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Texas Schools Using Electronic Chips To Track Students; Parents In Uproar

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the does-your-body-belong-to-the-state? dept.

Education 540

An anonymous reader writes "Two Schools in San Antonio are using electronic chips to help administrators count and track students' whereabouts. Students at Anson Jones Middle School and John Jay High School are now required to wear ID cards using radio frequency identification (RFID) technology embedded with electronic chips in an effort to daily attendance records. The article said the Northside Independent School District receives about $30 per day in state funding for each student reporting."

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540 comments

Microwaves are fun. (4, Insightful)

Wumpus (9548) | about 2 years ago | (#41669437)

Just saying.

Re:Microwaves are fun. (2)

MitchDev (2526834) | about 2 years ago | (#41669439)

Beat me to it....

Re:Microwaves are fun. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669535)

Jimmy, come in, we haven't seen you on our records lately, why yes Mr Tegan did say you were in his 5th form class, but we don't see you. We'll have to refer you to the police regarding truancy. Now I don't like this, but if you just wore this new ID badge, we don't need to get the police involved..."

Tie it to a rat (4, Interesting)

concealment (2447304) | about 2 years ago | (#41669523)

Tie the RFID chip to a rat, and leave out rat treats on the floor in your favorite classes. You'll get a perfect attendance award.

(Adults are dumb.)

Re:Tie it to a rat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669969)

Tie the RFID chip to a rat, and leave out rat treats on the floor in your favorite classes. You'll get a perfect attendance award.

(Adults are dumb.)

Tape them to the back of the Nerds in class like the old Kick Me ! signs to cut class undetected.

Re:Microwaves are fun. (1, Funny)

Penguinisto (415985) | about 2 years ago | (#41669659)

WWBTD [xkcd.com] ?

Re:Microwaves are fun. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669727)

Remember, you aren't a citizen of Texas, you are just the property of the corporate interests (true citizens) of Texas.

Just saying.

Story is unbelievable. (5, Insightful)

Kenja (541830) | about 2 years ago | (#41669453)

Really... parents caring about what the school does? Unheard of.

Re:Story is unbelievable. (1)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 2 years ago | (#41669841)

Well.. only because OMG666 preachersaysThisISbad.

Which is also cognitive dissonant because they want the end of the world to happen anyway because they are perfect and they are going to be magically vacuumed to heaven.

Simpler, more permanent (3, Insightful)

Darth Snowshoe (1434515) | about 2 years ago | (#41669467)

Hey, why not just embed the RFID tags in them subdermally, in their ear, like cattle? There must be a fair bit of expertise for that sort of thing in Texas.

In other news, the last kid in John Jay High School to figure out they could just leave their ID card in their locker and stay in bed all day was mercilessly mocked and bullied by his peers.

Re:Simpler, more permanent (1)

stevejf (2724307) | about 2 years ago | (#41669505)

OR tie all the students together like they do in urban elementary schools!

Re:Simpler, more permanent (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669685)

In the ear? The right hand or forehead [biblegateway.com] would be more appropriate.

Re:Simpler, more permanent (0)

bobthesungeek76036 (2697689) | about 2 years ago | (#41669717)

I love the subdermal idea. I feel they should start tagging the entire human population. I'll be first in line. Imagine being able to log in to your computer by just walking up to it. Or have your car unlock and start up when you walk up to it. House unlock. Or house alarm goes off when an unrecognized RFID enters. You get the picture.

Re:Simpler, more permanent (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669791)

If it was sub-dermal in the hand, I would imagine a rise in Faraday cage gloves. MJ would be happy.

Re:Simpler, more permanent (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#41669843)

Or house alarm goes off when an unrecognized RFID enters. You get the picture.

OK now i am SURE you are trolling...

Re:Simpler, more permanent (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669845)

I love the subdermal idea. I feel they should start tagging the entire human population. I'll be first in line. Imagine being able to log in to your computer by just walking up to it. Or have your car unlock and start up when you walk up to it. House unlock. Or house alarm goes off when an unrecognized RFID enters. You get the picture.

Oh mah zomg PIRAVCY!!!1!1! HATE HATE HAET!!!!1! Someone might somehow KNOW WHO YOU ARE, and that would be EVIL AND BAD because then they might ADVERTISE TO YOU MORE EFFECTIVELY, which is the GREATEST SIN IN THE ENTIRETY OF ALL POSSIBLE AND IMPOSSIBLE REALITIES! KILL TEH INTARLOPAR!!! Make him an example to others!

Re:Simpler, more permanent (1)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41669961)

Never underestimate the ability of people to screw up a simple security system. My guess is 99% of those systems will be vulnerable to a simple playback attack, why not, doing a good job means spending more money, right?

Also I've always wondered how RFIDs work in the presence of numerous other RFIDs, per person.

If the mark of the beast existed when I was a kid, I'd currently be tagged with 6 schools, something like 7 jobs, god only knows how many the .mil would insert (just one, or one per unit I served in, or ..). I guess you have to accept multiple invalid rfids per person, at least a couple dozen, which seems to make rate limiting invalid IDs more difficult. So in a classroom of 30 kids, you have to accept perhaps 1000 RFIDs before you get suspicious someone is messing with the system.

Also, being idiots, I'm sure instead of cryptographically secure identifiers, they'll be morons implementing systems using SS numbers, sequential numbers, etc. So it'll be easier to crack and/or a sniffer will sniff yummy identity theft stuff.

Re:Simpler, more permanent (1)

alexander_686 (957440) | about 2 years ago | (#41669777)

They don’t do it subdermally, they do it exdermally (is this a real word?) like people. i.e. they do it like a ear piercing, not under the skin which could muck up the leather or hamburger.

Re:Simpler, more permanent (1)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 2 years ago | (#41669925)

As they already treat them like cattle and as a commodity this is just the next logical step.

Familiar... (-1, Flamebait)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#41669469)

Wow, it's just like the teacher taking attendance! Except that it uses technology to automate the task, saving valuable lesson time. Clearly this is another example of government oppression.

Or does it work like patent law, where adding 'on a computer' to a well-established procedure turns it into something completly different?

Re:Familiar... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669581)

Wow, it's just like the teacher taking attendance!

Seems they still take a normal roll call:

The article said one recent morning at Anson Jones, where 1,200 attend, the regular roll counted reported 71 students absent. The RFID system corrected that number, showing eight of the 71 were actually in school that day. The map showed several students were in the band hall where practice ran late, while others were near the office. The school would have lost $240 that day if the chips would not have been in effect.

Counting their attendance is one thing, but the mapping is kinda creepy.

Re:Familiar... (4, Insightful)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 2 years ago | (#41669863)

This was the most important line in the article:

"The article said the Northside Independent School District receives about $30 per day in state funding for each student reporting."

This is the only reason anything gets done at a public school EVER.

Do what with daily records? (4, Informative)

mrbene (1380531) | about 2 years ago | (#41669473)

I guess I should RTFA, but:

in an effort to daily attendance records.

I don't know what that means...

Re:Do what with daily records? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669491)

It probably means that the teachers haven't a clue who their charges are and that the writer of the above passed through the system despite not attending.

Re:Do what with daily records? (1)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about 2 years ago | (#41669545)

Well played, well played :)

Re:Do what with daily records? (3, Insightful)

Herkum01 (592704) | about 2 years ago | (#41669493)

I guess public education has failed us then. Bad attendance costs schools, money. Bad education, Meehhh!

Re:Do what with daily records? (1)

mrbene (1380531) | about 2 years ago | (#41669531)

The point I was making is that the sentence tries to use "daily" as a verb.

Re:Do what with daily records? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669559)

It's like when you accidentally 93MB of .rar files.

Re:Do what with daily records? (1)

Spuds (8660) | about 2 years ago | (#41669583)

It's like that in the article too.

Re:Do what with daily records? (2)

Whalou (721698) | about 2 years ago | (#41669589)

My guess is that it should be "tally attendance records" instead.

Re:Do what with daily records? (5, Funny)

hendridm (302246) | about 2 years ago | (#41669703)

I think somebody accidentally a word.

Re:Do what with daily records? (1)

blane.bramble (133160) | about 2 years ago | (#41669835)

I see what you there!

Re:Do what with daily records? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669947)

Pfft. You totally my thunder.

I hope (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669485)

I hope there is one of those Pinko-Liberal-Commie-Democrat-Basterds teachers on the faculty making the kids read 1984 and Fahrenheit 451.

And who says English Lit is worthless.

suck it kids (1)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#41669497)

in my day the schools never took attendance. home room was for a quick break with friends. teachers couldn't care less if you were in class and never took attendance either

Re:suck it kids (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669571)

Let's see here... You don't use capitalization and make use of sentence fragments. Sure, I'll believe that your teachers didn't care!

Re:suck it kids (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669715)

Capitals are the oppressors of the lower case. The lOWER cASE has as much rights as the Capital Case.

What his teachers tought him is that all are characters are equal! What you are trying to say is that some characters are more equal than others. Shame on you.

Re:suck it kids (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669679)

In my day the teacher kept attendance, but someone from the class was in charge of the book that they kept the records in.
Needless to say, it would get lost, or pages torn out conveniently whenever one of the students was about to get in trouble for being absent too often, or being kicked out of class too often.

When a student goes missing ... (-1)

Spectre (1685) | about 2 years ago | (#41669499)

Given that the system knows where in the building students are and were, I imagine the parents will likely change their minds and praise the system if a student goes missing. They'll know when and where the student was the last time they were on campus, and I would assume through which door the student left.

Keeping tabs of 1200 students you are responsible for is a daunting task, as an adult, I wouldn't want to be tracked in this way, but I don't have a problem with my kids school ID cards being tracked while on the school's campus.

Re:When a student goes missing ... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669641)

There's more than one person that's supposed to be keeping track of those 1200 students.

I'd reckon probably about 450 people. (Class size of 30, 50 misc people, administrators, campus watch people, etc).

Besides. You stick all those 1200 people in a building, with maybe a dozen entrances/exits, so you don't need to watch each of them individually all the time.

Re:When a student goes missing ... (5, Insightful)

gr3yh47 (2023310) | about 2 years ago | (#41669649)

This is how surveillance states gain ground in leaps and bounds over generations. Kids that are GPS tracked by their parents get used to being GPS tracked by authority and as adults, don't mind it or are less likely to *actually* fight it from a state/national authority. Same logic here, with RFID chip tracking.

Re:When a student goes missing ... (-1)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#41669709)

hey stupid, kids were always tracked in school
25 years ago teachers took attendance in every class with little paper cards. and we had home room twice a day as well. for decades NYC has had special cops who's only job is to go around and arrest kids who are not in school.
if you were out of school then at night an automated system would call the home phone to tell your parents you missed school

Re:When a student goes missing ... (5, Insightful)

gr3yh47 (2023310) | about 2 years ago | (#41669915)

I'm stupid why? Because I understand that there is a (huge) difference between Electronic tracking of every movement throughout the day vs pen and paper attendance taking? Excuse me for pointing out the flaw in your logic

Re:When a student goes missing ... (2)

firewrought (36952) | about 2 years ago | (#41669847)

This is how surveillance states gain ground in leaps and bounds over generations. Kids that are GPS tracked by their parents get used to being GPS tracked by authority and as adults, don't mind it or are less likely to *actually* fight it from a state/national authority. Same logic here, with RFID chip tracking.

I don't think it will take that long. Tomorrow, some other parent will sue some other school district for their kid being kidnapped because the school should have known kidnappers were out there and done GPS-tracking preemptively.

Re:When a student goes missing ... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669689)

I'm sure a creepy school employee would love to know exactly when they can find your kids all alone. I don't understand why you don't have a problem with your kids being tracked, when you wouldn't like the same system for yourself. Also, if a parent is so worried about their children going missing then they can have their kid wear a tracking device that will track them off school grounds and actually be useful for finding them.

Re:When a student goes missing ... (3, Interesting)

Belial6 (794905) | about 2 years ago | (#41669697)

The problem here is that if your kid's school tracks your kid this way on the school campus, your kid likely won't have a problem being tracked that way all the time when they are an adult. Schools are at least as much about social engineering as they are about education. So, unless your attitude is "I got mine, screw my kids." you should be outraged at a school trying to do this.

Re:When a student goes missing ... (2, Funny)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#41669939)

The problem here is that if your kid's school tracks your kid this way on the school campus, your kid likely won't have a problem being tracked that way all the time when they are an adult. Schools are at least as much about social engineering as they are about education. So, unless your attitude is "I got mine, screw my kids." you should be outraged at a school trying to do this.

You must be a ball at parties...

"Why would I want to play a game that encourages me (and others!) to work out the best way to weaken the structure of a tower, leading to its inevitable collapse? The insanity! When we leave here, someone is probably going to go knock down some buildings on the way home, seeing as how we were all conditioned to believe its normal..."

Just play some fucking Jenga, and get yourself off the slippery slope. Not everyone careens helplessly down it.

Re:When a student goes missing ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669701)

It's foolproof, as well, because no student is going to take off their ID and place it in another student's bag...

For whatever purpose you think this will be a potential savior, any nefarious character will be able to get around this, simply.

So, like most "well intentioned" things (e.g. gun laws), the only folks that will comply are the ones you don't need to worry about anyhow.

Somewhere... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669501)

Somewhere in this school there's an Honor Roll student with a couple of dozen ID tags hanging around his neck and a wallet full of cash...

Re:Somewhere... (4, Insightful)

MartinSchou (1360093) | about 2 years ago | (#41669815)

Well, if it's done correctly, that would be flagged extremely quickly - a dozen kids constantly going through the same doors at the exact same time is a bit suspicious.

Especially when it's the single occupancy toilet.

Re:Somewhere... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669853)

Damn, and I had to earn money the hard way, selling real answers :( Kids have it so easy these days.

Generating more irrelevant data (4, Interesting)

concealment (2447304) | about 2 years ago | (#41669509)

The relevant data: did they learn valuable skills?

The irrelevant data: did they attend every class, and take three (3) or fewer dumps a day, numbering fewer than 15 minutes each and not more than 42.3 minutes total?

Our society is in love with metrics, but in its mad dash, produces lots and lots of data that is actually not relevant to the task at hand.

If they said they were using these RFIDs to figure out exactly when and where pedophiles are snatching their kids, I might consider that relevant data, but emphasizing attendance is a surrogate for emphasizing learning.

Re:Generating more irrelevant data (4, Insightful)

Chemisor (97276) | about 2 years ago | (#41669625)

For the schools it is irrelevant whether students learn valuable skills. Schools are graded on test scores and attendance. The former is improved by teaching the test. The latter is improved by tracking. Funding is determined by those two metrics, so: profit!

Re:Generating more irrelevant data (4, Insightful)

Belial6 (794905) | about 2 years ago | (#41669779)

Not really. Emphasizing attendance is a surrogate for emphasizing making money. That is the primary concern for schools these days. They have become a business. They get $30 dollars each day for each student. They are trying to make sure that they get as many of those $30 checks as they possibly can.

Your point still stands that they are not concerning themselves with education, but the reason isn't a love of metrics. It is a love of money.

Re:Generating more irrelevant data (1)

characterZer0 (138196) | about 2 years ago | (#41669963)

Solution: send your kids to a private school. Now it is up to the parents to make sure the kid is in school so they get their money's worth.

Re:Generating more irrelevant data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669887)

+1. Lots of data is still a poor substitute for thoughtful experiment design. There are some areas where it helps, but if you ask the wrong question, you just get a lot of the wrong data.

Just sayin' (1)

DarthVain (724186) | about 2 years ago | (#41669909)

Attendence in class probabaly is a pretty good indicator or metric of success.

Not saying that RFIDing folks is the right thing to do, however insofar as your arguement that attendence is irrelevent to learning, well I think it sort of falls down. If you don't go to class, it is pretty hard to "learn valuable skills".

Consumer vs Product (4, Insightful)

TeamSPAM (166583) | about 2 years ago | (#41669529)

Somehow I think the students have turned in the product and are no longer the consumer in this case.

Re:Consumer vs Product (5, Insightful)

gQuigs (913879) | about 2 years ago | (#41669787)

Please get both of those words out of the discussion. They are neither the consumer or the product. Education is not a product to be consumed.

They are students! They are there to learn, to be curious, to ask questions, make mistakes, and get messy.

Re:Consumer vs Product (2)

epyT-R (613989) | about 2 years ago | (#41669889)

tell that to to the state bureaucracy that mandated these tracking systems.

Conditioning for the Inevitable (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 2 years ago | (#41669533)

Another baby step along the road to condition us to accept permanent RFID tagging from birth and constant tracking and surveillance by the State, for our own good and safety, of course.

Reasonable? (4, Insightful)

pr0nbot (313417) | about 2 years ago | (#41669547)

This doesn't seem unreasonable does it? When the kids are at school, the staff are in loco parentis, and so keeping tabs on the little bastards doesn't sound crazy. After all if one of them goes AWOL and turns up in a suitcase, the school's likely to be sued.

Of course if it's being used for data collection for behavioural profiling or resale, that's another matter, but if it's just for "this kid was here earlier but didn't answer roll call, where the hell is he?" or "it's recess and we need to get a message to this kid, where the hell is he?" that seems fine.

Here's the best bit in the article right here; (5, Funny)

Darth Snowshoe (1434515) | about 2 years ago | (#41669567)

Steve Hernandez, whose daughter is a sophomore, objects to the tags, saying they are similar to the "mark of the beast."

"My daughter should not have to compromise (her) religion just because Northside Independent School District wants to get paid," Hernandez said.

Re:Here's the best bit in the article right here; (3, Informative)

gewalker (57809) | about 2 years ago | (#41669713)

A key passage for interpreting Revelations is the right at the start of the book,

Rev 1:1 The revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show to his servants the things that must soon take place. He made it known by sending his angel to his servant John,

So, I am pretty sure these RFID tags have nothing to do with the "mark of the beast", as almost 2000 years must surely be a stretch for "soon". They are similar in that the mark of the beast was necessary to "buy and sell" (i.e. government approval required) -- and the RFID tag being necessary to get the "public education".

No, having said that, if the person really believes that, I don't see how the government should be able to "force the child" to carry their RFID tag, as I am pretty sure that a public education is a constitutional right in Texas. -- That's the thing about rights, they are there to protect when even when your right is not popular (yes, even if it is stupid).

Re:Here's the best bit in the article right here; (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 2 years ago | (#41669749)

So, I am pretty sure these RFID tags have nothing to do with the "mark of the beast", as almost 2000 years must surely be a stretch for "soon". All good and well.

Except that 2000 years is nothing, not even the "blink of an eye" in the time scale of the universe.

Re:Here's the best bit in the article right here; (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669839)

It's bloody forever for the people he was speaking to, though. Much like Jesu' "some of you standing here will see me return".

Re:Here's the best bit in the article right here; (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669851)

So, I am pretty sure these RFID tags have nothing to do with the "mark of the beast", as almost 2000 years must surely be a stretch for "soon". All good and well.

Except that 2000 years is nothing, not even the "blink of an eye" in the time scale of the universe.

Some Christians believe the universe to be only 6000 years old though.

Re:Here's the best bit in the article right here; (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669953)

Since when is 1/3 of the entire history of time considered a "blink of an eye"?

Re:Here's the best bit in the article right here; (1)

Drethon (1445051) | about 2 years ago | (#41669929)

Well maybe if its chip 666... then again one of my IDs includes 666.

same electronic chips (4, Informative)

nimbius (983462) | about 2 years ago | (#41669569)

are used in their parents badges when they go to work. Its how they open doors and clock in. Recalling from my youth, kids have had ID badges since about 1996, theyve had to be visually verified in most cases before you can leave the lobby and enter your class at the start of the day. somehow the texan that wrote this article thinks by saying "electronic chips" and "children" in the same sentence, im supposed to get outraged.

Re:same electronic chips (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669721)

Are your parents tracked so that the can be brought up on a map like these students?

Re:same electronic chips (1)

Belial6 (794905) | about 2 years ago | (#41669871)

No, it just means that this particular community is far less willing to submit to abusive behavior than the one you lived in as a youth. Your attitude is a real world example of why they are outraged.

As for the comment about their parents having badges... There is a big difference between choosing to work at a job that requires badges, and being implicitly told, "Either carry this tracking device, or we will send the men with guns to round you up and imprison you."

Glad I don't have kids (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669573)

We are entering an era where children are raised more to the standards of "society" (i.e. government) than the parents themselves. My kind -- people who dare to think for themselves and reject coercive authority by default -- aren't wanted or needed in this kind of world. It probably sounds cynical to some people, but I think it's best that my genetic line ends right here. Good luck to the rest of you who continue the human race -- you're going to need it.

I'm confused... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669585)

How does kids not being in attendance cost the school money? Is funding somehow tied to attendance?

From the article: "Pascual Gonzalez, Northside's communications director told NBC that he estimates the district has been losing about $1.7 million a year because of underreported attendance"

Re:I'm confused... (1)

chill (34294) | about 2 years ago | (#41669683)

Yes. School funding comes mostly from property and impact taxes in the area. It is distributed to schools according to their population (attendance).

Each child is worth a particular dollar amount per day to the school. Special needs kids are worth more money.

Re:I'm confused... (2)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 2 years ago | (#41669891)

As an Indiana student from the *1980s* (to '91) it was often drummed into us (even as students) that funding levels were dependent on attendance and absentee levels.

As crazy as administrators and politicians have gotten since then about metrics I'm sure it is ten times worse by now....

What happens next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669595)

When these kids grow up, it's not outside the realm of probability that employers will want this kind of nonsense. Do you want your employer to even think about having this much information about you? Beyond certain security clearances, this sort of tracking could make sense, but this seems like another avenue to automatically detect non-compliance and bludgeon people with a zero-tolerance policy.

100% accountability is not necessarily a good thing, especially if it discourages people from learning how to hold themselves accountable. Isn't that part of what school is supposed to teach you?

Re:What happens next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669699)

Employers already do "want this kind of nonsense." Considering many jobs require you to have a badge to enter and exit the building. They say it's in the name of security to try to do things like prevent random strangers from coming in and shoulder surfing or picking stuff up off the printer or beating their girlfriend to death, but I know it's conspiracy to destroy our values.

Chains and collars... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669615)

Cheaper. Easier. Same effect. Teaches children their true place in our new social order.

Funny (3, Informative)

The MAZZTer (911996) | about 2 years ago | (#41669629)

Me and my co-workers have RFID-enabled badges to access our workplace and PCs, and it leaves logging trails for sure. No-one around here seems to be in an uproar about it.

Of course, here they have proprietary company property to protect.

Public schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669637)

Even with public schools, there are schools where truancy is a BIG problem, schools where there's a conflict between creationism and evolution, and schools where the administrators work to get as many students into the top colleges as possible.

Let's guess which type of schools are tagging the students. Does that affect your opinion?

Combine this with other technology! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669645)

Think about it! If we have a tracking chip for every citizen, that data can be linked up with our Screaming Eagle Freedom drones for fast and efficient elimination of those pesky domestic terrorists we keep hearing about!

Glorious efficiency! Saving you taxpayers money!

Re:Combine this with other technology! (1)

guuyuk (410254) | about 2 years ago | (#41669693)

Waiting to see who would scream (and how loud) when states embed RFID tags in license plates. Drive under a couple of sensors along the highway too fast, get a ticket (and someone somewhere would justify a law that states the owner is responsible for the vehicle).

Re:Combine this with other technology! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669885)

That's unlikely.

If speed limits were enforced that efficiently than no one would speed, and the police departments would loose a considerable amount of their income. Anything more efficient than the "parked care with a traffic cam in it" approach is unlikely to be deployed in the real world.

More like Little Brother.... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669653)

Did anyone elsed read this and immediately think of Little Brother by Corey Doctorow?

As a parent... (3, Interesting)

acoustix (123925) | about 2 years ago | (#41669655)

..I laud this public school's initiative to make sure that they are tracking attendance. Obviously it's primarily about funding in this case. But it also provides documented evidence of whether kids are in class or not. This information can (and should) be passed on to parents.

Also, in Iowa back in the 1990's our Governor (R) had proposed a change to the state's welfare system called "learnfare". The idea was that a family's welfare check depended on the child's attendance in school. They received 100% of the check for good attendance and were penalized for poor attendance. The idea was that they wanted kids in 3rd, 4th, 5th generations of welfare families to get a good education and not be the next generation on welfare.

Now obviously school attendance doesn't necessarily mean good grades, or caring about your future. But still, it was a step in the right direction.

Re:As a parent... (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 2 years ago | (#41669753)

Obviously it's primarily about funding in this case. But it also provides documented evidence of whether kids are in class or not.

When I was at school, the kids would have loved this. No need to turn up, just get a friend to carry your RFID tag.

Re:As a parent... (1)

acoustix (123925) | about 2 years ago | (#41669861)

Obviously it's primarily about funding in this case. But it also provides documented evidence of whether kids are in class or not.

When I was at school, the kids would have loved this. No need to turn up, just get a friend to carry your RFID tag.

True. This is why the school should also take a look at patterns and walk around with a handheld RFID device that will let them know if one kid has multiple cards. Give them in-school suspensions if caught.

We desperately need accountability in the public school system. It is obvious that the system is failing at multiple levels, including the parents. This is why I went to private schools and my child goes to a private school. There is more accountability.

Hey John, hold this for me (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669675)

Kids will never think of having a friend hold their card while they go off to do whatever it is kids do nowdays.

how hard (5, Insightful)

101percent (589072) | about 2 years ago | (#41669735)

How hard is it to manually count attendance? You have a degree in education but you cannot to the occasional headcount? After a week you should be able to look at your class and recall the *names* of the faces you do not see and deduct that from your total class size. Don't get me wrong, I love technology, but this sounds like another excuse to spend taxpayer money, in addition to other nefarious motives which will undoubtedly be discussed in this thread.

Re:how hard (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 2 years ago | (#41669951)

How hard is it to manually count attendance? You have a degree in education but you cannot to the occasional headcount?

Education degrees don't teach you to count.

How is this different... (1)

Thelasko (1196535) | about 2 years ago | (#41669745)

than what every major employer does in the United States? I know when I go to work, I have to wear and RFID badge that gets scanned when I enter the building. I also have to use it to access certain areas. The last three places I've worked had similar systems.

$30 a day per unit is a rip-off. Was this job bid (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669763)

30$ a day per student is outrageous from a cost point of view.
Who tracks it, the ATM processors? (- $5.00 to withdraw $20.00 -- theft)

Simple fix (2)

Anon-Admin (443764) | about 2 years ago | (#41669765)

Take ID card, wrap it in a towel, and set it on concrete, liberally beat it with a hammer.

From experience, it breaks the RFID chip and makes it stop working but leaves the card intact. Personally I hate these stupid chips and I have broken a bunch of them!

Here's an Idea (1)

Volntyr (1620539) | about 2 years ago | (#41669775)

For all parents who are objecting to this (I would be too if my daughter was subjected to this), simply start up a fundraiser for some Student RFID blocking wallets. After all, we want our children to grow up knowing the responsiblity of owning an actual wallet, right?

Chains and collars... (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about 2 years ago | (#41669785)

Cheaper. Simpler. Effective training for their new roles in our brave new world. Might as well tag 'em too.

Re:Chains and collars... (1)

LeadSongDog (1120683) | about 2 years ago | (#41669941)

Outdated. If the collars can't administer behavior-modification stimuli they aren't worth the trouble. Chains make too much noise when the serfs are doing what they're told. If dogs can get an "Invisible Fence (TM), so can humans. Advanced models could deliver transdermal "medication" for enhanced effectiveness.

How are they going to reboot Dazed and Confused?!? (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#41669831)

I guess in the new version, they'll all just get busted the second they skip out on school. That won't make for a very interesting movie.

If you have nothing to hide... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41669879)

If you have nothing to hide, what are you worried about? *eyeroll*

More and more, I'm wishing there was a sane home schooling alternative... By the time I find a mate, and we breed, I'm pretty sure there won't be a single school left on the planet I'd care to send my kids to...

Prison (0)

Migraineman (632203) | about 2 years ago | (#41669899)

I've always held that High School was effectively prison. Now even more so.
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