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342 comments

$128,000? (5, Funny)

crazyjj (2598719) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691753)

Considering the amount of effort in getting a job there, the hours worked, and the cost of living in Mountain View, I think that roughly equals minimum wage. Maybe they need a software engineers' union.

Re:$128,000? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691857)

Jesus, that's roughly 3x's what I make, and I'm on call 24/7. But then I'm not a genius with 3 phd's like the people that mop floors at google.

Re:$128,000? (0, Troll)

sycodon (149926) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691963)

Based on how some of their products work, they are vastly overpaid.

Re:$128,000? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692753)

Parent was modded informative? Really?

Re:$128,000? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691971)

Wow you are doing it wrong lol.

Re:$128,000? (-1, Offtopic)

19061969 (939279) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692599)

Yeah, you tell the looser!

Herp derp fadgit.

Re:$128,000? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692963)

I was being serious. If he is in the US only making under $43K as a constantly on-call software developer, he is doing it seriously wrong. Just ask, well, anyone.

Re:$128,000? (2)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692601)

If you're making $40k in the US, you're not developing software like the software engineers at Google are.

Or you graduated with a 2.4 GPA.

Re:$128,000? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692605)

Sucks to be you.

While I'm not quite making that much, I'm not working in the bay area, or even CA. my cost of living to salary is actually much higher than that.

That 128K is roughly 85K where I'm at.

Re:$128,000? (5, Insightful)

darjen (879890) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691859)

Frankly, I would rather earn 90k, work less, and have more free time to spend with my family.

Re:$128,000? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691961)

I work at Google and don't have long hours. I am on an on call rotation, but for a lot of teams, there are dedicated people on call, with a resulting salary bonus. (And the work load for being on call is really very minimal.)

Re:$128,000? (1)

darjen (879890) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692845)

That is good to hear. I worked as a developer at a couple different software companies in the past, where people were constantly there past 6 or bringing their work home the entire evening. Now that I work in the IT department of a large corporate headquarters, most everyone is gone by 5. Sometimes I even work through lunch and leave at 4 and nobody seems to care as long as I get work done. I find I enjoy programming much more under these conditions.

Re:$128,000? (2)

kronak (723456) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692019)

I work for a well-known company (which for NDA reasons must remain unnamed) that is typically associated with "long hours." It's not true. The extra hours are optional. Most of the folks who stay past 6 or 7 either REALLY love what they're doing, or have no idea how to manage their time.

Re:$128,000? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692455)

"typically associated with long hours". You mean Apple? Sure, the extra hours are optional, but if you want 500 RSUs instead of 100 this year, you're not going home at 7.

Re:$128,000? (4, Insightful)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692527)

I work for a well-known company (which for NDA reasons must remain unnamed)

You have an NDA that you can't even name your employer?

Most of the folks who stay past 6 or 7 either REALLY love what they're doing,

I work in an office stuffed with people who love their jobs. The ones who don't aren't around long (and tend not to get hired in the first place). My boss is big on people being to work by 9, and at 5:15 the place is a ghost town.

I REALLY love what I'm doing. I also REALLY love my wife and kids and would rather be hanging out with them than pretty much anyone else.

or have no idea how to manage their time.

This. I've seen way too many people sit at work for 12 hours but only work for 6. I'd much rather work a solid 8 hours then go home, relax, rest up, and do it again the next day.

Re:$128,000? (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#41693013)

You have an NDA that you can't even name your employer?

He could, but then he'd have to kill you.

Re:$128,000? (2)

tompaulco (629533) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692547)

Frankly, I would rather earn 90k, work less, and have more free time to spend with my family.
So would I, but unfortunately, I don't make that much, I work way too many hours, and have little time to spend with my family. But then, I am just a lowly Director of Development, not one of those fancy entry level software engineers.

Re:$128,000? (3, Interesting)

darjen (879890) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692747)

It's not my salary, just a number I picked. The going rate for a senior developer in my area seems to be hovering around 85-90.

Re:$128,000? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692843)

I work at Google as a senior software engineer, and have a great life-work balance. I work 9-5 and very rarely work outside of those hours. When I do, it's because I want to get something done not because somebody is breathing down my neck.

Not accurate, smaller companies pay more (3, Informative)

aralin (107264) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692329)

This survey must be only talking about companies above certain size. Our Sillicon Valley startup has about 50 employees and the average engineering salaries are north of $150,000. Large companies like Google actually don't have to pay that much, because the hours are more reasonable. I know there are other companies too that pay more than Google in the area.

Re:$128,000? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692405)

Ten times my salary == minimum wage.. fucking americans every time..

Re:$128,000? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692631)

Wow, where are you at?

In Brazil, entry level for software engineers is around US$40k/year.

And honestly, software doesn't pay much compared to consulting or finance.

Re:$128,000? (1)

slashpot (11017) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692597)

Agreed - add another 100k to that just to get anybody worth a shit in the Atlanta market.... where the cost of living is dirt cheap compared to living in Mountain View.

Re:$128,000? (2)

metamatic (202216) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692613)

Considering the amount of effort in getting a job there, the hours worked, and the cost of living in Mountain View, I think that roughly equals minimum wage.

You were moderated funny, but that's actually insightful. According to an online Cost of Living Comparison Tool [bestplaces.net], if I wanted to accept a job at Google they'd need to more than double my salary.

I think that their insistence on moving engineers to Mountain View is likely hurting them.

Filter error: You can type more than that for your (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691787)

Google paid its engineers an average base salary of $128,336, with Microsoft coming in second at $123,626. Apple, eBay, and Zynga rounded off the top 5

Technically, 5 isn't rounder than 2.

Re:Filter error: You can type more than that for y (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691891)

Technically, you don't understand the use of "rounded" here.

Re:Filter error: You can type more than that for y (4, Funny)

sycodon (149926) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691985)

2 is more rounded than 5, which is actually kind of squarish at the top. Yes, it is round at the bottom, but 2 has more rounding overall than the bottom of 5.

Excuse me, time for another Vicodin.

That's it? (3, Insightful)

CMU_Ken (574499) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691811)

128k? That doesn't seem like much once you factor in cost of living for the locations these companies reside in.

Re:That's it? (5, Informative)

CMU_Ken (574499) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691839)

And to add to my previous comment, I wish GlassDoor would redo their study after factoring in cost of living. Then we'd see who's *really* paying their engineers.

Re:That's it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692009)

Yeah right its greed, this is the stuff BO is talking about. Greedy engineers.

Re:That's it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692013)

But do they standardize on their salaries per city or per country? If it's per country, you can work for Google in, say, Boulder, Colorado, and have a lot more spare income than someone working in Mountain View.

Re:That's it? (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692521)

Google has datacenters in Iowa, South Carolina, Georgia, Oklahoma, and Oregon. Those are all cheap places to live.

The fact that Google salaries top Microsoft's on average with those locations says something.

Re:That's it? (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692653)

Datacenter technicians are not the same as software development engineers.

Re:That's it? (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692703)

No, but I know they have engineers who work in the datacenter that neighbors me (Council Bluffs, IA). And the Omaha metro area to which it belongs is routinely named one of the best cities in the country for cost of living.

Re:That's it? (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692729)

Yes, but there's many more technicians that engineers at their data centers. Opposite is true in MV, CA. Which is why the numbers skew high.

Off Topic: Facebook?! Really?! (4, Insightful)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691815)

(Rant)
So Slashdot was bought by Dice, right? Have they done ANYTHING to improve it?

I'm almost as sharp as a marble, but just look at this:

Title: Google's Engineers Are Well Paid, Not Just Well Fed
Summary: D H NG writes "According to a study by the career site Glassdoor, Google tops the list of tech companies in the salaries it pays to software engineers. Google paid its engineers an average base salary of $128,336, with Microsoft coming in second at $123,626. Apple, eBay, and Zynga rounded off the top 5."

And it has a ... wait for it ... Facebook tag?

Y'all yelled at me wen I said that Facebook is getting indirect advertising. And yet the Slashdot regulars haven't bothered to fork it since they instinctively know they can't get the critical mass to go to the forked version. So we continue to live with stuff like that.

(/Rant)

Off Topic Indeed (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691877)

Y'all yelled at me wen I said that Facebook is getting indirect advertising. And yet the Slashdot regulars haven't bothered to fork it since they instinctively know they can't get the critical mass to go to the forked version. So we continue to live with stuff like that.

Hmmm, no subscriber asterisk next to your name ... how much do you pay to use Slashdot again? A misplaced tag and you're talking about forking? Please, the editing is far worse than a mistagged article (who even notices the tags?). Even then if you fork, who's paying who to do what again?

"We all" would love something better, go start it and try to pay editors yourself and we'll come, believe you me.

Re:Off Topic: Facebook?! Really?! (3, Informative)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692007)

Not to ruin a perfectly good rant, but if you take a look at that (such as it is) you see that Facebook is mentioned as being close behind Google in terms of overall salaries (not just engineering ).

Re:Off Topic: Facebook?! Really?! (2)

TheSpoom (715771) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692053)

You try to set up Slashcode in any reasonable way and get back to me. You know it hasn't been touched in like two years, right?

Re:Off Topic: Facebook?! Really?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692847)

This comment has inspired me to suggest a moderation option of "-1, Meh".

Cost of living.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691861)

Yea, but they're also in one of the highest cost of living areas...

OK, but what about the hours? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691869)

In Germany for a slightly lower salary (let's say 100K) you work only 37 hrs a week (for real, not only on paper), have 30 days of paid vacation a year, an extensive social security and healthcare coverage provided by the government (you don't need any private insurance), and you cannot be fired "at will", but only for a fair reason. What about google, microsoft, and the US in general?

Yesterday here on slashdot I read a scary post saying that astronomy Ph.D. students work 80 hrs a week, and reading the comments it seemed that it's considered "normal" in the US. I thought they were on another planet!

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (2)

paskie (539112) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691929)

What software companies in Germany have average salary around 100k?

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692025)

Dunno about software, but when I was there I was on about $100K USD per year and I was just a middleware admin. Took quite the pay cut moving to Canada and 'only' getting ~$85K/year.

I can only imagine software guys would earn far more than that.

Your data pool is now '2' big :) I know, nothing to do with average base salaries.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692161)

I was talking about Bavaria too, Munich in fact. I am sure you are talking about Munich too :)

Are you a tt'er?

AC2

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (1)

acidfast7 (551610) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692407)

i hope he's not a tt'er. That place seems to be the worse place to meet authentic Germans (or Bavarians rather.)

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692041)

My knowledge is about Bavaria, where nearly ANY software engineer makes 100K (75K euros) 3-5 years after graduation.

Bavaria is richer than the german average, but Silicon Valley is richer than the US average too.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692139)

Rubbish.

Perhaps
a) for a large comapny (Siemens, EADS)
and
b) in Munich

NO WAY will a software engineer in Passau, Regensburg, Aschaffenburg, Augsburg etc be making 75000 Euros 5 years after graduating.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692879)

To add to that, even in Munich not every software developer will make 75K€ 3-5 years after graduation. In fact, one of our colleagues (I work in Munich) has just left for Google, where he will be earning about double what he got here. Also, at least in the small companies I have worked for since leaving university, a 40 hour work week is the norm, not 37 (that would be the big companies). What the original poster also does not mention is that the extensive social security and healthcare coverage is not provided by the German government, it is paid for by the employee and the employer (the split used to be 50/50, I'm not sure what it is currently).

All that being said, it would take a lot more than $120K to entice me to move to the U.S. I like it here.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691951)

I think you made up numbers. The median senior software engineer makes the equivilent of $64,000 per year. In the United States $64,000 would be below the lowest 10%.

-- MyLongNickName
(source payscale.com)

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (1)

YttriumOxide (837412) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692105)

I think you made up numbers. The median senior software engineer makes the equivilent of $64,000 per year. In the United States $64,000 would be below the lowest 10%.

-- MyLongNickName
(source payscale.com)

I have a difficult time believing that as a software developer working in Germany... I live in a relatively cheap city (Hannover) and the average income of my team is around 80k USD according to Google's exchange rate calculator (I know the salaries for my team since I'm the supervisor and had a hand in hiring them).

I'm also pretty certain we don't pay well for developers since we're not even a software development company.

A SENIOR software developer working for a company that actually does development as their bread and butter should be on significantly more.

Note that sites like payscale get their data from people going to the site to see if they're earning a reasonable amount. Most people who do this are earning below the average, so it tends to skew the figures quite a bit.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692115)

64K USD is less than the salary of a fresh engineer graduate, at least in Munich. Simple Volkswagen factory workers can make even more money than that.

Sorry but Germany is not all the same, as well as Silicon Valley is not the US average.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692411)

You'd have to pay me a ton of money to work on Volkswagens all day.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (1)

tompaulco (629533) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692603)

64K USD is less than the salary of a fresh engineer graduate, at least in Munich.
That's OK, here in the U.S., the starting salary for an engineer is about $50k, but just try finding a job that will pay you that fresh out of school. There are lies, damn lies, and then there are statistics.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692901)

My employer hires extensively directly from college, and starting salaries for hardware and software engineers are higher than that. (My starting salary when I started more than a decade ago as a new college grad was higher than that, and salaries have gone up since then.) I live in Texas as well, not the west coast, so the cost of living is lower.

My group of ~20 engineers grew by 5 in the last two years, and will grow by the same again in the next two years, almost all of which comes from new grads. And we have a hundred similar groups.

We won't hire you if you didn't get a high GPA in college and can withstand a grueling interview process, though. (The GPA is to show that, even if you are so smart that half your classes were below you, you still recognized the value of putting on a good public face and getting all the proper documentation in order.)

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691995)

Anybody can still be fired "at will" in European countries, just not for an "illegal" reason (race, religion, age,...), or as long as that's not the official reason anyway. If you get fired, you get either a period of time (3 months or so, based on how long you were employed) to look for a new job while doing your current one (often with one day a week off to go on interviews), or you get paid your wages (plus the value of all extra benefits) for the same amount of time.

But it's fairly common knowledge that employees actually have some rights in most of the civilized world, whereas in the US they're just an expensive product the company needs to acquire. Unless you're in management of course, in which case you can't be paid enough for doing pretty much nothing that adds any value to the company.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (1)

mikael_j (106439) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692111)

You're oversimplifying it.

At least here in Sweden there's first and foremost a difference between being fired and being laid off. You can't just fire someone without just cause, if you do you are likely to have whatever union that employee belongs to breathing down your neck.

As for laying people off, even that isn't quite so simple. In theory it's "first in, last out" but in practice this is often negotiated away during layoffs (one way or another, sometimes the employees who are laid off despite not being "next in line" get a pretty good deal (severance et cetera) other times the union involved in the negotiations are a particularly useful one and just agree to just about everything the employer demands).

All in all it's not very easy for a boss to just up and fire you for no particular reason (unless we're counting 19 year-old fast food employees with no union membership and no knowledge of labor laws but that's like saying it's OK to rob someone who's somehow managed to not learn that robbery is a crime and that they can call the cops).

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692273)

"European" countries are not exactly homogeneous in terms of regulation.

Forget about individual lay offs in Germany, France or Italy, they're extremely difficult to do, not only they cannot be discriminatory, but the company has also the burden to prove that the single worker is inefficient, and that his/her inefficiency could not be discovered during the recruiting sessions. Only for top management positions things are different.

Collective lay offs are easier, but highly expensive, both for the company and for the government (workers get lots of subsidies).

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692003)

In Germany, there's only a slight chance that your government will become a fascist monster that slaughters hundreds of thousands of innocent people. But the work life balance is fantastic!

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0, Flamebait)

Acy James Stapp (1005) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692065)

And in the U.S., there's a 100% chance that your government is currently a fascist monster that slaughters hundreds of thousands of innocent people. And the work life balance sucks.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (1)

daem0n1x (748565) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692067)

So, what's so different from the USA?

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692589)

So, what's so different from the USA?

Sauerkraut and Oktoberfest. There's a lot more of both in Germany, especially the sauerkraut.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (2)

somersault (912633) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692397)

Yeah because the US government is soooo much better [wikipedia.org]. Only 100,000 rather than hundreds of thousands. And the US is such a great place to be in a minority group.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

thomasw_lrd (1203850) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692873)

Minority groups are doing pretty good in the US. Hell we have black muslim president. Doesn't get more minority than that. (Yes, I know he's not really a muslim, but let's face it, most USian's are ignorant rednecks).

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (4, Interesting)

acidfast7 (551610) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692209)

It's also common for PhD students to work 80h/wk in Germany (at least at the reputable institutions ... Excellence Universities and Max-Planck Institutes) for example. Even students doing diplomarbeit work 60+ hr/wk.

Also, one needs to compare net (netto) salaries. More the 50% of my gross (brutto) salaries is "comsumed" (for better rather than worse most of the time) in taxes (roughly 35% when income/old age/solidarity/church tax (which I opt-out of) /unemployment), mandatory health insurance (roughly 8%), mandatory pension (roughly 10%).

Also, I wouldn't directly convert €1:$1.3 because with the cost of living and the VAT ... it's much closer to €1:$1 in real terms.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692283)

Yes, but does Germany maintain a standing military with ability to project force worldwide?

Does Germany import mountains of cheaply made goods for the masses to fill their oversized homes with?

Does Germany have subsidized corn food products so cheap that even the poor can afford to be morbidly obese?

Who would want to live in such a cultural backwater where all you do is drink beer and travel the world?

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (1)

ikaruga (2725453) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692321)

Don't confuse the Ph.D. student work routine with the standard worker's. There quite a few key differences here
The major one being that Ph.D. students are still students, not some company employees. They are their own bosses(at least the intelligent ones). The amount of time they spend in the lab is based on their own pace, their own norms, their own ambitions as well as their own skill and competence. Some students just love to be in the lab. Others are extremely unlucky and are surrounded by technical troubles and bureaucracy. Of course there are also the imcompetent ones that just can't get anything done in time.
I'm first year (medical) Engineering Ph.D. student. And of all countries, I happen to live in Japan, a place were they just go overtime. And yet, thanks to the great scholarship and grants and the fact my research is going very smooth, I on average stay at the lab 40 hours a week. Only very lately I've been going overtime, but not because people are telling me to do so, but because I'm also trying to expand my research in to a venture business. Everything I do is my choice.
Also it's important to notice that when people say Ph.D. student, they probably are talking about hard science students. From MY experience, their reality is much harsher.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (0)

tompaulco (629533) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692625)

an extensive social security and healthcare coverage provided by the government
It's not provided by the government, it's provided by you, the tax payer. They are just taking it away from you, running it through an expensive bureaucracy, and then handing back 1/4 of what they took, and somehow convincing you that it is free money.

Re:OK, but what about the hours? (3, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692865)

They are just taking it away from you, running it through an expensive bureaucracy, and then handing back 1/4 of what they took

There's no point trying to have this discussion with made-up numbers. The question is whether government administration in a given sector is more or less effective and efficient than private industry, so it's all about the numbers. And not just "golly that number sounds too big!"-type numbers (which is how many people comprehend medicare fraud, for example), but how those numbers compare to the alternative.

Study Methodology Flawed? (1)

CrankyFool (680025) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691883)

I have some issues with the study; for one thing, it's worth noting they don't tell us how they actually did the study. For another, I have no idea how they came to the conclusion that $128K is A) high; and B) at the top of the scale for software engineers when their own data contradicts this.

Here, allow me to present Netflix, which happens to also be in the Bay Area, and Glassdoor's software engineer salaries for Netflix:

http://www.glassdoor.com/GD/Salary/Netflix-Salaries-E11891.htm?filter.jobTitleFTS=software+engineer [glassdoor.com]

Senior Software Engineers average $177K; Software Engineers average $161K.

Re:Study Methodology Flawed? (1)

aglider (2435074) | about a year and a half ago | (#41691941)

Maybe that article was actually meant to push people to apply as an engineer to Google Inc.
Or maybe they're completely morons.
Or maybe they have little prectice with maths.
Probably all of the three above.

CEO has Vision. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691919)

I make the big bucks because I am CEO. It is I who stays clear-headed and doesn't zombie-walk into making another Linux. Nobody but I can get around the mental road block. God says, "fast disputed lusted fairest Midnight II begannest fruitfully lattice thoughts avenue vowing rude convinced countryman
were Fair sharper peril Whatever Dido delightful spent summing Saint handkerchief solicited stick increasing oblation heinous decline ventures reports withdrew builded knocked upbraided infinite sucking tutor Curiosity tempted disgusted "

Google Home (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41691931)

Any engineer would loved to be paid 127,001

Re:Google Home (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692497)

don't let on - its a super secret - but there's a new google authored RFC about being able to send ads from the 127.1 address!

Technically Microsoft offers the highest then.. (4, Insightful)

HerculesMO (693085) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692095)

Because it's in Redmond. The other companies are in the Bay area largely, and that's the most expensive place to live per square foot in the country. Gas and everything else are more expensive too.

Re:Technically Microsoft offers the highest then.. (1)

zerro (1820876) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692349)

+1 I'm guessing those who think that 120k/yr is _alot_ of money havent really looked at the cost of living in the Bay area and others. I have. For me, mainly due to housing prices, it's more or less the equivalent of an 80k/yr in many other places that have _reasonable_ housing costs.

Re:Technically Microsoft offers the highest then.. (2)

HerculesMO (693085) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692429)

A 3 Bedroom in the Bay Area (my inlaws are out there) in a reasonable neighborhood is over 700k. It's ridiculous.

Comparably, where I live, in the tristate area and working in NYC, I paid a little more than half that for a 4 bedroom house with two car garage and full basement. Taxes are higher, but with the price of the house, who cares? Plus, my schools are immensely better here as well. Cali schools suck, unless you live in Cupertino.. but the those houses are $1 million+.

Re:Technically Microsoft offers the highest then.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692371)

Redmond isn't necessarily cheap. It turns out that in NJ, my salary is 44% higher by cost of living than what Google is paying, and it's right on the nose for what Salaries are in Redmond, WA.

Re:Technically Microsoft offers the highest then.. (1)

HerculesMO (693085) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692541)

People who work at MS don't live in Redmond necessarily, but the suburbs around MS are pretty well priced. Same with NJ, as opposed to NYC.

The entire Bay Area is really expensive though.

Nortel? (2)

dlingman (1757250) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692133)

Noticed that Nortel is in the list of companies they are reporting average salaries from. Might want to let them know about the whole bankruptcy/sell off everything thing that happened.

salary is only one part of the story (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692155)

A good salary is one thing. When google recruits does not even talks about salary. They ask you to be interviewed for almost 2 months time, without letting you know any of the details. That's their strategy, totally inhumane. Its like, we know you have a full time job already with salary X, we want you on our team, but first you need to spend 2 months on interviews, without any knowledge of salary and not sure of course that you are gonna get the job. Honestly, my advice, go get a second job, with the same effort you are going to get triple the money they are giving...

Re:salary is only one part of the story (1)

slashpot (11017) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692635)

That's was my experience too - and exactly what I did. I quadrupled though.

Are they really well paid? (5, Insightful)

ltsmash (569641) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692215)

I'm not so sure that these engineers are very well paid. Last year, Apple CEO Tim Cook was awarded $378 million in compensation. According to the above survey, the average software engineer at Apple makes $114,413 a year. In order to make the same amount as the CEO, the engineer would have to work 3300 years. So let's ask the question: When would the engineer have had to start working in order to have the same amount of money as the CEO? The engineer's first day of work would be 1300 years before Jesus of Nazareth would be born. And keep in mind this is an engineer. Consider junior level employees. According to an article by the New York Times, a salesman working at an Apple store makes about $11.25 an hour. He would make the same amount as the CEO in about 16 thousand years —- that would put his first day of work well into the stone age -- if you’re a creationist, his work time would be longer than the age of the universe.

Re:Are they really well paid? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41693059)

Tim Cook does well when the price of the stock goes up. Otherwise he makes about as much as a good shortstop for a major league team. Horrors.

Not the whole story... (3, Informative)

erp_consultant (2614861) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692345)

The article doesn't mention but I suspect that is base salary only. Google is known to have a very good benefits package (at least by today's standards). There may be a stock and/or bonus component that is not included. I find it hard to believe that 128K is the total comp for an engineer at Google.

Having said all that, my experience is that salaries in CA are far too low given the cost of living there. Where I live (it's a large city, not out in the sticks) you can buy a nice house for 250-300K. Same house in Silicon Valley or LA? Well over a million and that's being conservative. Taxes are also much higher in CA. So you would think that salaries are 4x as high there as they are here but they are almost the same.

Sure, CA is really nice. I love going there. Great weather, all that. But living there? Forget it.

Re:Not the whole story... (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692475)

it was 80degrees yesterday in the bay area.

I think its worth it. for lots of reasons. I don't love the high cost but there really is a lot to love about this area and its culture/style.

That sounds about normal (4, Interesting)

neurovish (315867) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692443)

$128,336 in San Francisco equates to about $65k when cost of living is adjusted to the US average (specifically Raleigh, NC...it was the most average I could think of and is pretty close). I'm sure there is some flexibility in those numbers, but I don't know of anywhere in the bay area that isn't well above the national average.

PhD's Google Employs (5, Insightful)

kye4u (2686257) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692591)

Considering the number of Phd's and M.S. graduates that Google employs versus Microsoft, it stands to reason that the average salary would be higher. As others have mentioned, when you factor cost of living, hours worked, and the degree employees hold, 128K doesn't go very far. Also in Washington State (where Microsoft is located), there is no state tax

When the median home price in Mountain View is over a million and the cost for a decent 2 bed/bath apartment is 3k/month, your dollar doesn't go to far.

still not bad same as the 1990's (3)

Vince6791 (2639183) | about a year and a half ago | (#41692693)

Oh please, even for California that is a lot of money. With taxes taken out you get about $5700 a month, about $66.80 an hour gross $35.62 an hour net. Your telling me you can't find an apartment for $1400 - $2000 anywhere in California. The highest I ever got was $18(working 9-5, actually 7-6, 7-9, 7-12, 6-9, time and half only) an hour gross comes to about $11.63 an hour net, $1860 a month. NY taxes are freaking high. You can get a shitty roach infested single apartment here in ny queens, brooklyn, bronx for $1100-1300 no utilities included, 2 bedroom $1800-$2000 in queens. Basement apartments are now $900 a month and still rising. Yes, expenses are up, wages and salaries are down. In the 1990's an engineer with a E.E. got started with $120k a year. These days hard work and experience means shit, but if you have a degree with no experience and not a very hard worker you get paid like a king.

Incorrect summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692719)

The article states that Facebook, not Microsoft, is the second-highest paying.

Also, the subset of employees who report salary on Glassdoor is biased.

Incorrect summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41692851)

The article states that Facebook, not Microsoft, is the second-highest paid. Also, the subset of employees who report their salary on Glassdoor is biased.

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