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Kim Dotcom Outs Mega Teaser Site, Finalizes Domain Name

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the oh-you-actually-big-tease dept.

The Internet 195

hypnosec writes "Kim Dotcom has let out more information about the launch of Megaupload's successor Mega, which he claims will be 'bigger, better, faster, stronger, [and] safer.' Mega is currently looking for partners willing to provide servers, support and connectivity to become 'Mega Storage Nodes.' The prime requirement, according to Dotcom, is that the servers should be located outside the U.S. and that the companies should also be based outside of the U.S. For this reason, Dotcom has decided that the new service will be launching with 'Me.ga' domain name."

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Ugh (-1, Troll)

niix (839104) | about 2 years ago | (#41842131)

I'm sick of hearing about this dude.

Re:Ugh (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842181)

That's funny. He feels the same way about you, and he doesn't even know you exist.

Re:Ugh (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#41842201)

I'm sick of hearing about the US projecting its bad laws outside its jurisdiction.

Re:Ugh (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842467)

Well you're doing it to your self as the summary makes no referance to the ongoing legal case.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843435)

His post was in response to a post that said they were sick of hearing stories about Dotcom.

Re:Ugh (2)

AK Marc (707885) | about 2 years ago | (#41845081)

Why would he be re-launching his site (the explicit topic at hand)? I'll give you a hint, it' because the US projected it's power outside its jurisdiction.

Meh, the Internet will just route around the damage. The problem is that the "damage" is the USA.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842607)

So quit reading about it! And if people would just lay down and submit, then maybe the media would stop reporting it, and then you wouldn't have to worry. Preach total submission; long-term it's the only way to get what you want.

Re:Ugh (5, Interesting)

BetterSense (1398915) | about 2 years ago | (#41842819)

According the the article I read in my dead-tree Wired issue, plus speculation, the new service is going to be fully encrypted, forcing all users to encrypt their uploads so that the upload service itself cannot see what the content on its severs is, and so they have total plausible deniability, with the added bonus that the government also can't find clear-text data on their servers to incriminate them with.

This might also allow you and your trusted friends to upload anything you want, and megaupload/your ISP/the government cannot then bust you for copyright infringement or whatever, for the practical reason that they don't know what the data is. Of course this is possible now with current technology, but a cloud storage service with a good user interface with this feature 'built-in' and mandatory might be what it takes to get ordinary people to encrypt their content. Imagine Dropbox with mandatory encryption. True cypherpunks would argue that everything should have always been like this anyway.

Of course, Big Content doesn't roll over for such technicalities so I expect this to simply spawn more anti-cryptography laws.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843443)

Imagine Dropbox with mandatory encryption.

Like https://www.cyphertite.com/ ?

Re:Ugh (2, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#41843553)

There's a procedure to follow, though. Anti-crypto laws are tricky things to get through politically. Doable, but it needs a good excuse, and 'Hollywood isn't rich enough' is not going to do it easily. The obvious justification is child porn. The mere suspicion of child pornography is toxic today, and any acts justified as opposing child porn are near-impossible to argue against without being branded a pedophile-enabler.

Re:Ugh (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 2 years ago | (#41845127)

Ah yes, any service that doesn't make it easy for copyright holder to oppress the masses must be "child porn." After all, you don't have anything to hide, do you?

Re:Ugh (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843599)

Imagine Dropbox with mandatory encryption. True cypherpunks would argue that everything should have always been like this anyway.

There are reasons why this isn't the default -- Dropbox relies on de-duplication to reduce their storage and bandwith costs.
Encrypting the data before upload would remove that possibility.
Not that it's not worth doing -- but it will be more expensive than a non-secure equivalent.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844135)

Pro tip to the ordinary people out there, the current "encryption" that most pirates use today is called "yenc"

re: encryption and legislation (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844177)

I just pointed out to a friend of mine in I.T., last week, that it seems odd how U.S. govt. largely forgot about their interest in controlling encryption. I mean, it wasn't THAT long ago that they were still forcing Microsoft to make a separate version of Internet Explorer because it was a federal crime to export it with 128-bit encryption capabilities in it. And remember how worked up they got over the Pretty Good Privacy software when it was first released to the public?

But despite CPUs getting many times more powerful and the "common man" encrypting things with 1024 bit encryption in many cases as default settings in programs, you don't really hear a peep out of govt. about it these days.

I have to assume this means they're capable of breaking it on-demand, so they're happy to let people use the stuff freely and get a false sense of security. Maybe there's a back-door or flaw in the math the NSA knows about, or they simply have such massive super-computer data centers at their disposal now, they can brute force break it? I don't know ... but it's HIGHLY unusual for government to just quit concerning itself with something it was really paranoid about just years earlier, when it purports to make sure they can't view the contents of communications between people.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844229)

>This might also allow you and your trusted friends to upload anything you want, and megaupload/your ISP/the government cannot then bust you for copyright infringement or whatever, for the practical reason that they don't know what the data is

Unless of course you post the key to decipher them on the public site where you advertise your uploads URLs which is the models the download sites rely on.

And if they instead rely on private communities, their impact will be less important and big content will have won, de facto. And big communities, if they happened to exist, will be easily infiltrated, so we will have a few heads rolling here and there during a few publicized trials, instead of just Dotcom's. So, basically, megaupload is just getting itself out of the responsability loop at the price of efficiency.

Re:Ugh (3, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#41844327)

Sure, the MAFIAA can trawl file sharing sites and get the password to the key. But they can't trace it back to who uploaded it, so they can't sue you. And Mega can't know that you've posted the key, so Mega can't know what's in the encrypted file. So they can't sue Mega either.

Re:Ugh (1)

Beezlebub33 (1220368) | about 2 years ago | (#41845249)

Can they then submit a take-down notice? What do they have to do to support it? Since there does not appear to be a cost associated with submitting incorrect / false take-down notices, then they could take a shotgun approach and take-down pretty much everything. Of course, mega won't have to implement this (not being US based), but the question is: what happens then? Another raid?

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844929)

... the file upload encryption will take place "on the fly" ... utilizing plug in technology -
  get ready for a plug in ;-) with "additional" features ( think Ad substitution )

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41845333)

Funny isn't it? If they don't encrypt anything and people get in and take it, they are at fault, but if they do encrypt it, then there are more laws to try and force you to give the government the keys.

The US Government passed a law about five years ago requiring any new encryption developers to provide the US government enough of a key that they could decrypt it in short order. It was about that time, that I decided to encrypt several terabytes of random data, just to shove it up their ass for them to suck on.

Re:Ugh (1)

NevarMore (248971) | about 2 years ago | (#41842831)

The move somewhere else if you don't lik....oh right.

Re:Ugh (5, Insightful)

funwithBSD (245349) | about 2 years ago | (#41843085)

Just wait until it is the UN dictating the rules.

They are already lining up "blasphemy" laws restricting free speech and eyeballing a global Internet Tax.

Re:Ugh (2, Interesting)

Abreu (173023) | about 2 years ago | (#41845391)

It's funny how right wingers in the USA seem to think the United Nations is all-powerful.

Guys, the UN has no power whatsoever, it cannot dictate laws to member states, much less enforce them.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844631)

Then do something about it.

Re:Ugh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842225)

As sick as you may be, and as much of a bastard he may be. He is currently turning into a reborn martyr of internet freedom.

I wish him luck in his ventures and hope for service that is as good as his old. The only half way decent file service out there is mediafire, but rapidshare has gained some ground in recent months by being better than they were a year ago.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843323)

As sick as you may be, and as much of a bastard he may be. He is currently turning into a reborn martyr of internet freedom.

I wish him luck in his ventures and hope for service that is as good as his old. The only half way decent file service out there is mediafire, but rapidshare has gained some ground in recent months by being better than they were a year ago.

In my opinion, he wouldn't come of as NEARLY so much an unmitigated douchebag if he didn't legally change his last name to "Dotcom". Seriously, it'd be that simple. If he didn't do that, he'd probably have far more respect than he does now.

Re:Ugh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843103)

And we're sick of your posts. They don't contribute anything to Slashdot at all. You're stupid and ignorant, and a perfect example as to why abortion in the US should remain legal. It's a pity your mother didn't avail herself of it.
 
However, it's still not to late to correct her oversight. Please, kill yourself.

Have to say... (3, Interesting)

santax (1541065) | about 2 years ago | (#41842133)

He has pretty big balls. I wish him all the best. But this time, I hope he will build a safe-room, in a safe-room because this is going to upset a lot of tier 1 criminals, eh businesspeople.

Re:Have to say... (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 2 years ago | (#41842315)

There's a house in California that's built in an old abandon mineshaft. It's nearly a mile deep and an elevator is required for access. Inside there's a natural spring that the home owner can use for water. It even has its own water fall and such. I've always wanted to get something like that. Get enough food down there and you could survive just about anything. Want to expand? Get a pickaxe. I'm sure he could have waited down there long enough for his lawyers to get this taken care of. lol

Re:Have to say... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842443)

Somebody has been playing a lot of minecraft

Re:Have to say... (0)

TheCarp (96830) | about 2 years ago | (#41842757)

> Want to expand? Get a pickaxe

There was some old jew in the midwest (I think) that built his own secret bomb shelter under his house. Did it himself, dug it, poured concrete, complete with blast doors, ventilation, multiple rooms.

It took him many years, and as I remember the pictures of him, he was jacked. Of course, he should be after all that digging and hauling.

In any case, you will need more than a pick axe, you will need materials to build structures and a lot of time....and some place to move the dirt....

Re:Have to say... (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 2 years ago | (#41844629)

I think you mean this [imdb.com] .

Re:Have to say...No safe room needed. (1)

BoRegardless (721219) | about 2 years ago | (#41843185)

I personally think this is the answer for all cloud storage. You encrypt data before it leaves and the server, God only knows where, stores your stuff. You can access it or your friends you give access to can get the data. Big deal. If Kim doesn't do it, who else does?

Thus if Amazon, Apple, Microsoft and a lot of other big companies can offer cloud storage, what is different about Me.ga except that Kim doesn't have lobbyists in Washington, DC?

The holding of encrypted data on a server is just anonymous data.

Re:Have to say... (4, Funny)

MoaDweeb (858263) | about 2 years ago | (#41844041)

He DID have a safe room and went and hid. The Police enticed him out later with candy bars and threats.

Looking forward to downloading warez & pr0n (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842135)

Kim,

Thanks for fighting the good fight.

Yes!

How long until: (3, Insightful)

ledow (319597) | about 2 years ago | (#41842153)

"The domain name associated with the website Me.ga has been seized pursuant to an order issued by the U.S. District Court"

(or equivalent).

Re:How long until: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842327)

It's administered by the country of Gabon, so what you say is unlikely.

Re:How long until: (4, Insightful)

ledow (319597) | about 2 years ago | (#41842413)

Yeah, the US would never interfere in foreign countries where they have no jurisdiction to get their hands on a suspected copyright-infringer, would they?

Gabon looks like just the kind of place that a little backhander and/or exchange of oil purchases could make anything happen.

Re:How long until: (1)

homsar (2461440) | about 2 years ago | (#41843291)

Is that even necessary? Couldn't the US Government simply order ICANN to suspend .ga?

Re:How long until: (5, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#41843591)

In theory, yes - though it'd take some time to be implimented. It'd be a big step though, as it would undermine all trust in the DNS system, and that is something the US can't afford to do right now. The UN is already pressing for a more multinational management - an abuse of power by the US would only prove them right.

Re:How long until: (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843259)

Gabon might just seize it for a small donation.

Re:How long until: (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843969)

The .ga TLD is operated by Gabon Telecom SA, which is owned by Maroc Telecom, which is owned by Vivendi SA.

Re:How long until: (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842329)

With the stuff happening in UAE, it won't be the US. What we will see is:

"This domain associated with the website me.ga has been seized pursuant to the anti-blasphemy laws in Elbonia."

Copyright Cartels are one thing... but wait until we get countries who torture and kill people (and their families) because of some mention about an event or happening, or just a jibe at one of the rulers.

Re:How long until: (4, Funny)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 2 years ago | (#41842381)

And the more important question: will he be changing his name to Kim Dotga?

Re:How long until: (1, Interesting)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#41842531)

"The domain name associated with the website Me.ga has been seized pursuant to an order issued by the U.S. District Court"

Well, the rationale for seizing his other one was that since it was a .com, and America owns .com (apparently), it was within their rights.

A domain not registered with a US authority, for a company entirely based outside of the US ... unless they can intimidate a local government into playing along, they may find themselves with no 'real' jurisdiction. A US District Court might get told that what they want is irrelevant.

Of course, it's not entirely without precedent for the US to do these things anyway without the knowledge or permission of the country where it takes place [nytimes.com] . And there's certainly loads of pressure they would be willing to apply in the form of trade sanctions and other diplomatic pressure.

And so we see the true enemy of the internet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842155)

The IP rights lobbyists and their flunky Legislators.

It should be obvious whos internet will win. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842179)

And its not going to be "America's" internet.

We are going back to our old ways of isolating ourselves from the world because of the greed of a very few.

While Kim may be greedy and potentially an asshole, he's going to win and is playing by rules far more legitimate then our current IP circus.

To those of you in the MPAA, RIAA, and software, mobile phone, and ISP industries. You cannot fight this. Learn and adapt or you will fail while people like Kim refuse to lay down and prosper.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842517)

You're right, if the international community has its way it will be the internet of the dictators and Kim Dotcom will be shut down for blasphemy and incorrect politics and we'll all be left wishing copyright law was the worst thing that happened to us.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (4, Insightful)

misexistentialist (1537887) | about 2 years ago | (#41842657)

It's not like the governments of other countries are enthusiastic about an open internet.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843023)

Agreed, but some will always remain more flexible then others. And in the end I think they will either win through economic or intellectual superiority by either undercutting or outsmarting the competition.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (1)

Dan667 (564390) | about 2 years ago | (#41842705)

they have already been gutted, it will just take a while for them to bleed out. Kind of like microsoft.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (0)

Elbereth (58257) | about 2 years ago | (#41843005)

While Kim may be greedy and potentially an asshole, he's going to win and is playing by rules far more legitimate then our current IP circus.

That's a very Machiavellian philosophy, tantamount to Realpolitik. Realpolitik is why the USA supported so many corrupt dictators and bloody warlords during the Cold War. We looked the other way when they committed human rights abuses and atrocities, because they were seen as a stabilizing influence and loyal anti-communists.

To those of you in the MPAA, RIAA, and software, mobile phone, and ISP industries. You cannot fight this. Learn and adapt or you will fail while people like Kim refuse to lay down and prosper.

If he refuses to prosper, then it should be easy to win against Kim Dotcom.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843125)

Hehe yes poorly worded rhetoric. I meant to say if he refuses to lay down he will have a chance of prospering. If the international community allows it.

But your right its pretty damn Machiavellian.

Things are moving forward though and its getting harder to "stop" filesharing through censorship.

The best possible end result of all this will be technology immune to censorship because the geeks of the world dont like the party line.

"We" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843043)

We are going back to our old ways of isolating ourselves from the world because of the greed of a very few

If it is only the very few causing the problem, then how is it possible that "we" (meaning all of "us") are causing the problem?

Let's call a spade a spade here. A government is NOT the people, and the people are NOT the government. If that was true, then logically, government wouldn't need guns -- because "we" would already be following the principles that "we" believe in.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843141)

...because of the greed of a very few...

So wanting to be paid for your product is greedy? Do you feel the same way about clothing, food, cars, etc.?

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (3, Insightful)

runeghost (2509522) | about 2 years ago | (#41844967)

Wanting to get paid for your work is not greedy. Charging many multiples of a product's 'fair market value' by leveraging legislative or other control channels you possess (aka. rent extraction), or preventing people from legally-mandated fair access to content they have bought and paid for, is both greedy and wicked.

The public does not make nice distinctions between "oh, the restrictions on this IP here are pretty reasonable while those on that IP over there are just crazy". To the vast majority of people, IP and copyright are fungible concepts that do not vary from one product or author to another. Most readers had a very good idea of what was fair (checking out a book from a library, lending it to a friend, selling it to a used bookstore) and what wasn't (printing copies of books and selling them for personal profit, stealing ideas or entire texts without attribution). Those institutions that dominated the IP regime in the United States for decades (the MPAA and the RIAA, among others) decided that they were going to play hardball and lock things down so hard that people should consider themselves fortunate to be allowed to read their own books or listen to their own music. They lost. And then they doubled-down and lost again, and again and again. Now that they've finally screwed themselves (and the basic idea of Intellectual Property among a whole generation) to the point where they can see their own deaths approaching, NOW they're suddenly crying, "Omg! Won't someone think of the poor IP creators?". (The IP creators who the corporations screw over every chance they get.)

Too bad. They blew it. Do I feel bad for those talented folks who are going to find it difficult or impossible to make a living on their work? Do I mourn the creations that might have been but now never will be? Absolutely. But the bloated corporate monstrosities that killed the very of idea of decent copyright? They can burn, and when they run up to me begging, I may laugh, but I certainly won't put the fire out, not even if it gives me a chance to piss on them.

I'll just leave your false equivalence between digital and physical goods to lie there and rot, as it deserves.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (4, Interesting)

PraiseBob (1923958) | about 2 years ago | (#41843315)

While Kim may be greedy and potentially an asshole, he's going to win and is playing by rules far more legitimate then our current IP circus.

Except he had his personal assets seized, his companys assets destroyed, and is facing huge legal fees along with possible extradition and decades of prison time. You say he will win the legal battle, but everything done to him so far has been illegal and yet it was still done. The forces working against him don't really care about following legal procedure, they care about ruining his life. And anybody who wants to follow his business models certainly has to carefully consider how much of their own life they are putting at risk by going against the current IP circus. Or take a look at the guys from Pirate Bay, locked in cages in solitary confinement. Are they winning the fight?

I'm all for a more open internet, but your viewpoint is full of idealistic assumptions that are by no means assured.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41845417)

Actually the Pirate Bay guy isn't in solitary confinement and it's on a different charge (hacking the tax system), not for running TPB.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41845597)

Actually the Pirate Bay guy isn't in solitary confinement and it's on a different charge (hacking the tax system), not for running TPB.

You are correct only on the second point. He is in solitary however, and most people believe it's only for the reason of vengeance against him by the copyright cartel.

http://torrentfreak.com/pirate-bay-founder-held-in-solitary-confinement-write-him-a-letter-today-121020/ [torrentfreak.com]

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (3, Insightful)

houghi (78078) | about 2 years ago | (#41843397)

To those of you in the MPAA, RIAA, and software, mobile phone, and ISP industries. You cannot fight this.

Sure they can fight this. They have been fighting since Gutenberg. OK, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_copyright_law [wikipedia.org] says :
Pope Alexander VI issued a bull in 1501 against the unlicensed printing of books.
And :
Popes conceded at different times to certain printers the exclusive privilege of printing for specific terms (rarely exceeding 14 years)
That is 50 years after Gutenberg started printing.

So don't say they can't fight it. They have been fighting it for a LOT longer then you and me are around and they will continue fighting it.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (2)

xigxag (167441) | about 2 years ago | (#41843759)

Unfortunately they can fight it, and have continued to fight even after the death of megaupload. Almost every filesharing service which was predominant two years ago has folded or has severely tightened its policies. Almost none of them now accept paypal; you have to pay with a credit card or wire transfer using some dodgy offshore middleman.

And once "me.ga" is deemed an outlaw business by the USA, then subscribing to the service, or advertising on the service, or linking to the service will be considered "terrorism" or "money laundering" or some other highly criminal activity. So, Kim Dotcom's new service might prosper, but it will not be something that American citizens will be able to share in. We'll still be held hostage by the MAFIAA, as usual.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (1)

CBravo (35450) | about 2 years ago | (#41844615)

We've been doing business with Cuba too...

Who has not.

Re:It should be obvious whos internet will win. (1)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | about 2 years ago | (#41844857)

while people like Kim refuse to lay down and prosper.

I dunno, Laying down and prospering sounds like a pretty good deal.

Inspired by prison (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842205)

I read about this a few weeks ago from the wired interview: http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/10/ff-kim-dotcom/

Was there any doubt he would not be hosting this in the U.S.? I'm not sure what the news is here.

Oblig Futurama (4, Funny)

Revotron (1115029) | about 2 years ago | (#41842211)

"You can't shut us down. The internet is about the free exchange and sale of other people's ideas!"

THIS GUY IS A BUSINESS GENIUS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842247)

OMG

plus 2, troll) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842313)

if you move a 7able won't be nstanding to underscore

Re:plus 2, troll) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843465)

what? no goatse link? You're slipping, AC.

Sssshhhhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844561)

Sssshhhh! That is where he is planning on hosting his new servers. Got to be at least 12U of server space up in there.

US IP Laws (2)

spottedkangaroo (451692) | about 2 years ago | (#41842349)

Seems like our IP laws are really helping our industries right now. Soon all data centers will be located out of the reach of *AA ?

Re:US IP Laws (3, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#41842635)

Seems like our IP laws are really helping our industries right now. Soon all data centers will be located out of the reach of *AA ?

Out of reach? Given the way the US is exporting its IP laws with some serious diplomatic pressure ... if SOCOM can rustle up someone to go in and do a raid where they're not supposed to be, I wouldn't put that past the influence of the *AAs.

American foreign policy is in large part driven by what those guys want. To the point that documents written by industry are part of governmental briefings -- even if the conclusions in the document is entirely in the service of the interests of the *AAs.

Welcome to the oligarchy. It's hard not to come to the conclusion that it's the industry calling the shots, not the government.

Re:US IP Laws (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842653)

Considering the AAs are experiencing record profits and American media is more popular around the globe than it's ever been, I'm not sure what point you were trying to make.

Gabon .ga registry problems (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842515)

I'm really not sure that .ga (Gabon) was the best choice - see: http://www.internetnews.me/2012/01/13/is-the-gabon-registry-offline/

America going downhill (0)

blackdragon07 (1357701) | about 2 years ago | (#41842569)

Once it was a thing of pride to live here in America, but now unless you have a stake in Big business and/or brainwashed by those in power you see its going downhill and i agree with allot of comments that before to long nothing will be hosted or even businesses being based here because of all the crap that's going on from Music companies inability to adapt to new technology to the coal/oil industry having a strangle hold on energy. I read on here the other day i believe that Sweden was using trash to make energy....this would be a great thing for big cities in America. Nothing will change because everyone in office is getting bought off by Big Business.

Re:America going downhill (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842905)

Once it was a thing of pride to live here in America

Just think how the rest of the world sees you.

America has become an insufferable bully, who is trying to make sure the rest of the world is toeing the line so their industries can continue to be profitable, even at the expense of innovation.

That and the fact that America will intervene anywhere there's enough oil, but nowhere else ... most of the rest of the world is getting tired of listening.

Re:America going downhill (1)

blackdragon07 (1357701) | about 2 years ago | (#41842977)

Not disagreeing as i think the same thing. I wish we would stop getting involved with all the crap we do! It's down right stupid anymore, and from things i read the world doesn't like us anymore and honestly can't blame them. Like i said its sad that America has fallen this much and done half the crap it has done over the last few years.

Re:America going downhill (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 2 years ago | (#41844141)

America will intervene anywhere there's enough oil, but nowhere else

It helps to produce opium; doesn't hurt to have a good spot for a pipeline, either...

Re:America going downhill (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844045)

You can tell you've been educated here in the US too. Or perhaps you were talking about being given an allotment of comments?

Oh look he wants investors (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842611)

Looks like yet another classic Kim Dotcom scam.

This guy isn't an internet hero, he is a piece of shit.

Re:Oh look he wants investors (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#41843627)

He can be both. Dotcom vs the MPAA? Dick vs Asshole. Whoever wins, we win.

Re:Oh look he wants investors (3, Informative)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 2 years ago | (#41844323)

Whoever wins, we win.

Not even slightly.

It's a normal asshole verses one of the biggest douche-bags of all time.

It's clearly better for the MPAA to loose because they are much much worse.

Anyway, is he an asshole? I had a paid up megaupload account which I only used for legal stuff. It worked really well.

Re:Oh look he wants investors (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843979)

This guy isn't an internet hero, he is a piece of shit.

IMO, there are much better, non-fecal matter adjectives to describe Dotcom: annoying, vain, braggart, etc. However, that's neither here nor there...the big point is:

He wasn't a hero; now he has become an geopolitical internet martyr.

We are starting to build up a longer and longer line of "internet martyrs": Kevin Mitnick and Julian Assange to name just two (there are plenty of others).

What's interesting to me is that there will possibly be more unification of a techno-society because of the martyrs our governments are creating, which suggests we might be heading to a newer social structure. (Albeit it's in it's infancy...but it's seems that we are starting to see it emerging...)

Re:Oh look he wants investors (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41845301)

I like how you childish kids seem to think that the world runs on black and white tape.

There are always levels of dickishness that are acceptable. As is anger, sadness, jealousy and all other negatives you can think of.
Likewise, too much positives is bad too.

Oblig Serenity (1)

nevermore94 (789194) | about 2 years ago | (#41842671)

There is no news. There is only the truth of the signal.
You can't stop the signal. Everything goes somewhere, and I go everywhere.

the USA (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842829)

See this is why i oppose weakening the control that the us has over the internet. Only the USA stands for freeedom.

I guess this guy has enough money, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41842907)

... read this if you want to know what it's like to NOT have the kind of money he does: The rotten and corrupt Domain Name System [kimmoa.se] .

In a bizarre coincidence, the guy has almost the same name...

Wheres the old stuff going? (1)

NinjaTekNeeks (817385) | about 2 years ago | (#41843129)

I haven't followed the case very closely but what ended up happening to the content that existed on the megaupload site? Did Dotcom get his servers back?

Also, if this service works it will be much easier that uploading truecrypt volumes. Which I will probably keep doing anyway.

When.... (1)

Jintsui (2759005) | about 2 years ago | (#41843187)

is that fat ass going to take the hint. No matter where he goes or where he hides, they will still come after him.

[US] is not safe for ... any business (4, Interesting)

mounthood (993037) | about 2 years ago | (#41843245)

From the page on server limitations:

Unfortunately we can't work with hosting companies based in the United States. Safe harbour for service providers via the Digital Millenium Copyright Act has been undermined by the Department of Justice with its novel criminal prosecution of Megaupload. It is not safe for cloud storage sites or any business allowing user generated content to be hosted on servers in the United States or on domains like .com / .net. The US government is frequently seizing domains without offering service providers a hearing or due process.

When people ask "why use me.ga?" they're going to hear the Kim DotCom story. Eventually it'll be taken for granted that Hollywood has corrupted the Justice Department. This could be the PR move that turns ordinary people against Hollywood.

Re:[US] is not safe for ... any business (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41843987)

As a USA Citizen I apologize for the way that our WHORING politicians suck on the teat of greedy Hollywood. I can assure you that I have NOT voted for any politician that is currently in office. To get these current old fogies out of office we some how have to convince the current voters to vote these old hollywood prostitutes out of office. Maybe we can convince the newer voters to elect some other people??

Re:[US] is not safe for ... any business (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844551)

Then Hollywood is turning the whole Kim-Dotcom-Mega-Upload saga into a movie - et voila: their version of the story will be the one which is remembered!

Vote obama MAKE it better ( lol ) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844697)

4 more years a hollywood in power and i bet its game over for IT in the usa.
SO vote for obuma and tank for the next 50 years.

Re:[US] is not safe for ... any business (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41845247)

There's lots and lots of things in the world that are not computer technology or the Internet. If you can keep this in your head while reading this kind of article you'll see it's just fluff work to get eyeballs like yours on websites like theirs.

Huh... (3, Insightful)

koan (80826) | about 2 years ago | (#41844025)

I get the feeling the RIAA, MPAA and the rest of the anti-piracy morons are holding us back, dragging us down.

At some point I stop caring about your "intellectual property" and "media licenses" and long for you to disappear.

sigh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41844139)

I hate abuse of copyright laws as much as the next guy, but I can't help feeling that getting rid of the rules all together can't be the solution. In the end, what's going to happen is that I will write a book, some jerk will upload it to me.ga, and then Kim Dotcom will make a ton of cash off of it while I get jack. Screw him. He's making money by selling our stuff.

Still trying to hide things (0)

smooth wombat (796938) | about 2 years ago | (#41844249)

Ah yes, now we have it! Now we'll encrypt what our user's upload and for others to download because then we're not responsible for anything. Yeah, that's it.

Now our user's have no fear that their legitimate files will be seen. *wink* *wink* *nudge* *nudge*

See, the issue isn't that we're trying to hide anything, because everything here is legal and above board, no, the real issue is that we're offering a service for people to store all their legitimate files safe from prying eyes. *wink* *wink* *nudge* *nudge*

Honest, that's all we're doing. Just a place to store all your legitimate files. *wink* *wink* *nudge* *nudge*

We could offer a no encryption service, but we need to protect the privacy of our user's and their legitimate needs. *wink* *wink* *nudge* *nudge*

So again, just so everyone is clear on this, we're offering this service so people can store and trade their legitimate files without fear of anyone finding out what those legitimate files are. *wink* *wink* *nudge* *nudge*

Re:Still trying to hide things (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 2 years ago | (#41844345)

What's wrong with that?

Entirely predictable (1)

JonathanCombe (642832) | about 2 years ago | (#41844407)

I've commented before that increasing surveillance of the Internet and increasingly draconian laws is just going to push more people to use encryption so that Governments and other agencies cannot see the data that is being transmitted. Even if they go after ISPs you will never stop people exchanging files - it is easy to set up a local Wifi network amongst neighbours, for instance.

Domain name/public internet access (2)

nurb432 (527695) | about 2 years ago | (#41845221)

Is the wrong way to go. It provides several points of failure that are hard to get around, and has proven to be vulnerable time and time again as we lose sites like Demonoid and Library.nu ( and countless others before them ).

Best bet is to go underground with something like Freenet or I2P. Sure, it may not be as 'transparent', but that is fixable by creating brain dead installers and multiple public access points. ( then you play whack-a-mole as those are shut down ). The days of the 'open net' is limited.

This way there is nothing specific to shut down.

Of course if there is a money trail, and there will be with Kim, that is still vulnerable.

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