Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Where Has All the Xenon Gone?

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the went-into-hallmark-mylar-balloons-by-accident dept.

Earth 225

LucidBeast writes "Xenon, the second heaviest of the noble gasses, is only found in trace amounts in the atmosphere. Atmosphere contains less xenon than other lighter noble gasses. Missing xenon has perplexed scientists and it has been speculated that it is hiding in the Earth's mantle. Now, a group at the University of Bayreuth in Germany thinks it might have found the answer. It turns out that xenon does not dissolve easily into magnesium silicate perovskite, and thus it cannot hide there. Because it had no place to hide, it is now gone forever."

cancel ×

225 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Fortunately (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41617995)

most slashdotters are net producers of gasses.

Re:Fortunately (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618007)

You're thinking CO2 and methane. I'm quite sure I don't produce very much xenon.

Re:Fortunately (2)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 2 years ago | (#41618493)

most slashdotters are net producers of gasses.

You're thinking CO2 and methane. I'm quite sure I don't produce very much xenon.

I have a fission reactor in my garage. So I am a net producer of radioactive Xenon.

Re:Fortunately (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41618669)

I just have a Tesla Coil I run 24/7 as a security device. so all I generate is Ozone.

Pandora (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41617997)

There's some on Pandora, so if we need it we can always send in a mining company or something to extract it.

http://aliens.wikia.com/wiki/Pandora

Easy Answer... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41617999)

Just ask the bitmap brothers where it's at, they have ample..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2w-tiRnac2k [youtube.com]

It's in all those funny looking headlights (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618003)

It's in all those funny looking headlights

Re:It's in all those funny looking headlights (2, Informative)

equex (747231) | about 2 years ago | (#41618025)

which are a fucking hazard

Re:It's in all those funny looking headlights (1)

Mister Transistor (259842) | about 2 years ago | (#41618061)

I thought it went into all those disco strobe lights in the '70s...

Re:It's in all those funny looking headlights (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618345)

Actually pretty close. A bunch went into display/effects laser systems in the 1990s, before cheap diode lasers because available in a variety of colours. If you ever saw non-red/non-green lasers at shows in the 1990s, they were either YAG (different tech altogether), or Argon/Neon/Krypton/Xenon blends for different colours. Now they're pretty much all solid-state, and cost $500 instead of around $100k.

Re:It's in all those funny looking headlights (5, Informative)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41618677)

Xenon is in QUALITY headlights. the blue and purple crap the posers put on their cars is not Xenon but actually low grade halogen bulbs with a color coating on them.

Re:It's in all those funny looking headlights (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618747)

Your face must be so punchable.

Re:It's in all those funny looking headlights (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618811)

Let me guess, you are one of those posers....

Re:It's in all those funny looking headlights (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41619043)

Sorry, even the real Xenon headlights are a hazard, especially to older drivers.

Obligatory (5, Funny)

Legion303 (97901) | about 2 years ago | (#41618015)

Found it! It was in the couch.

Strategic Xenon Reserve (2)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 2 years ago | (#41618017)

There is probably a massive government Xenon reserve somewhere, like there is for almost everything else; oil, corn, wheat, your private information, and so on...

Canadians Reserves (4, Interesting)

Dareth (47614) | about 2 years ago | (#41618063)

Canada has a Strategic Maple Syrup Reserve [theatlantic.com] .

Re:Canadians Reserves (5, Funny)

dexotaku (1136235) | about 2 years ago | (#41618175)

..but somehow we lack a strategic bacon reserve. I think bacon really should have the priority there.

Re:Canadians Reserves (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618261)

..but somehow we lack a strategic bacon reserve.

Speak for yourself buddy.

Re:Canadians Reserves (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 2 years ago | (#41618497)

..but somehow we lack a strategic bacon reserve. I think bacon really should have the priority there.

What strategies are based on bacon?

Re:Canadians Reserves (2)

dexotaku (1136235) | about 2 years ago | (#41618685)

What strategies are based on bacon?

Dunno.. the only ones that immediately spring to mind involve things like suicide or murder via, say, bear attack.

Re:Canadians Reserves (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618787)

The bacon sandwich strategy of course. I'd reveal more but then I'd get hungry.

Re:Canadians Reserves (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618853)

it's used as a muslim repellant.

Re:Canadians Reserves (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618511)

If somehow Maple Syrup coated Bacon could trap the Xenon we would have all these needs covered.

Re:Canadians Reserves (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41618691)

You might be funny.... but make some Brownies but replace the cooking oil with Bacon fat. ZOMG far better than the "healthy" crap.

Re:Canadians Reserves (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41619005)

Please no! Have you ever tasted Canadian bacon?

Re:Strategic Xenon Reserve (4, Interesting)

WillAdams (45638) | about 2 years ago | (#41618085)

Problem is, the U.S. is getting out of the rare gas business:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/11/AR2010101104496.html [washingtonpost.com]

So one can't even convincingly joke about it.

Re:Strategic Xenon Reserve (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618379)

US Government has been selling off assets to buy land for years now, actually. In fact, the US Federal Government is the fastest-growing land owner in the country.

The objective is mainly to lock away minerals to prevent mining and other economic use of land, and partly to consolidate more power. The more land the Federal government owns, the more they can inject themselves into everyones' business.

Re:Strategic Xenon Reserve (1, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41618713)

Look everyone, it's another Rand Conspiracy nutjob...

I miss the days when the nutballs were easily identified by the tinfoil skull caps and end is near signs.... No they had to find a horribly written book by a incredibly untalented author that was universally panned as horrible in her time and all time after that and start their new religion on that piece of Science fiction..

You guys know that is how Scientology started right?

Re:Strategic Xenon Reserve (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618771)

Hey, be nice. In Scientology, everyone can get 'better'.
In Randology, you start as an arrogant prick and stay that way. Or get killed.

Re:Strategic Xenon Reserve (1)

Bigbutt (65939) | about 2 years ago | (#41618759)

Must be the Democrats doing that since the Republicans are planning on reducing the debt by selling off Federal land.

[John]

Re:Strategic Xenon Reserve (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41619103)

If you don't want the federal government messing with your stuff or in your business, not selling your land to them would be a pretty good first step.

typo (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618021)

*It*

It was blown away in a Megablast. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618029)

This will make the Xenonphobes happy.

Re:It was blown away in a Megablast. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618281)

It was blown away in a Megablast.

This will make the Xenonphobes happy.

The reference should certainly make the Bitmap Brothers happy.

Re:It was blown away in a Megablast. (0)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41618723)

"The reference should certainly make the Bitmap Brothers happy."

Daft Punk is lightly amused...

Re:It was blown away in a Megablast. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41619185)

This will make the Xenonphobes happy.

But is a big setback for Xenophilia research.

Xenon (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618059)

I know what happened to it. It was overthrown by the Sludge Vohaul virus, presumably in Space Quest XI.

Where it'll be found (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618075)

It'll be found in a country that by coincidence is in need of liberating.

"gone"? did it ever exist? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618099)

I'm confused: did it go out into upper atmosphere or space like helium (seems unlikely @~10x weight of nitrogen & oxygen), did alchemists turn it into gold or did we overestimate the amount there initially was? not seeing how the "conservation of mass" loop is being closed here...

Re:"gone"? did it ever exist? (2)

gl4ss (559668) | about 2 years ago | (#41618125)

I'm confused: did it go out into upper atmosphere or space like helium (seems unlikely @~10x weight of nitrogen & oxygen), did alchemists turn it into gold or did we overestimate the amount there initially was? not seeing how the "conservation of mass" loop is being closed here...

it's assumed it was here after earth formed, by assumptions that the material which earth was formed from had x amount of it.

Re:"gone"? did it ever exist? (5, Informative)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#41618303)

RTFA. It says that it was probably in the early earth's atmosphere, and the earth's atmosphere was probably blown away by some event, and then re-established itself xenon-free from gasses bubbling up from the molten landscape.

They also wonder why Mars has no xenon.

Re:"gone"? did it ever exist? (5, Interesting)

Logger (9214) | about 2 years ago | (#41618339)

I interpreted the poorly written article to mean. The forming rocks could absorb the other noble gases just fine, but not xenon. I infer this would have left an atmosphere (at the time) that was rich in xenon since very little of it was absorbed into the rock. The article speculated that some form of meteorite collision or solar event blew off the atmosphere. Leaving me to infer that the atmosphere we have today is the result of the rock releasing gas into the atmosphere. Since the rock was xenon poor, today's atmosphere is also xenon poor as a result.

Re:"gone"? did it ever exist? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41619073)

Which coincides nicely with the planetary impact hypothesis for the Moon's origin.

Re:"gone"? did it ever exist? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41619135)

There is a boundary in the atmosphere called the turbopause, where below this gases are well mixed from turbulence, and only above the boundary do gases start to stratify based on their mass. This occurs at an altitude of about 100 km. So while Xenon being heavy would be a big factor in how fast it leaves the atmosphere, there would still be quite a bit that works its way up there regardless. To some degree, chemistry and ionization effects will control how much leaves the atmosphere too, not just the mass.

Wrong question (4, Informative)

JazzHarper (745403) | about 2 years ago | (#41618115)

TFS makes no sense at all; TFA is not much better. It seems that, rather than asking, "Why is there so little xenon in the atmosphere" and coming up with a purely speculative answer, the researchers might have questioned why anyone expected to find more.

Re:Wrong question (3, Informative)

Fubari (196373) | about 2 years ago | (#41618653)

It seems that, rather than asking, "Why is there so little xenon in the atmosphere" and coming up with a purely speculative answer, the researchers might have questioned why anyone expected to find more.

I thought everyone (well, scientists anyway) expected more Xenon than we observe on Earth because of meteorite samples: apparently meteorites have more xenon than we see in our atmosphere.

Unless... did you mean why didn't the Bayreuth researches test (e.g. question) any those theories? I thought they did test one of those theories by trying to saturate a mineral (perovskite) with xenon, said mineral being found in the Earth's mantel. (IANAGS, so perhaps an actual geo-scientist could comment on whether perovskite was a good choice for a test like this; I'm willing to give the Bayreuth researchers the benefit of the doubt, given that they are actual geoscientists and probably gave some thought to candidate minerals for their test).

Interesting? Sure... I never knew about a "xenon discrepancy"; so mildly interesting.
Informative? Sort of... I would have liked to see another paragraph on xenon comparing content for extra vs. terrestrial rocks. I'm willing to give the geo-scientist community the benefit of the doubt of having thoroughly considered the "xenon deficiency" to the point where they actually gave it a name.

From TFA:

“This model is enough to explain the whole xenon deficiency,” says Svyatoslav Shcheka, a geochemist at the University of Bayreuth in Germany. He and Hans Keppler, also of Bayreuth, report the finding online October 10 in Nature.

Compared with meteorites that formed out of primordial solar system stuff, Earth and Mars have far less xenon in their atmospheres. Scientists have proposed many possible explanations, such as minerals that locked up xenon in the upper parts of Earth’s middle layer, the mantle.

Re:Wrong question (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 2 years ago | (#41618893)

I am guessing that there is some pretty solid theory of exactly what radio of material is created in stars and then expelled in when they die. So we know that teh universe is made up of xx% cardon, x% silicon, xx% xenon.
So any mass as big as a planet would have that same percentage of Xenon unless something happened to it.

Re:Wrong question (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41619257)

That is sort of the gist, but the actual theories are much more involved and probably interesting to some. It isn't based just on the composition of stars, as that would get you something closer to the composition of the Sun. Instead, if you look at the composition of the planets and asteroids, you can see some pretty clear gradients in material with distance from the sun, that there were various stratification processes occurring throughout the solar system. Additionally, chemistry plays a big part in it. Elements that absorbs or binds with iron minerals tend to get pulled to the center of the Earth, while stuff that is attracted to silicates sticks with the stuff that floated to the surface.

Where the real work gets done is looking at how this process effects radioactive materials and different isotopes. This allows geologists and physicists to work out timelines of when the Earth formed, stratified, and thickened essentially. Some elements decay, for example, from something that does not bind to iron to something that does. If this decayed before the iron sank to the center of the earth, the decay products would have sank to, if it decays after, we would see some portion of it on the surface where it didn't get a chance to sink. Knowing the half-life of many such examples leads to the timeline.

Some of the models are getting pretty details and making verified, precise predictions of the ratios of various elements and isotopes. Although they only apply to some, and other elements are still being researched (as Xenon is in this case).

If Earth itself (5, Funny)

srussia (884021) | about 2 years ago | (#41618133)

...is xenophobic, what hope does mankind have?

Microsoft is to blame (2)

rossdee (243626) | about 2 years ago | (#41618137)

They used the Xenon to make XBox 360's

Re:Microsoft is to blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618871)

I'm only here because I thought this article was about microprocessors.

Re:Microsoft is to blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618903)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenon_%28processor%29

Wanted: proof reader (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618143)

Atmosphere contains less xenon...

I turns out that...

In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 years ago | (#41618177)

Seriously, all new cars come with HIDs now...

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (2)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about 2 years ago | (#41618221)

most new cars I've seen over the past 5-6 years have come with LED headlights. First thing I did when I got the electronics for my bike in 2007 was replace the HIDs with LEDs. They're far more efficient and far more rugged.

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618363)

I have never seen LED headlights, and I don't even think they are legal here. Are you sure you aren't thinking of external indicator lights? (fog lights, signal lights, brake lights, etc.)

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (1)

lexa1979 (2020026) | about 2 years ago | (#41618533)

look on new Audi car, I know they have... Citroen does also on its newer models...

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41618781)

Audi R8 and S8 are the ONLY ones that have LED headlights as an OPTION. They are not standard.

Or are you confused and think that the stylized strip of led's for DRL indicators are the headlights...

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (2)

bigtomrodney (993427) | about 2 years ago | (#41618937)

No, Audi and Volkswagen's entire new line has LED headlights on all of their models this year and the A4/A5 have had them for 4-5 years now.

But don't think I'm agreeing with Tastecicles, because they're almost wrong. They are only the dipped/low-beam headlights as LEDs are not yet legal in the USA or Europe for full or high-beam use. But as for this usage, even SEAT has them now on some of their models and that's one of VAG's "budget" brands.

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 years ago | (#41618671)

Some high-end euro cars do have LED headlights (not just sidelights/indicators) but they're nowhere near as common as HIDs on new cars AFAIK...

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (1)

mikestew (1483105) | about 2 years ago | (#41618949)

LED headlights in my Nissan Leaf, so they're apparently legal in the US. Though Nissan cheaped out and put halogens in for the high beams.

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (1)

dbraden (214956) | about 2 years ago | (#41619133)

Assuming bigtomrodney above is right, Nissan didn't cheap out, it's just that LED high beams aren't legal in the U.S., yet.

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (1)

dopaz (148229) | about 2 years ago | (#41618499)

You are mistaken, LED headlights are just now becoming available from the factory. While aftermarket conversion kits may have been available (though I've never heard of anyone else replacing their HID headlights with LEDs) they certainly aren't common.

One of the first new cars that was equipped from the factory with LED headlights was the 2008 Lexus LS600h. That's the Hybrid version of the flagship Lexus sedan. It is a $100,000+ vehicle and is pretty rare. Five years later, we are starting to see LED headlights trickle down into more common vehicles. The 2013 Honda Accord offers them, but only on the "Touring" (highest) trim level. Some Audis have them... I'm not talking about a bunch of white LEDs arranged around the headlight assembly, I mean the primary illumination source when driving at night is a LED. Some high-end BMWs have LED headlights.

Overall, not a common headlight and certainly not even available on most cars made in the past 5 years.

Re:In Xenon/HID headlight bulbs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618763)

"most new cars I've seen over the past 5-6 years have come with LED headlights. "

Wow everyone! It's the 1%! He only sees 7 series BMW and R8 Audi cars...

Yet I can name 80,000 car models sold in the past 5-6 years that DONT come with LED headlights. Like 99% of all Ford, GM, Chrysler, Toyota,Honda,Suzuki, Kia, Subaru, BMW,Audi, Mercedes cars DONT have LED headlights but regular old halogen bulbs or HID bulbs... Incredibly few cars come with LED headlights.

How is it driving in that Lamborgini Junker from 2011, How can you tolerate sitting in a car that has held your butt more than 12 times?

Easy (0)

Narishma (822073) | about 2 years ago | (#41618191)

Microsoft put it in all those Xbox consoles [wikipedia.org] .

Where? (1)

alexandre_ganso (1227152) | about 2 years ago | (#41618195)

So, where did it go?

Re:Where? (1)

mellon (7048) | about 2 years ago | (#41618277)

Ask the Lorax, dude. Ask the Lorax.

Re:Where? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#41618335)

It was never there in the first place. The summary's not too hot. Try reading "come from" in place of "hide" for starters.

Be glad they are gone! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618201)

The dangers of General Artificial Intelligence is no laughing matter!

Need some insight (1)

Gerinych (1393861) | about 2 years ago | (#41618247)

Guys, I'm really stupid when it comes to chemistry and stuff... How would xenon escape into space if it's denser than any other (barring one) gases?

Re:Need some insight (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618377)

The theory is that the entire atmosphere was wiped out by some event, perhaps a big collision or some sort. The atmosphere we have now is the result of gases released from within the core of the earth after that event.

Don't Worry! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618251)

Fukushima gave us tons of new xenon. Particularly lots of Xe-133 and Xe-136. Hooray!

Halliburton! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618273)

This being Slashdot I am surprised that you are not blaming Halliburton and Dick Cheney for the Xenon gas shortage. And also calling for a governement agency to address the problem.....

Wha?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618309)

And because it had no place to hide, it is now gone forever.
 
I didn't read the article but this cannot be their conclusion. Because something cannot be found it must be gone forever? WTF is that suppose to mean? If there is a known quantity and it can't be found it just means it's somewhere else. If there is no known quanitity than maybe they're just talking out their asses.

Re:Wha?? (4, Interesting)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | about 2 years ago | (#41618561)

I was confused as hell, but here is what I've gleaned:

1. Most noble gases were dissolved in/embedded in the early Earth's rock.
2. Xenon due to a variety of factors, did not behave in a similar manner, and thus was free floating in the early atmosphere.
3. A 'big event', like the event that caused Earth's moon to form also knocked the original atmosphere into space.
4. Because almost all of the xenon was in the atmosphere at the time of the event, it was literally lost (from the perspective of the Earth) to space and was either acquired by the other planets or sun, or blown by the solar wind out to the edge of the solar system and beyond.
5. Some small amounts of xenon were recaptured by Earth (like how the bits that formed the moon are still 'bound' to Earth) and those small amounts are what we measure in our current atmosphere.

In short:

Xenon exists in the atmosphere, not rocks. Impact event knocks off Earth's atmosphere (and the Xenon), Earth's atmosphere is replaced by outgassing from the previously saturated rock. The rock did not contain Xenon, so we have only trace amounts today.

Another terrible summary (4, Informative)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#41618329)

(please note that this post is aimed more at the editor than the submitter, whose first language may not be English)

"Xenon, the second heaviest of the noble gasses, is only found in trace amounts in the atmosphere.

So far so good.

[The] [a]tmosphere contains less xenon than other lighter noble gasses.

Could be read as meaning that the other noble gasses contain more xenon than the atmosphere, but as a sentence it's passable.

...it is hiding in the earths mantle.

It's called [the] Earth, and you forgot the possesive apostrophe.

Now a group at the University of Bayreuth in Germany think that they might have found the answer.

"The answer," given the context, can only seem to mean that they've found out where the xenon is hiding, but...

I[t] turns out that xenon does not dissolve easily into magnesium silicate perovskite, thus it cannot hide there. And because it had no place to hide, it is now gone forever."

Oh, okay, so "the answer" seems to be "we still don't know, but it's not where we thought it was"? Rather than "it is now gone forever" it seems (from reading one of articles, shock horror) that it was never actually there in the first place - perhaps substituting "come from" in place of "hide" would have made more sense.

Yours sincerely,

Captain Pedantic

Re:Another terrible summary (1)

JoeRobe (207552) | about 2 years ago | (#41618471)

the second heaviest of the noble gasses

For what it's worth, actually it's "gases". "Gasses" is a present tense verb.

Re:Another terrible summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618489)

Dear Captain Pedantic,

I agree with all of your points except the last. The researchers are proposing that xenon was there when the Earth formed (which we expect due to the concentration of xenon in meteorites), but that it boiled off with the rest of our first atmosphere. As the Earth cooled, our atmosphere was replenished by elements that had been previously trapped (dissolved) in rock. Xenon was not replenished because it was not soluble in the rocks in the first place.

So, the xenon was once present, and is now gone forever.

Sincerely,
Admiral Pedantic

Re:Another terrible summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618845)

Can we elect you as the /. Chief-in-Proofreading? I know they churn out a lot of stories, but their lack of aplomb for summarizing is appalling.

Re:Another terrible summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618967)

(from reading one of articles, shock horror)

Should probably be: "(from reading one of [the] articles, shock horror)"

But it could also be [many], [five], [my]... We will never know!

Car Headlights! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618341)

Nothing else to see here.

Ricermobiles. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618389)

Ricermobiles.

Next question, please!

but no!! (1)

spectrokid (660550) | about 2 years ago | (#41618449)

Even if it doesn't dissolve in perovsky, it actually dissolves very well in Topatourbiolilepiquorthite [lmgtfy.com] !! So that is not a good reason!

Re:but no!! (1)

Bardez (915334) | about 2 years ago | (#41618833)

Wouldn't some sort of citation that backs that claim up be more appropriate than a snarky "Let me Google that for you" link, especially since none of the top links in Google seem to immediately reveal any credit to your claim?

XXEEEENUU!!! (0)

Bananatree3 (872975) | about 2 years ago | (#41618569)

Xenu and Xerxes decided one day to take it away.

Xenon Rocks? (1)

mekkab (133181) | about 2 years ago | (#41618583)

Considering their web page hasn't been updated since 1997...
xenononline.com [xenononline.com]
...I'm not surprised they're gone forever.

Xenophobia (1)

idlehanz (1262698) | about 2 years ago | (#41618593)

If you're afraid of where, how, or why the Xenon disappeared.

I thought xenon was most chemically active (3, Informative)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 2 years ago | (#41618851)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noble_gas_compound [wikipedia.org]

Yes, see the link: of all the noble gases we've studied, it is the most chemically active, we've created many more compounds with xenon than any other noble gas. It's the most reactive.

Radon is heavier and has more complex electron shells and therefore is probably more reactive, theoretically. But it is also radioactive, so it isn't more chemically active when we take into account the concept the idea of sticking around and staying in the compound.

So xenon is the most chemically active noble gas, period.

The real question (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 2 years ago | (#41618887)

Where have all the Cowboy Neals gone?
Long time passing.
Where have all the Cowboy Neals gone?
Long time ago.
Where have all the Cowboy Neals gone?
Mommas grounded them one by one.
Oh, When will they ever learn?
Oh, When will they ever learn?

That explains this message I just saw. (1)

Minwee (522556) | about 2 years ago | (#41618889)

"Borno, gone relativistic. See you in a hundred years. Xenon."

Rocks Rocks Rocks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41618935)

You mean it's not in my basement?

(Note: I live in the Rocky Mountains)

Wha... (1)

rickb928 (945187) | about 2 years ago | (#41618975)

I'd like to say you can't make this up, but, apparently, you can.

Twilight of the Xenon (1)

Beeftopia (1846720) | about 2 years ago | (#41618977)

O Noble Gas, We Hardly Knew Ye! :(

First thing that popped into my mind (1)

jitterman (987991) | about 2 years ago | (#41619093)

after I read the article title:

I need some Xenon!
I'm holdin' out for some Xenon 'til the mornin' li-ight!
...

Bad 80s movie? You're soaking in it!

So long XeCl excimer laser (1)

ChemGeek4501 (1044544) | about 2 years ago | (#41619155)

You were a good friend for many years....

Been looking for years... (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 2 years ago | (#41619243)

...But, I still don't Xenon.

Used up in science demonstrations (2)

mister_playboy (1474163) | about 2 years ago | (#41619261)

At 169 m/s, the speed of sound in xenon gas is slower than that in air due to the slower average speed of the heavy xenon atoms compared to nitrogen and oxygen molecules. Hence, xenon lowers the resonant frequencies of the vocal tract when inhaled. This produces a characteristic lowered voice timbre, an effect opposite to the high-timbred voice caused by inhalation of helium. Like helium, xenon does not satisfy the body's need for oxygen. Xenon is both a simple asphyxiant and an anesthetic more powerful than nitrous oxide; consequently, many universities no longer allow the voice stunt as a general chemistry demonstration. As xenon is expensive, the gas sulfur hexafluoride, which is similar to xenon in molecular weight (146 versus 131), is generally used in this stunt, and is an asphyxiant without being anesthetic.

Fun times. :)

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?