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Gut Bacteria Cocktail May End Need for Fecal Transplants

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the or-do-you-prefer-it-old-school dept.

Medicine 183

sciencehabit writes "A tonic of gut microbes may be the secret recipe for treating a common hospital scourge. Researchers have pinpointed the exact mix of microbes required to cure mice of chronic infection by Clostridium difficile. The hard-to-treat bacterium infects alomst 336,000 in the US each year and causes bloating, pain, & diarrhea. A similar bacterial cocktail may be able to replace the current controversial treatment involving the intake of a healthy person's fecal matter to restore the right balance of microbes in the gut."

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183 comments

Yogurt does the same thing (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785549)

I use it regularly.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (4, Informative)

couchslug (175151) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785587)

Kefir is even better, but hard to monetize so it's less common. Get some, keep a large jar and replenish with milk as required.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (4, Insightful)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785643)

Yogurt is basically the same process, hell they have successfully monetized bottled water.

Do not underestimate the laziness of the average American.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (5, Insightful)

demonlapin (527802) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786759)

Do not underestimate the laziness of the average American.

A common and largely incorrect sentiment suggesting you just have never bothered to think it through all the way. The brilliant realization that drove bottled water out of the original, much smaller Evian market (remember all those hipster T-shirts from the 90's that spelled it backward?) and into the world of Dasani (which is merely the filtered water used by your local Coca-Cola bottler) was that water is widely available for free, but cold water that you can carry with you was not. You could, of course, choose to carry your own water bottle, which many people do when going to the gym or other predictable activity, but on a long journey this is not a good solution. You might choose to carry a cooler and fill it with ice and a few bottles of cold water that you would refill at leisure, if traveling by car, but even then that's a lot of work (and if you have to replenish ice, a bag is likely to cost more than several liters of water, especially if you get the cheaper brands). If traveling by air, bottles of chilled water are nearly the only method to achieve this goal (due to the restrictions on liquids). And if you're flying somewhere, why worry about the tiny additional cost of a couple of bottles of water compared to the hundreds of dollars you spent to get there?

The same logic explains why a two liter bottle of soda at room temperature sells for the same price as a chilled half-liter bottle of the same stuff in a gas station. You are mostly paying for portability (i.e., it fits in your car cupholder) and chilling, not the liquid inside. You can get a better deal by buying fountain drinks, but they go flat faster and have a much higher risk of spill than a bottle with a screw-on cap.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (3, Interesting)

anotheryak (1823894) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786771)

"I have no idea what I'm taking about, and I was in too much of a rush to First-Post so I did not bother to read the article. But I made an anti-American remark, and I was snotty, therefore, I'm an instant Slashdot expert! Modded up to 'insightful'".

What sort of fools modded this up?

By the way, if you had bothered to read the article, the research is at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. In the UK. That's not in the US, that's across the Atlantic Ocean, way on the other side.

I think you underestimated your own laziness.

Re: Warning: paranoia may cloud sensibilities (4, Insightful)

gnoshi (314933) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785977)

Kefir is even better, but hard to monetize so it's less common. Get some, keep a large jar and replenish with milk as required.

It didn't cross your mind that if you were actually correct, the researcher - who is presumably at least reasonably competent inside the field in which they are working - would have been culturing the microbes from yoghurt or kefir?

Right now, the evidence provided means the 'yoghurt or kefir are just as good' claim carries as much weight as the claim that homeopathic vaccines are as effective as real vaccines.

Re: Warning: paranoia may cloud sensibilities (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786345)

This research doesn't show the only way or all the ways your gut flora can be restored after (treating) a C dif infection. It describes one way and proves its claim without ruling any other treatments out. Put another way, this research does not disprove the effectiveness of any rememdies not explicitly covered and should not be assumed to evaluate their individual effectivenesses.

The key idea is intentionally augmenting the gut's flora with probiotics so that restoration of beneficial native flora can occur more rapidly. The paper points to specific strains which are required to attain the effectiveness of a fecal transfer. L bacillus and acidophilus may not cure your C dif infection or instantly restore homeostasis, but they'll significantly help restore your ability to properly receive nutrients from digested food. While more palatable than eating poo, they're simply not as efffective because they don't represent all the necessary flora. They are, however, still effective and recommended as treatments.

While theirs was not an accurate or well supported claim, please recognize that the comment you responded to contained more truth than your dissmissively out of hand rebuttal. Also, don't try to appeal to authority when there is evidence against your assertion that probiotics are equivalent to homeopathy.

Re: Warning: paranoia may cloud sensibilities (4, Informative)

UncleBenBen (2759793) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786373)

Yoghurt efficiency is not homeopathic lie.

From the "Québec Nationnalle health agency", an official document (PDF, French) [inspq.qc.ca] , page 36.
.

(Google traduction)"On primary prevention, in a recent double-blind presented American College of Gastroenterology where 44 patients who had a yogurt enriched lactobacilli were compared with 45 patients with placebo, the incidence of diarrhea was significantly lower in the group with probiotic (p = 0.01). However, in view specifically of diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile, the difference between the groups was less significant (1 patient in the probiotic group vs 7 in the placebo group had an episode of CDAD, p = 0.058)."

Re: Warning: paranoia may cloud sensibilities (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786511)

So yoghurt works in 14% of cases. I mean, it's better than nothing, but still, a little lame. You are right, though, it is a homeopathic remedy that "works". However, I wouldn't want to spend weeks shitting myself blind to find out I'm like most people and it didn't work.

Re: Warning: paranoia may cloud sensibilities (5, Insightful)

Acheron (2182) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786755)

Eating yogurt is not a homeopathic remedy. Look up what homeopathic means.

Eating yogurt is a simple treatment, and as the grandparent's quote indicates it is significantly effective at reducing the incidence of diarrhea in cases of gut flora loss (due to antibiotics usually). However, it is significantly less effective when the problem is specifically c.difficile overgrowth.

So if you're taking antibiotics, get a probiotic yogurt, it is likely to help. If you do end up with c. diff, you may need another type of treatment.

Re: Warning: paranoia may cloud sensibilities (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about a year and a half ago | (#41787421)

Couple of notes here. This is purely anecdotal so don't take it as the Gospel. I was on IV antibiotics not too long ago followed by oral antibiotic for a condition called Diverticulitis.

Anyways, while I was on the antibiotic, I wasn't to have milk or milk based foods (yogurt, ice cream so on). I was told it would reduce the effectiveness of the antibiotic and the treatment wouldn't work. After I finished the oral antibiotics, I was instructed to drink at least 2 ounces of kefir at least twice a day by my doctor in order to replenish the "good" bacteria in the gut. I imagine this is the gut flora being talked about.

I guess what I'm getting at is, check with your doc first if you are going to do something like this. You might need to wait until your off the antibiotic first.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about a year and a half ago | (#41787263)

What's this about kefir.

I buy it in the health food section about once a week. Please explain because I would love to have it more often but at $5 a quart, I think a quart a week is enough. on the other hand, I go through about a gallon and a half of milk a week.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785767)

Eating yogurt is the same as "intake of a healthy person's fecal matter?"

Source, please.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (2)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785903)

Eating yogurt is the same as "intake of a healthy person's fecal matter?"

Source, please.

It's not the same. It only contains one of the species of common intestinal bacteria that keep your gut happy. But sometimes just reestablishing a colony of that one is enough to help a lot with intestinal problems.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (4, Funny)

2.7182 (819680) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785991)

Yeah, but yogurt tastes like shit.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (1)

reub2000 (705806) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786233)

Sugar, sugar, and more sugar. Try some dannon. You can barely taste the yogurt.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786379)

Or lots of garlic, black pepper, some lemon juice, and bunch of lamb kabobs and flat bread. Mmm mmm baaa!

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41787445)

<sheldon>Though I find your method of increasing your yogurt intake mouth-watering, some of the compounds in garlic are anti-bacterial and might have an adverse effect on trying to restore the balance of gut flora. I do find your post amusing though and suggest it be modded funny.</sheldon>

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (2)

narcc (412956) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785983)

Eating yogurt is the same as "intake of a healthy person's fecal matter?"

I've always felt that way -- minus the "healthy" part.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (1)

Score Whore (32328) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785927)

Is this a troll? Cause you can tell that yogurt has nothing to do with the bacteria in your digestive tract because you don't shit yogurt, eh?

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (1)

muridae (966931) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786125)

Yogurt does help create a healthy gut flora, but yogurt contains only a few, at most, of the bacteria that the intestine needs to operate normally. Your gut naturally contains E. Coli, and Enterococcus, neither of which you want to get from the grocery store.

And, if it weren't for your large intestine filtering out most of the water, then when you drank milk you would excrete something similar to yogurt.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (3, Funny)

nospam007 (722110) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786615)

"Your gut naturally contains E. Coli, and Enterococcus, neither of which you want to get from the grocery store."

Grocery store?

I know a local restaurant where you can get a fecal matter cocktail for years now.

Re:Yogurt does the same thing (5, Interesting)

mjjochen (638603) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786673)

I would never ever wish C-Diff on anyone, not even my worst enemy. After the wife was put on broad spectrum antibiotics for an ear infection, then came what we thought was a bit of the flu or stomach virus (a.k.a. the trotts). Never-ending trotts. After exploratory colonoscopy & cultures to verify, & several different rounds of antibiotics, what finally worked for us was one last round of antibiotics combined with an insane intake of yogurt & probiotics (as we were finishing off the antibiotics). I think it was the combination that worked for us. We now start a (paranoid) regimen of yogurt & pro-biotics whenever someone is on antibiotics. Would we have gone for the "shit enema" (as unappealing as that sounds)? Perhaps. Let me put it this way, after weeks of the most debilitating pain (doubled over in pain), not eating for days, and blood literally pouring out your hind end, you are ready to grasp at anything that might work. Wife said that child birth had nothing on the C-Diff pains (& she went through 2 births with not so much as an aspirin -- another story. . .). I'll joke about a lot of things, but not this. So if this works (faster), more power to it. Oh yeah, cases of C-Diff are on the rise -- yay ( http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/Harvard_Mens_Health_Watch/2010/June/clostridium-difficile-an-intestinal-infection-on-the-rise [harvard.edu] & http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2012/03/06/148072242/deaths-from-dangerous-gut-bacteria-hit-historic-highs [npr.org] ).

Why is it controversial? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785567)

Because you don't have to pay big pharma for poo?

Re:Why is it controversial? (1)

fish waffle (179067) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785629)

No, the controversy is in how to maximize patient disgust for the technique. It's ok though, I think they found the ideal solution:

*Correction, 5:20 p.m.: Some physicians have been successfully treating patients for C. difficile with ground-up, filtered fecal material inserted into the stomach with a tube, not via an enema.

Re:Why is it controversial? (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785759)

Some physicians have been successfully treating patients for C. difficile with ground-up, filtered fecal material inserted into the stomach with a tube, not via an enema

It is surprising they did not insert the bacteria through the other side: stomach is a harsh place for bacteria

Re:Why is it controversial? (5, Informative)

LastDawnOfMan (1851550) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785839)

It's not inserted into the stomach. Whoever wrote that doesn't know what the hell he's talking about, or is listening to someone who doesn't know what he's talking about. It's inserted into the small bowel via the colon using the same equipment used in colonoscopies. And it's not controversial. If you have C. diff, you are suffering so horribly that grossness of the procedure just doesn't enter the equation. And the fecal transplant method is incredibly effective, and incredibly quick to solve the problem. People who have been in agony for weeks get so much better in a few hours they can be discharged from the hospital. The only issue is that fecal transplants aren't yet covered by insurance. But they aren't that expensive, less than a grand out of pocket.

Re:Why is it controversial? (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785889)

The only issue is that fecal transplants aren't yet covered by insurance.

This, and the fact that it may just be a temporary cure if the patient has a weak immunity: the same cause may make the same effects.

Re:Why is it controversial? (2)

jamesh (87723) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786157)

The only issue is that fecal transplants aren't yet covered by insurance.

This, and the fact that it may just be a temporary cure if the patient has a weak immunity: the same cause may make the same effects.

This may be true, but does your gut really get affected that much by your immune system? I know it does it various auto-immune diseases but that is the opposite to what you are describing. From what i've read the balance of bacteria in your gut is supposed to regulate itself but the bad bacteria can move in after the patient has had a heavy does of antibiotics to treat other infections.

Unless you were implying that the weak immunity requires heavy doses of antibiotics to treat recurring infections? I guess that makes sense, but just follow up each dose with a reverse enema of poop :)

Re:Why is it controversial? (4, Informative)

manu0601 (2221348) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786257)

but does your gut really get affected that much by your immune system?

Yes, a lot. The gut is the major organ involved with immunity. We are constantly sampling gut bacterial antigens, producing antibodies against the species that grow too much

Thyroïd problems impact gut immunity, and a low thyroid function is strongly associated with Candida Albicans proliferation, for instance

.

Re:Why is it controversial? (3, Informative)

teaserX (252970) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786489)

Generally, the root cause of a C. Diff infection is the course of antibiotics given to the the patient to treat another ailment. Once the course has concluded the normal diversity of gut flora is no longer present and the opportunity for C. Diff to overpopulate the gut arises. C. Diff is resistant to most antibiotics due to having a cyst phase in its life cycle that enables the bacteria to live on surfaces outside the bowel. Treatment with certain antibiotics including Flagyl or Vancomyacin may kill the C. Diff bacteria in the bowel but will also kill any other resident gut flora at the same time. If the patient comes in contact with C. Diff immediately following this second antibiotic course the infection will likely return. Often the physician will recommend live culture yogurt and other probiotics be ingested even during the C. Diff antibiotic treatment to promote a diversity of gut flora the moment the antibiotics are discontinued. This is not always successful and the treatment may have to repeated several times.

Re:Why is it controversial? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786043)

isn't the best guess for why we the appendix is that it contains a small pocket of bacteria to restart the system in case you have something that flushes the system?

Re:Why is it controversial? (1)

jamesh (87723) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786107)

isn't the best guess for why we the appendix is that it contains a small pocket of bacteria to restart the system in case you have something that flushes the system?

I've heard that theory. Doesn't help those of us who have had our appendix removed though.

Re:Why is it controversial? (2)

jamesh (87723) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786123)

People who have been in agony for weeks get so much better in a few hours they can be discharged from the hospital. The only issue is that fecal transplants aren't yet covered by insurance.

That should be a pretty easy decision to make though... hospital stays aren't cheap (and I assume are covered by insurance in the US?) and a decent infection of clostridium difficile can kill you and make you very expensive to take care of while you die.

Re:Why is it controversial? (2)

sjames (1099) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786269)

I gotta wonder, why not take it as a pill with an enteric coating for $0.50 rather than $1000?

Only medicine could bill $1000 for putting a bit of shit into someone's intestine.

Re:Why is it controversial? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786527)

I gotta wonder, why not take it as a pill with an enteric coating for $0.50 rather than $1000? Only the American insurance industry could bill $1000 for putting a bit of shit into someone's intestine.

Fixed that for you. Unfortunately I'm your insurance provider so that'll be $11,926.02 co-pay and $114.15 per refill. Plus you just exhausted your lifetime cap so that's another $52,367.94. BTW we switched insurance companies on your group plan without your permission so your doctor that you've been using for the last 20 years is not covered, so you get to pay the whole bill. Also we've decided to increase your monthly premium by $1,376.42 while eliminating coverage for birth control, root canals, and eye glasses, just because we can and there's fuck-all you can do about it. It's retroactive to last March, so you owe us $111,376.41 and your credit rating is now -663 and we own your house.

Sincerely,
The American health insurance industry

P.S. PAY US NOW OR WE WILL HARVEST YOUR ORGANS


The saddest thing is that most of the above (while not relating to a fecal transplant) has happened to me. Best health care system in the world my ass.

Re:Why is it controversial? (2)

demonlapin (527802) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786775)

These are also performed via upper rather than lower endoscopy, with the gastroscope passed via the mouth and past the stomach into the small bowel, for the reason that a simple enema has an unacceptably high risk of being expelled before it can take root - these people are suffering from massive diarrhea, after all. That's how the GI docs I know do it. It's a simple procedure whose major risk is the yuck factor.

Re:Why is it controversial? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786905)

Can this be cured by rectal injection of yogurt?

You know...for science?

Re:Why is it controversial? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786977)

Insurance is no problem if you take the DIY route

Re:Why is it controversial? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785961)

Thank god, because I was just envisioning the patient being handed an enema bag and a straw...

Um, ew (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785571)

I'd never heard of this before, and I still wish I hadn't.

Re:Um, ew (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785953)

This treatment is nothing but a load of crap.

Re:Um, ew (4, Funny)

queequeg1 (180099) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786243)

Yeah, the whole idea kind of leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

Re:Um, ew (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41787349)

please, we're not interested in your gay reflections

Poop thread. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786519)

Yep, this whole story is a big poop thread.

Eat Sh*t Sucka (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785579)

If I'm unfortunate to get this illness, please don't tell me the cure.

Re:Eat Sh*t Sucka (5, Insightful)

jamesh (87723) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786169)

If I'm unfortunate to get this illness, please don't tell me the cure.

If you are unfortunate enough to get this illness you will welcome the cure with open bowels.

Slow news day (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785663)

not quite hurricanes, and shit sandwiches

some time the controversial works (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785737)

remember seeing a guy that had very extreme astma to the point of being more or less disabled, he learned that some specific intestine worm
sometimes had a positive effect by giving the immunes system something else to work on, or something like that

the worm lives in the intestine and gets into the body through the skin of the feet, see traveled africa stepping in latrines
he is now almost no astma symptoms and harvest worms from his own poo, for himself and to sell on the internet ...

Re:some time the controversial works (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786009)

Is "astma" a misspelling of "asthma", or is it a different illness?

Re:some time the controversial works (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786229)

My guess, the post was meant to be for Asthma [sciencemag.org] .

Re:some time the controversial works (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786309)

He would have to haveen very desperate to get guinea worms on purpose!

Those things are life threatening!

I'd have settled for some other parasite!

Abbreviated title (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785763)

My browser tab abbreviated the title of the page to 'Gut Bacteria Cock'. Of course I had to immediately flip over and read.

Not like any yogurt (3, Informative)

Kurofuneparry (1360993) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785781)

Med student here, just attended three meetings on this condition, and I've had a number of patients with this condition.

This kind of treatment has been tested before and is an exciting possibility, but there have been failures in the past. Also, this is nothing like the yogurt cultures you know.

......... then again I'm an idiot .........

Re:Not like any yogurt (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786011)

scat enthusiast here, just ate some shit a couple hours ago. A lot of people (more than you might think) are into the scat scene (or perhaps dabble at the edges -- literally -- with anilingus). Call it an anecdote, but me and my shit-eating friends seem to get sick a lot less than other people. I can even eat at taco bell without blowing out my colon! It's an acquired taste, but there's nothing like sucking a turd out of a hot woman's asshole. It's kind of like giving birth, I guess.

Insightful numbers (5, Informative)

manu0601 (2221348) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785825)

To get an idea of how gut bacteria are that important: we are made of about 10e13 human cells, and we contain 10e14 gut bacterial, for about 2 kg of mass. Let a subset of the gut bacteria population become hostile pathogens, and you see that we can easily be outnumbered by attackers.

Re:Insightful numbers (3, Interesting)

muridae (966931) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786207)

Just had that happen to me. Multiple infections meant that in the last six months I have had every type of antibiotic available. Then, surgery to remove the source of the infections. Since I'd been exposed to every major branch of antibiotics, the bacteria in my gut was now resistant to all but the 'drugs of last resort'. So of course, some of that bacteria got out and started trashing my insides and the surgical incision.

Scariest thing in the world to hear that the normal bacteria in your gut is now resistant to everything but Vanc, Streptomycin, and Linezolid; and that it's trying to chew it's way through your kidneys. Especially since those drugs of last resort almost all cause kidney damage.

Re:Insightful numbers (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786845)

Since I'd been exposed to every major branch of antibiotics, the bacteria in my gut was now resistant to all but the 'drugs of last resort'

Note that antibiotic resistance would not be a problem if your immune system had been able to cope with your pathogen species.

The disaster here may be caused by bacterial selection through antibiotics. In normal situations, gut bacteria fight each others near equilibrium, and your immune system just have to maintain the equilibrium by reducing species that are growing too much. Antibiotics wipe out entire chunks of gut bacteria diversity, creating situations where some resistant species do not have bacterial enemies left, and it gets much harder for the immune system to maintain equilibrium. If the immune system is weakened, it may get overflowed, and gut bacteria start invading other organs

Re:Insightful numbers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786631)

That's not insightful, you're misleading on purpose. Human cells are bigger than bacteria, so you could say they were wrong, size does matter.

Studying symbiotic microbes (4, Interesting)

muhula (621678) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785827)

Science is just starting to discover how the body as an ecosystem functions. We still have a lot of progress to make from wiping out all bacteria and relying on broad-spectrum antibodies.

The amazing thing about the bacterial ecosystem is how even different parts of your skin can be colonized by completely different types of bacteria, even just a few inches apart. There are symbiotic relationships just among the bacteria, and other bacteria which are several degrees removed from directly relying on our host bodies. It's a fascinating area of study, but one which is difficult, because it's impossible to isolate and study the bugs individually.

Slashdot: News for turds, shit that matters. (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785871)

This one's better than another crappy MS slashvertisement though...

Re:Slashdot: News for turds, shit that matters. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786153)

Perhaps: "shit that splatters?"

It's disgusting unless you're a third worlder (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785875)

The thought of someone else's shit in my colon amuseth me not.

--
Brown 25, another fine product from URANUS...

Fecal Transplant? (1, Troll)

Penurious Penguin (2687307) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785915)

In regards to why anyone would need a shit transplant, I willfully remain ignorant. According to legend, there's a version of fecal transplant called a Happy Meal, which comes with free bread and sauce and a nice bag with some plastic item or something in it. It's said to be safe for children, but I'm no expert.

humbled by poo (3, Interesting)

Penurious Penguin (2687307) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786071)

Hell, so it really is an actual treatment. I would never have surmised it. Pardon the crassness in the first sentence of my original comment, but it seemed ludicrous at first. Inadvertent education, ..who'd a thunk it.

Re:Fecal Transplant? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786117)

I read about it in scientific american. The amount of feces that is actually "implanted" is virtually microscopic. It's a verrry tiny piece that has a bunch of the good bacteria sitting on it waiting to do their thing inside the patient.

It's not like the patient must scarf down a full steaming deuce.

My dog thanks you for this because (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41785919)

he can't explain why he craves his own shit but now, he knows.

Big news to our family (1)

lecithin (745575) | about a year and a half ago | (#41785963)

We had a son that was born at 23 weeks/0 days. Yea, that is 4 months premature. At this time (he turns 4 in December) the biggest problem he has is chronic issues with his gut. The odds are that he never got the correct mix of bacteria in his gut early on, because he was in a sterile environment when his body should have been getting mama milk and the crap that goes along with it. ;)

This is good.

Re:Big news to our family (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786093)

Also great news for the growing population of ulcerative colitis patients, hopefully Barry Marshall (Nobel Prize winner, credited with discovering most ulcers are cause by bacteria) jumps on this research as an alternative to the fecal transplant method he's been using to generate remission in lots of patients in Australia.

Re:Big news to our family (1)

Penurious Penguin (2687307) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786141)

I remember encountering some research strongly supporting pre-biotics over pro-biotics. From my own experience, a blend of the two can be very effective. "Pro-biotics" are things such as kefir, sauerkraut, kimchi, strains like lactobacillus, etc.
"Pre-biotics" are, for example, raw garlic, raw onions, raw leeks, certain bitter raw leaves and so on. Kimchi seems to fit both profiles, to me, especially if made with green onions. When both are included in a regimented diet, a lot can happen. Another factor in maintaining healthy cultures seems to involve avoiding things like corn, most sugars and even gluten. For starches, better than modern wheat seem to be brown rice, millet, or other grains with lower or no gluten content. Many people born with perfectly healthy internal flora are afflicted at some point by antibiotics. To rehabilitate their innards, a new and sometime radical diet is often required. Anyway, I wish you good luck with your son. I think there are many things that can help.

2 nurses, 1 cup (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786015)

Cat got your tongue? (something important seems to be missing from your comment ... like the body or the subject!)

If they do this to a politician... (4, Funny)

jd2112 (1535857) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786027)

Do they call it a brain transplant?

Re:If they do this to a politician... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786187)

Only if they're republican.

Re:If they do this to a politician... (3, Insightful)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786191)

You think politicians say stupid things because they're stupid? No, they say stupid things because that's what the voters want to hear. So who's stupid in this scenario?

Re:If they do this to a politician... (1)

Xyrus (755017) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786955)

Do they call it a brain transplant?

Only if they use bullshit.

Is there some reason (1)

rsilvergun (571051) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786111)

this had to be green lighted at dinner time? Seriously.

Re:Is there some reason (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786199)

because it's always dinnertime somewhere?

I'm sorry... (0)

Genda (560240) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786215)

But there ain't no way Jamie Lee Curtis is going to convince me to eat shit... I don't care how regular it makes me, UUuuugggghhhh!

For real? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786217)

You have got to be shitting me.

Thank God (1)

tsotha (720379) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786279)

Like I told my donor, "Get lost, buddy, I don't need your shit any more".

Try the veal.

fecal (1)

WilyCoder (736280) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786391)

why bother with feces when you've got a good excuse to shoot an acidic coffee enema up your rectum? i hear its a better high than meth...

Christ (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786441)

That is the most appetizing headline I ever read

Yikes! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786591)

There's some stuff I just don't want to know.

Feces of the Lambs (2)

Sentrion (964745) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786605)

A researcher once tried to test me. I ate his shit with some fava beans and a nice gut bacteria cocktail... (slurpslurp)

Re:Feces of the Lambs (0)

anotheryak (1823894) | about a year and a half ago | (#41786787)

Oh yes, now I remember why I stopped reading Slashdot back in 2001. It's full of 14-year old boys...or at least adults that act like them.

Re:Feces of the Lambs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41787453)

And you just couldn't resist coming back, could you?

Anyone care to bet on (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786697)

a) it will be expensive
b) it will be prescribed to considerably more than 336,000 people a year
c) profit!

"Need?" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41786811)

I always thought they were optional...

Did anyone else... (1)

Memroid (898199) | about a year and a half ago | (#41787655)

read this as "Gut Bacteria Cocktail May End Need for Facial Transplants"? I was a little excited.

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