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CIA: Flying Skyhook Wasn't Just For James Bond, It Actually Rescued Agents

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the you're-outta-here dept.

Government 123

coondoggie writes "This had to be one hell of a ride. The CIA today said it added a pretty cool item to its museum archives — the instruction card for officers being plucked off the ground by a contraption that would allow a person to be snatched off the ground by a flying aircraft without the plane actually landing."

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It's in the Archive so now they use... (4, Funny)

NinjaTekNeeks (817385) | about 2 years ago | (#41662479)

Teleporter's most likely. Always wondered what you could come up with with an unlimited budget, now we know.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662563)

with with snatch

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41664011)

TWAT?!??

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (-1, Flamebait)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#41662661)

Teleporter's [sic] most likely.

Aliterate, meet Bob. [angryflower.com] Where in the hell did you learn that? STOP IT! You look like an idiot.

BTW, in case one of you aliterates thinks "aliterate" is a misspelling, look it up in a dictionary.

Jees, I miss the days when people who actually read something besides cereal boxes, comic books, and the internet came here. Now we have tons of folks who look like they're high school dropouts. IMO, if you don't know how to use an apostrophe, your views can't be very educated.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662765)

IMO, if you don't know how to use an apostrophe, your views can't be very educated.

Your "opinion" doesn't impress me much.
The apostrophe is an almost useless archaism. I would guess its most important use nowadays is as a shibboleth.
The OP was making a point (as well as a joke) about what's kept secret versus what is revealed.
Your post contributed nothing (ditto mine).

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (2)

Picass0 (147474) | about 2 years ago | (#41662869)

Ironic. You're jumping on someone about grammar and you start a sentence with "Jees".

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (2, Insightful)

NinjaTekNeeks (817385) | about 2 years ago | (#41663223)

Well, if there was an edit function I could correct the mistakes I made, since I don't have that ability, you will just need to suffer the inconvenience it has caused you and move on with your day.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (4, Funny)

Jeng (926980) | about 2 years ago | (#41663411)

You might be a computer if you only can only process information that is properly formatted and improperly formatted information gives you a segfault.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (3, Funny)

robot256 (1635039) | about 2 years ago | (#41663893)

I think it gave him an "itsyourfault".

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41664755)

You might be a computer if you only can only process information that is properly formatted and improperly formatted information gives you a segfault.

You might be a piece of lowlife shit if you think that it is acceptable for the language
to be ruined by the lazy stupid people who don't care to write and speak properly.

In fact, maybe you are a slant eyed godless dog-eating cocksucker, and maybe you
need to get anal cancer soon and die.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41663745)

I fail to see how a person unwilling to *read* has anything to do with a person unwilling to *write* correctly. Perhaps you are aneural? Look it up, it's a word.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about 2 years ago | (#41666895)

I fail to see how a person unwilling to *read* has anything to do with a person unwilling to *write* correctly. Perhaps you are aneural? Look it up, it's a word.

If you are unwilling to read (that is, actual books) it is fantastically unlikely that you will be able to write properly.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (4, Informative)

jdray (645332) | about 2 years ago | (#41662733)

IIRC, the skyhook was featured in "The Green Berets" (1968). I've definitely seen it in some Vietnam War flick. At any rate, when I was in the USAF, as a loadmaster on C-130s, I remember reading about a procedure and rig for the extraction. Definitely a corner case, though, like JATO bottles.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (3, Informative)

cold fjord (826450) | about 2 years ago | (#41665795)

IIRC, the skyhook was featured in "The Green Berets" (1968).

You are correct: extraction method [youtube.com]

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (4, Insightful)

Guppy06 (410832) | about 2 years ago | (#41662817)

Teleporter's most likely.

Or, y'know, a helicopter.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41663035)

yeh, but a c-130 is still something like 2x faster and 10x range

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (2)

Guppy06 (410832) | about 2 years ago | (#41663449)

Helicopters can be refueled mid-flight and have a radar signature that's bit more... subtle.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (4, Insightful)

Darth_brooks (180756) | about 2 years ago | (#41663525)

and have a radar signature that's bit more... subtle.

[[citation needed]]

Those big whirly things on top, and especially that big old flat one on the back, aren't the most stealthy things on earth. A helicopter's advantage comes from being able to hug the nap of the earth and hide from radar, rather than deflect it away.

True, we used "stealth" helicopters in the bin laden raid, but my guess would be that the concern there was the super secrete stuff was 75% noise reduction 25% radar signature.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | about 2 years ago | (#41663607)

Those big whirly things on top, and especially that big old flat one on the back, aren't the most stealthy things on earth.

The comparison was to a C-130.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41666101)

Yeah, "stealth" in helicopters is a relative term. Not really silent and invisible to radar, but more like, not so fucking loud and obvious that you break a crown when one flies within a hundred yards.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (4, Funny)

Sez Zero (586611) | about 2 years ago | (#41662925)

Here's the CIA link [cia.gov] I thought this was funny, regarding the development of the system:

The first live test, with a sheep, failed when the harness twisted and strangled the animal. On subsequent tests other sheep fared better.

Yes, hard to believe a subsequent test where sheep fared worse, but I'm sure slashdot will oblige.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (5, Funny)

KrackerJax (83403) | about 2 years ago | (#41663389)

Also from the CIA article:

"Fulton first used instrumented dummies as he prepared for a live pickup. He next used a pig, as pigs have nervous systems close to humans. Lifted off the ground, the pig began to spin as it flew through the air at 125 mph. It arrived on board undamaged but in a disoriented state. Once it recovered, it attacked the crew."

Too funny, I can only imagine what a berserker pig in an aircraft is like.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (4, Funny)

Darth_brooks (180756) | about 2 years ago | (#41663565)

especially one inside the confines of an aircraft. I can only imagine how the ground crew and engineers were treated upon landing.

(Bay door opens)

Engineer: So how'd it.....(several angry loadmasters exit with torn flight suits and reeking of pig shit).....nevermind. So, uhhhh, pork chops for dinner tonight?

Loadmaster: Pork chops for dinner tonight.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41664189)

Forgive me if I'm not the first to post this, but...
"I'm tired of these motherf*****g pigs on this motherf*****g plane!

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (1)

Genda (560240) | about 2 years ago | (#41665489)

Oh! Now you went and done it... Now they're gonna go make "Pigs on a Plane" starring Samuel L. Jackson, and its all your fault. I hope you're happy with yourself.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41663949)

The sheep was hauled on board and raped?

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 2 years ago | (#41664695)

RTFA This was not the (Scottish|Irish|Australian|Kiwi) air-force. So no.

Although I propose a new meme. The logistics command way. Like the Scottish|Irish way except instead of a cliff you use the edge of a load ramp on a C-130 at altitude.

Re:It's in the Archive so now they use... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#41666521)

Brings to mind Arthur C Clarke's short story Travel By Wire where the experimenters turned a rabbit into a pile of 1 cubic centimetre 3D pixels, and decided they had to up the resolution. The next test subject died of fright and the one after that lived because it had been blindfolded.

The Unit... (2)

bhlowe (1803290) | about 2 years ago | (#41662497)

They showed this extraction method on The Unit. Season 2, episode 1 "Change of Station".

Re:The Unit... (5, Informative)

j-pimp (177072) | about 2 years ago | (#41662529)

They showed this extraction method on The Unit. Season 2, episode 1 "Change of Station".

Also, Morgan Freeman used it to get Batman out of China without taking the bat boots off for the TSA.

Re:The Unit... (1)

Ogive17 (691899) | about 2 years ago | (#41663095)

I also saw it in an older war movie, possibly "Bridge over the river Kwai".

They used it to extract a high ranking POW, if memory serves.

Re:The Unit... (1)

jackbird (721605) | about 2 years ago | (#41665371)

Um, I don't think that could have been Bridge on the River Kwai. William Holden escapes into the jungle on foot at the beginning, and the movie ends before there's any extraction of what's left of the demolition team.

Also, the movie came out in 1957 (winning Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Director, and 4 other Oscars that year), and TFA says the first use of the skyhook was 1962.

Excellent fucking movie though.

Re:The Unit... (1)

khallow (566160) | about 2 years ago | (#41666911)

You might be referring to The Green Berets [wikipedia.org] which had the abduction of a North Vietnam general as part of the plot.

Re:The Unit... (4, Interesting)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 2 years ago | (#41664129)

He even described it accurately:

Lucius Fox: Now for high altitude jumps you're gonna need oxygen and stabilizers. Now I must say compared to your usual requests, jumping out of an airplane is pretty straightforward.
Bruce Wayne: And what about getting back into the plane?
Lucius Fox: I'd recommend a good travel agent.
Bruce Wayne: Without it landing.
Lucius Fox: Now that's more like it, Mr. Wayne. The CIA had a program back in the 60's for getting their people out of hot spots called Sky Hook. We could look into that.

Re:The Unit... (2)

MrWin2kMan (918702) | about 2 years ago | (#41663105)

'The Green Berets' starring John Wayne was the first time I saw it in film.

Re:The Unit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41664497)

Yeah, I was going to comment on that as well, was friggin awesome :-)

Re:The Unit... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#41666533)

Also in The American Way [imdb.com] .

Is this a surprise? (4, Informative)

Lester67 (218549) | about 2 years ago | (#41662509)

They practiced this, pretty regularly at Hurlburt Field, Florida... within view of the general public. Several of the MC-130's were fitted with the catch arms. (It's even had a wikipedia page for awhile now.)

So, yeah, it's cool... but it's hardly new or a secret.

Re:Is this a surprise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662653)

People don't notice anything until it's shoved in their face. How many people do you think knew who Joe Kittinger was before yesterday's stunt? Fairly few it seems.

Re:Is this a surprise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662771)

Knew who he was.

But didn't know that more than 10 years after he performed that feat, he spent 11 months in the Hanoi Hilton.

Re:Is this a surprise? (3, Informative)

Tourney3p0 (772619) | about 2 years ago | (#41663017)

There's still an MC-130E at the entrance of Hurlburt (at the museum, so findable using GIS) still outfitted with the sky hook last time I was down there. I believe the later CT1s have all had the functionality removed, but I'm a CT2 (MC-130H) guy. Sadly, the E model is being phased out and even the development team has been shifted to other duties.

Re:Is this a surprise? (2)

jdray (645332) | about 2 years ago | (#41663119)

Sadly, the E model is being phased out...

Sadly? Really? Those things were getting difficult to maintain when I was in (happily crewing H models) in the late eighties. My friends at Little Rock, who were stuck with E models, cussed them regularly.

Re:Is this a surprise? (1)

Tourney3p0 (772619) | about 2 years ago | (#41663217)

Yeah, no doubt they're getting up there in years. It's time I suppose.

It looks like they're going to be replaced by J-models, which I personally don't care for due to how the vendor has a lifetime contract for the main mission computer. That in itself isn't so bad, but we still have to have a full government team working concurrently to develop the plane-specific OFP. Nothing to do with the functionality, but it's pretty wasteful. Personal preference.

Re:Is this a surprise? (4, Informative)

G-Man (79561) | about 2 years ago | (#41663285)

Yep, the Fulton Recovery System - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulton_surface-to-air_recovery_system [wikipedia.org]

I get the impression it was similar to ejecting from an aircraft: Yes it worked, yes it was fairly safe, but you only did it if you really had to.

Re:Is this a surprise? (3, Funny)

Klinky (636952) | about 2 years ago | (#41663437)

This is a great quote from the wiki:

"Fulton first used instrumented dummies as he prepared for a live pickup. He next used a pig, as pigs have nervous systems close to humans. Lifted off the ground, the pig began to spin as it flew through the air at 125 mph (200 km/h). It arrived on board uninjured but in a disoriented state. Once it recovered, it attacked the crew."

Aspect ratio (1, Insightful)

SuperMooCow (2739821) | about 2 years ago | (#41662561)

Another stupid webmaster who never learned about aspect ratios. In fact, there's also stupid people in television stations, because the amount of broadcasts with the wrong aspect ratio is rather astounding.

Re:Aspect ratio (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#41662837)

Another stupid webmaster who never learned about aspect ratios.

Or thumbnails.

Re:Aspect ratio (2)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41662851)

In fact, there's also stupid people in television stations, because the amount of broadcasts with the wrong aspect ratio is rather astounding.

A little off topic, but I've seen SD PBS analog "basic" cable channels with black bars holding a HD aspect video, that HD aspect video is holding a SD video, inside that SD video is a HD signal. Yes, double blackbar'd. Impressive fail there.

Re:Aspect ratio (-1, Troll)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | about 2 years ago | (#41662961)

Naw, the only fail was watching PBS in the first place.

Re:Aspect ratio (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41664781)

Chill, Romney... this isn't the time or place.

Re:Aspect ratio (1)

istartedi (132515) | about 2 years ago | (#41662969)

Yes, but was it stable or was it switching every few seconds? There's nothing quite like having aspect on "auto" and letting the station bother you dozens of times before you impose a compromise manually.

Re:Aspect ratio (1)

T-Bone-T (1048702) | about 2 years ago | (#41663283)

It isn't just the broadcasters. I was at Chili's and all the HDTVs were showing the game in SD. Broadcasters won't fix it if viewers can't even tell if it is wrong.

They extracted several agents from the USSR (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662577)

But they had to wait until the end of the cold war to collect their legs.

Re:They extracted several agents from the USSR (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about 2 years ago | (#41662803)

the catch was actually relatively gentle considering the plane would have been travelling at a couple hundred mph. Something to do with the lift of the balloon and friction on the rope...

skyhook (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662583)

The concept and implementation has been around for decades and used successfully. probably, although I'm not sure, came out of some of the stunts that the old pre-WWII aviators did to impress people (and make money) at their airshows.

It was also use in The Green Berets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662585)

It was also use in The Green Berets (1968) when they captured an NVA general.

Also in "The Green Berets" (1)

Zlurg (591611) | about 2 years ago | (#41662601)

The late-60s John Wayne movie "The Green Berets" has this contraption, and they even do a fairly good job showing it at work. Good movie, too...cept for Provo Privy.

Cardboard Box (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662613)

Take care of your cardboard box, and your cardboard box will take care of you.

This system was described exactly written during a dialog sequence in Metal Gear Solid 3. Even used similar diagrams if I recall correctly.

Meh. (1)

Forty Two Tenfold (1134125) | about 2 years ago | (#41662643)

Pah!

Necessity is the mother of invention (1)

Tommy Bologna (2431404) | about 2 years ago | (#41662657)

I didn't realize this flying skyhook technology and its use were doubted by any serious person. Are these the same people who doubt the moon landings?

Re:Necessity is the mother of invention (4, Funny)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about 2 years ago | (#41662701)

Why would I believe it existed just because I saw it in a movie? i can't say I gave it a lot of thought, but I generally don't go "Gosh, I saw it in a james Bond movie, it must exist in real lifte."

Re:Necessity is the mother of invention (1)

Tommy Bologna (2431404) | about 2 years ago | (#41662879)

I guess I do more than watch movies. I've also seen it described and photographed in a book. This hasn't been a secret and they've been using it for decades.

Re:Necessity is the mother of invention (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41663821)

And, believe it or not, other people might not give a shit about stuff like this. And, believe it or not, there might be topics other people care about that you don't. Imagine that.

Re:Necessity is the mother of invention (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41664111)

I guess I do more than watch movies

And I guess you're a lying scumbag for implying that your parent poster doesn't.

Re:Necessity is the mother of invention (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41666691)

So you're saying James Bond doesn't exist?!

First Father Christmas. Now this. I'm gutted...

Re:Necessity is the mother of invention (1)

NikeHerc (694644) | about 2 years ago | (#41664499)

Are these the same people who doubt the moon landings?

Probably not. The supply of people who will fall for the conspiracy theory du jour seems endless.

simpler system used 50+ years ago (5, Interesting)

rubycodez (864176) | about 2 years ago | (#41662691)

prop plane flying in special circles could keep a weight at end of winchable cable relatively stationary to ground. this method was used to take and deliver mail at remote locations, and at stunt shows to pick up and leave a stuntman.

Re:simpler system used 50+ years ago (1)

dickens (31040) | about 2 years ago | (#41662991)

Cool idea - Just like an AC-130 but with a cable instead of a chain of hot lead (or depleted uranium)

Re:simpler system used 50+ years ago (1)

EricTheGreen (223110) | about 2 years ago | (#41664257)

No doubt simpler....but whatever the CIA is trying to airlift out in those circumstances probably needs to get itself gone in a hurry....and not require the plane flying around several times to be shot at by whatever angry folks are in pursuit....

Re:simpler system used 50+ years ago (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 2 years ago | (#41664283)

Simpler maybe - but also much less flexible and much more dangerous for the aircraft in the type of mission that TFA describes. Simpler is not always better.

Re:simpler system used 50+ years ago (4, Informative)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | about 2 years ago | (#41664659)

You could also lower a (wired) telephone for the person on the ground to discuss things with the aircraft crew, like what stuff needed to be delivered. Phone comes down, ground guy takes/makes call. Phone goes up. Cable with box comes down. Ground guy disconnects the snap. Cable goes back up. Rinse and repeat if you need more than one box.

Fly the aircraft high enough and it looks like a phone, or a box of stuff, is just being lowered by a cable out of the sky with no obvious source. And the craft has to be reasonably high for the cable to be stable, rather than circling, when it's near ground level.

I understand this was used by missionaries in remote locations. I wonder how careful they were to let the congregation know that they were talking to / getting stuff from other missionaries, rather than heaven. B -)

I hear you can also use it to raise (or lower) a guy in a harness.

The main disadvantage compared to skyhook is that the aircraft has to circle the landing zone for a half-hour or so - at radar-visible height. It's there long enough to shoot down, and puts a big target on whom/whatever you were interacting with on the ground. NOT what you want for a black op behind enemy lines. Skyhook just flies an airplane over the target, with nothing to distinguish that spot from anywhere else on the flight path.

Re:simpler system used 50+ years ago (1)

Everything Else Was (786676) | about 2 years ago | (#41666015)

Skyhook just flies an airplane over the target, with nothing to distinguish that spot from anywhere else on the flight path.

Except the frickin' balloon with lights on the cable! ;-)

The enemy just has to follow the balloon to get to the guy. Then the plane crew will be winching up a dead guy.

poo poo (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662705)

poo poo

Re:poo poo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662911)

pee pee

See this in a museum (3, Informative)

steveha (103154) | about 2 years ago | (#41662755)

You can see a display about this in the Evergreen Avation Museum in McMinnville, Oregon. They have an airplane on display with the "catcher" appratus mounted on the nose, and I think they have the other hardware too. (It's been a few years since I went there, and I mostly remember my tour of the Spruce Goose.)

http://www.evergreenmuseum.org/ [evergreenmuseum.org]

They had some other intriguing stuff. I remember a short-range VTOL device that was basically an airplane engine mounted vertically; it sucked air in from the top, blew it out the bottom, and the operator would stand on a ring that circled the outside of the engine. I remember wondering how difficult that might be to fly, since it was too old to have a computer-controlled active stabilisation system. Also, I think I would want to wear hearing and eye protection if I was riding that thing.

steveha

Corona (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41662801)

The US used a so-called Sky Hook [regencystamps.com] to capture de-orbited film before it hit the water from the Corona [wikipedia.org] spy satellite program.

WWII glider yank-recovery (2)

smellsofbikes (890263) | about 2 years ago | (#41662835)

In WWII we were recovering entire gliders this way, not just people: http://www.silentwingsmuseum.com/pdf/RetrievalSystem.pdf [silentwingsmuseum.com] -- a history of airplane/ground retrieval systems specifically relating to the effort to pull Waco CG4A gliders big enough to hold 15 people, from the fields where they'd landed back into the air and tow them back to the launch airbase without the tow plane landing. It was dangerous work and pretty often it ended up just tearing the glider into pieces but it was successful a fair amount of the time.

Re:WWII glider yank-recovery (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#41666561)

Brings to mind hang glider launches over water where the tow boat would accelerate to full speed as the rope fed out. The glider pilot got to watch the loop of rope in front of him getting smaller and smaller.

This reminds me of something else (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#41662881)

I heard (or I think I heard) about some system where you could play out a rope from a plane and, if the rope was long enough, the plane could circle and somehow the end of the rope would be held over a certain spot on the ground. Apparently (again, if I recall correctly) it could be used to gently lower equipment to the ground, where the receiver could just reach up and unhook the shipment from the rope while the plane was circling overhead. Has anyone ever heard of anything like that?

Re:This reminds me of something else (1)

BradleyUffner (103496) | about 2 years ago | (#41663207)

I heard (or I think I heard) about some system where you could play out a rope from a plane and, if the rope was long enough, the plane could circle and somehow the end of the rope would be held over a certain spot on the ground. Apparently (again, if I recall correctly) it could be used to gently lower equipment to the ground, where the receiver could just reach up and unhook the shipment from the rope while the plane was circling overhead. Has anyone ever heard of anything like that?

I remember what you describe on TV when I was younger for both picking up and dropping off equipment. I'm pretty sure they even picked up a stunt man using this technique to demonstrate how gentle it was..

railroads had this for decades (2)

swschrad (312009) | about 2 years ago | (#41662923)

the mail wagon got its mail from small cities by having a snatch hook grab it from a hanging hook at the edge of the platform, and the snatch hook was then pulled back into the mail car. so the CIA technology is derivative.

Holy Batman (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41663043)

In The Dark Knight, Batman used it to kidnap a guy in Hong Kong!

Fulton_surface-to-air recovery (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41663089)

as featured in the Green Berets
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulton_surface-to-air_recovery_system

Julian Assange (2)

Marksolo (970704) | about 2 years ago | (#41663187)

This was my bet on the most effective way to get him out of London. Too bad Ecuador doesn't have the equipment.

Re:Julian Assange (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#41666567)

But the RAF.

The British used it in WWII (1)

Dr La (1342733) | about 2 years ago | (#41663317)

The British experimented and used this method already during WWII, to retrieve spies from occupied Europe.

It was in a John Wayne film (1)

gadget junkie (618542) | about 2 years ago | (#41663351)

I seem to remember that this contraption was used in the John Wayne film "The Green Berets" [wikipedia.org] , and since it was way before special effects, I suspect it was really a person being snatched off the ground.

Re:It was in a John Wayne film (1)

icebraining (1313345) | about 2 years ago | (#41664457)

No movie after Metropolis (1927) can be said to be before special effects.

Re:It was in a John Wayne film (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 2 years ago | (#41665343)

Actually, Georges MéliÃs [wikipedia.org] accidentally discovered the stop trick [wikipedia.org] in 1896 and used it to create magic tricks in his films. Later, he also invented a number of other classic special effects techniques, decades before Metropolis was made. The film history shown in the movie Hugo [wikipedia.org] was quite accurate, as was its depiction in his later life as a toy salesman.

FrosT pist (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41663993)

failure, i7s corpse hoobyist dilettante

It works - CIA pages sky-hooked (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41664005)

All the links on the CIA site give a 404!

Recycling old news in a new wrapper (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41664135)

This is kind of silly. Devices of this type were used in glider recovery operations during WW2 and recovery of people was no secret. This is simply a new exhibit at an interesting museum but hardly a major discovery. Does the CIA museum mention that they have used automobiles to extract people as well or can that be next year's "discovery?"

The Green Berets (1)

p51d007 (656414) | about 2 years ago | (#41665123)

The 1960's movie with John Wayne had a Fulton recovery system used in it, toward the end of the movie.

The skyhook was in the movie "Green Berets" (0)

dtjohnson (102237) | about 2 years ago | (#41665131)

The skyhook was used in the 1968 John Wayne movie "The Green Berets." I think they used it to skyhook a communist agent that they had captured.

News for 1960 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41665583)

I remember reading & seeing pictures of this system in use in 1960s.

Obama is raping the US of A, making us another socialist plunderland & /. has news from 1960s.

This has been well known for a while (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41666111)

I don't get it? In other news, King tut had a nice casket. Check out the pics!

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