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Fisker Hybrids Get Bad Karma From Superstorm Sandy

timothy posted about a year ago | from the ok-ok-but-to-be-fair-it-was-raining dept.

Transportation 414

New submitter slas6654 writes with this excerpt from Jalopnik: "Approximately 16 of the $100,000+ Fisker Karma extended-range luxury hybrids were parked in Port Newark, New Jersey last night when water from Hurricane Sandy's storm surge apparently breached the port and submerged the vehicles. As Jalopnik has exclusively learned, the cars then caught fire and burned to the ground.' Apparently Fiskar super-duty lithium ion batteries are neither water-proof or water soluble."

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Someone forgot to test (5, Funny)

fredrated (639554) | about a year ago | (#41845383)

the 'submerged in water' use case?

Re:Someone forgot to test (5, Funny)

HexaByte (817350) | about a year ago | (#41845533)

Well, I guess if you have a hybrid SUV, you better think twice before you use it to back your boat into the lake!

Re:Someone forgot to test (4, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about a year ago | (#41845767)

I always thought that Fiskar looked like the hottest EV there was...

And I was RIGHT! :-)

Re:Someone forgot to test (5, Insightful)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about a year ago | (#41845543)

On the upside, switching to EV's will seriously reduce the frequency of flood damaged cars being sold as 'working perfectly'

Re:Someone forgot to test (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845837)

"submerged in salt water" is a whole other beast. A nasty one.

Re:Someone forgot to test (1)

SuperTechnoNerd (964528) | about a year ago | (#41845851)

Salt water no less. Great for electronics!

Re:Someone forgot to test (5, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about a year ago | (#41845855)

"When I first came here, this was all swamp. Everyone said I was daft to build a Fisker in a swamp, but I built in all the same, just to show them. It sank into the swamp. So I built a second one. That sank into the swamp. So I built a third. That burned down, fell over, then sank into the swamp. But the fourth one stayed up. And that's what you're going to get, Lad, the strongest Fisker in all of England."

Re:Someone forgot to test (1)

TWX (665546) | about a year ago | (#41845857)

I wouldn't be surprised if automakers actually test for it. Mainly because of things like we're seeing in this story.

Re:Someone forgot to test (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845953)

When you're dealing with Lithium Ion batteries, this is actually a sensible test, considering these cars will be driven in rain, and could get stuck in a puddle, even if it's not likely they'll be "completely submerged in a hurricane."

Why? Because Lithium is actually highly, and energetically, reactive to water: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ypUVpwgcAA [youtube.com]

If your battery pack contains a whole lot of lithium, and isn't well-sealed to make sure water can't get inside... it'd be trivially easy to imagine the engine would heat up and catch fire.

FiskEr, not FiskAr (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845399)

Come on, editors, get your act together already.

Re:FiskEr, not FiskAr (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845465)

Thanks. I was wondering how a pair of scissors caught on fire.

Re:FiskEr, not FiskAr (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845771)

Thanks. I was wondering how a pair of scissors caught on fire.

You can't run well with these.

Re:FiskEr, not FiskAr (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year ago | (#41845777)

If a watch company can make a car [wikipedia.org] , then a scissor company should be allowed to also.

Re:FiskEr, not FiskAr (1)

operagost (62405) | about a year ago | (#41845853)

Smart: the car so small, school girls can wear two on each wrist.

Re:FiskEr, not FiskAr (1)

Tukz (664339) | about a year ago | (#41845797)

I've got an Fiskars UPS, they've made a lot more than just scissors and common house hold items.

Re:FiskEr, not FiskAr (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about a year ago | (#41846003)

I bought a house so figured I'd need a lawn mower [amazon.com] . That's my only experience with Fiskars.

Re:FiskEr, not FiskAr (1, Funny)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year ago | (#41845791)

I was amused at he headline, either Earl Hickey or a Hindu must have written it.

I guess it will be a while before Fisker gets mod points! So what got Fisker downmodded enough to hurt its karma? Too much flamebait!

Why does this matter? (3, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845427)

The cars were totalled the minute they were submerged. If they were destroyed later, why does that matter?

Re:Why does this matter? (1)

HexaByte (817350) | about a year ago | (#41845487)

Not necessarily. Many cars are flooded and restored.

Re:Why does this matter? (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845503)

You can drive them if you want, I will not be.

A flooded car is a totaled car. No cars on the market are built for that.

I am not going to be buying a flooded car or any other R title.

Re:Why does this matter? (1)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about a year ago | (#41845569)

The point being, you can't look at a car and tell with confidence it's been in a flood. You can hide the damage and commit fraud by selling one.

How do you 'hide' the damage these cars have? ;-)

Re:Why does this matter? (5, Interesting)

atheos (192468) | about a year ago | (#41845989)

"How do you 'hide' the damage these cars have? ;-)" Easy, pop a kick panel and inspect any ground cables, and exposed metal above the floor level. These cars start rusting within days of exposure, and you can usually see a waterline once the carpet and/or kick panels have been exposed. I've had the not-so-pleasure of informing numerous people that their cars were submersed at some point in their history, and not a single person has responded with anything similar to "oh yea, I already know that".

Re:Why does this matter? (1)

plover (150551) | about a year ago | (#41846019)

How do you 'hide' the damage these cars have? ;-)

A salvage title, and a LOT of work. A friend of mine just sold a flood-damaged Harley Davidson he rebuilt from the frame up. You can tell from the paperwork that it was destroyed in a flood, but you can no longer tell just from looking at the bike.

And he was committing no fraud: he was very proud of the whole summer's worth of work he put into that bike.

Re:Why does this matter? (2)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#41845519)

With a salvage title, sure. Otherwise it's fraud IMHO.

Re:Why does this matter? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845495)

Because each vehicle could have had a bankster CEO at the wheel as they burned down, doing us all a favor.

Instead, we just got a waste of some nice cars.

Hopefully the next hurricane will do a better job of cleaning up the criminal capital of the US.

Re:Why does this matter? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845695)

Did someone let /r/politics in here again?

Re:Why does this matter? (1)

Ariven (256118) | about a year ago | (#41845725)

I'd have to say their apparent tendency to burst into flames when they get wet would kinda move them from the "nice car" category...

Re:Why does this matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845525)

Yeah! And why does it matter that it was destroyed by a storm surge!?

You're on to something, man!

Mod parent up!!!!

Re:Why does this matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845941)

Because they spontaneously exploded, 16 of them!

Re:Why does this matter? (1)

trooper9 (1205868) | about a year ago | (#41845535)

If someone gets into high water? The water sucks enough, but then you catch on fire...

Re:Why does this matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845551)

And more interestingly, an entire other row of them is sitting across from the ones that burned, which indicates it could either have been a fault in one specific vehicle, leading to cobustion of the whole group (they appear quite closely packed), or perhaps in a specific run of them. This is of course assuming the batteries on all models were equally charged, and that submersion happened to both rows of vehicles (rather than a wave or something washing over the one row but dissipating before the full brunt of it washed over the adjacent row.

Re:Why does this matter? (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845581)

Or something else all together could have started the fire. Like say a hoodlum with a some gasoline.

Re:Why does this matter? (-1, Troll)

smooth wombat (796938) | about a year ago | (#41845745)

Like say a hoodlum with a some gasoline.

There is no such thing as a hoodlum. What you're thinking of is someone who's mad at the man and takes out his anger on someone who has done nothing to him.

We're supposed to praise these people as they stick it to the man and the pigs who try to stop them. After all, wasn't that what was happening after Rodney King got the snot beat out of him? The folks in the neighborhood were just sticking it to the man.

On here, appropriating someone else's property without their permission, not compensating someone for their work or destroying property for the lulz isn't a crime. It's an act to be celebrated because what someone does has no effect on anyone else and they should be allowed to do what they want.

Re:Why does this matter? (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year ago | (#41845555)

The cars were totalled the minute they were submerged. If they were destroyed later, why does that matter?

It's still a safety issue. I didn't RTFA, but I'd rather not be in a car that catches fire when submerged in water. Granted, I have no plans of driving a car into such conditions. But I'd guess that most people who have ended up submerged in a car didn't either. Depending on the situation, you may need to wait until the interior of the car fills up with water to equalize the pressure before you can open your door, it would rather suck to be cooked to death first wouldn't it?

Re:Why does this matter? (5, Informative)

PPH (736903) | about a year ago | (#41845557)

Because they could have been parked in someone's garage and gotten flooded. And that would be the difference between some clean up work and a house burned to the ground (or water line).

Re:Why does this matter? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845685)

That happens to regular cars as well in flood. It is more rare though.

Years ago my grandfather had a car burn down in the driveway. It had been driven home and a few hours later it went up in flames for no apparent reason.

Re:Why does this matter? (4, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year ago | (#41845759)

Hey, large swaths of New York City are without power. That means no heat either, and it's pretty cold - so a nice car fire might be welcomed!

Re:Why does this matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845559)

A friend's SUV was trashed a few years ago when the parking lot flooded. It didn't 'catch fire and burn to the ground' afterwards, it just sat there smelling like sewage.

Re:Why does this matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845571)

It matters if you were unexpectedly stuck in your vehicle while it became submerged.. unless of course you don't value your livelihood/safety.

Re:Why does this matter? (1)

sunderland56 (621843) | about a year ago | (#41845573)

It matters a whole lot if you're in the car when it submerges and catches fire. It also matters a whole lot if it's parked in your garage. Try calling your insurance agent and explaining how your house burned down because of the flood.

Anyone remember high-school chemistry, where the teacher put some sodium in a bowl of water? Lithium is similar - although the reaction is nowhere near as intense, I still don't want to be sitting right on top of a huge stack of lithium batteries when they get submerged.

Re:Why does this matter? (5, Informative)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845603)

Actually lots of houses burn down due to floods. A gas line ruptures or electric power issues light the house up and then the fire Dept can't make it there due to the water.

Re:Why does this matter? (3, Informative)

mariasama16 (1895136) | about a year ago | (#41845749)

Actually lots of houses burn down due to floods. A gas line ruptures or electric power issues light the house up and then the fire Dept can't make it there due to the water.

Exactly. The houses in Breezy Point are a good example of this.

Re:Why does this matter? (5, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#41845717)

I'd be less worried about the lithium-water reaction(Li-ion batteries tend to be sealed, if only so the internals don't degrade even faster than usual, they are touchy things) and more worried about a short circuit anywhere near a battery pack punchy enough to run a car. At 330 volts, you don't need an ultra-low resistance path to get some serious current flowing, and serious current is something that large battery packs are more than happy to supply.

Now, once the electrical heating breaches the seals and touches off a merry metal fire, you have additional problems...

Re:Why does this matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845575)

You's dumb.

What if you drove into a flooded area? (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#41845635)

Something that happens in flooded streets are people driving in a foot or two of water (which the car can handle) suddenly entering a much deeper area because they cannot see the road lowering with the water above it.

With a normal car, you then sputter to a halt, get out and or wait there for help.

Or an alternate case, less likely but it does happen, is that an accident throws your car into a lake. It sucks, but you make your way out.

Now enter a car that catches fire as soon as it's in deep water. Now you have a WAY more serious problem, and cannot see or even breathe. This is a really bad problem to have and is something that could result in some deaths. They need more safegaurds to prevent mere immersion from destroying the car if nothing else so occupants can get out.

Re:What if you drove into a flooded area? (5, Informative)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845705)

DO NOT DRIVE in a foot of water.

A single foot of water moving sideways is more than enough to take your car off the road. If you cannot see the bottom do not drive through it.

Re:What if you drove into a flooded area? (1)

lbenes (2737085) | about a year ago | (#41845839)

Now enter a car that catches fire as soon as it's in deep water. Now you have a WAY more serious problem, and cannot see or even breathe. This is a really bad problem to have and is something that could result in some deaths. They need more safegaurds to prevent mere immersion from destroying the car if nothing else so occupants can get out.

Wow, talk about FUD! First of all the occupants could of got out, because if you red the article, you'd know it happened AFTER the car was submerged. Secondly, SALT water is much worse for engines and batteries than fresh water.

I welcome any safety improvements that result from this, but when I buy a car, I don't expect it to perform like a submarine.

Re:Why does this matter? (1)

sunking2 (521698) | about a year ago | (#41845693)

Because 70% of the Earth is covered with salt water? However, on a half serious note it could raise the question of whether living near the beach could be an issue with sea spray accumulation over time.

Top Gear says your wrong (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845783)

Top Gear says you're wrong, and at least as far as the Toyota Hilux is concerned, 5 hours submerged in salt water: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnWKz7Cthkk

Re:Top Gear says your wrong (2, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845873)

Totaled does not mean not working. It means worthless.

That Hilux was rendered worthless. I would not want to drive it nor would Toyota suggest anyone drive it after that treatment.

Re:Why does this matter? (3, Insightful)

sumdumass (711423) | about a year ago | (#41845911)

How about building burns down because water main break cased water to pour into the underground parking garage and onto an electric car that burst into flames?

Or how about Man burns to death as firefighters point out there isn't much point putting water on a car which is on fire because it slid into a pond, became submerged and is burning.

Or maybe, Two first responders were injured after a car erupted in fire because it started raining while they were tending to an accident.

I know a parked car without anyone around doesn't pose much of a threat. But I think in reality, that situation happens as much as or less then when it could be a threat to human life or property. So finding out why is somewhat of a concern I would think.

Re:Why does this matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845927)

Apparently someone modded you -1 Troll for disagreeing. But you made a valid point that warrants discussion.

Re:Why does this matter? (4, Insightful)

Tailhook (98486) | about a year ago | (#41846031)

why does that matter?

There is an important difference between "totalled" and "erupt into a 1350 deg. C toxic lithium fire." Traditional gas/diesel cars don't usually do that when flooded, so a new and dramatic failure mode has been revealed. Something to note if you live in New Orleans or parts of Texas that see frequent flash floods and perhaps not the best thing to park in your integral garage.

You didn't really fail to understand this did you? You'd just rather people not discuss concerns that emerge with the things you prefer.

LOL (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845467)

So a Fisker Karma is basically a time bomb activated by flooding...

Too bad that it's plug in hybrid instead of a massive, gas guzzling, view obstructing penis-mobile.

If there was one thing I wish all Republicans had in their garage, it's a ticking time-bomb in their garage...

Oh well... I guess I have to go back to convincing the tard party to invest all their savings in gold. Probably want to take a second mortgage on the house to buy more gold too, as the dollar will soon be worthless.

Re:LOL (2)

jellomizer (103300) | about a year ago | (#41845779)

So you want to kill people who have a different viewpoint than you. Dude you need help.

haha (1)

Alien Being (18488) | about a year ago | (#41845471)

We already knew it was a piece of shit.

Why pick on EVs? (0)

slacka (713188) | about a year ago | (#41845491)

Electric, gas or hybrid, any car fully submerged in salt water is heading to the scrap yard. Why pick on Fiskar because it's a hybrid?

Re:Why pick on EVs? (2)

mgscheue (21096) | about a year ago | (#41845509)

Because they caught on fire?

Re:Why pick on EVs? (5, Insightful)

Darth Hubris (26923) | about a year ago | (#41845537)

Because most cars don't burst into flame when submerged.

Re:Why pick on EVs? (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year ago | (#41845691)

Because most cars don't burst into flame when submerged.

Wasn't that a problem with the Canyonero?

Oh wait, never mind.

Re:Why pick on EVs? (1)

operagost (62405) | about a year ago | (#41845883)

But at least it smelled like steak. This probably smells like burnt plastic and despair.

Re:Why pick on EVs? (4, Insightful)

spire3661 (1038968) | about a year ago | (#41845683)

Let me explain it simply. On Earth, water falls from the sky, very frequently, sometimes with great force. Having a consumer level bomb that is activated by water is a bad idea whilst operating on Earth. It is a very volatile condition. These cars BURNED by being put in water and you dont think that is cause for alarm? Not one or two but over a DOZEN.

Re:Why pick on EVs? (-1, Flamebait)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about a year ago | (#41845995)

Electric, gas or hybrid, any car fully submerged in salt water is heading to the scrap yard. Why pick on Fiskar because it's a hybrid?

Because they need to provide a story on the front page that will make slashdot's conservative base happy. A story about hybrids - especially ones that can be tangentially connected to President Obama - catching on fire will give them a cause to celebrate regardless of the outcome of next week's election.

And yes, I know I will be moderated down for this. Likely it will be the conservatives with moderator points doing it, to show that they are more "right".

Misleading? (5, Insightful)

Sez Zero (586611) | about a year ago | (#41845517)

It looks like several were close together, while others parked a little bit away were unscathed. Perhaps one caught fire and that burnt adjacent cars? They were parked pretty close, and there's a Karma in one of the photos that didn't suffer the same fate.

Re:Misleading? (1)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about a year ago | (#41845593)

They could have moved cars around after the fire, or even pulled cars that weren't submerged into the area. The picture doesn't tell us the difference between the 'good' cars and the movie quality special effects paper weights.

Re:Misleading? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year ago | (#41845785)

Building the cars' frames out of phosphorus didn't exactly help matters...

Re:Misleading? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41846013)

The magnesium trim wasn't such a bright idea either.

Re:Misleading? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845793)

Had a dead battery

Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the road (5, Interesting)

Andy Prough (2730467) | about a year ago | (#41845523)

We have flash floods every summer in Texas. Most cars that run into a few feet of water simply stall. If instead, your car explodes and kills all the occupants, then you've got a potential death trap.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (1)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about a year ago | (#41845611)

Generally speaking if you're driving through FEET of water, perhaps you shouldn't do that?

Yes I know flash floods happen, but the vast bulk of cars submerged aren't being driven at the time.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (1)

whoever57 (658626) | about a year ago | (#41845679)

Generally speaking if you're driving through FEET of water, perhaps you shouldn't do that?

1. Idiots

2. Since the water is usually not as clear as a swimming pool, it may not be obvious how deep the water actually is.

MIX 1 and 2! Result: car driven into flood waters.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845731)

Why did you write Idiots twice?

Driving through water is dumb, driving through water that you do not know the depth of is suicidal.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (1)

operagost (62405) | about a year ago | (#41845929)

It's stupid for people to let their kids play with executive toys made of rare-earth magnets, too. But that didn't stop the government from shutting down Buckyballs.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about a year ago | (#41845945)

You NEVER know the depth of water. If you've ever driven through a puddle, count yourself as an idiot. That could have been much deeper, and you wouldn't have known. See point 2 above.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (1)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about a year ago | (#41845897)

If it's up to your hood, it's at least multiple FEET deep.

As I said there would be instances where it's unavoidable but the VAST VAST majority are.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (5, Interesting)

Andy Prough (2730467) | about a year ago | (#41845901)

That's the point of "flash" flooding. It's unexpected. Perfectly good drivers turn a bend in the road on a rainy night and run straight into a gulley with 4 feet of water. We've got a lot of country roads with no lighting and poor visibility. Happens every summer around here - except deaths are extremely rare. But - if your car exploded before you could get out? Very bad.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845711)

"if you're driving through FEET of water, perhaps you shouldn't do that?"

He said he was from Texas.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845633)

If you are driving your car during a flash flood you are none too bright. Lots of ways to die in a conventional car that way.

Most cars that ingest water don't just stall. They also manage to ruin the engine.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845815)

The point of "flash" in flash flood is that it happens extremely rapidly - one doesn't exactly plan ahead for it.

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about a year ago | (#41845971)

How the fuck do you plan to avoid a FLASH flood, there genius?

Re:Huge problem in Texas - flash floods on the roa (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#41846023)

If you are driving your car during a flash flood you are none too bright. Lots of ways to die in a conventional car that way.

I'm going to assume that where you live, flash flooding is rather uncommon.

One cannot predict when or where a flash flood will occur - hence the 'flash' in the name. So, to say that people who drive "during a flash flood" are "none to bright" only serves to prove your ignorance on the topic.

Were we discussing regular, predictable flooding, I would wholeheartedly agree.

water...causes fire? (5, Funny)

DSS11Q13 (1853164) | about a year ago | (#41845545)

It's a witch!

Re:water...causes fire? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845719)

OH CRAP, how are we gonna deal with that if we can't just drown them in the lake? Or is that just for regular people who are accused of being witches?

Re:water...causes fire? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845949)

It's a witch!

BURN THE WI- oh wait.

Neither are 100+ fancy homes (0)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about a year ago | (#41845647)

Those caught on fire too.

Gas mains erupting everywhere plus high winds equals crispy critters no matter what form your battery or gas tank is.

Fiskar means "fishes" in Swedish. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845667)

It also means "is fishing". I found the headline hilarious.

Your Tax Dollars at Work... (-1, Troll)

ilikenwf (1139495) | about a year ago | (#41845673)

Fiskar got stimulus money.

Re:Your Tax Dollars at Work... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#41845755)

Why are we spending tax dollars making scissors?

Re:Your Tax Dollars at Work... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845973)

Fiskar got stimulus money.

...your point being?

Please, PLEASE tell me it's more than "oooooooooo, scary scary government spending money, must find some OBAMAAAAAA way to make the concept scary scary and OBAAAAAAAMA evil and stuff, and by the way OBAAAAAAAAAMAAAAAAAAAA doesn't that name scare you? Scary scary". Seriously, I want to keep SOME faith in Slashdot.

seo (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41845689)

http://www.disenowebmonegros.com/

Come on (0)

Stargoat (658863) | about a year ago | (#41845763)

In a story like this, pics or it didn't happen. This is difficult to believe but easily verified.

Re:Come on (3, Informative)

captaindomon (870655) | about a year ago | (#41845867)

The article has four pictures.

Somewhat Expected (1)

Revotron (1115029) | about a year ago | (#41845831)

An understanding of somewhat basic chemistry makes this a "duh" moment. Lithium + water = everyone's favorite science class demonstration.

Wouldn't be the first government stimulus project to go up in flames. Hopefully it'll be the last.

Superstorm? (0)

dbialac (320955) | about a year ago | (#41845905)

Why is a category 1 hurricane being called a superstorm? I live in Florida and we get these frequently. They aren't a big deal if you're properly prepared for them. Hell, we got the same winds level of winds from Sandy that NY/NJ got when it was a much stronger C2 (nearly a 3), though the C2 part was off shore. Perhaps a better name for this is a super failure to be properly prepared?

Re:Superstorm? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#41846029)

Why is a category 1 hurricane being called a superstorm? I live in Florida and we get these frequently. They aren't a big deal if you're properly prepared for them. Hell, we got the same winds level of winds from Sandy that NY/NJ got when it was a much stronger C2 (nearly a 3), though the C2 part was off shore. Perhaps a better name for this is a super failure to be properly prepared?

The trees and structures are different.
Drop the building codes in Florida and replace the Palm trees with large leafy trees and even a category one would be a problem.

Lithium + Water? (1)

underling (302237) | about a year ago | (#41845917)

Lithium is an alkali metal, and therefore highly reactive when introduced to water, quickly turning into hydrogen gas and lithium hydroxide. If the barrier between battery and the outside failed, fire is a likely outcome.

CO2? (2)

bendytendril (1281160) | about a year ago | (#41845919)

I wonder how much CO2 a burning hybrid produces?

Water proof, water soluble... (0)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about a year ago | (#41845935)

... I don't think you can be both.

Fisker? (1)

Darth Snowshoe (1434515) | about a year ago | (#41845969)

I hardly know her!

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