Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Apple Maps Accidentally Reveals Secret Military Base In Taiwan

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the no-harm-no-foul dept.

China 131

redletterdave writes "After one Taiwanese newspaper snapped and printed a satellite photo of a top-secret military base from the new Maps application running on an iPhone 5, the defense ministry of Taiwan on Tuesday publicly requested Apple blur the sensitive images of the country's classified military installations. The top-secret radar base, located in the northern county of Hsinchu, contains a highly-advanced ultra-high-frequency long-range radar that military officials say can detect missiles launched as far away as the city of Xinjiang, which is located in northwest China. The radar system was obtained via U.S.-based defense group Raytheon in 2003, and is still being constructed with hopes to be completed by the end of this year. 'Regarding images taken by commercial satellites, legally we can do nothing about it,' said David Lo, the spokesman of Taiwan's defense ministry, in a statement to reporters. 'But we'll ask Apple to lower the resolution of satellite images of some confidential military establishments the way we've asked Google in the past.'"

cancel ×

131 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Probably weren't even looking for it. (5, Funny)

AuralityKev (1356747) | about 2 years ago | (#41612317)

They found it when they were actually searching for the nearest Burger King in Gary, Indiana.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612353)

They found it when they were actually searching for the nearest Burger King in Gary, Indiana.

Hey when you have a feature that Google doesn't, you gotta show it off to demonstrate your superiority!

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (4, Funny)

firex726 (1188453) | about 2 years ago | (#41612383)

> Turn left at the Pacific Ocean and continue for 6000 miles.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | about 2 years ago | (#41612717)

What? Your car isn't amphibious? Whattaloooser!

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (3, Informative)

cayenne8 (626475) | about 2 years ago | (#41612719)

Not sure what the big deal is.

If Apple has images of it....you know the other side already had even higher resolution images of it long ago.....(likely with previously stolen US technology).

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (3, Insightful)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 2 years ago | (#41612855)

It's called diplomacy: You pretend that you haven't build a secret military base just across the potential enemy's street and the potential enemy pretends that he has no knowledge of it.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (1)

garyisabusyguy (732330) | about 2 years ago | (#41613377)

Then you dismantle the entire base and replace it with paper mache and blow-up objects so that the potential enemy targets a fake base while you re-build it in secret

Shake, bake and repeat

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41615301)

Besides, all their base are belong to the US anyway.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (2)

houghi (78078) | about 2 years ago | (#41613013)

http://goo.gl/maps/XfYm3 [goo.gl]
Look at step 16

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 2 years ago | (#41613205)

http://goo.gl/maps/XfYm3 [goo.gl] Look at step 16

Well you always stop at Hawaii, this just infers your on the ground when you travel..
Which for me would be very nice for a change.

I've been to Hawaii four times and never once got off the plane, either it was a quick fuel stop.or raining too hard.
.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (2)

drkim (1559875) | about 2 years ago | (#41615295)

Don't be silly! You can't take this route!

Didn't you see the note on step 21?
Slight left onto HI-80 S/Kamehameha Hwy
Continue to follow Kamehameha Hwy 2.1 mi
This road is closed until 28 Oct!

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (1)

jiriw (444695) | about 2 years ago | (#41613671)

This route may have road closures.

*Sprays drink through nose upon keyboard

Why isn't there a route with a ferry through the Bering strait nowadays? The wonderful, carbon-dioxide induced temperatures should make that one easy to pull off, you'd think ;)

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41614941)

A bridge across it has been approved though. It is planned to be completed in 2030.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (1)

Drathos (1092) | about 2 years ago | (#41615859)

Things are improving. It used to involve swimming or kayaking across the Pacific. At least now you can take a sailboat.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (2)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#41612439)

It's like the real-world equivalent of stumbleupon, only you lose your address bar and can't use a traditional search engine.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (3, Funny)

poetmatt (793785) | about 2 years ago | (#41612833)

Please. We're talking about Taiwan. Let's not insult Taiwan like that - Taiwan has not stooped to the level of Gary, Indiana.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about 2 years ago | (#41613167)

So, they were suicidal, then?

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613495)

We have Burger King in Australia, but I am still trying to work out how to drive to Taiwan.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613945)

Well that would be 3400 Grant Street. Anyone from G. I. knows that.

Re:Probably weren't even looking for it. (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 2 years ago | (#41614945)

They found it when they were actually searching for the nearest Burger King in Gary, Indiana.

And it was labeled Streisand Air Base.

Terrorists new best friend (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612407)

Apple's attempting to corner another section of the market; terrorists. What until you find out who gets to guy the iCloud data...

Re:Terrorists new best friend (4, Informative)

Dupple (1016592) | about 2 years ago | (#41612597)

I think google may have beaten them to it

According to this article, the images are even clearer in google maps

http://www.theverge.com/2012/10/9/3477836/taiwan-radar-defense-system-apple-ios-6-maps-complaint [theverge.com]

Re:Terrorists new best friend (2)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 2 years ago | (#41613371)

I think google may have beaten them to it. According to this article, the images are even clearer in google maps

They are the same articles, in that they say the same thing, FT original A::
"Oddly enough, images of the base appear clearer when viewed through Google Maps"

Which google was asked to blur, as mentioned by both articles.

Apple Maps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612411)

Not even once [imgur.com]

Xinjiang (5, Informative)

trainman (6872) | about 2 years ago | (#41612413)

Slight correction, Xinjiang is a province not a city. And a very lovely part of the country to visit.

Re:Xinjiang (3, Informative)

cyfer2000 (548592) | about 2 years ago | (#41612789)

it's technically an " Autonomous Region" about the same size of Alaska.

Re:Xinjiang (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613491)

It's one of my favorite parts of China.

what a reasonable way to solve a problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612415)

Talking things out and working cooperatively to find solutions... and from a man who works for an institution that is coercive in nature. Amazing.

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612489)

I agree. The spokesman says "legally we can do nothing about it," but Taiwan is a country, for crying out loud!
"Legally" means whatever they say it means. They're showing unusual restraint here.

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (1)

Lonewolf666 (259450) | about 2 years ago | (#41612577)

A country that would have to force a company in another, much more powerful country. Any attempt to lean on Apple must consider the possibility of angering the US government.

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612939)

True, but given the station was created by an American DoD contractor, the US might not want the images visible either. Especially if they use the same technology.

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (2, Funny)

crutchy (1949900) | about 2 years ago | (#41612745)

if taiwan declares war on the US because a US corporation violated their national security, it would open the floodgates...

china: "mmm fung pei! finally we have excuse... prepare 10,000 nuclear missiles for launch, and prepare our 1,000,000,000 soldiers to finish them off"
russia: "quickly, follow the chinese because all our stuff is a bit rusty so let them take the brunt... long live the mighty Soviet Union!"
iran: "quick lets fuck up israel while the US is busy"
north korea: "ahh harrow!... taiwan decrare war on US infidels... rets just rob a few terrorists over the pacific whire they're distracted"

us: "aaw crap!"

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (1)

garyisabusyguy (732330) | about 2 years ago | (#41613439)

please, it is not the 1960's anymore and nobody really buys that whole 'enemy going to launch tonight if we fail to show absolute strength'

More likely that Taiwan wants to have more Apple plants built there and does not want to piss them off

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about 2 years ago | (#41616299)

enemy going to launch tonight if we fail to show absolute strength

funny... sounds like the foundation of current US foreign and defense policy to me

and winner = NONE (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#41613583)

after all of that.

Re:and winner = NONE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41616217)

Wrong. Those who sell the guns win no matter which side wins the war. And then there's much to rebuild, meaning someone else is getting richer.

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (4, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 2 years ago | (#41613715)

And then France is all "Fire le missles!"

"But I am le tired."

"Well then have a nap. THEN FIRE LE MISSLES"

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (1, Funny)

AK Marc (707885) | about 2 years ago | (#41614529)

But sir, do we surrender before or after we file the missiles?

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about 2 years ago | (#41616289)

detonate le warheads and then fire le missiles of course

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (5, Informative)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | about 2 years ago | (#41616721)

But sir, do we surrender before or after we file the missiles?

That is a tired such a tired joke.

Of 125 major European wars since 1495, the French have fought in 50, more than Austria (47) and England (43).
Out of a total 168 battles since 387BC, they won 109, lost 49 and drawn 10.
  -- Stephen Fry, QI season 6 episode 5.

Not bad for a bunch of surrender monkeys. Disclaimer: I'm a German and we were, after all, responsible for that oft mentioned surrender but we also admire courage and tenacity even in our (thankfully former) enemies. If you occupants of the Anglo Saxon cultural bubble want to call anybody a bunch of 'Surrender Mokeys' it's us Germans. We did after all surrender twice in the last century, the French only once.

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (1)

monzie (729782) | about 2 years ago | (#41614819)

It's more likely that Iran not North Korea would use the word "infidels" , but I am trying to fix a really bad joke here..

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (2)

crutchy (1949900) | about 2 years ago | (#41616283)

silence!... i kill you!

Re:what a reasonable way to solve a problem (1)

drkim (1559875) | about 2 years ago | (#41615329)

I agree. The spokesman says "legally we can do nothing about it," but Taiwan is a country, for crying out loud!

There is something called "international law" that applies to acts between countries.

Uh, maybe... (5, Funny)

SomePgmr (2021234) | about 2 years ago | (#41612419)

The images of a base showed up, so they gave everyone the specs and capabilities of the radar system in their request to hide the base again? That doesn't seem very clever.

"Dear Google, we see you're showing images of Area 51. This is the base where we hide all the alien corpses and spacecraft we've collected over the years, so we'd really appreciate it if you blur the aerial photography. Thanks!"

Re:Uh, maybe... (1)

mooingyak (720677) | about 2 years ago | (#41612675)

The images of a base showed up, so they gave everyone the specs and capabilities of the radar system in their request to hide the base again? That doesn't seem very clever.

"Dear Google, we see you're showing images of Area 51. This is the base where we hide all the alien corpses and spacecraft we've collected over the years, so we'd really appreciate it if you blur the aerial photography. Thanks!"

That part seemed a little bit odd to me too. Only thing I can think of is that it's their way of telling China that there's nothing for them to worry about without actually saying that.

Re:Uh, maybe... (3, Insightful)

heypete (60671) | about 2 years ago | (#41612721)

Indeed.

More seriously, though, China has its own spy satellites and certainly has detailed aerial imagery of Taiwan probably in excess of the quality available to commercial imaging satellites. This information being known to the public isn't really going to change anything -- it's not like the average person is going to be able to do anything to a radar installation on a military base.

Re:Uh, maybe... (1)

shmlco (594907) | about 2 years ago | (#41612903)

Ditto. Anyone with the reason and the capability to do anything about the radar installation already has access to satellite imagery that far surpasses that of Maps.

Re:Uh, maybe... (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613353)

Right. However, this is a public acknowledgement of Taiwan having a secret military base. China publicly blasts Taiwan in the media all the time, but is mostly ok with the current state of things behind closed doors. I wouldn't be surprised if China ends up making some sort of show about this, just to save face.

Re:Uh, maybe... (3, Interesting)

DRJlaw (946416) | about 2 years ago | (#41613645)

More seriously, though, China has its own spy satellites and certainly has detailed aerial imagery of Taiwan probably in excess of the quality available to commercial imaging satellites. This information being known to the public isn't really going to change anything -- it's not like the average person is going to be able to do anything to a radar installation on a military base.

You don't say? [kitsapsun.com]
How about an above average militant? [yahoo.com]

There is quite a leap from protester (or militant) with access to low resolution imagery and state military with access to state-launched spy satellite high resolution imagery. For instance, the state military is unlikely to launch an attack unless the leadership of that country has decided instigate a de facto war. The "average person," on the other hand, has little other means for obtaining details concerning internal security fences, obscured lines of sight, illuminated and non-illuminated areas, etc. The sort of information that you'd need to plan an infiltration in advance.

There is quite a difference, but you either fail to appreciate it or do not care. Military personnel both appreciate the difference and care. Most people with a passing knowledge of military history apprecite the difference and care.

So... no.

Re:Uh, maybe... (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 2 years ago | (#41614535)

Most of the "satellite" view is not from satellites.

Re:Uh, maybe... (1)

Rich0 (548339) | about 2 years ago | (#41615377)

I'm sure that if China wanted lower-level aerial footage of the base they could have it. Taiwan isn't that big - I'm sure aircraft pass over most of it all the time, and you don't have to pass directly over a location to take a photo.

Plus, I'd think the more sensitive thing about a fancy radar station would be its emissions, and those aren't exactly easy to hide if it can scan targets on the far side of China (though no doubt they operate it differently in peacetime).

Re:Uh, maybe... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41615483)

I think they want it blurred to make it harder for random wackos and pranksters to attack/infiltrate the base.

Re:Uh, maybe... (3, Funny)

gsgriffin (1195771) | about 2 years ago | (#41612809)

Can't find the secret bases in Taiwan...just look for the blurred areas...done.

Re:Uh, maybe... (5, Interesting)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41613079)

The images of a base showed up, so they gave everyone the specs and capabilities of the radar system in their request to hide the base again? That doesn't seem very clever.

You know, there may be at least a very small chance that they were not entirely forthcoming when they disclosed the capabilities and purpose of the facility in question...

Re:Uh, maybe... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41614109)

Um, duh? Anyone who knows some basic fucking RF knows that "long-range" and "ultra-high-frequency" aren't compatible.

Re:Uh, maybe... (1)

stephanruby (542433) | about 2 years ago | (#41613719)

Those poor 2-stars generals, first it's the cows [dailychilli.com] that attack and expose their secret base.

Now Apple does the same.

Re:Uh, maybe... (1)

myowntrueself (607117) | about 2 years ago | (#41614035)

Dear Taiwan,

if you tell us where all your secret bases are we'll make sure they are blurred. Send us an email with coordinates.

Apple

apples next law suit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612429)

now apple is going to sue the taiwan government for copying their design for military bases.

Bad Security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612461)

If Apple can get the images from commercial satellites then why can't any other country do the same? It seems like simply requesting that Apple take down the images is not a proper security measure.

What's the point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612493)

Why? You'd figure those who want clear pictures of the installation for "nefarious" purposes has the means to obtain them.

Re:What's the point? (1)

Antipater (2053064) | about 2 years ago | (#41612607)

"Wants to know what building on the base would be the best target to drive his truck loaded with explosives into" does not necessarily require "has the capability to launch spy satellites"

Re:What's the point? (1)

shmlco (594907) | about 2 years ago | (#41612983)

If I'm a terrorist and I have a truck loaded with explosives, I don't think I'm going to drive said truck onto a military base and try to blow up a radar system. You have to match capability with intent.

There are plenty of high profile targets to choose from, without hitting a hardened military installation. And as I've mentioned earlier, anyone with the capability AND the reason to do anything about the radar installation already has access to satellite imagery that far surpasses that of Maps.

Re:What's the point? (1)

mooingyak (720677) | about 2 years ago | (#41612839)

Why? You'd figure those who want clear pictures of the installation for "nefarious" purposes has the means to obtain them.

It's under construction, so maybe it's partly a request to keep things blurred going forward to conceal progress and the final look.

Pics? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612505)

This post is worthless without pics!

Silly Taiwanese people. You DON'T request Apple. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612523)

Silly Taiwanese people. You don't request Apple for anything. You beg. You pray. You hope. But you DON'T speak to The Apple unless spoken to by The Apple. Commoners!

Re:Silly Taiwanese people. You DON'T request Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613169)

Silly Taiwanese people. You don't request Apple for anything. You beg. You pray. You hope. But you DON'T speak to The Apple unless spoken to by The Apple. Commoners!

The Apple has already spoken, though. The Taiwanese have obviously displeased The Apple, and informing China of this secret base is the punishment. Through this miracle, China will cleanse this unclean people from the iEarth, and it is right. It is not their place to argue this; The Apple has spoken. Glory be to Lord Jobs in the highest, and glory be to His almighty disapproving glare.

Chi-coms already know (1)

geoffrobinson (109879) | about 2 years ago | (#41612533)

My guess is that the mainline Chinese already know all about it. I wouldn't sweat it.

Apple? (1)

Cute and Cuddly (2646619) | about 2 years ago | (#41612557)

Well, if the hardware is made in Chine, what makes anybody think they are not using Chinese developers as well. Perhaps was not so accidental.

Good for something... (5, Funny)

chinton (151403) | about 2 years ago | (#41612613)

At least Apple Maps revealed something that was actually there.

Re:Good for something... (3)

mynameiskhan (2689067) | about 2 years ago | (#41613141)

Well said. Just yesterday it could not locate a bank ATM in a building I was parked outside of. Then I had to follow it's lead up to the actual bank about 2 miles away. Thanks to great cooking by Mr. Cook.

Re:Good for something... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41614513)

Your story doesn't make sense. If you knew the ATM was there, why were you looking for it? Was it broken, is that why you went to the bank?

Re:Good for something... (2)

monzie (729782) | about 2 years ago | (#41614839)

You don't know how to use iOS Maps correctly. Just like you weren't holding your iPhone 4 correctly. Dont' you know secret military bases have ATM's ? Apple just showed you an ATM were there's a less chance of a queue...

Headline click fodder (2)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | about 2 years ago | (#41612651)

Headline makes it sound like Apple made some sort of error and gave aid and comfort to an enemy... somewhere.

The base happens to be there in a photo. Owners of base are asking for it to be blurred. Your slow news day will now come to a close. (cue national anthem)

Re:Headline click fodder (1)

Scowler (667000) | about 2 years ago | (#41612899)

Apple clickbait is the only thing keeping slashdot threads going these days. (Well, that and anything relating to "outrageous" copyright enforcement.)

No problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41612757)

It's problem hidden behind a purple blur.

Oops. you mean we can't show everything on earth? (1)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | about 2 years ago | (#41612775)

Apple is going to offer a new section on the App store called "Apps for Spys"...

In other news . . . (3, Funny)

Tanman (90298) | about 2 years ago | (#41612805)

In other news, a giant art sculpture designed to be visible from space located in the northernmost reaches of Siberia is mysteriously blurry when viewed from the latest satellite photography through Apple's new maps application.

Streisand Effect (5, Interesting)

Roogna (9643) | about 2 years ago | (#41612909)

Is it me, or is blurring/removing something from these maps the absolute ideal way to tell the entire world: "There's something really important to someone here."

I can see the conversation now. "How do I get to the Secret Base?" -- "Take a left and follow the road until it disappears on your map, then you're there."

Re:Streisand Effect (1)

LordLucless (582312) | about 2 years ago | (#41613117)

People who care already know there's something really important there. What they may not know is the precise building/street layout.

Re:Streisand Effect (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613897)

Believe me. If a corporation can get satelite photos of a facility, then governments can get them too.

Re:Streisand Effect (1)

jspoon (585173) | about 2 years ago | (#41613929)

Thing is the only people who care (PRC) have their own satellites, probably more of them than anyone but the US and Russia. And you can bet they've photographed every inch of Taiwan. China's problem, then, is NOT to get images but to identify locations worthy of further attention. It could save them a lot of time to go on google maps and scan for areas with blurring or just suspiciously low resolution. Note that this is a different situation from not wanting to let non-state actors i.e. terrorists get a look at what's on the roof of the White House. That may be misguided as well, but it's probable that Al-Qaeda has no other way to get that information. Also, it's no secret at this point that there's SOMETHING up there poised to shoot down any incoming plane, so we're not giving anything away by hiding it.

Re:Streisand Effect (2)

gman003 (1693318) | about 2 years ago | (#41613133)

Which makes it perfect for misdirection.

Taiwan: "Apple, you must immediately remove all images of this minor air-defense outpost."
Apple: "OK. Hey everyone, we just removed images of this air-defense outpost"
Everyone looks at the shiny forbidden images
Nobody looks at the reinforced missile silos they were actually trying to hide

Re:Streisand Effect (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613229)

That is generally why *all* bases in the US require the imagery to be blurred (Imagery under a certain GSD/registration accuracy is automatically classified). So you can't tell the important from the boring ones.

Re:Streisand Effect (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 2 years ago | (#41613305)

It's not just you. I'm a little disappointed I haven't seen the uncensored images in the comments here yet.

Here you go [pcmag.com] Maybe TFA had images that were blocked by my browser. Either way, the photos are now far more visible than they were originally.

Re:Streisand Effect (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613445)

I haven't been able to find the original images yet, but i'm pretty sure that the 'air base' satellite images on most of the sites are totally wrong. From a bit of research it looks like it's much more sensibly located on a big hill here:
http://goo.gl/maps/H3aRr

The main hints being the photo here:
http://fareasternpotato.blogspot.co.uk/2012_02_01_archive.html
And military intelligence type sites referring to it as 'Leshan Mountain' rather than 'near Hsinchu'.

Sadly the Google images are rather low res and I don't have an iOS6 device to check on.

Re:Streisand Effect (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613315)

Is it me, or is blurring/removing something from these maps the absolute ideal way to tell the entire world: "There's something really important to someone here."

Well, wait, if it's anything like in the US, it could be the location of a specific former vice president's summer coffin. The question that any invading spy would have to ask themselves is whether or not that's worth the risk.

Re:Streisand Effect (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 2 years ago | (#41613641)

Is it me, or is blurring/removing something from these maps the absolute ideal way to tell the entire world: "There's something really important to someone here."

Usually it's not even worth bothering to hide the fact that something important is there, the fences and armed guards are sufficient to that task. (The sub base just a few miles from me has it's own exit off the highway - complete with a standard green highway sign and the name of the base.) The goal is to either avoid revealing what that important something is, or to avoid revealing the details of that something important.

Re:Streisand Effect (2)

stephanruby (542433) | about 2 years ago | (#41614059)

Is it me, or is blurring/removing something from these maps the absolute ideal way to tell the entire world: "There's something really important to someone here."

Or it could just be a decoy military site.

After all, the British and the Germans both had their own decoy sites [wikipedia.org] during World War II.

So why wouldn't Tawain have theirs too?

After all, if the cows that breached their security perimeter [dailychilli.com] couldn't even be silenced afterwards, then perhaps there was no one there to even guard the place, or to threaten the cows into not talking to the press about what they had seen.

Re:Streisand Effect (1)

tompaulco (629533) | about 2 years ago | (#41614135)

Take a hint from The Simpsons. Trillion dollar satellites can't find anything unless it is on the roof. Time to invest in some cheap metal buildings.

Re:Streisand Effect (1)

russotto (537200) | about 2 years ago | (#41614241)

Take a hint from The Simpsons. Trillion dollar satellites can't find anything unless it is on the roof. Time to invest in some cheap metal buildings.

That's not going to work so well for the business end of a radar system.

Re:Streisand Effect (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | about 2 years ago | (#41615505)

"How do I get to the Secret Base?" -- "Take a left and follow the road until it disappears on your map, then you're there."

Based on this info using Apple maps I've concluded there are approximately one thousand secret bases in my city alone.

Constant worry about China (2)

mynameiskhan (2689067) | about 2 years ago | (#41613095)

I am guessing that Taiwan is worried about China. But I bet they very well know that China does not depend on Apple/Google maps. China probably has a much higher resolution pic of the base and few dudes already working within the base as well. Therefore, the nature of worry is just akin to Cheney's worry about his property on google maps and his hallucinations that Russians have locked on to his property's coordinates by looking at Google earth.

Puh-lease (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41613135)

Apple/Google hasn't given Beijing anything new. China spy Taiwan loooong time now!

Apple Maps? (5, Funny)

PPH (736903) | about 2 years ago | (#41613887)

No problem. The correct location of the base will never be found.

Google and other map providers hide the truth..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41614543)

Google and other map providers have obfiscated several high risk sites in the past. Perfect example: The White House. The view shown by google earth does not show any of the surface to air device, sniper cache, and other countermeasures that are known to be there (known as in documented elsewhere, and photographable with a long range commercial camera lens)

North Koreans bury everything (1)

richardcavell (694686) | about 2 years ago | (#41615913)

North Korea has perfected the art of tunnelling, and covering up what is going on from eyes in the sky. They need not worry about satellites photographing their secret places. Is that better or worse for us? Richard

Re:North Koreans bury everything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41616627)

No worries. US obviously has methods of scanning underground facilities using satellites with very sensitive gravitation field sensors and also by analyzing satellite images of terrain under seismic waves. I've noticed that military actions are often deferred until after there is a minor earthquake near the area of deployment. Sooner or later, an earthquake strikes the area and then you get your map.

What surprise? (1)

PacRim Jim (812876) | about 2 years ago | (#41616473)

It's ludicrous to think that China was unaware of this base.

Not a secret now. (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 2 years ago | (#41616559)

Damage is done, it is not a secret anymore.

ultra-high-frequency long-range radar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41616649)

Sounds like an oxymoron. I would like to see the explanation of its working principle.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>