day in my life 15 years from now will look a lot like a day in my life now. Except, hopefully, I won't still be working on my second master's degree, and I'll have kids.

Re:Based on experience (2)

rgbrenner (317308) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607743)

I'll second this.

This "article" is nothing more than fantasy written in the same vein as similar articles in the 50s. 15 years from now will be NOTHING like the article.

It will be like today, with some fairly minor improvements. Think of the improvements between 1995 and today.

See the revolutionary awesome difference? No? That's because there were no revolutionary changes. We got faster processors, smaller phones, faster internet connections, etc, etc, etc. But those are all minor in the grand scheme of things.

Things just don't change that fast.

keep dreaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607577)

tl;dr

Wow, the future is the past (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607581)

Reminds me of the original star trek, always carrying little cards around.

Come on! " pull your Computing ID (CID) card from the alarm unit, and stumble out of the bedroom. Pausing briefly to drop your CID into your desktop computer,"

Right, because computers won't be able to track who you are, your own home. Stopped reading there.

Only one sentence of this whole thing is likely (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607597)

" The organization that took over for NASA is likely to face budget cuts regardless of who wins."

The rest is garbage.

I'm in advertising? (5, Funny)

ffoiii (226358) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607607)

Everything was plausible up until I found out I was in advertising, at which point I would obviously hack the order of precedence in my robot's "Three Laws" chip and command my robot to kill me.

Re:I'm in advertising? (2)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607717)

That was the point where I thought, "Ah! I seem to have died and gone to Hell in 15 years. Oh, dear..."

At least there were no flying cars or jetpacks.

Sounds an extremely dull existence (2)

second_coming (2014346) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607615)

With all that 'advancement' in technology I would hope that we wouldn't all be relying on a card that could be lost or stolen.

What about voice pattern analysis or retinal scans?

I stopped at computer id card (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607623)

Seriously? Biometrics for other shit but still using cards? Please don't consider yourself a science fiction writer, you aren't.

15 years from now... (3, Insightful)

Gordonjcp (186804) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607635)

... stuff will be pretty much the same as it is today. Just like stuff today is pretty much like it was 15 years ago.

It's a bit easier to pick up my email on my phone, and my home internet connection is about 100 times faster. That's about it, really.

Yeah right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607643)

I almost expected it to tell me Nixon's head was working on his reelection campaign already.

Disapointed (5, Funny)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607659)

I read all the way to the end hoping to get to the nymphomaniac fembot or the cloned and imprinted sex-kitten

Security nightmare (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607661)

Your alarm triggered the shower's heating unit, so the water comes out at a pleasant 108 degrees, exactly your preference.

Or it would have, except that as a prank your roommate grabbed your CID and changed the preferences so that the water now comes out at 35 F (2 C).

As the door closes behind you, you absently wave your phone by the doorbell panel. The embedded RFID chip triggers the locks and security system, and sends a command to start your car.

Meanwhile, a bad guy read your RFID chip yesterday when you passed him going to the restaurant and made a copy. He uses it to unlock your house, sits down at the PC to install a tool that will send your CID and any other identifying information about you to him, figures out where your car is likely to be, closes the door, re-locking the security system and starting your car. A confederate hops in the now-started car, drives a while, replaces the ID transponder currently in the car with one he can control, and leaves.

You quickly swab your nose and throat, and place the samples on the attachment's sensor, then step into the kitchen to make some tea while you wait. In 20 minutes, the results come back, showing a very strong likelihood that you have the seasonal flu. Your results are automatically sent to the CDC, where their algorithms verify your CID and confirm you had contact with several other people now exhibiting symptoms. An antiviral drug is prescribed for you immediately.

In addition, your insurance company knows that you are now sick, and raises your rates accordingly. Also, you notice that when you visit ad-supported web sites, they're all pushing products to help you combat your illness.

Awful and quite possibly true (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607673)

Remember when the future was more than just the present with a coat of varnish? Even dystopia would be better than this.

If that much interconnection exists.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607681)

Then it'll take an act of God to convince me that I need to be physically present at the office, instead of working remotely.

sounds like crappy 50's pulp sci-fi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607685)

and i thought EL-RON stoppped writing this crap when he died.

So much bullshit (4, Insightful)

Lord Grey (463613) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607699)

These kinds of readings irritate me. They present a wonderful picture, but only when everything goes right. When all the automated thingies in the environment can correctly anticipate your next action. When you don't do the unexpected, or the unexpected doesn't pop up somewhere in the surroundings.

Who's life is that? Not mine. In the above scenario: 1) the alarm clock would wake me up on my day off because I forgot to notify it; 2) the Internet is down and I can't connect outside my house; 3) my arm is in a cast so making decent gestures at my desktop 'computer' is real chore, if not impossible; and 4) my wife is extremely pissed at me for not being able to fix a damn thing in our house. Then a major storm tears through the neighborhood, my roof is half torn off, rainwater gets everywhere and all the electronics go absolutely apeshit.

Tell me what happens when things go wrong, not right. At least a little bit, to provide some much-needed reality.

Re:So much bullshit (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607799)

Relevant to this kind of thinking: "Even in the future, nothing works!" - Dark Helmet

Luls (1)

neminem (561346) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607711)

Minority Report-style UI, as I've generally heard it called the past few years, is a joke. Would be great for games, and perhaps for giving presentations, but who would want it for actually doing work? Stupid people might for a few days, because they imagine it would look cool, until they actually -tried- it and realized what the rest of us already know, that it would suck for actually getting things done quickly. I have nothing against experimental UIs being, well, experimented with, but the mouse and keyboard UI has lasted this long because it -works-.

Realistic in that it's not a Utopia (2)

concealment (2447304) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607715)

That was an interesting vision of the future. A couple thoughts:

(1) It's a vision of hell. I prefer solitude and real experience to the social networking world. What about someone who wants off the grid because the grid is a plastic substitute for real experience?

(2) Bonus points to the writer for not claiming that social problems were non-existent. The freeways get hacked, there's been a nuclear war, the middle east is still trouble, and China still wants to control Europe.

It shies away from Utopian thinking enough that I can believe it, but it also shows an automated world that I don't think I want. In that, it's an excellent brain-stimulating piece of writing.

Nothing will change (3, Interesting)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607719)

I'll probably still be driving the same car I have today. My computer will be a little faster, and it'll be running Windows 11. Other than that I really can't see my day being so different than it is now. Well, hopefully I'll get a new dishwasher sometime but I doubt it'll be networked.

tl;dr (2)

mcmonkey (96054) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607725)

(42 degrees, you remind yourself — the transition to metric still isn't second nature, after almost two full years.)

I stopped right there.

If everything is so computerized and automated in the future, why would there be a transition to metric? All the internal calculations could be Celsius, Meters, and Grams, but I could set my devices to display Fahrenheit, Yards, and Ounces.

What's with all the futurist articles coming? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607729)

If the editors are just reposting the same old bullshit, I also will [youtube.com].

Hmmmm... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607731)

15 years ago:
- Was in college, playing around with Intel Pentium computers with black and white CRT monitors.
- Was watching p0rn on CDs.

Now:
- Working, playing around with smart phones, with ARM core processors.
- Watch p0rn on my smartphone.

15 years from now:
- Still working, playing around with something like a cross between a Google project glass and a Sony Personal 3D Viewer
- Still watch p0rn, but through the above said device.
- Getting ready to retire in the next 10 years.
- Heavily regretting that my whole life has been one wank party!

Re:Hmmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607827)

You know what, I am making changes.

15 years from now, I want to leave a legacy that my grandkids can be/will be proud of....

Baloney, Fifteen years from now I'll be 75 (1)

RotateLeftByte (797477) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607747)

If I'm not pushing up the daisies, I'll be totally 'off grid' on an island well away from 'stuff'

No mobile Phone. No Computer

Yeah!

{been writing code for 40 years}

I offer a counter prediction (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607751)

15 years from now, things will basically be about the same. There will only be a few differences in tech and social fads, none of which were predicted by this article.

108 degrees?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607753)

108 degrees for the shower? Do you want your skin to melt off?

Re:108 degrees?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607841)

Perhaps this is on the Kelvin scale?

42 Celsius (1)

Matt.Battey (1741550) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607769)

Now I know this is crazy! Next well be all told we are 175 centimeters tall and it's a 15 km trip into work! SI units, in Canada maybe! Viva British Imperial Measure!

I remember this story! (1)

Guru80 (1579277) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607771)

Same one I heard in 2000, 1990, and 1980....I'm still waiting on the hover board, personally.

quotas for water and tracking of everyone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607783)

Yup looks like you libs won

meat vs poison (1)

swframe (646356) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607789)

I work from home. Many of the events, in the article, don't happen for me. I don't wake up until I want to. The only tech I care about relate to health care and food production. The luxury tech I would like to see make it are google glasses and low-cost high-speed global wi-fi. The tech that might make a huge difference to me is the d-wave quantum computer applied to AI. I suspect we need another 1K to 100K increase in cpu performance to create AI that will replace me in the workforce. I am not sure we can get there in 15 years.

Horrible dystopia!!! (1)

lxs (131946) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607849)

Fifteen years from now, your alarm goes off at 7:30 AM

I stopped reading right there.

Chatty Alarm Clocks and Other Things I Don't Want. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607867)

I have absolutely NO desire for my alarm clock to talk to my shower OR anything else.

Mr. Alarm Clock best keep his mouth shut or he will "Sleeping With Da Fishes."

Fifteen years from now (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year and a half ago | (#41607871)

Fifteen years from now, your alarm goes off at 7:30 AM, pulling you out of a dead sleep

It had better not! I retire in 2014 (if not earlier).

the loose sensory netting inside your pillow will keep the noise going until it detects alpha waves in drastically higher numbers than theta waves

In a ten dollar clock?

Sighing, you roll out of bed, pull your Computing ID (CID) card from the alarm unit, and stumble out of the bedroom. Pausing briefly to drop your CID into your desktop computer

Networking will be obsolete? That CID sounds like one of the removable drives in STOS that kind of looked like cassettes. I don't have to log into my Linux computer now, why should I have to in fifteen years?

the transition to metric still isn't second nature

The transition has started with liquids, but I'd be willing to bet large sums of money that we'll still be using farenheight in fifteen years.

You have it set to download in basic 8K, eschewing the 3D

"3D" (which isn't really 3D) is a fad that has come and gone for over six decades. Every generation thinks their generation is the 3D generation; it comes and goes every 20-30 years.

At a spoken command, your TV turns on and begins playback.

Doubtful, becaude I'll be blasting the stereo like I do now.

you state your name to authorize payment for the episode

Bullshit, I don't pay for TV now, why would I agree to in fifteen years? OTA or Pirate Bay.

pull your CID from the desktop, and put it into your phone

Wifi and bluetooth will be gone?

As the door closes behind you, you absently wave your phone by the doorbell panel. The embedded RFID chip triggers the locks and security system

Again, why a card? The door should know you're leaving, and by then the stereo and TV will be off. Say the word "lock" and the door locks itself. Why make things harder than they are now?

Sorry, but this is nothing like life will be in 15 years. It never, ever is how fortune tellers say it will be.

15 years from now... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41607873)

we'll be able to dupe the post.
cause i saw the same thing 15 years ago, and 30 years ago as well. the names change but the story is the same.

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