Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Mars Rover Solves Metallic Object Mystery, Unearths Another

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the hits-keep-coming dept.

Mars 179

SchrodingerZ writes "Last week the Mars Curiosity Rover spotted a shiny metallic-looking object in the martian soil. This week scientists have confirmed that it is plastic that has fallen off the 1-ton rover. However, the discovery of this trans-planetary littering has opened up another mystery for the science team. On October 12th the rover took a sample of soil from the ground, feeding it into its Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments for analysis, and a picture of the hole dug by the rover's claw revealed metallic particles in the dirt. The sample was subsequently dropped due to fears that particles from the rover had made it into the dirt. Further study now suggests that the metallic particles are actually native to Mars, as the photo reveals that they are embedded in the soil in clumps. In 2007 the older rover Spirit found evidence of silica for the first time, more testing will occur over the next few days to determine truly if this is again just Curiosity's littler, or something more profound."

cancel ×

179 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Crossing my fingers (5, Insightful)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 2 years ago | (#41699483)

I hope it finds massive amounts of palladium, iridium or some mix of rare metals. Nothing would kick-start a race to Mars like greed. Unfortunately.

Re:Crossing my fingers (5, Funny)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | about 2 years ago | (#41699567)

>> Nothing would kick-start a race to Mars like greed.

Well, that and the opportunity to litter.

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700349)

>> Nothing would kick-start a race to Mars like greed.

Well, that and the opportunity to litter.

Obviously we need to prep a mission ASAP to put up some "no littering!" signs.

Re:Crossing my fingers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700351)

I heard that there are 60 million people living on Mars!

Re:Crossing my fingers (4, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#41701509)

Well, that and the opportunity to litter.

The word you're looking for is terraforming. Makes it sound all scientificy.

Re:Crossing my fingers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699629)

Getting it back to Earth would cost far more than it's worth. Better to discover it in an asteroid.

Re:Crossing my fingers (5, Insightful)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 2 years ago | (#41699707)

Getting it back to Earth would cost far more than it's worth. Better to discover it in an asteroid.

With the technology we have now, yes. The point would be to develop better technology to make it cost effective, and you can bet some companies would at least try.

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699829)

Most likely, as soon as it became economically feasible, the price would collapse due to either expected or actual oversupply, immediately bankrupting the idiots who went chasing riches.

Re:Crossing my fingers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700193)

Not necessarily. What if only one company can make it feasible, they could regulate the flow onto the market to prevent it from collapsing. In theory at least.

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

Darth_brooks (180756) | about 2 years ago | (#41700609)

Just like any gold rush; the companies that supply the provisions stand the biggest chance to get rich.

Re:Crossing my fingers (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#41701529)

What's the stock ticker for the Weyland-Yutani corporation?

DeBeers & Diamonds? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701323)

It also occurs to me that even if the supply was significant, the difficulty in creating enough capacity for bringing it back in large quantities could keep prices high.

Re:Crossing my fingers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701559)

Like diamonds?

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

abirdman (557790) | about 2 years ago | (#41700337)

They could cut costs with my new inter-planetary palladium/iridium drive, just off the drawing board, and raring to go.

Re:Crossing my fingers (5, Informative)

Rei (128717) | about 2 years ago | (#41700473)

The advantage isn't taking metals back. It's using them on Mars. If there really is even just metallic iron, that'd be a HUGE benefit for colonization. Trivial to mine (scoop dust, blow over rotating magnetic collector), trivial to process (I once sketched out the resource chains to run a blast furnace on Mars and it's just staggering - if this is metallic iron and it's pure enough to be structurally sound if simply melted and cast, it'd be huge deal).

If it applies to metals other than iron, all the more the benefit. Anything you can do to reduce the massive resource chains needed by modern tech could be a godsend for actual colonization.

Re:Crossing my fingers (2)

mpoulton (689851) | about 2 years ago | (#41701229)

I once sketched out the resource chains to run a blast furnace on Mars and it's just staggering - if this is metallic iron and it's pure enough to be structurally sound if simply melted and cast, it'd be huge deal.

Well, it's a pretty big deal just to melt and cast iron when you're on a foreign planet with no life and CO2 for an atmosphere. And making modern useful things out of iron actually requires steel alloys, which means having other metals available and being able to control carbon content of the melt. When there's no fuel on the planet, that means you must use electric power. It takes HUGE amounts of power to run an arc furnace, and moderately use amounts to run an induction furnace. Millions of watts either way. That's a lot of solar panels to haul to Mars.

Re:Crossing my fingers (2)

Lehk228 (705449) | about 2 years ago | (#41701427)

mirrors, made from steel panels a giant solar hotdog roaster

Re:Crossing my fingers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701261)

Isn't Mars one big chunk of iron ore (rust)? I thought that is why it is red?

Re:Crossing my fingers (5, Insightful)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about 2 years ago | (#41701547)

The advantage isn't taking metals back. It's using them on Mars. If there really is even just metallic iron, that'd be a HUGE benefit for colonization.

However, without trade, the colony will always be dependent on its parent nation. And that's not really a colony, it's just an outpost. A really expensive outpost.

The advantage with asteroids (and to some extent lunar development), is that you can serve other markets. Even if it's not cost effective to bring the product back to Earth, as long as it's cheaper than launching from Earth, there should be a small but growing market for in-orbit delivery. Starting with fuel, then air/water, then bulk shielding and crude structures, and developing through more complex manufactured materials. And each stage also feeds back on itself, if you can supply fuel cheaper than Earth-launch, you lower your own running costs, and make whole new activities possible in space which creates whole new markets...

Such a process, once started, should then develop naturally, with each stage paying for itself and creating a market for the next stage; without requiring constant funding through traditional space agencies. [Although it will also give space agencies more bang for their buck. As well as making space exploration easier to justify to the average voter, and the very average politicians.] Until one day you read about how many people permanently live in space, and you realise that we are finally genuinely out there.

Mars won't do that. It will always be a "program", a drain. Historically, colonies like that always fail.

Metal madness (1)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about 2 years ago | (#41701383)

Differentiated metals on Mars almost certainly came from asteroid impacts. (*) So discovering rare elemental metals on Mars means that you'll find it on asteroids (ie, not just on metallic asteroids, impacts mean the average carbonaceous will have a good coating of metallic elements.)

(* Unless there's some native metal crapping lifeform on Mars. Which is also okay.)

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about 2 years ago | (#41699811)

As well as possibly an underground lost civilization with ghosts and monsters n' shit.

Re:Crossing my fingers (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 2 years ago | (#41700027)

As well as possibly an underground lost civilization with ghosts and monsters n' shit.

Hopefully that big ass oxygen reactor is still working after all these years.

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

Ocker3 (1232550) | about 2 years ago | (#41700321)

If it needs to be restarted, where are we going to find an amnesiac super-spy with an identity crisis to restart it for us? We already have the three-breasted 'professional' lady

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 2 years ago | (#41700939)

If it needs to be restarted, where are we going to find an amnesiac super-spy with an identity crisis to restart it for us? We already have the three-breasted 'professional' lady

Dunno, but with the way Arnold's life has been going he'd probably jump at the chance to go to Mars.

Re:Crossing my fingers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701149)

To meet the spy criteria, do you think MI6 would take Sir Richard Branson? He's going to Mars [huffingtonpost.com] - using his own money.

Re:Crossing my fingers (-1, Troll)

jest3r (458429) | about 2 years ago | (#41700143)

Nah .. billions of Tax dollars to analyze garbage and create uncertainty. Welcome to NASA.

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

poly_pusher (1004145) | about 2 years ago | (#41700407)

Doubt is not a pleasant situation, but certainty is absurd. -Voltaire

So I guess what you're saying is that you're certain NASA is a waste of money. Well, I doubt you have any clue what you are talking about and it makes me very uncertain about our future...

Re:Crossing my fingers (-1, Troll)

jest3r (458429) | about 2 years ago | (#41700929)

Why does my opinion make you uncertain about your future?

Last week NASA marketing team issued press releases and interviews drumming up excitement about the possibility of finding metal. Then it turns out to be trash. Then they announce under the trash there might be more metal particles.

Given the fact that the rover has a limited lifespan I am certain that they are wasting time and money analyzing anything close to the landing site .. creating uncertainty about anything they might find at that particular location. Getting the rover as far away as possible and then get us excited about the possibilities.

Re:Crossing my fingers (5, Insightful)

Dan East (318230) | about 2 years ago | (#41700241)

I hope it finds massive amounts of palladium, iridium or some mix of rare metals. Nothing would kick-start a race to Mars like greed. Unfortunately.

So by "Unfortunately" do you mean that the only reason we should go to the incredible expense and risk of visiting other planets is for purely academic or intellectual purposes? Is there anything of actual value to our planet Earth that we can glean from pure knowledge (and knowledge alone) of Mars? Say we learn more about the history of Mars. Humanity applies that information in exactly what way to better our species or improve our planet in some way?

At the end of the day, for it to be worthwhile beyond the science that we are doing right this minute with rovers, there has to be something of value on Mars. Real, tangible value. Materials that are rare on earth, a stopover for energy to reach other parts of the Solar System and beyond, a low gravity place to make materials that we can't produce on Earth, or even a "lifeboat" for humanity - at the end of the day there has to be something a step beyond just knowledge for the sake of knowledge.

Re:Crossing my fingers (3, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41701117)

So by "Unfortunately" do you mean that the only reason we should go to the incredible expense and risk of visiting other planets is for purely academic or intellectual purposes? Is there anything of actual value to our planet Earth that we can glean from pure knowledge (and knowledge alone) of Mars? Say we learn more about the history of Mars. Humanity applies that information in exactly what way to better our species or improve our planet in some way?

Probably you should read Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars and see what the character Ann has to say about it before your next comment along these lines.

Re:Crossing my fingers (0)

khallow (566160) | about 2 years ago | (#41701481)

Probably you should read Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars and see what the character Ann has to say about it before your next comment along these lines.

Having actually read Red Mars, Ann was a flake and Robinson gave too much credence to the belief system in question. Having said that, if he didn't take that belief system so seriously, he would have lost some sales. So it was a financially sound decision on his part.

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

chichilalescu (1647065) | about 2 years ago | (#41701391)

um... actually, knowledge for the sake of knowledge seems good enough to me.
I agree it sounds selfish while there are still people starving to death, but knowledge in itself is a worthy goal.

Re:Crossing my fingers (-1, Flamebait)

vuelto (99486) | about 2 years ago | (#41700259)

Yes,
I completely understand condemning the hypothetical greed of imaginary people who are reminiscent of my overbearing father.  Also as a /. commenter I have no qualms about posting comments that have nothing to do with the story to which they are attached.

On the other hand space exploration is just a silly academic exercise until we come up with some way to make it profitable. Reality, unlike the Star Trek universe, requires that we boldly go and bring back something useful so that we can afford to boldly go back and do some silly academic science-ing.

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700457)

Not this, again. You expect me to believe there's a Confederate ironclad space rocket, in a dry riverbed on Mars? Aliens are dying from a plague which is really caused by rare metal contamination of their underground water supply? A local martian warlord is suppressing the local population, while the ESA has a secret contract with them to store our nuclear waste in their disposal facility?

And right about then, Dr Who shows up. *cue the intro music*

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about 2 years ago | (#41700735)

Indeed. Maybe it's diamonds ;)

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 2 years ago | (#41700767)

There's not a metal on Earth that, even if transport prices to/from Mars dropped by a factor of 100, would be worth fetching from Mars.

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | about 2 years ago | (#41701553)

There's not a metal on Earth that, even if transport prices to/from Mars dropped by a factor of 100, would be worth fetching from Mars.

Well duh, of course if it's a metal on Earth why send it to Mars?

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

kenp2002 (545495) | about 2 years ago | (#41700805)

I think you have confused profitable with greed again...

Re:Crossing my fingers (3, Informative)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 2 years ago | (#41700845)

It's not greed, it's simple math. No animal expends energy unless it can be reasonably sure the reward is more energy.

Re:Crossing my fingers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701099)

don't forget element zero!

Re:Crossing my fingers (1)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#41701305)

Nothing would kick-start a race to Mars like greed. Unfortunately.

Barsoomian women would have, but so far we haven't found them.

Re:Crossing my fingers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701363)

Yes! Let's spend billions to make millions! Greed! Grow up you deluded sci-fi nerd.

Quality Control (-1, Offtopic)

Bohnanza (523456) | about 2 years ago | (#41699485)

Perhaps it would help if we built rovers that didn't fall apart as soon as they get moving.

Re:Quality Control (1)

jhoegl (638955) | about 2 years ago | (#41699699)

no no no.. it is a secret conspiracy to start dumping trash on Mars.
*evil laugh*

Re:Quality Control (1)

demonbug (309515) | about 2 years ago | (#41700433)

Hey, haz waste is getting expensive to dispose of!

Actually, I do kind of wonder if it is getting to the point where it would have been cheaper just to launch rad waste into space rather than pay for all the studies and eventual construction costs associated with building a permanent disposal site.

Re:Quality Control (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701089)

Actually, I do kind of wonder if it is getting to the point where it would have been cheaper just to launch rad waste into space

Farnsworth: Solving the problem once and for all.

Qbert: But what about--

Farnsworth: ONCE AND FOR ALL!

Re:Quality Control (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699751)

You build something that complex and send it that far and see what kinda luck you have.

Ill bet this is one of those "Your results may vary" kinda things.

Re:Quality Control (1)

Ocker3 (1232550) | about 2 years ago | (#41700343)

Exactly, you build something that complex, send it that far on a journey that violent, something's going to come loose. It could have been a part from so many places on the whole lander assembly!

traveling wherever (2)

Onymous Coward (97719) | about 2 years ago | (#41699503)

Might I recommend, as much as is possible, pack your trash.

Re:traveling wherever (1)

ItalianScallion (145653) | about 2 years ago | (#41699685)

Yea! what ever happened to "Take only pictures. Leave only footsteps." ?

I mean, imprinting "JPL" in morse code over and over in the martian dust counts as footsteps, I guess, but....

Re:traveling wherever (3, Funny)

Longjmp (632577) | about 2 years ago | (#41700535)

Might I recommend, as much as is possible, pack your trash.

On the contrary. If I had the chance to go to Mars today, I'd take with me:
A recent newspaper, a can of beer and a half-eaten sandwich.

Then I'd place them somewhere were Curiosity was likely to spot it, and return to Earth silently.

And probably run around with a huge grin on my face for the rest of my life.

CITO, right? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701033)

I have to wonder about the FTF on whatever Curiosity leaves behind.

I hope they find something that justifies... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699507)

a manned trip.

You know what it is (1)

Dantoo (176555) | about 2 years ago | (#41699531)

It is for now, Unobtanium. ;)

Re:You know what it is (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699589)

I was just thinking today about how I liked that name. I loved that nobody in the movie went "We call it unobtanium because it is virtually unobtainable.", because that kind of I'll-connect-the-dots-for-you-because-the-audience-is-to-stupid diolag really ruins the nuance of those things.

Re:You know what it is (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699873)

Just like ununoctium, which once octiated is virtually impossible to un-octiate.

Re:You know what it is (4, Informative)

tragedy (27079) | about 2 years ago | (#41699893)

Avatar didn't invent "Unobtainium". The precise origin is unknown, but it goes back at least to the 1950's and has been traditionally used as a stand in for any material that has all the desired properties for an application (strength, weight, heat resistance, etc.) but that doesn't actually exist. So it's not called "Unobtainium" because it's virtually unobtainable, but because it just plain doesn't exist. Movies seem to have picked it up as a MacGuffin. It was used for the magical material the drill was made of in _The Core_ for example.

Re:You know what it is (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700955)

I believe in the H.G. Wells novel The First Men in the Moon, the trip was made possible because heating some metal with helium around it allowed it to block gravity.

Re:You know what it is (1)

tragedy (27079) | about 2 years ago | (#41701563)

Oh, mystery substances with the properties necessary to make otherwise impossible things work have been around since antiquity. The oldest I can think of offhand is Adamant, but I'm sure there are even older ones. Referring to them as unobtainium started somewhere, however. I don't know exactly where, but the term seems to have been around for at least 60 years.

Re:You know what it is (1)

loufoque (1400831) | about 2 years ago | (#41700269)

"the" movie?
unobtanium is a classic, present in dozens of works of literature, TV shows and films.

Re:You know what it is (1)

jo42 (227475) | about 2 years ago | (#41700493)

You mean Bullwankium. AKA the stuff the drops out the backside of a politician or upper management type or MBA.

Gold! (4, Insightful)

bware (148533) | about 2 years ago | (#41699539)

Nuggets the size of your fist! Don't tell anyone!

There. That always works to get the next territory settled.

Re:Gold! (4, Funny)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#41699859)

Nuggets the size of your fist! Don't tell anyone!

If your nuggets are the size of your fist, you should probably tell your doctor.

Re:Gold! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700747)

Or your pothead friends. :-)~

Re:Gold! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700935)

If your nuggets are the size of your fist, you should probably tell your doctor.

Great. Now I don't want to eat chicken nuggets again. Ever.

Re:Gold! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701285)

Nuggets the size of your fist! Don't tell anyone!

If your nuggets are the size of your fist, you should probably tell your doctor.

Or the Laydeeez....rowr

Re:Gold! (2)

demonbug (309515) | about 2 years ago | (#41700465)

Nuggets the size of your fist! Don't tell anyone!

There. That always works to get the next territory settled.

What's the equivalent of jeans on Mars? Better start investing now...

Every hiker knows... (1)

AUX4Ever (463172) | about 2 years ago | (#41699573)

Leave no trace. Maybe we can do an LNT workshop at NASA.

Re:Every hiker knows... (2)

AaronLS (1804210) | about 2 years ago | (#41699601)

I'm sure there's fragments from the sole of your hiking boats everywhere you've been, and little pieces of plastic from gear that's broken off without you even noticing ;)

Re:Every hiker knows... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700149)

Thankfully I try to do as little hiking in boats as possible, so that isn't a concern to me.

Re:Every hiker knows... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699613)

Why does a bear get to leave that disgusting load wherever he wants but if I leave some delicious Dorritos suddenly I'M the bad guy?

Re:Every hiker knows... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699767)

Why does a bear get to leave that disgusting load wherever he wants but if I leave some disgusting and terribly bad for you and those animals that are going to eat it Dorritos suddenly I'M the bad guy?

FTFY... and the answer is now in the question...

Re:Every hiker knows... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700065)

Except this a four wheel expedition. Tread Lightly would apply better.

The remains of a lost civilization. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699583)

After they created nanobots, they were wiped out and all matter on the planet was turned to clumps, wasted, washed and blown all across the planet.

But really, hopefully there are some rare elements there in massive quantities.

Re:The remains of a lost civilization. (1)

aaronfaby (741318) | about 2 years ago | (#41699619)

Wouldn't "all matter on the planet" include the planet itself?

Re:The remains of a lost civilization. (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 years ago | (#41699737)

no. Only matter ON the planet.

Re:The remains of a lost civilization. (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 2 years ago | (#41699857)

The Mole People may have survived, since they live IN the planet.

Re:The remains of a lost civilization. (1)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | about 2 years ago | (#41701107)

No. That's the part that doesn't matter.

Littler? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699591)

Is that German rubbish?

how about ... (3, Interesting)

jest3r (458429) | about 2 years ago | (#41699617)

Drive the rover as far away from the Mars Garbage Gyre as possible before sampling the soil.

Otherwise it's like taking a dump in your own back yard and gardening it in.

Re:how about ... (5, Funny)

Master Moose (1243274) | about 2 years ago | (#41699733)

I call that sustainable living.

Re:how about ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699783)

That is just silly - If you can afford a backyard most certainly you can afford at least an outhouse.

Re:how about ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701085)

Don't forget element zero!

Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699633)

more testing will occur over the next few days to determine truly if this is again just Curiosity's littler, or something more profound.

Curiosity's littler what?

Parts falling off? (5, Funny)

PPH (736903) | about 2 years ago | (#41699865)

Are they sure it isn't a Land Rover?

Re:Parts falling off? (4, Funny)

cyberworm (710231) | about 2 years ago | (#41700455)

They are sure. Its not leaking oil.

USAF made? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41699915)

" it is plastic that has fallen off the 1-ton rover." Was it made by the USAF?

I know what the metal particles are... (0)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 2 years ago | (#41700029)

Curiosity obliterated the Martian Cyber-cat...with its laser "spectrometer". (Come on, seriously, NASA? Everyone knows what death rays are for.)

The beer can Opportunity will find tomorrow: mine (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 2 years ago | (#41700077)

Just a warning about that beer can.

The Rainier logo gives it away, I think.

Sample fed into ChemMin when? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700307)

According to NASA press conference today (10/18, 2 PM CT), the third scoop was fed into the ChemMin instrument yestersol. They said they just got notice that the instrument got results and were being received as they spoke. The first two scoops were thrown away as per the plan and they were done for cleaning any remaining Earth molecules. Actually this third scoop was part of the cleaning too, but ChemMin is less far sensitive to Earth contamination than the SAM instrument which will be feed from a future scoop. (ChemMin is for mineralogy, SAM is a chemistry lab -- GC-MS, etc. -- that looks for organics among other things.)

co3k (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700533)

Coomitterbase and lost its earlier nota going home

unmarsed (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700573)

The term in the headline should be unmarsed instead of unearthed.

shhhhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700599)

i forgot i dumped some trash as i drove buy the film site....quick get some new sand form the back room ...

Bad summary. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700683)

Curiosity did not reveal "metallic particles in the dirt." As the linked article states, it found "bright" particles. Bright does not mean metal!

Nanobots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41700925)

They're long-dead nanobots that devoured and reduced the Martian landscape (and Martians) to dust.

I think that would be something more profound.

How about a better rover? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701003)

Seriously, how about we build a rover where shit doesn't start falling off it within weeks of it's landing? Maybe use a few more lock washers or something? I'm assuming they're just not hitting other rovers in some sort of billion dollar traffic jam out there.

My keys (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701043)

Oh good, they found my keys.

Shiny metal.... object (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701055)

Check for teeth marks..

Cartoon? (1)

seandiggity (992657) | about 2 years ago | (#41701503)

Someone needs to animate the rover dropping a piece, driving a few yards away, turning around, dropping a piece, going to inspect the first piece it dropped...and on and on...until it falls apart. Maybe title it "Curiosity Killed the Curiosity".

...and somewhere in there is a metaphor for human endeavor :P

Remember the other lander? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701527)

Remember the other lander where they mixed up English and metric units. Probably bits of that lander that came in hard.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?