Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

The Three Pillars of Nokia Strategy Have All Failed

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the time-to-reinvest-in-pillar-technology dept.

Businesses 409

An anonymous reader writes "'When all 3 legs of your 3-legged strategy fail, what do you do? You rush — run run run — to change your total strategy. But what would a madman do?' Ex-Nokia exec Tommi Ahonen's new article has a few suggestions. Is the Nokia board either asleep at the wheel, or incompetent, or in collusion with the incompetent CEO? Ahonen provides an insider's view not just of how Nokia's Windows phone strategy has failed, but how this has spread to other parts of the company's technology. He says the 'Elop Effect' has 'single-handedly destroyed [...] Europe's biggest tech giant.' He raises the question: Why is Nokia's board failing to act? We've discussed Tommi's articles before, where he was correctly predicting Windows Phone's market failure at a point where others were claiming that 'the Lumia line is, in fact, selling quite nicely.'"

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

How many more? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643597)

Hatred towards Nokia on Slashdot... Why not failing HTC, patent troll Motorola Mobility (nobody in Europe buys that Chinese crap btw)...

Re:How many more? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643639)

It's far too early to be predicting the death of Nokia or Windows phone. It hasn't gained popularity, but that could easily change.

Re:How many more? (5, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 2 years ago | (#41643659)

Paid by Microsoft to take a dive, and open a "Microsoft-sized hole" in the market.

But that's not working put as planned, either...

Re:How many more? (5, Insightful)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 2 years ago | (#41643993)

For that to be true MSFT would have had to plan that 1.- Nobody would buy WinPhone...okay I see that one, 2.- Nokia would leave them with a product to sell in that gap...which if they wouldn't buy WinPhone on Nokia a change of brand name sure as hell isn't gonna help move units, and 3.- The gap wouldn't just be absorbed by Google, with the CCC Android 2.x phones taking the low end while the more expensive Android and Apple units take the high.

So you see this is the problem I have when people describe Bill Gates kind of evil moves at MSFT....Ballmer just ain't that smart. I mean who was on stage bragging about his squirting Zune and not getting why he was being laughed at? Who spent a fuckton of money on products like Zune, Kin, Sidekick, etc, with no real plan on how to monetize the purchases? Who fucked over what few loyal WinPhone customers they had by not giving them Win 8 on their Win 7 phones and thus burnt the brand with many a customer? Who was fucking retarded enough to let IE get horribly fragmented in the vain hope that they could pretend its 2003 and they can actually get people to upgrade the OS just for a new version of IE?

Hell I could write a post the length of a Harry Potter book just pointing out the fucking DUMB moves that has gone on under Ballmer, his mobile "strategy" is a trainwreck, he is taking a shit on one of the few remaining cash cows MSFT has in order to push Windows onto...ARM? WTF? Are you shitting me? WTH would ANYBODY want Windows on a chip that...won't actually run Windows programs? Why, because they think the Win 3.x color scheme of Metro is just too damned sexy?

Actually I think one could argue that Nokia and MSFT are the same company, its just that MSFT has...for the moment at least..a couple of cash cows to keep its head above the water ATM but the simple fact is both companies seem directionless, completely devoid of any real innovation inside, waited until the market was already in the middle of a huge shift before simply reacting with half assed products, and both are acting like they have no real competition when in reality they have to bring their AAA game or get curbstomped which even Ray Charles could see the latter is exactly what is happening.

Re:How many more? (5, Insightful)

amiga3D (567632) | about 2 years ago | (#41644041)

I think it's clear now that Microsoft, as always, used a stopgap solution to make their followup successful. Winphone 7 was never going anywhere and the plan was always for Win8. Nokia fell into the EEE trap and was used to crack into the market to pave the way for Win8. Their carcass may still prove useful to MS down the road with their patents and such and also as an inroad to European and other world markets. This is yet another brilliant move by MS. I still find it hard to believe that companies partner with them knowing how it usually turns out. I guess the short term benefits are just too tempting. I expect to see Win8 phones from Microsoft. Wonder how that will play with Nokia? I'd say they are helpless.

Re:How many more? (4, Insightful)

21mhz (443080) | about 2 years ago | (#41644491)

I think it's clear now that Microsoft, as always, used a stopgap solution to make their followup successful. Winphone 7 was never going anywhere and the plan was always for Win8. Nokia fell into the EEE trap and was used to crack into the market to pave the way for Win8. Their carcass may still prove useful to MS down the road with their patents and such and also as an inroad to European and other world markets. This is yet another brilliant move by MS. I still find it hard to believe that companies partner with them knowing how it usually turns out. I guess the short term benefits are just too tempting. I expect to see Win8 phones from Microsoft. Wonder how that will play with Nokia? I'd say they are helpless.

Wow dude. You almost make it look as if Nokia is already bankrupt and is NOT the one finishing the sexiest Windows Phone 8 device (if not the sexiest smartphone overall) to come out in 2012. And Microsoft is already pushing its own Windows Phone 8 devices to compete with Nokia, so it's not just a rumor. But then I go out of the Slashdot bubble and the vision disappears.

Windows Phone 7 was, indeed, a stopgap solution. For Nokia as much as for Microsoft. And it actually made engineering sense to overhaul the hardware platform requirements for Windows Phone 8, because of the depth of the software changes. Legacy hardware, in principle, could have been supported with some extra effort, but my armchair CEO skills are insufficient to give a verdict on how easy would it have been for both companies. The existing Windows Phone users do not have it much worse than the users of Android phones stuck on Gingerbread. Who was the latest refusenik OEM again, Motorola Mobility? Their new owner company, what was it? Must be evil.

Re:How many more? (5, Insightful)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#41643729)

Windows Phone 7 is dead. Microsoft declared it dead the exact moment Nokia needed it the most, but nevermind. Nobody in his right mind would buy one right now, even if they liked the platform, with Windows Phone 8 on the horizon. If 8 takes off, *and* Nokia can survive until 8 takes off, they could do fine, albeit as a somewhat smaller company. But when you read TFA, and look at the graphs, and look at the general user community reaction to 8 in general, neither of these things (8 takes off, and Nokia can survive until Windows 8 phones become profitable) seem particularly likely.

Why (from TFA) haven't the board fired Elop? Corruption, perhaps? Payoffs?

Re:How many more? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643777)

I meant "Windows phone" as in Windows on a phone in general, not specifically WP7. I own an Android phone, but I have to admit that I like WP7. When I'm ready to upgrade my phone, I will definitely be looking at Windows 8 phones as well as all of the new Android phones. My biggest complaint about Android is it still feels clunky, like stuff is kind of cut and pasted together to create a Frankensteinesque amalgam of an operating system. WP7 feels a lot more unified and "device-like" and I hope Windows 8 on phones does too.

Re:How many more? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#41643909)

> I meant "Windows phone" as in Windows on a phone in general, not specifically WP7. I own an Android phone, but I have to admit that I like WP7.

Then, trade in today. Nokia desperately needs the money.

> When I'm ready to upgrade my phone, I will definitely be looking at Windows 8 phones as well as all of the new Android phones. My biggest complaint about Android is it still feels clunky, like stuff is kind of cut and pasted together to create a Frankensteinesque amalgam of an operating system. WP7 feels a lot more unified and "device-like" and I hope Windows 8 on phones does too.

Nokia may not survive until then. That was the point.

Re:How many more? (4, Informative)

Znork (31774) | about 2 years ago | (#41643963)

The board probably had decided on a MS strategy before hiring Elop so they're as complicit in the current strategy as he is. That means they have face invested in the strategy which makes it unlikely that they'll fire Elop and change directions before it's too late. Once the board gets replaced the company may stand a chance, but that'll take some time.

Re:How many more? (5, Insightful)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 2 years ago | (#41644475)

The optimism for Windows Phone in the press really does surprise me. Windows Phone 7 was really feature incomplete at launch but people made the excuse that it was their first Version. Ahhh No it was not, Microsoft had been making mobile OSs for a long time and Windows Phone 7 was Major version 7 and used the same kernel as Windows Mobile.
Microsoft has chopped Nokia off at the knees when it announced Windows Phone 8. Not only will it not run on the Nokia Lumia 900 it would not run on any existing Windows Mobile device. At that moment Microsoft was telling everyone to not buy a Windows Phone but wait for the next version and new hardware. Sales probably dropped to as close to zero.
Microsoft and Nokia need to understand that Windows Phone can not be almost as good as IOS and Android, it can not be as good as IOS and Android, it can be a little better than IOS and Android. It has to be much better than IOS and Android. Any new mobile OS that launches will have few apps than IOS and Android so you must be a much better platform than IOS and Android. RIM might get by with good enough because they have a large customer base that trusts them. Microsoft could have gotten by four years ago with Windows Phone 7 when IOS was limited to a few carriers and Android was just getting going. MeeGo could have leveraged the Nokia user base. Palm could have made it because it was at the right place and the right time but had a crippled SDK and not great hardware.
Also Nokia gave up the potential profit center of running the app store and selling media to the devices.
Nokia smelled smoke and jump off the platform and into a cold heartless sea and had to hope for Microsoft to save them. They should have put out the fire.

Re:How many more? (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#41643863)

It's far too early to be predicting the death of Nokia or Windows phone. It hasn't gained popularity, but that could easily change.

TFA's thesis, though, is that Nokia was actually doing well before it went Windows and is now bleeding out. If true, that makes Elop a fuckup whether Nokia pulls out of it dive or not; the only possible vindication would be survival and some sort of mid/long term strategic gain that validates the present losses.

Re:How many more? (1)

Beavertank (1178717) | about 2 years ago | (#41644351)

...which was exactly the line with Palm's WebOS. The fact that it COULD change doesn't mean it's LIKELY to, much as I wish it would have with WebOS.

Re:How many more? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643691)

No sir, we are really sorry for Nokia.
If any hate is spewing, is targeted against the ex M$ bigwig Elop which brew this destructive strategy.
Far-well Nokia, once pride of Finland.
You are dead and we are really sorry.

Buy nokia stock! (0)

goombah99 (560566) | about 2 years ago | (#41643755)

Nokia stock has gone way down. By most estimates its value is near book value and that it's patents alone (which are not included in book value) have a worth that exceeds the book value. Nokia goofed on symbian and they made a choice to not compete on the android platform with samsung. Now considering that they did very well in the low end market (and still do) it's slightly surprising they were averse to sheer price competition. However one has to realize that Samsung is backed by an in house fab so they might have made the right decision.

Windows 8 gives them a chance to draw on some strengths by adding value from other assets they own. At the time there were 5. 1) superior mapping, 2) superior camera 3) superior enterprise connection via Siemens network 4) a history of strong design 5) a very strong patent portfolio that might allow better comms.

The siemens argument if floundering. The mapping one has not been exploited as much as it could be but I think it is latent, waiting for win 8 to release. So they still have 4 of the 5 cyllinders.

The problem they have is the rise of the smart phone. It's inevitable this will creep into their vast low end market. So they were doomed. They may have accelerated this fal however by bad management.

The problem with their stock price was the cratering of their profit centers by announcing the end of symbian prematurely. THey have been selling off and or leasing off assets to maintain cash flow. They are closing facilities in europe but opening them in 2nd world countries. So they are really squeezed on cash.

hence the stock is teetering.

But when they return to profitability with win 8 release, perhaps as a leaner company, I think their stock price should rise enormously from it's under -book value at present. THey have very serious competitive advantages for the technologies they can intergrate into win8.

Re:Buy nokia stock! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643793)

Q: How does a stock go down by 90%?
A: Well first it goes down 80% and then it gets cut in half.

Re:How many more? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643815)

What phones aren't made in China?

Re:How many more? (5, Informative)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41643991)

What phones aren't made in China?

Ironically Nokias before Elop sacked Nokias workforce

Re:How many more? (4, Insightful)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41643817)

Hatred towards Nokia on Slashdot... Why not failing HTC, patent troll Motorola Mobility (nobody in Europe buys that Chinese crap btw)...

I think mentioning HTC is very relevant, ignoring the shear scale on which Nokia has been destroyed by Elop in Months, for the third ecosystem [in reality sixth], to produce Windows Phones. Ironically one of HTC's strategy is to produce Windows phones too next year, and they cheaper than Nokia's offerings for equivalent models.

Re:How many more? (1, Interesting)

slackware 3.6 (2524328) | about 2 years ago | (#41643827)

Yah well I have a Motorolla XPR 6550 @-way radio. Motoralla's radio products are awesome. The phones suck though.

Re:How many more? (1)

mchnz (457843) | about 2 years ago | (#41643949)

There's no doubt that with smart phones now sub-$100, there will be a shakeout. It may be calculators and corded phones all over again. As for what nationality to buy, most of the world is now buying Asian, and much of the "Chinese crap" you write of gets reasonable reviews and appears to last the required 2 year life span.

Re:How many more? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644237)

Hint: Google and Doubleclick ads on Slashdot. How many of those Slashdotters own Google stock?

Shhh! (0, Troll)

21mhz (443080) | about 2 years ago | (#41644281)

I've been actually missing a good Ahonen troll story.
Lately even comments citing his long-winded ramblings have become rare. Not every story about Nokia gets one that is moderated sufficiently high. I've been almost afraid that he has lost credibility even among Linux zealots. That point-by-point debunking [wordpress.com] has been published that made the majority of people concerned about Nokia think rationally again. But no, this one has made it again, and how timely: just before Q3 results, and the start of Windows Phone 8 sales. Think of it: even if Tomi will be proven a total ass in the next few years, he will be a well-to-do ass, because of all your traffic generating ad revenue. Help him, he's trying really hard.

Re:How many more? (1)

Mabhatter (126906) | about 2 years ago | (#41644617)

HTC is more about being a step behind Samsung than failing. That one step behind is a giant profit margin, hurting their books... HTC is still OEM for important Nexus devices... They just aren't making PROFIT.

Moto was at one point the original Cellular phone company... Too much time resting on past fame, dropping Nextel so they make phones but don't even run a phone service...

What you do is... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643611)

You call Apple, and say "Hey, I hear you have a maps problem. Guess what? We have lots of map data and experience."

Re:What you do is... (3, Interesting)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41643785)

You call Apple, and say "Hey, I hear you have a maps problem. Guess what? We have lots of map data and experience."

I could see how that would help Apple. I can see how it might get some short term money from Apple, but as they already get money from Apple, and still managed to burn through $10Billion in months how exactly is this going help Nokia. In fact other than promoting Maps on Nokia over Apple like they are already doing. I fail to see any benefit.

Re:What you do is... (3, Insightful)

rrohbeck (944847) | about 2 years ago | (#41643893)

You call Apple, and say "Hey, I hear you have a maps problem. Guess what? We have lots of map data and experience."

Response from Apple: "Sounds good, but we'll rather wait until you're bankrupt and pick up the patents and your map data for cheap."

Re:What you do is... (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | about 2 years ago | (#41644273)

You call Apple, and say "Hey, I hear you have a maps problem. Guess what? We have lots of map data and experience."

Response from Apple: "Sounds good, but we'll rather wait until you're bankrupt and pick up the patents and your map data for cheap."

Response from Microsoft: Let the bidding war begin!

Re:What you do is... (1)

vakuona (788200) | about 2 years ago | (#41644501)

Response from Apple to MSFT. Bring it on!

We are not talking about 1997 Apple here. This is 2012 Apple with more money than God. Well, than Microsoft at least.

Besides, if I was Apple, I would buy TomTom for the maps and Ericsson for the patents. Navteq might be better (arguable) but Tomtom is at least good enough.

Old proverb (5, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 2 years ago | (#41643629)

"Never attribute to malice that which can be explained by stupidity." It's the Occam's Razor of the corporate world. Yes, people get greedy or manipulative, it's true... but that's the exception, not the rule. For the most part, people are just really, really, fucking stupid. Senior management in particular tends to develop problems like target fixation, confirmation bias, and even when everything is in the spiral of death and the alarms are going off, engines on fire, they somehow think they'll be able to pull out of the dive and fix the problem... right up until the part where they crater. They teach this in every management course studies... Have an exit strategy. Know what your breakpoints are and when to bail. And company after company, even big ones, really really big ones, still fail at this, not because of greed, but because of stupidity.

Re:Old proverb (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643687)

"It's the Occam's Razor of the corporate world" or the Hanlon's razor of the whole world. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanlon%27s_razor)

Re:Old proverb (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#41643889)

They teach this in every management course studies... Have an exit strategy.

"Hey, I've got my golden parachute right here, just like you said."

"Oh, I see, you meant an exist strategy that saves the company. Haha, I'm off to apply 'lessons learned' elsewhere, enjoy!"

Is Nokia just a simulation? (2)

Latent Heat (558884) | about 2 years ago | (#41643967)

So, after looking at another thread on Slashdot, is Nokia just a simulation or some kind of hologram?

Re:Is Nokia just a simulation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644427)

Could it be a simugrammed hololation?

Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (0)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#41643631)

Nokia had no true smartphone os so it was windows or android. And android is Samsung.

The geeks might have liked the n900 or whatever it was but the iPhone and droid had all the hype

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643709)

Might have been, but compared to all the symbian devices sold, Iphone was a drop in the sea.
N9 + Meego would have been the solution (although as seen by few days old post, the route was hard and constantly counterfeithed by symbian lobbies inside Nokia).

Nokia has one (probably their last) shot : transform "featurephones" into "smartphones".

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (3, Informative)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#41643747)

the iphone stole 14% of mobile PROFITS a year after it was first released. and that was only 1 million units sold.

almost all of those cheapo phones sold around the world make no money. all the profits are made on a few devices.

apple is now at something like 60% of PROFITS of all cell phones sold around the world. Samsung is 30% or more. everyone else is fighting for scraps

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (4, Insightful)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41644015)

the iphone stole 14% of mobile PROFITS a year after it was first released. and that was only 1 million units sold.

almost all of those cheapo phones sold around the world make no money. all the profits are made on a few devices.

apple is now at something like 60% of PROFITS of all cell phones sold around the world. Samsung is 30% or more. everyone else is fighting for scraps

iPhone never stole anything! Apple make massive mark-ups to their products and have people prepared to pay for it. Most people aren't which is why Androids market share is 4 times that of Apples...and Apples is dropping. Apple does well with early adopters, but now the market is maturing not so much!

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644259)

And yet only 2 people are making ANY money selling phones, and Nokia isn't one of them. Apple makes more than double the next in line, which means they can afford to lower their prices if they have to, but no one else can, at least not without going bankrupt. It doesn't matter who many units you sell if you make nothing on each one, and have next to no plan to make money after the fact. At that point, you are just waiting to go out of business.

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644481)

Nokia not making profit? With 1 Billion devices out there? 1 _BILLION_ devices. Does that ring a bell?
Nokia is not making profit now. Nokia was making twice as much profit as Apple and Samsung before IPhone 4.
N9 was Nokia's reply to IPhone 4; it came late, and that was a disaster. The rest was just a merely new sequence of mistakes of a headless chicken running on the last energies of his headless body.

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (1)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about 2 years ago | (#41643819)

They could have gone the route of a droid phone maker. The problem there was that all of their suppliers were already android makers, and competing with your suppliers isn't a great strategy.

Being just another android handset maker could have been equally catastrophic (after all, nothing they've released lately is on par with the droids from Samsung), so given the huge pile of cash microsoft was offering their options were limited. They would have been better to keep toes in both though, and been a Droid maker *and* a WP7/WP8 maker.

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41643847)

Nokia had no true smartphone os so it was windows or android. And android is Samsung.

The geeks might have liked the n900 or whatever it was but the iPhone and droid had all the hype

The iPhone and droid may have had hype...but Nokia had growing market share; an App store; incredible phones...and most importantly choices. It decided to burn them in a memo and yes Meego was one of them, but regardless of dismissing other peoples opinions just because they are more technical than yourself. The cold truth is the current Strategy failed, and is continuing to fail!!

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (4, Interesting)

DMiax (915735) | about 2 years ago | (#41643885)

Nokia had their own OS in development, which came out before Windows (and now we learn it was one year early since apparently WP7 was just warming up and only WP8 is the real deal). Different from Windows, Meego already had an SDK out and a migration path from Symbian, so that developers could have their apps ported on day one.

We cannot say it would have been a hit for sure, but it had more than a small edge on Windows anyway. Why not give it a shot, along with Windows and then decide what was the best for the company? Nokia was full of cash at the time and could think long term.

Why not do that? Because Elop did what was best for Microsoft, not Nokia and wilfully sacrificed all the assets of his own company to benefit his previous one. Why he is not being investigated for breach of fiduciary duty is beyond me.

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (5, Interesting)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 2 years ago | (#41644293)

Because Elop did what was best for Microsoft, not Nokia and wilfully sacrificed all the assets of his own company to benefit his previous one. Why he is not being investigated for breach of fiduciary duty is beyond me.

I don't buy this argument, because I don't think Elop was a Microsoft mole. I think he is a Windows True Believer.

People talk about Steve Jobs and his Reality Distortion Field; but I've known Microsofties that believe just as strongly in All Things Windows. They truly believe Windows is the solution to everything, and everything else is an also-ran. They truly think that the world is just waiting for a Microsoft solution to any problem, and as soon as it's released by golly the world is going to flock to it in droves.

I remember sitting through a talk just before Internet Explorer 7 was released. This was at the point (pre-Chrome even, IIRC) where Firefox was starting to seriously eat into IE's market share. The speaker waxed eloquently on just how great Internet Explorer 7 was going to be, and how Mozilla should consider just folding up shop once the final version was released because no one was going to use Firefox after that point. It wasn't hyperbole - he really believe that.

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (3, Informative)

21mhz (443080) | about 2 years ago | (#41644537)

OK, you didn't read it yet, here you go: The story of MeeGo [taskumuro.com] .

Re:Not like Nokia's other phones were selling (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644529)

Nokia has invented the smartphone! Remember the Communicator? In the 90s!

I'm not much of a Nokia Fan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643641)

But I'm very skeptical of this article's honesty.

Seriously, nokia's been delivering very high quality products lately, and I still see a LOT of people using their phones (I'd say 10:1 to apple's stuff) where I live.

So I'd say this is just paid FUD. By whom. No idea, but I'd point at whoever could benefit from nokia's stock falling.

Re:I'm not much of a Nokia Fan (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643689)

You must live in some third world shit hole. I haven't seen a nokia phone in years.

Re:I'm not much of a Nokia Fan (5, Informative)

larry bagina (561269) | about 2 years ago | (#41643841)

Apple sold 5 million [apple.com] iPhone 5s on opening weekend. As of 1 month ago, Nokia has sold 7 million [techcrunch.com] Lumias. Total.

The Lumia was introduced in November 2011, so that's 10 months of sales. Apple sold over 100 million iPhones last year.

Re:I'm not much of a Nokia Fan (4, Interesting)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41644025)

Apple sold 5 million [apple.com] iPhone 5s on opening weekend. As of 1 month ago, Nokia has sold 7 million [techcrunch.com] Lumias. Total.

The Lumia was introduced in November 2011, so that's 10 months of sales. Apple sold over 100 million iPhones last year.

That is not the half of it Android activates 1.3 Million phones every day, and has a market share 4 times that of Apple, and Nokia could have had an Android product...and still had a Windows one if it really wanted.

Re:I'm not much of a Nokia Fan (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644489)

A market share 4 times that of Apple and yet Apple's iPhone profits are larger than all Android handset manufacturer's combined.

http://www.asymco.com/2012/05/03/the-phone-market-in-2012-a-tale-of-two-disruptions/

Suck on that you FOSS faggots.

Re:I'm not much of a Nokia Fan (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41643973)

But I'm very skeptical of this article's honesty.

Seriously, nokia's been delivering very high quality products lately, and I still see a LOT of people using their phones (I'd say 10:1 to apple's stuff) where I live.

So I'd say this is just paid FUD. By whom. No idea, but I'd point at whoever could benefit from nokia's stock falling.

Lets not talk about FUD but little thing called facts. This is the latest from IDC

http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS23638712 [idc.com]

As you can see for each Windows Phone user there are TWENTY Android users and Five Apple users.

Windows Phone 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643645)

I was quite a fan of Nokia choosing Qt, and the change to Windows quite a disappointment.
But to my knowledge, they are betting on Windows 8, and calling it a failure,
while there hasn't been released a single Windows 8 phone, seems to me a bit too early.

Blogspam, on my Slashdot? More likely than you... (4, Funny)

0xdeadbeef (28836) | about 2 years ago | (#41643667)

Woah, he predicted Windows Phone would not succeed at the level of iPhone and Android? Better tell James Randi to hang it up, because we got a real god damned psychic right here!

Re:Blogspam, on my Slashdot? More likely than you. (5, Informative)

NetCow (117556) | about 2 years ago | (#41644429)

Woah, he predicted Windows Phone would not succeed at the level of iPhone and Android? Better tell James Randi to hang it up, because we got a real god damned psychic right here!

Bra-vo, very sarcastic and blasé, but unfortunately it makes you look quite ignorant. Ahonen predicted this in February 2011 right after Elop's announcement. For example:

Look at the alternatives. (4, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | about 2 years ago | (#41643773)

It's hard. Apple won't let them use IOS. Android is generic, so they have no edge over Chinese manufacturers. Blackberry has tanked. Microsoft looked like a good option.

Nokia makes excellent hardware at a good price. Their gear tends to be much more rugged than Apple's fragile mobile devices. Their problems are more on the marketing side.

They had an alternative - MeeGo (5, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#41643853)

Nokia had an alternative, MeeGo. The trouble was at the time it was already outpaced by iOS and Android, so Nokia thought they probably could not catch up without a lot of rework.

And that's why they chose Windows Phone 7. But, as one of the comments in the article notes, the real problem is that Windows Phone 7 was not really a way to catch up either. It was a temporary solution, to be abandoned by Microsoft to the degree that even fairly powerful Nokia phones running Windows Phone 7 could not be upgraded to WP8.

If that were known (as the comment alleges) then Nokia probably would have been better off putting in an All-Hands effort to make MeeGo compete with other modern smartphone OS's. I'm not sure they would have been in a worse place than where they are now, and then they would be in full control of their own destiny.

But as things stand the fate of Nokia and Microsoft are intertwined (with more risk to Nokia than Microsoft).

Re:They had an alternative - MeeGo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643951)

Besides a few slashdot nerds no one was buying MeeGo phones. These same nerds knew other nerds with these phones and assumed everyone was buying them.

Nokia stopped making them becuase no one was buying them - the only people complaining about this are a few slashdot nerds and Nokia execs who lost their jobs.

Re:They had an alternative - MeeGo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644029)

Yet nobody is buying Windows phones...perhaps the problem is Nokia...

Re:They had an alternative - MeeGo (4, Informative)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41644053)

Besides a few slashdot nerds no one was buying MeeGo phones. These same nerds knew other nerds with these phones and assumed everyone was buying them.

Nokia stopped making them becuase no one was buying them - the only people complaining about this are a few slashdot nerds and Nokia execs who lost their jobs.

This is a quote from the January 26th 2012 by Tomi Ahonen

“Luckily I didn’t have to do the math for this, the nice people at All About Symbian had tracked the numbers (read through the comments) and calculated the limits, finding N9 sales to be between the level of 1.5 million and 2.0 million units in Q4. Wow! Nokia specifically excluded all of its richest and biggest traditional markets where it tried to sell the Lumia, and these countries achieved – lets call it the average, 1.75 million unit sales of the N9 in Q4. So the one N9 outsold both Lumia handsets by almost exactly 3 to 1.” [1]

Re:They had an alternative - MeeGo (1)

21mhz (443080) | about 2 years ago | (#41644607)

This is a quote from the January 26th 2012 by Tomi Ahonen

“Luckily I didn’t have to do the math for this, the nice people at All About Symbian had tracked the numbers (read through the comments) and calculated the limits, finding N9 sales to be between the level of 1.5 million and 2.0 million units in Q4.

Funny how nobody goes down to All About Symbian and references that, maybe because these numbers are nowhere to be found "in the comments".
This is the problem with Tomi's data: almost all of them are "calculated" with no real explanation how.

Re:They had an alternative - MeeGo (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about 2 years ago | (#41644081)

Nokia never marketed them. Only nerds even heard of them. It's an amazing phone that sells without advertising. They spend tons of money on advertising those winphones but they aren't exactly flying off the shelves. I'd think with a little effort the N900 could have failed a little less than the winphones they tried to foist on people.

Re:They had an alternative - MeeGo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644581)

It was outpaced, yes, because it came out 2 YEARS after the original scheduled release date!
Back then a PC which would have been 1 month late would have been outdated!
And it STILL the most innovative UI I've seen so far on any smartphone. Period.
Would it had been dual core, it would have been able to compete with IPhone 5 _easily_. And trust me, at that point I would not have been so sure about Apple's supremacy anymore.

Re:Look at the alternatives. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643961)

Android is generic, so they have no edge over hoards of disposable chinese laborers and regulation-free environmental exploitation.

FTFY.

Re:Look at the alternatives. (5, Insightful)

LordLucless (582312) | about 2 years ago | (#41643999)

Android is generic, so they have no edge over Chinese manufacturers.

Nokia makes excellent hardware at a good price. Their gear tends to be much more rugged than Apple's fragile mobile devices.

Your second quote puts paid to your first. Nokia was a hardware company. They made good hardware. They should have jumped into Android with both feet. A proven, reliable, popular operating system, that lets vendors customize it, and would have let them concentrate on their strengths - hardware.

Re:Look at the alternatives. (1)

dinfinity (2300094) | about 2 years ago | (#41644361)

So true.

Even though I have been very happy with my HTC devices in the past couple of years, I have always looked at the competing Nokia hardware with much envy. I would have bought a Windows Mobile 6 device from them, had they offered it and I would instabuy an Android N9 successor were it to come out.

Re:Look at the alternatives. (1)

Deathlizard (115856) | about 2 years ago | (#41644123)

WM8 still looks like a good option if Microsoft's Windows 8 plans actually plays out and apps port seamlessly from PC/Tablet to Phone, but it's still a long shot.

Meego is a dead horse since it's market share makes even WebOS look good, which keeps devs away focusing on the more popular Android and IOS Ecosystems. Hell, if Microsoft is struggling to get App Developers over to Windows Phone, Meego had no chance in hell outside of Nokia Fanboys.

Their biggest problems is that they still are big on feature phones when feature phones are doorknob dead, and they didn't diversify their smartphone strategy like the other smartphone manufactures did. They bet the farm on WM and Meego/Symbian when everyone else was betting on Android and doing WM on the side. There was no excuse for them to not do an android phone (hell even a WebOS phone at this point) alongside their WM counterparts outside of MS funneling a never ending stream of money to Nokia's (or even Elop's) pockets.

As for their android diversification argument. If all they did was make a slim stock android phone, it would have sold like gangbusters simply because it wouldn't have had all of the Crap UI Bloatware that HTC, Motorola and Samsung force on their customers. Hell, Google might have chosen them to make a Nexus device with their hardware pedigree and all...

Re:Look at the alternatives. (2)

Dan East (318230) | about 2 years ago | (#41644227)

"Android is generic, so they have no edge over Chinese manufacturers."

I don't understand the logic in this. Samsung stands out in the mobile market because of their hardware. People aren't saying "Oh, the customization Samsung has done to Android stands out and makes their devices less generic, so Samsung is selling a lot of phones." Nor do people equate Samsung as the definitive Android device. Whenever I heard "Samsung" in reference to phones, a single thing came to mind: their beautiful OLED displays. The rest of the hardware - it just worked. That's all Nokia would have needed with Android, was some hardware capability that set them apart.

If, as so many people have asserted, Nokia makes fantastic hardware, then they only need these things in an OS:
1) An OS that doesn't suck.
2) An OS that is already mature and available.
3) An OS with a healthy 3rd party application development ecosystem.
4) An OS that doesn't cost a fortune to license.

I can count on 1 finger the number of operating systems that meet Nokia's needs.

Re:Look at the alternatives. (4, Insightful)

Curupira (1899458) | about 2 years ago | (#41644337)

Android is generic, so they have no edge over Chinese manufacturers.

I really don't get why this argument applies against Android but misteriously doesn't apply against Windows Phone. Hello, WP is also a generic, third-party licensed operating system, not a in-house solution. After all, HTC is a Chinese manufacturer and also uses Windows Phone...

Re:Look at the alternatives. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644421)

It's hard. Apple won't let them use IOS. Android is generic, so they have no edge over Chinese manufacturers. Blackberry has tanked. Microsoft looked like a good option.

Nokia makes excellent hardware at a good price. Their gear tends to be much more rugged than Apple's fragile mobile devices. Their problems are more on the marketing side.

Microsoft did *not* look like a good option, even back then. The only reason they went with Microsoft was because of Elop's connections. He's a MS boy, and he was calling the shots.

Nokia had at least three operating system options of its own that it could have run with at the time, and it threw them all out. They should have focussed on one of them and polished it rather than letting them all flounder until they were worthless.

WebOS was for sale at the time, and had a good reputation among developers. They could have bought that.

Heck, even if they had run with Android, what would have been the problem with that? Nokia's strength is in their hardware quality -- the phones that are selling in big numbers are the Android phones from good quality hardware makers. Their hardware would have been good enough to differentiate themselves, even if they were using the same software as everyone else. Nokia could have had a very large chunk of that pie.

Instead they figured they wanted a whole pie to themselves. Too bad it turned out to be a very small pie. And too bad the owner of the pie seems to want it back before Nokia even managed to start nibbling on the crust.

Re:Look at the alternatives. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644513)

"It's hard. Apple won't let them use IOS. Android is generic, so they have no edge over Chinese manufacturers. Blackberry has tanked. Microsoft looked like a good option."

Nokia: "Help! Help! We're drowning!"
Android: "Over here! We have plenty of safe options to choose from!'
Microsoft: "Here, Nokia. We'll throw you a life saver."
Nokia: "Thanks! We'll take it."
Microsoft: [reaches for anvil]

Honestly. Of all the companies to try.

same stockholders... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643805)

Before Elop got involved, Nokia was working on a Linux-based OS called Meego. Then they killed it. Who benefits? Microsoft of course - the less Linux to compete against the better.

If you were on Nokia's board of directors, and you had stock in both Nokia and Microsoft, would it bother you at all to see Nokia collapse for Microsoft's benefit?

Re:same stockholders... (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about 2 years ago | (#41644093)

I wonder how much Nokia stock is held by Microsoft people?

plus `#1, Troll) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643835)

for *BSD be3ause

Nothing new (4, Insightful)

zyzko (6739) | about 2 years ago | (#41643839)

Oh, a link to blog post by Ahonen, with nothing really new.

I agree that execution by Elop has been sub-par. But calling that "SYMBIAN WAS WINNING" is even by wearing Symbian-goggles a very red-rosed opinion of what was going on. Nokia was in huge trouble, it's UI teams competing with each other and handset teams not building on the same platform as noted in in an article [slashdot.org] from yesterday. Symbian as it was was dead. Developers hated it, users disliked it compared to competition and why it did so good up until the end was good quality Nokia hardware.

Ahonen is right on some points, but he seems to totally disagree on that Nokia had to do something, by going on with Symbian without major rework was just not feasible, the whole MeeGo thing was really screwed up with competing package managers, UIs and teamwork with Intel so as a CEO what what would have he done - he doesn't tell. Maybe MeeGo strategy would have proved to be success.

I don't want to resort to ad-hominems but in case of Ahonen I would take his comments with a grain of salt - he clearly has an axe to grind with Nokia and the postings he has made and appearances on interviews smell like bitterness. And they always boil to one point: Profits before elop and profits after Elop.

Re:Nothing new (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643941)

Symbian might not have been winning, and yet it was and still is - the bread winner for Nokia. Symbian sales did not drop because it was behind the times - but because Elop killed it - just a few months after launching a flagship device - and in that process also frittered away the brand loyalty. And all this was done in favor of WP7 which had no future.!! Had Nokia stayed with Symbian until WP8, they would have been in a much better position than they find themselves in today.

Re:Nothing new (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41644075)

Oh, a link to blog post by Ahonen, with nothing really new.

I agree that execution by Elop has been sub-par. But calling that "SYMBIAN WAS WINNING" is even by wearing Symbian-goggles a very red-rosed opinion of what was going on. Nokia was in huge trouble, it's UI teams competing with each other and handset teams not building on the same platform as noted in in an article [slashdot.org] from yesterday. Symbian as it was was dead. Developers hated it, users disliked it compared to competition and why it did so good up until the end was good quality Nokia hardware.

Ahonen is right on some points, but he seems to totally disagree on that Nokia had to do something, by going on with Symbian without major rework was just not feasible, the whole MeeGo thing was really screwed up with competing package managers, UIs and teamwork with Intel so as a CEO what what would have he done - he doesn't tell. Maybe MeeGo strategy would have proved to be success.

I don't want to resort to ad-hominems but in case of Ahonen I would take his comments with a grain of salt - he clearly has an axe to grind with Nokia and the postings he has made and appearances on interviews smell like bitterness. And they always boil to one point: Profits before elop and profits after Elop.

From the latest results of IDC Q2
http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS23638712 [idc.com]
Symbian 4.5% windows phone 3.5%

Re:Nothing new (4, Insightful)

TheLongshot (919014) | about 2 years ago | (#41644405)

Symbian was doing well, and I don't think his argument was that it was ultimately a winning strategy to ride Symbian. What he's making a point of is that Elop's "Burning Platforms" memo quickly killed Symbian, which was bringing in money for Nokia. People knew after that that there was no future in Symbian.

I pretty much knew at that point that Nokia was doomed. They pretty much killed everything that made them money, for a weak platform that they wouldn't even have a phone out for almost a year. Even a moron could see that. While things did have to change at Nokia, Elop pretty much destroyed most of the phone division, with little to show for it.

Re:Nothing new (1)

hattig (47930) | about 2 years ago | (#41644423)

Nokia was in huge trouble, it's UI teams competing with each other and handset teams not building on the same platform as noted in in an article from yesterday.

Hardly a reason to dump it all in a very public manner and switch to something completely different, turning Nokia instantly from a mobile solutions company into a Windows Phone OEM.

You sort out the internal issues with development, resulting in a single coherent vision and roadmap for development of the platform that you have. You might have to fire a few egos to get things moving again, but they would have left as soon as the platform switch was announced anyway.

You also might choose to set up an alternative development process for an alternative platform - WP in this instance - using the resources freed up by sorting out the issues. That's your backup strategy should it turn out the main strategy is still not working out.

Regardless of the guy's grinding axe, the facts remain - Nokia is making losses instead of profits, and the Windows Phone choice has so far totally failed because nobody wants a Windows mobile., and it's unlikely that the market will change its mind when WP8 comes out.

Re:Nothing new (1)

DMiax (915735) | about 2 years ago | (#41644649)

Nokia was in huge trouble, it's UI teams competing with each other and handset teams not building on the same platform as noted in in an article from yesterday.

Hardly a reason to dump it all in a very public manner and switch to something completely different, turning Nokia instantly from a mobile solutions company into a Windows Phone OEM.

And it could have been much better, if the new OS did not come after almost one year. One year in which they still had to sell the phones that their CEO was bad-mouthing.

At least wait until the 920 is released (2, Insightful)

WaffleMonster (969671) | about 2 years ago | (#41643845)

Neither Windows phone 8 or the Lumina 920 have been released and we have people already yelling "rrruuunnn!!!"

There is a fine line between working vigorously to save a sinking ship and trying to work the pumps and hand bailer after it is too late. You need equal quantities of balls and intelligence to make the correct decision.

What TFA is doing is seeing a puddle on the floor and immediately sounding abandon ship and running for the life boats.

There is no low hanging fruit left in business. Sometimes you need to slug it out and take risks because changing strategies every two seconds is not a winning proposition either.

I'm not saying they won't fail or that windows phone is good or bad. I'm only asserting it is too early.

Re:At least wait until the 920 is released (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about 2 years ago | (#41644103)

It's not a puddle, it's a lake.

Re:At least wait until the 920 is released (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644105)

Are you seriously telling me that you think that Windows Phone 8 is going to be anything less than a turd?

Re:At least wait until the 920 is released (1)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | about 2 years ago | (#41644639)

Turd, Zune, what is the difference?

Well, here's a few suggestions (1)

bytesex (112972) | about 2 years ago | (#41643875)

Other cellphone makers are leaving a lot of 'easy' niches open IMHO:
- You need a shop in high street. Android is too generic, Samsung is too much of everything else (TV's and stuff) - Nokia could have an 'Apple store' and get away with it.
- You need security and robustness. Smartphones are moving from a hipster-thing to a commodity right now, so it's time you start addressing companies to use smartphones for company uses. And then I mean properly - with security inside the phone, bigger batteries and compatibility with office tools. Huge market.
- Stop doing everything that's irritating about Apple: no app-store, no iTunes obligation, no stupid connectors, no wrong way to hold it. No selling your soul to placate His Steveness. Emphasize it. Android does that, but not enough - it has no commercial incentive: make sure that hipsters are on the defensive - it's easy: they're hipsters.

Re:Well, here's a few suggestions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644031)

Other cellphone makers are leaving a lot of 'easy' niches open IMHO:
- You need a shop in high street. Android is too generic, Samsung is too much of everything else (TV's and stuff) - Nokia could have an 'Apple store' and get away with it.
- You need security and robustness. Smartphones are moving from a hipster-thing to a commodity right now, so it's time you start addressing companies to use smartphones for company uses. And then I mean properly - with security inside the phone, bigger batteries and compatibility with office tools. Huge market.
- Stop doing everything that's irritating about Apple: no app-store, no iTunes obligation, no stupid connectors, no wrong way to hold it. No selling your soul to placate His Steveness. Emphasize it. Android does that, but not enough - it has no commercial incentive: make sure that hipsters are on the defensive - it's easy: they're hipsters.

Ha ha ha you realise that WP 8 will be more Apple than Apple right ?
Android may be more fragmented, and have more hardware diversity but the freedom you get is unknown either on the Apple side of the pond or on the Windows phone 8 side.
You aint buying a WP8 phone if what you want is the old Nokia experience, or the Android experience. Not even Apple users will want to use it since if the Apple experience like a prison, WP 8 will feel like a maximum security federal prison. DO NOT WANT.
I love the old Nokia phones, even the symbian smartphones. In terms of battery life and built in applications nothing could bet the E series. All that is now lost, betting on a piece of shit piece of OS known as WP8. I've written Nokia off, and now it's Android all the way. If Nokia somehow entered the Android ecosystem, having rugged E series like smartphones I'd be all over them.

Re:Well, here's a few suggestions (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#41644121)

Other cellphone makers are leaving a lot of 'easy' niches open IMHO:
- You need a shop in high street. Android is too generic, Samsung is too much of everything else (TV's and stuff) - Nokia could have an 'Apple store' and get away with it.
- You need security and robustness. Smartphones are moving from a hipster-thing to a commodity right now, so it's time you start addressing companies to use smartphones for company uses. And then I mean properly - with security inside the phone, bigger batteries and compatibility with office tools. Huge market.
- Stop doing everything that's irritating about Apple: no app-store, no iTunes obligation, no stupid connectors, no wrong way to hold it. No selling your soul to placate His Steveness. Emphasize it. Android does that, but not enough - it has no commercial incentive: make sure that hipsters are on the defensive - it's easy: they're hipsters.

You seem a little confused
Nokia has several!! OS offerings, and a larger more successful store.
Nokias phones were considered so rebust they were a meme!!
Nokia are following Apple, because Microsoft is following Apple they have to change OS's to stop.

Bipolar disorder (0, Flamebait)

gmuslera (3436) | about 2 years ago | (#41643891)

If just Nokia had a single mind, either for failure or success. But they build something great and then destroy it in the next breath as a norm. They had something maybe not perfect, but with full of potential, with the N900. Then they crippled it (making it with a lot of closed parts, not giving it enough main memory, etc), not going after all markets, and then called it a failure and killed it. They had Symbian, the next generation, they got Meego with the very innovative user interface of the N9, and when they got both ready to take over the world, basically declared both platform dead. Announced Meltemi, and killed it before releasing any product with it. Those where their own winning cards, along with their hardware what could put them forward than the rest.

Even those efforts, with mostly open software, could had leveraged their hardware offer, if they published enough specification on their hardware to have drivers to enabling them for alternate operating systems (nitdroid, cyanogen mod port, webos, meego, etc), or even push forward the groups trying to giving new uses to their phones giving them the specs, help and support to do so.

And they closed the door to Android, that have a very healthy ecosystem, because they would lose the control, and instead they gave that control to Microsoft, a company with a lengthy record of stabbing partners in the back (and exactly that, unsurprisely, did with Nokia declaring that the windows 8 won't run in any of the then just released Nokia windows phones.

No situational awareness (2)

mchnz (457843) | about 2 years ago | (#41643899)

Nokia failed to realise is that their customers were buying because they had a reliable brand with a respectable name, but that in most other respects, most of their customers considered Nokia's phones to have similar features as all the rest. They were trusted and reliable - they were an IBM, not an Apple. When they stopped making phones with similar features as all the rest, they were taking a big step into unknown territory.

If they had simply built a solid android phone, they could have retained much of their customer base and charged a premium for brand/quality. I guess they still could.

how is it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41643953)

History has shown that most companies that strike a 'strategic' pact with MS, don't live long after.

"You rush â" run run run" (2)

John Hasler (414242) | about 2 years ago | (#41643995)

With no legs?

Some important bits to consider... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644009)

A. Nokia had been losing market value for quite some time before Elop was placed at the helm. More or less this is why he was placed at the helm
B. Nokia management effectively sabotaged engineering efforts via 1) destructive competition between different groups and 2) excessive corporate bureaucracy.
C. MeeGo was practically dead on arrival for multiple reasons. Political: essentially because Intel was involved. Technical: the Slashdot hive mind needs to learn that Qt is not very good. It has a variety of serious technical defects(memory leaks and performance issues being at the top) and is poorly suited for mobile. From the point of view of engineering, its innards are a mess and it's documentation is lacking to the point to figure out what a member function of a class is going to do, on one needs to examine the source code. One can witness that even Trolltech knows that is sucks to a large degree in that Qt 5.0 is about pushing QML driven by JavaScript. That is right folks, the C++ interface is such garbage to just avoid it.
D. The N9 (Harmattan) was late, very late. Moreover it is not even really a MeeGo device. By the time the device was out, the hardware was horribly outdated for a high-endish phone. The N9's hardware has some serious feature issues: slow GPU, no hardware video decode being the top issues.

What is awful is this: if Nokia had stuck with Maemo (which was not Qt based at all), then the N9 would have been out sooner and the platform would have been better. Weather or not to stick with Maemo/MeeGo or to dump it was a non-trivial call. That platform had a HUGE number of issues (some of which are caused by that Intel and it's Moblin involvement). It also had horror issues coming from Qt. Nokia was WISE to dump Qt to Digia, but it was terribly unwise to have bought it in the first place. I can name only a few programs that use Qt and I hate them all. KDE sucks ass, it is slow and gets in my way. Origin (that is right EA's version Steam) is also a Qt application. Anyone like Origin? I did not think so.

Suicide by Microsoft? (4, Insightful)

dgharmon (2564621) | about 2 years ago | (#41644241)

"Ex-Nokia exec Tommi Ahonen's new article has a few suggestions. Is the Nokia board either asleep at the wheel, or incompetent, or in collusion with the incompetent CEO?"

No, they are just another in the long line of suicide-by-Microsoft [groklaw.net] victims ..

My sister walked in to the Lumina trap ... (2)

quax (19371) | about 2 years ago | (#41644263)

... by getting a Windows Mobile 7 device.

She used to be a happy Nokia customer but being a M.D. she didn't pay attention to the gizmo market and unfortunatelly didn't ask me prior to deciding on her new phone.

Basic functionality that she needs for her job i.e. Outlook contact import, how long a call lasts, alarm function when the phone is turned off etc. are not working. The touch screen menu is so sensitive that sometimes she accidentally places calls, on the other hand she sometimes has a hard time accepting calls.

Other than that the phone and its software looks really sleek.

After spending hours on the Nokia hotline and getting answers like "we don't know if this is supposed to work" or "we never thought about that", she now considers returning the phone and has been turned from a loyal low attention Nokia customer to one that wants anything but another Nokia.

Re:My sister walked in to the Lumina trap ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644517)

I'm glad she didn't ask for your expert knowledge on the "gizmo market" because anyone who does look at the "gizmo market" knows it's not the "Lumina," but Lumia.

Re:My sister walked in to the Lumina trap ... (1)

quax (19371) | about 2 years ago | (#41644627)

Anybody who knows anything about the market knows that one doesn't really have to remember Nokia smartphone names any more.

hard to blain elop alone... (0)

chentiangemalc (1710624) | about 2 years ago | (#41644365)

the company was heading for dismal state before he took it on ... just like blackberry didn't take the iphone release seriously, playing catchup ever since...

Nokia took what was the best option at that time (0)

ninjacut (1938862) | about 2 years ago | (#41644383)

Whatever hardware they can come up with (they make one of the best hardware, no doubt about it) the success was dependent on what ecosystem it brings together. The option was to go with Android or Microsoft, there is simply no third option to ready to compete. So with Android, they would have been me too player and not really any strong support from Google both on IP or monetary. In addition they may have to pay Microsoft and Apple if they went that route. Regarding Microsoft, strong financials with one of the largest developer community and ecosystem. Even with few % market share the applications have increased faster than Android, which is telling us something. Say what, but desktop, enterprise, cloud no one has the integration as good as Microsoft. The Windows phone, as a product in itself is actually better than iOS or Android. It is not as closed as Apple or open as Android, but the UI is fresh, new and very effective. Simply said, if this had happened 3-4 years back we would have a different market composition. Regarding future, the Lumia 920 is the top contender in terms of display, features, camera, navigation and the OS. Not even iPhone 5 or any of the current Android phone come close to it. The interest is picking up, but Microsoft has to fight against the bad image it created with its earlier Windows mobile 6.5. The providers are not helping in any way. Verizon is all behind Android, Sprint is confused so the only players are ATT and TMobile. If both Nokia and Microsoft are persistent for some more time the success is sure to follow. Expect better traction in the market, once the Windows 8 PC, tablets are released. Any one with objective mind will appreciate what Microsoft has done.

What Are the Three Pillars??? (1)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 2 years ago | (#41644507)

I got way down the page and found that I was in reality not even a quarter through and still hadn't seen any explanation of the title of the article (three pillars). Just a bunch of rambling. I tried reading some more then hit the tl;dr; wall.

Can someone list succinctly (like the article should have) what the three pillars are?

Re:What Are the Three Pillars??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41644563)

Fierceness, Relentlessness, and Quantity

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?