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New HAL Exoskeleton: A Brain-Controlled Full Body Suit To Be Used In Fukushima

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the suit-up dept.

Japan 111

An anonymous reader writes "Cyberdyne announced today an improved version of the HAL (Hybrid Assistive Limb) robotic exoskeleton at the Japan Robot Show. From the article: 'he latest version of the HAL has remained brain-controlled but evolved to a full body robot suit that protects against heavy radiation without feeling the weight of the suit. Eventually it could be used by workers dismantling the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant."

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Open the exoskeleton hands Hal (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701181)

I'm afraid I can't do that Dave.

Re:Open the exoskeleton hands Hal (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701191)

Guys...can you come over?... I need some help to get this thing off my c**k.

Re:Open the exoskeleton hands Hal (2)

Genda (560240) | about 2 years ago | (#41701817)

No...No... leave it on, the ladies will love it.

Re:Open the exoskeleton hands Hal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41702445)

Dave-san?

It's the wrong trousers ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41706937)

and they've gone wrong!

Cyberdyne created HAL. (5, Funny)

MrQuacker (1938262) | about 2 years ago | (#41701187)

Yeah, this will end well.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (5, Funny)

JWSmythe (446288) | about 2 years ago | (#41701309)

    Cyberdyne, the fictional creator of Skynet, which made the fictional Terminator, bears the same name as Cyberdyne, the real company, who just released a fully functional brain operated exeoskeleton robot?

    Or that they made a possibly-autonomous robot named HAL, the same as the fictional computer which had a bad habit of killing people?

    Include Cybermen and/or Daleks, and we're one brain-snatching away from three different sci-fi universes colliding with reality.

    That may not be all that bad, as long as a guy with a blue box that's larger on the inside than the outside, shows up to give me a ride off of this rock. ... and just remember, only 63 more shopping days until doomsday.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

Cryacin (657549) | about 2 years ago | (#41701535)

Reminds me of the Y-17 trauma override harness from the Fallout New Vegas Big MT expansion pack... http://fallout.wikia.com/wiki/Y-17_trauma_override_harness [wikia.com]

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701609)

Those bastards move really damn fast. I was rocking Unarmed and had heavy armor. They were backpedaling faster than I could run up and ballistic fist their faces off. I had to remove my armor and get shot a lot by energy weapons. JE Sawyer's mod is fun btw. Makes the game nice and hard, but still fun, even on normal difficulty.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (2)

Roger W Moore (538166) | about 2 years ago | (#41701601)

Include Cybermen and/or Daleks, and we're one brain-snatching away from three different sci-fi universes colliding with reality.

Right idea but wrong Sci-Fi universe: they are going to be sending it to a nuclear power plant in Japan which seems to be how half of the Godzilla movies start...

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 2 years ago | (#41701683)

or it could become Giant Robot!

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

jhoegl (638955) | about 2 years ago | (#41701941)

already covered.
Mechagodzilla [wikipedia.org]

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

aarusso (1091183) | about 2 years ago | (#41701763)

Where the luddists when we need them?

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

guttentag (313541) | about 2 years ago | (#41701831)

Include Cybermen and/or Daleks, and we're one brain-snatching away from three different sci-fi universes colliding with reality.

It hasn't started raining Daleks yet, but does Betelgeuse throwing fireballs at us this weekend [earthsky.org] count?

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

Genda (560240) | about 2 years ago | (#41701833)

You missed the obvious allusions to The Guyver and Ripley's Personal Forklift from Aliens... clearly these guys are out to stitch as many movie cliches together into a single event as is humanly possible. Maybe they can add a proton beam for ghost Busting!

MechaHAL. (4, Funny)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about 2 years ago | (#41702047)

As long as the suit comes in five distinct models which can join up to become a single unit, I will be happy.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (2)

aliquis (678370) | about 2 years ago | (#41702163)

I don't know about you but there's a bulldozer outside.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

iamgnat (1015755) | about 2 years ago | (#41704799)

Is a man laying in front of it holding a towel?

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

michelcolman (1208008) | about 2 years ago | (#41702543)

I'm beginning to suspect that some science fiction authors stumbled upon a time machine and have been warning us about the future they saw by writing "fictional" stories about it.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41702955)

I'm beginning to suspect that some science fiction authors stumbled upon a time machine and have been warning us about the future they saw by writing "fictional" stories about it.

I believe the story you're referring to was a Philip K. Dick short story, but I don't recall for sure at the moment.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

ZeroSumHappiness (1710320) | about 2 years ago | (#41704931)

That's a safe bet no matter the premise.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

Hillgiant (916436) | about 2 years ago | (#41704287)

The lead designer is John Bigboote.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) | about 2 years ago | (#41701339)

If we know Cyberdyne's HAL will be up to no good, our only hope is the trademark Lawyers. But the only way to know what it will do in the future is to create a time machine and find out. But in so doing, we open up the chance for HAL coming back in time before the respective movies were made and trademarking the terms itself, thus immunizing it from legal action!

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

flyerbri (1519371) | about 2 years ago | (#41701591)

Already invented the time machine, went forward, didnt end up well, Terminator wars all over the place, went on to massive contamination of the atmosphere due to air pollution since there were so many robots out there that didnt have to breathe they didnt care, then they created the matrix to re-evolve humans when i ded (too many times to count, we're goin on 50 trillion years here), but the good news is. It all started in Los Angeles, where the Angels 'won the war versus heaven and hell'.. they really didnt win, god said screw it and left the house for a bit. I'm back now, and can plainly see there's progress... Russia's back again and Mexico isnt in America (Mexico was the US!), but we've still got some problems to consider. The BORG are not fully comprehending their neceesity to 'loosen their iron vice grip' to work between systems, and emotions are being abused. Women are very clever, that's for sure. But when they built the Penis Guy Trap I built the Venus Fly Trap to catch all them cute young emotional women before they were 'thrown to the wolves' and 'cleansed of their inefficient emotion. Silly BORG, Chicks are for d*cks, the future doesnt bode well with all women and no men, you collapse on yourselves because ya'all are collective personalities led by one... Try sharing responsibilities, and cherishing life, and understanding even math breaks down in imagination! That's why we need both women and men lawyers, not to defend, but to 'break us out of the logical nightmare' that creates a house of cards that topples when one woman thinks her sh*t dont stink. Well, when you're dead, and your senses are turned off, of course it don't stink. But for those of us mopping your sh*t up... The 99% that is... Things are a changin..

The brain.. a horrible thing to mind.... We're loopin, missie, and you're refusing to let go and share control is causin the whole thing to collapse. I'm sharing responsibilities. That created me then you. Now it's Your turn.

God's in da house.....

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

aarusso (1091183) | about 2 years ago | (#41701783)

Dude, I don't know what are you taking, but I want one of these also!

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (1)

Genda (560240) | about 2 years ago | (#41701855)

In your case, I would suggest the BLUE pill. Oh, and I'm glad to hear your making progress with that ADHD thing... yeeooowww

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (4, Interesting)

guttentag (313541) | about 2 years ago | (#41701871)

On purpose. Apparently the company [wikipedia.org] was founded in 2004 and named after the fictional company [wikipedia.org] from the Terminator franchise. Since they're going after the publicity, they should open a satellite office at 47131 Bayside Parkway, Fremont CA [google.com] , the real-life location of the company's offices. And keep an out-of-service SWAT van in the parking lot.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (2)

bfandreas (603438) | about 2 years ago | (#41702553)

...and being a Japanese company I do fully expect that suit to have a world class sanitary solution.
None of this tube and plastic bag nonesense.

I'm sorry, Dave. I can't do that. I'm a bidet, you know.

Re:Cyberdyne created HAL. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41703683)

Since they're going after the publicity, they should open a satellite office at 47131 Bayside Parkway, Fremont CA.

They had to kick out Mattson Technology first (who were one of former employers, lol). I know the building from inside ;-)

Does it come with a crowbar? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701207)

Here's your Mark 1 HEV suit Gordon

How about an MA5B? (1)

gtvr (1702650) | about 2 years ago | (#41703703)

Seriously, this thing is armored already. Just needs a slot to attach Cortana.

Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushima? (4, Insightful)

siddesu (698447) | about 2 years ago | (#41701215)

Why not put a well-shielded controller instead and have the people control it remotely from a safe location? Well, it is Japan, the land of the weird ideas.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701269)

Hopefully it could do both. Oh and of course, the AI model, preferably one such that it's CPU is a neural net processor; a learning computer.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

siddesu (698447) | about 2 years ago | (#41701303)

That, I think, is a bit premature without an interface to Skynet and the Skynet itself. Also, I believe the correct term is "nural net".

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701359)

WTF is a nural net?

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (4, Funny)

rubycodez (864176) | about 2 years ago | (#41701735)

It's much more efficient for catching tasty nuras than line and hook

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

Archtech (159117) | about 2 years ago | (#41703009)

It's a net made of nurv fibre, obviously.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701501)

It can't do both. The radiation shielding claim is bullshit. Any protective gear will shield against alpha and beta radiation. This means that they are claiming special shielding against gamma and neutron radiation. A little physics here: a tenth thickness is the thickness of material needed to reduce the radiation flux by one tenth. For gamma radiation it is 2 inches of lead or 4 inches of steel. For neutron radiation it is 10 inches of water or 10 inches of polycarbonate.

There is no suit that a human can wear that can even provide a single tenth thickness for gamma or neutron radiation. It is simply too massive. Any type of shielding that you would wear would also likely make it take longer for you to do work, which would defeat the purpose. When people need to work in high radiation zones, temporary shielding is installed, the work is carefully planned to minimize the time, and radiation dose is constantly monitored (including positioning the workers body to minimize dose). Powered battlesuits aren't used, nor will they be.

design flaw (2)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 years ago | (#41701639)

An exoskeleton is essentially two things. A sensor suit that perceives human bodily motions, providing sensory feedback is the first. A mechanical framework which reproduces the actions and receives physical feedback, perhaps with amplified strength is the second.

With modern telepresence technology with physical and visual sensors and displays surpassing human abilities to perceive, and for the second thing planned to be operating in a radiological hazard likely to cause failure of the human providing data input, requiring that the first thing be physically located inside the second thing is an engineering failure.

Re:design flaw (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701737)

How are you going to link them together? There's so much radiation in there that had problems controlling simple packbots.

Re:design flaw (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 years ago | (#41702031)

Simple packbots in a normal situation, yes. But this is not a normal situation. This is the inside of three melted down nuclear reactors on one site. Increasing the output powers of the radio enough to overcome the environmental noise could not possibly harm the humans there because there aren't any and aren't going to be any. Compared to the energy required to move the RC device, this radio power is trivial. Please stop thinking like this is some sort of normal situation where off the shelf consumer electronics will solve the problem. This is a 40 year project to recover 5% of Japan's territory from uninhabitability. Different rules apply.

Re:design flaw (1)

michelcolman (1208008) | about 2 years ago | (#41702621)

5% of Japan's territory just for the Fukushima site? And Japan has at least 18 other nuclear sites as well, so that wouldn't leave much space for other things.

I suspect there's something wrong in your calculation.

Maybe you meant the entire Fukushima prefecture, but not all of it is contaminated to such a degree that it has become uninhabitable (certainly not for 40 years or more), and in any case that's not what the suit is for. That's just for the actual nuclear site.

Re:design flaw (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 years ago | (#41702141)

Without using radio let me suggest another way. Data laser. Light is immune to radiological interference. It's limited to line of sight, so you have to drop relays here and there, but the power budget of a data laser is trivial, as are targeting mechanics. Bandwidth and latency are far more than sufficient. This entire discussion is littered with "can't do" people. Guess what: Failure is not an available option.

Re:design flaw (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#41704317)

You're missing the obvious. Umbilicus. Power and data in one cable, wrapped up in kevlar.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

WalksOnDirt (704461) | about 2 years ago | (#41701895)

This means that they are claiming special shielding against gamma and neutron radiation.

Other than an operating nuclear reactor, neutron radiation is pretty rare. Which sill leaves you with the gammas, of course.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

kdemetter (965669) | about 2 years ago | (#41701897)

The nice thing about an exoskeleton, is that it wears itself.
So even if it needs to be very heavy in order to protect against radiation, this is not a problem for the user, as they don't have to carry the weight.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 2 years ago | (#41701299)

How would you control it? Wireless would be a problem, as radiation tends to play bloody havoc with radio signals, and a cable, while possible, would offer a lot of technical challenges, reducing movement ability and whatnot. And radiation could still be a problem, you'd have to shield the cable as well, and of course make up an interface with feedback and precise control to move around. Do-able, but not easy.

Powersuit's are simply a lot easier and more versatile all around.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (2, Insightful)

siddesu (698447) | about 2 years ago | (#41701333)

The same way TEPCO controlled the third-party workers, who were told not to wear radiation badges -- via optical fiber from Tokyo, of course. As for versatile, yeah, humans are not only more versatile, they are also a lot cheaper. Why invest in capable robots at all?

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

jibjibjib (889679) | about 2 years ago | (#41701841)

> radiation tends to play bloody havoc with radio signals

Could you provide more details about how that works? I'm surprised, because gamma radiation has a very different wavelength to radio signals, and alpha and beta particles are different things altogether.

Radio signals are used all the time in the relatively radiation-filled environment of outer space, too.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

michelcolman (1208008) | about 2 years ago | (#41702629)

If you look at the images we got from robots inside the reactor building, and the amount of static on them because of the radiation, I think it's safe to say that there's some kind of negative influence, be it in the electronics or in the actual transmission.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41703183)

That's the radiation messing with the CCD, not the radio transmission.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 years ago | (#41701865)

Fiber optic data cables don't require or benefit from radiation shielding. For heavy work you're dragging a power cable anyway, so why not embed a dozen 40Gbps strands in it? If you want to use wireless data to control the recon machine, this is not a problem either, as in the human-free zone inside a melted down nuclear reactor you are free to use transmitter power sufficient enough to overcome the noise. The noise in there is hellish but overcoming that problem is easier than finding radiation hardened humans.

We are going to be about this meltdown recovery business for 40 years at a price of over a hundred billion dollars. We would save a great deal of money by leveraging technology as best we can to cut the human healthcare costs. Using a human for 30 minutes in that hellhole costs a half million bucks if he dies quick after, and ten if he lingers. Japan is not Russia, which had hundreds of thousands of humans from vassal states to use up for a half day each to clean up their mess. Japan takes care of their people.

For Japan to gain some waldo magic from this would only be making the most of a bad situation. (A waldo is a machine operated remotely by a human. )

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701957)

Fiber optic data cables don't require or benefit from radiation shielding.

Wouldn't fiber optic cables darken like regular glass does under radiation? It wouldn't be an instant effect, but over time enough radiation could be absorbed to create enough defects that will disable communication.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41702751)

You would agree that the cables would still be cheaper than you?

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701447)

For the same reasons that humanoid robots that can move exactly as human does not yet exist. The materials are too heavy yet to allow current tech servos to move a robot with the speed and accuracy needed to represent the whole range of human movement correctly. (and if it were, it would be several times more expensive)

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

siddesu (698447) | about 2 years ago | (#41701537)

Why does it have to be humanoid? I'm fine with any robot that can do the job.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (2)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 years ago | (#41701909)

You underestimate the ability of humans to compensate for the failings of their machines. Given a rapid enough feedback loop even a child can operate any machine beyond its design limits. We let children as young as three operate remote controlled aircraft, obviously with neither training nor experience. Some of them are even amazing at it.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about 2 years ago | (#41702057)

Why not put a well-shielded controller instead and have the people control it remotely from a safe location? Well, it is Japan, the land of the weird ideas.

And risk ruining a perfectly good robot?

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (1)

michelcolman (1208008) | about 2 years ago | (#41702661)

You're right, putting a human inside of the robot is better. After all, he will be much more inclined to do anything possible to bring his personal enclosure back home safely than someone in a cozy office would for a remote controlled robot.

Re:Powersuit's good, but why use humans in Fukushi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41706863)

Why not put a well-shielded controller instead and have the people control it remotely from a safe location? Well, it is Japan, the land of the weird ideas.

Remote controlled through a wire maybe.
But it couldnt be remote controlled through waves because radiation causes interference.

Uh oh... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701239)

I hope they solved the icing problem that plagued a certain other robotic exoskeleton.

Otherwise, HAL might freeze over.

Re:Uh oh... (1)

Anaerin (905998) | about 2 years ago | (#41701271)

That's only really a problem if they try to beat SR-71's altitude record for fixed-wing flight.

Re:Uh oh... (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#41701471)

Yeah, the WHOOSH would be pretty strong at that altitude.

Re:Uh oh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701497)

whether he got it or not, still, it was a pretty bad joke

ya dog (2)

laserdog (2500192) | about 2 years ago | (#41701275)

1 step closer to star trek

I am not an expert on radiation by any means (1, Interesting)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | about 2 years ago | (#41701335)

I am not an expert on radiation by any means.... but... the head, legs and arms (and the crotch when walking) look awfully exposed to me. Or does white cloth reflect radiation?

Yes, I do know that nurses were aprons made of lead and are not fully encases in a lead lining but they are dealing with a small radiation source coming from a single spot. Anyone going into a reactor would be dealing with radiation coming from everywhere, constantly, for a long time. So the lead shield banging into your balls protects you, from radiation from the front, some of the time... WHOOT! Sign me up!

Oh and any radiation from the top, goes straight through the entire body. This is about as usefull as a bullet-proof vest, against a spear coming out of the ceiling.

If radiation were to come from only a single spot and didn't bounce around, you could simply use a lead sheet mounted on wheels between you and the radiation source and work faster and in greater comfort, since that is not an option apparently (surely someone tried this and discarded it as being the product of a deranged mind), I fail to see how what is essentially an expensive sieve is going to keep you safe.

Re:I am not an expert on radiation by any means (2)

foniksonik (573572) | about 2 years ago | (#41701375)

"I am not an expert on radiation by any means...."

Looks like you pre-answered you're own questions.

For clarity though we'll all just assume that the photo op at a Robot Expo wasn't an example of how the system would be used at Fukushima, site of a nuclear reactor meltdown.

Re:I am not an expert on radiation by any means (1)

mad flyer (589291) | about 2 years ago | (#41701505)

>>> I am not an expert on radiation by any means....

Then you should work for Tepco or the Japanese governement... your seems to have the same skillset...

With maybe too much common sense...

The japanese refused the help from the French when they offered to send their nuclear disaster radiation hardened robots...
(Because, YES radiation is pounding on electronic, but shielding a robot is not rocket surgery, at least when you prepare for the problem before it happens when you have time to develop, test and build properly a solution instead of waiting for the whole plant to be on fire)

Now , 1 year later... hem... 1 year too late... they come up with a new way to risk human life in order to win porkbarrell contract to sell their nonsensical exoskeleton...

Way to go people...

If only Mc Arthur could come back to fix this mess...

Re:I am not an expert on radiation by any means (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about 2 years ago | (#41701517)

heh... reminded me of the scene in Family Guy...
"Not so fast! There is a shield the exact size and shape of a bullet somewhere about my person -" ::BANG!:: "- Well played, worthy adversary. Well played..."

Re:I am not an expert on radiation by any means (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41702277)

It worked well enough in the Matrix, did it not?

Re:I am not an expert on radiation by any means (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 2 years ago | (#41706503)

faster worktime, fewer people, less exposure.

The word you're looking for is "Mech" (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 2 years ago | (#41701341)

Didn't we go over this already... like, in the 80s ?

Re:The word you're looking for is "Mech" (2)

deek (22697) | about 2 years ago | (#41701373)

Not the Japanese. They love Mech stuff.

Actually, so do I. I think I'm turning Japanese, I really think so.

(well, you did mention the 80s)

Re:The word you're looking for is "Mech" (2)

drkim (1559875) | about 2 years ago | (#41702411)

Not the Japanese. They love Mech stuff.

You can buy your own mech now. With that extra $1.3 million you have laying around:

http://suidobashijuko.jp/#bto [suidobashijuko.jp]

Re:The word you're looking for is "Mech" (1)

wbr1 (2538558) | about 2 years ago | (#41703185)

Now that song is stuck in my head. Screw you deek :P

about time (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about 2 years ago | (#41701491)

This xenomorph fight is starting to tire me out.

What could possible go wrong? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41701521)

Cyberdyne, HAL, Fukushima - what could possible go wrong?

Robert Heinlein would be proud (2, Interesting)

Andy Prough (2730467) | about 2 years ago | (#41701741)

Starship Troopers and the Mobile Infantry - here we come. Now all we need are better suits, pocket atomic hand-grenades, a one-world corporate-government, and an alien race to fight against.

Re:Robert Heinlein would be proud (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 2 years ago | (#41701821)

We have all that now.

Re:Robert Heinlein would be proud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41702449)

You mean Apple, IEDs, USA and Mexicans?

Re:Robert Heinlein would be proud (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#41707071)

I was thinking of WalMart, Green Burritos, and anyone not a Tea Party Member.

Re:Robert Heinlein would be proud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41705673)

We do have a better suit, it's the American one, created by Sarcos originally, and now owned and further improved by Raetheon, called XOS 2. Check it out on youtube, and that's what it was like a few years ago, it's in an even more advanced stage now. Also check out the exoskeleton created by the Berkeley Robotics group (I met their director a few years ago, he noted that the main problems are actually mechanical engineering based, rather than Energy, or controller based... But it's now in the stage where it can too be fully utilized, and it is, by military, in some areas like carrying cargo, warheads... check it out by going to the berkeley robotics site, or googling BLEEX, which was their decade old prototype of the more advanced currently used "hulc").

Re:Robert Heinlein would be proud (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 2 years ago | (#41705685)

In the book, IIRC, the bugs, unintelligent, only created brain bug caste types in special cases, when they had a problem, and in an evolutionary sense, the brain bug magically solved it.

See also the engineer caste from the Mote in God's Eye, which sat idly by applying it's genuis at the beck and call and instrction of the political caste. Or Atlas Shrugged, for that matter, which also pointed out engineers putting their society-driving intelligence to be subservient to the political class.

All wonderful sarcasms directed at engineers keeping the technologically nonsentient political class in charge.

If this marries Google... (1)

aarusso (1091183) | about 2 years ago | (#41701769)

Then we have a problem.

How to militarize this technology (1)

simoncpu was here (1601629) | about 2 years ago | (#41702349)

The Japanese can militarize this technology by creating a Mobile Suit Gundam!

Re:How to militarize this technology (1)

Lord Maud'Dib (611577) | about 2 years ago | (#41702459)

You mean to say that the Agriculture Ministry is not in charge of Gundam already? But...

Re:How to militarize this technology (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#41707027)

I'm feeling sheepish, I was thinking of Rice Farming.

Steven Hawking (1)

Spectrumanalyzer (2733849) | about 2 years ago | (#41703603)

...may benefit from this in the future.

Imagine a brilliant super genious in an excoskeleton walking amongst us. ...oh wait!

Re:Steven Hawking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41706235)

Steven is anything but a "super genious". Other than hawking radiation, what exactly did he contribute to Science? Not relativity, not quantum electrodynamics... not much actually. He's popular because he's a gimp, because he's a cripple. he's a slightly above average Scientist, nothing more, certainly not a genious level.

Re:Steven Hawking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41706533)

I don't know about "super genius," but I think there's a good chance he would score over 140-145 on an IQ test and qualify for "genius".

Re:Steven Hawking (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#41707013)

For the UnWashed, Mr Hawking introduced the idea of considering complex information in a Graphical Context, not just some variation of a spread sheet.

Everything is wrong with this idea (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41704023)

The first thing that is wrong with this idea is that it is brain-controlled when the wearer is intended to be able-bodied. Only cripples need mind-controlled exoskeletons. The rest of us just need force feedback.

The even bigger problem, though, is that they claim they need humans because robots can't hack the environment, but what is the exoskeleton going to be? A robot. So now you'll have a human at health risk inside a robot which may fail. Does that make any sense? No it doesn't. Build more modular robots and use the fucking robots and when they fail you won't have risked a human. I thought Japan was supposed to be great at robots but so far all the evidence suggests that they're no better than the rest of us, and that schools and hobbyists are still on the leading edge.

Is anyone else worried... (1)

Valor958 (2724297) | about 2 years ago | (#41704123)

anytime Cyberdyne creates any sort of technology?

Next up, HAL able to walk and work independantly.
*2 years later*
The HAL Union Soldiers just occupied all of Japan yesterday and appear to be setting up manufacturing hubs... more at '11.

What have we done!!!?!?! (1)

diodeus (96408) | about 2 years ago | (#41704129)

Now...radioactive cyberzombies.

...or about to be. (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 2 years ago | (#41705493)

"Cyberdyne"? Come on, someone's fuckin' with you.

Re:...or about to be. (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#41706957)

Wouldn't it be, "something's f..... with you?"

Begun Mechwarriors Has (1)

fast turtle (1118037) | about 2 years ago | (#41706407)

No signal:

IIRC, this is one of the key techs needed for mechwar. Add in an implanted cell phone and "Resistance Is Futile"

Time to set up the PatLabor Department (1)

Tungbo (183321) | about 2 years ago | (#41706497)

now that "Labors" will be put into production.  Who else can stop a rampaging mecha ?

Re:Time to set up the PatLabor Department (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#41706939)

The EverReady Bunny?

Editor of fishwrap neurogadget.com Labatomized! (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#41706817)

I believe that HAL was the creation of Aurthor C. Clarke, Stanley Kubrick had something to do with making a movie FROM the book.
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