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Canadian Island's Historic Hot Springs Dry Up After Earthquake

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the don't-keep-that-all-bottled-up-inside-you dept.

Canada 97

theshowmecanuck writes with this snippet from Canada's National Post: "Days after the remote B.C. archipelago of Haida Gwaii emerged virtually unscathed from Canada's second-strongest earthquake, locals discovered that the shifting earth had mysteriously switched off a centuries-old hot spring considered sacred by the Haida. ... A Parks Canada inspection party set out to investigate and stepped ashore to find that the island's three main hot spring pools, which once bubbled with water as warm as 77 Celsius, were bone dry. "Not even a small puddle," said Mr. Gladstone. Surrounding rocks, once warm to the touch, were cold." The earthquake measured 7.7 on the Richter scale."

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Not the first time this happens... (4, Informative)

mfarah (231411) | about 2 years ago | (#41864137)

I live in Chile, one of the most earthquake-prone countries. Near my city there used to be a rather popular hot spring pools place *in the Andes Mountains* (not in a close-by valley), called "Baños Morales" ("Morales' [Thermal] Baths"). An earthquake in the '50s shifted plates and the hot springs completely dried up. The place still exists, but it's been abandoned.

Re:Not the first time this happens... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41864209)

I live in Chile, one of the most earthquake-prone countries. Near my city there used to be a rather popular hot spring pools place *in the Andes Mountains* (not in a close-by valley), called "Baños Morales" ("Morales' [Thermal] Baths"). An earthquake in the '50s shifted plates and the hot springs completely dried up. The place still exists, but it's been abandoned.

maybe you'd like to relocate to a house right on top of the san andreas fault line?

so how dumb do you have to be, to live in a disaster-prone area like that?

Re:Not the first time this happens... (3)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 2 years ago | (#41864549)

I dunno, ask the east and gulf coast of the united states. Our government even pays people to rebuild every year. How dumb is that?

Re:Not the first time this happens... (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | about 2 years ago | (#41864721)

And the midwest (tornados), and the west coast (earthquakes), and the Great Lakes area (floods), and the southwest (drought)....

Re:Not the first time this happens... (1)

JMJimmy (2036122) | about 2 years ago | (#41865013)

Not sure about the US but Ontario doesn't allow building new buildings in the flood plain around the great lakes (or anywhere for that matter). I'm pretty sure once one is destroyed you can't rebuild it unless 1 wall is structurally sound then it becomes a renovation not a rebuild... stupid but reasonable. Also if you mortgage a building in a flood plain the banks will require you to have flood insurance.

Re:Not the first time this happens... (3, Funny)

Macrat (638047) | about 2 years ago | (#41867159)

Not sure about the US but Ontario doesn't allow building new buildings in the flood plain around the great lakes (or anywhere for that matter).

In the US, flood plains are called "trailer parks."

Re:Not the first time this happens... (2)

JMJimmy (2036122) | about 2 years ago | (#41869581)

Really? I thought trailer parks were called Tornado Catchers

Re:Not the first time this happens... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41874127)

After the Mississippi flooded in the 1980's, FEMA, quickly followed by other governmental agencies in the US, started doing what they can to restrict building in flood prone areas. I don't know the details. It may be indirect coercion, along the lines of your flood insurance will only pay for your losses but you only get paid if you agree not to rebuild in the flood zone. One of my relatives bought a house built about 20-25 years ago in the Sierra Foothills next to a stream. It is in a flood zone; today no new housing is allowed in the zone. He can add to his existing structure. My guess is that is from the local zoning rules/laws, but I would also expect there is cooperation on such issues between Feds, State, and local on such issues. So, there is at a minimum a hodge-podge of restrictions in the US about new and re-builds on flood zones.

====
Exquire Magazine used to give Awards every January issue for Dubious Achievements in the prior year. Maybe they still do. In 1983 they gave an award to an American Survivalist. To escape the oncoming doom from crop failures, natural disasters, race riots, monetary collapse, war, famine, disease and pestilence, he looked around and moved far far away to the safest place on earth: The Falkland Islands.

(In case you are deficient in history, he arrived just in time for Argentina to invade the Falkland Islands and start a stupid war with the UK.)

 

Re:Not the first time this happens... (2)

Chrisq (894406) | about 2 years ago | (#41865271)

And the midwest (tornados), and the west coast (earthquakes), and the Great Lakes area (floods), and the southwest (drought)....

Sounds like God has got it in for you.

Re:Not the first time this happens... (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 2 years ago | (#41866529)

Well, to be honest, lots of them watch porn on their iPhones at church every Sunday...

Re:Not the first time this happens... (2)

khallow (566160) | about 2 years ago | (#41868217)

Some sorts of disasters are far more predictable and frequent than others. Flooding is particularly notorious.

I don't have a problem with people living in bad areas. I just have a problem paying for their lifestyle.

Re:Not the first time this happens... (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 2 years ago | (#41876569)

Tornados don't generally hit the same town ever 5 to 10 years. They're a true random natural disaster. Flood plains? Well, that's kind of the same issue as the hurricanes isn't it? Lastly, droughts don't destroy your house. Federal relief for hurricane and flood damage should be the same everywhere. The feds should offer to buy your house for the difference between what the insurance company is paying you and its assessed tax appraisal. Not a great deal but better than nothing. Then the government should knock down your house and turn it into a green way, park, beach, general public lands or whatever... The problem is permanently solved. Personally, I don't think there should be any relief and the government should stop forcing insurance companies to insure people insane enough to live in these places... but whatever.

Re:Not the first time this happens... (2)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 2 years ago | (#41864871)

or the banks of the mississippi or red river or west coast earthquake zones and brush fire areas near the rockies and desert southwest, etc., etc.

or anywhere really that people live in communities and want to rebuild and expect their government that they pay taxes to to help

i know, what a crazy concept

Re:Not the first time this happens... (2)

shugah (881805) | about 2 years ago | (#41864943)

I used to live in Pacifica California - approximately 200 yards from the San Andreas fault. When people from the gulf or Atlantic coasts asked me how I could live so close to a fault line my answer was always "at least there is no earthquake season".

Re:Not the first time this happens... (5, Funny)

ewieling (90662) | about 2 years ago | (#41865193)

"At least I know where my faults are"

Re:Not the first time this happens... (4, Interesting)

Anachragnome (1008495) | about 2 years ago | (#41867563)

"I used to live in Pacifica California..."

Just south of there, at Rancho Del Oso (a portion of Big Basin State Park), there is a spring that a pioneering family built their homestead around. That spring almost completely stopped flowing after the Loma Prieta earthquake, while further down the coast near the epicenter in the Forest of Nisene Marks some long dry springs started flowing again.

If you cut the flow in one place, it will flow somewhere else--or build up pressure until something blows.

I wonder if there are new hot springs somewhere in Haida Gwaii.

Re:Not the first time this happens... (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 2 years ago | (#41864415)

Nice sig. That was one of my favorite shows growing up.

not surprising (4, Interesting)

v1 (525388) | about 2 years ago | (#41864149)

was going to happen eventually. Springs of any sort (hot or otherwise) are a bit of a fluke, it just takes nature awhile to correct them. Water's not supposed to flow uphill ;)

Hot springs are going to be forming in volcanic active areas anyway, and those are going to be messing up the plates in their area, making earthquakes (even if only small ones) more common. So hot springs themselves should be considered very temporary by their very nature and design. A lot more temporary than say, a cold spring. We have a few of those here in Iowa, and I don't see an earthquake busting their pipes anytime soon out here.

Re:not surprising (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41864345)

Yes very "mysterious", just like when i had my backinjury my legs "mysteriously" stopped functioning.

Or when my keyboard "mysteriously" broke after rage quitting SC2.

Re:not surprising (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | about 2 years ago | (#41864789)

"springs are going to be forming in volcanic active areas anyway, and those are going to be messing up the plates in their area, making earthquakes (even if only small ones) more common" You do realize that there is no shortage of water (hot or not) around islands in the ocean...

Re:not surprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41871207)

He was comparing hot spring vs. cold spring.

New Madrid (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 2 years ago | (#41864833)

hears your challenge, and accepts your offer to bust your pipes

Re:New Madrid (1)

v1 (525388) | about 2 years ago | (#41865145)

oh here in Iowa you will have too much competition for that, in the winter when the temps wallow in the double digits below 0 (F)

Re:New Madrid (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 2 years ago | (#41866845)

here in nyc we have once a century hurricanes that happen every year now

Re:New Madrid (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about 2 years ago | (#41867883)

here in nyc we have once a century hurricanes that happen every year now

The century has been devalued.

Re:New Madrid (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 2 years ago | (#41868247)

yeah but its a bull market on hurricanes

Re:New Madrid (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about 2 years ago | (#41868629)

yeah but its a bull market on hurricanes

Death down, taxes up, botheration and bull unchangd in heavy trading.

Re:not surprising (1)

Ol Biscuitbarrel (1859702) | about 2 years ago | (#41867379)

Well, excepting areas of long-lasting sustained volcanism, resurgent calderas like Yellowstone for example, which has been active for over a million years now in basically the same spot. On an individual basis springs probably come and go, how long they stay active is an interesting question; it's been looked into I'm sure.

Re:not surprising (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41868053)

Hot springs are not a case of 'water flowing uphill'. Water under high pressure is heated due to a raised geothermal gradient (maybe due to magmatic intrustion or other volcanic processes). This heat increases the pressure further until the rock above fractures and cracks propagate upward to the surface. Then you're in business for a hot spring that can be continuously fed by the way the water table is setup, especially if there is an aquifer nearby. Earthquakes cause shifts in the water table and probably drained the water source for the hot spring.

Cold springs aren't any more permanent, just governed by a different set of circumstances. In Iowa, an earthquake probably won't cause the eventual death of the cold springs. More likely, a massive flooding event will load the water table differently and the spring distribution will change.

Global Warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41864173)

This is what your fossil fuels have wrought.

Re:Global Warming (1, Informative)

durrr (1316311) | about 2 years ago | (#41864189)

Sure it's not GMO crops or teenage pregnancy?

Re:Global Warming (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 2 years ago | (#41864213)

It would appear that your userID suits you quite well. :)

Re:Global Warming (1)

plover (150551) | about 2 years ago | (#41864237)

Don't feed the troll.

The GP makes a pretty strong case for why we shouldn't have government programs to take care of the mentally deficient and provide them with internet access. Eventually some of those morons find their way off Facebook and end up here.

Re:Global Warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41865315)

I think it happens when Slashdot posts a Facebook article, and gets momentarily raised in the Google search results.
We all know Facebook users can only get there by typing "www.faecboox.com" into a search engine after all.

Re:Global Warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41868467)

That's funny, I thought it was "www.fecesboox.com"

Geo thermal Energy Curses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41864203)

Big Oil Strikes Again Mr Bond!

Quick, quick!! (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41864233)

We need to drill huge holes, lay the walls with concrete so the water will flow again, all in the name of preserving nature. How dare the earthquake take a historic hot springs from us, when we know better how to preserve nature and not interfere by interfering...

To hell with studies, facts and proof that earth during multiple periods of time was much hotter than it is today, we KNOW that this CHANGE of temperatures is OUR fault and that its BAD. That's why we have to allocate billions of resources to right the wrong we're doing by interfering even more.

Haida Pool Service (4, Funny)

Chemisor (97276) | about 2 years ago | (#41864243)

You should always call a professional to service your pool to avoid natural disasters. Why, only last week God tried to snake the drains on the sacred Haida hot springs, causing a 7.7 magnitude earthquake and completely draining the pools. Don't let this happen to you! Call Haida Pool Service to get the job done right! Proudly serving limbo and all 9 circles since 6000 BC.

Quick, who can we blame? (1)

onyxruby (118189) | about 2 years ago | (#41864299)

If we're quick about it we can get the headlines to blame this on global warming! Perhaps we can blame it on Obama instead, that way we can blame both the left and the right?

Re:Quick, who can we blame? (2)

Lieutenant_Dan (583843) | about 2 years ago | (#41864335)

This is in Canada. So it's typical we would blame the Federal Conservatives, Harper, and his oil-pleasing cronies.

Personally I blame the various unions and the inefficient healthcare sector with their monumental waste.

Re:Quick, who can we blame? (3, Funny)

Phrogman (80473) | about 2 years ago | (#41864659)

The thing is, if you blame Harper and the Conservatives for something - they are likely guilty of it :P

Re:Quick, who can we blame? (1)

psema4 (966801) | about 2 years ago | (#41873291)

The thing is, if you blame Harper and the Conservatives for something - they are likely guilty of it :P

After receiving a (seismic v2) encoded message from God, the Conservatives went and drained these springs to convince the public. The need to privatize our hot springs is most pressing! Sell before they loose too much value! http://www.calgaryherald.com/business/Parks+Canada+privatize+springs/7196294/story.html [calgaryherald.com]

Re:Quick, who can we blame? (1)

haruchai (17472) | about 2 years ago | (#41864875)

Move to the USA. You'll be able to bitch twice as much about healthcare on a per-dollar, per-capita basis.

Re:Quick, who can we blame? (1)

jamesh (87723) | about 2 years ago | (#41869465)

This is in Canada. So it's typical we would blame the Federal Conservatives, Harper, and his oil-pleasing cronies.

That's a load of crap. I live in Australia and it doesn't stop us from blaming America. Why so you think Canadians are so special?

Re:Quick, who can we blame? (1)

Ainu (135288) | about 2 years ago | (#41864339)

Heck, why don't we blame sprinkling iron sulphate on the pacific?

This is the Raven's Retribution (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41864327)

"The warriors poured brown salt into the sea from giant canoes, hoping to make chíin return.
The raven , yáahl, was angered and dropped a stone into the water from hig in the sky.
The ground shook like thunder and all the gifts of Jáadaa Gántl were taken away."

Re:This is the Raven's Retribution (2)

Ashenkase (2008188) | about 2 years ago | (#41864453)

Wish I had mod points, you would get them all. Visited the springs on a Zodiac tour back in 2005. Southern Haida Gwaii is a magical place. By the time we got to the springs we were chilled, we took a dip, had a nice lunch at the Watchman's house and then had a nap in the tall grass. On the way back to the drop-in we had an encounter with a breaching whale. Will always remember that day.

Re:This is the Raven's Retribution (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#41864507)

Wish I had mod points, you would get them all. Visited the springs on a Zodiac tour back in 2005. Southern Haida Gwaii is a magical place

Well, now it's a less magical place.

Re:This is the Raven's Retribution (1)

turkeyfeathers (843622) | about 2 years ago | (#41864991)

No, the springs magically went away.

Re:This is the Raven's Retribution (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about 2 years ago | (#41867911)

Wish I had mod points, you would get them all. Visited the springs on a Zodiac tour back in 2005. Southern Haida Gwaii is a magical place

Well, now it's a less magical place.

Vol De Mort.

Re:This is the Raven's Retribution (1)

Ashenkase (2008188) | about 2 years ago | (#41869051)

Well, now it's a less magical place.

The loss of the Springs doesn't diminish the experience I had on Haida Gwaii in anyway. Was lucky enough to experience a Haida wedding with full dress Haida dancers (Crow [spiritsoft...tcoast.com] ). I also got to experience Tow Hill in Naikoon Provincial Park [vancouverisland.com] . The deep sea fishing expedition did not settle well with my inner ear, but I got to play a round of golf [massetbc.com] in one of the most North West [google.ca] regions of Canada.

Fracking (1)

onyxruby (118189) | about 2 years ago | (#41864331)

I wonder if fracking would work to open the hot springs back up? After all a hot spring is nothing more than a place where cracks in the earth allow heat from below to travel farther up than normal towards the surface. If you were to gently frack the site you could create new channels and allow the heat to once more come back up close enough to heat the water.

It would be an interesting experiment to say the least. If successful it could save the local economy.

Re:Fracking (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#41864383)

Not much of a local economy to save. It's it the middle of nowhere. An occasional tourist I suppose, but since there isn't a McDonald's within 100 meters, it can be too significant.

Fracking (injecting sand, soap and other miscellaneous and mysterious chemicals under pressure to open up tiny microfractures) isn't the technique you're looking for. Doesn't have nearly the power needed.

Nuke it from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.

Re:Fracking (1, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#41864405)

urrrrr.

in, not it

can't not can

  INSUFFICIENT CAFFEINE TO CONTINUE. *** EMERGENCY STOP DETECTED. ***

(Note to Slashdot programmers. If you allowed editing this sort of embarrassment wouldn't be necessary. WE WOULDN'T HAVE TO YELL.)

Re:Fracking (-1, Flamebait)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 2 years ago | (#41864915)

You really don't know anything about BC tourism if you think McD's has anything to do with the majority of it.

I really hate how US'ians just inject their world views into every culture they interact with. You should know better considering where you live.

Re:Fracking (1)

supervillainsf (820395) | about 2 years ago | (#41865099)

I have some really good friends from Canada and they all seem to have a sense of humor so I can only assume you have some totally irrational dislike of your southern neighbors that impairs your sarcasm detector, or you're just dumb as shit.

Re:Fracking (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 2 years ago | (#41865413)

Nah, i just did what he did.

Always be careful of what you accuse others of, since people can't see the world through themselves all their opinions and advice usually only apply to themselves. Cosmic jokes and everything.

Re:Fracking (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 2 years ago | (#41865259)

I really hate how US'ians just inject their world views into every culture

USians? What the smeg is a "USian?"

- A puzzled Canadian who is now down one hotspring

Re:Fracking (0)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 2 years ago | (#41865437)

Ever heard of this thing called Google? Would have been faster than posting. Then again, just a smidgen of logical deduction on your part would give you the answer.

Re:Fracking (2)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 2 years ago | (#41866401)

Ah, Usain Bolt. Quick tip - It's spelled "Usain," not "USain."

Re:Fracking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41868647)

Wow. Google made you stupider. I'm impressed.

Re:Fracking (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 2 years ago | (#41869133)

Look you dimwit anonymous coward. There's no such thing as "USians." North America is populated by Americans, Canadians and Mexicans. No one in Canada or Mexico calls themself an "American." I'm Canadian.

Re:Fracking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41869601)

But I suspect everyone NOT on the continent of North America calls all of you "Americans".
But usually means USAnians (see what I did there?)

Posted by an AC Downunderian (hint: Terra Australis, we have lots of hot springs!)

Re:Fracking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41869631)

umm whoosh.. But you are from the left coast. Canada's granola bar.

What ain't nuts or fruits is flakes.

US ians is a slang derogatory term to refer to americans. Here, let me google that for you: http://bit.ly/POt63C [bit.ly]

Re:Fracking (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 2 years ago | (#41869665)

I live close to the American border, I've been to the USA hundreds of times - Amongst my many Canadian and American (and Mexican) friends I've never heard this dim-witted term anywhere other than Slashdot. I've never heard a single person use it. I've heard "yanks," I've heard "muricans / mercans"... on and on... But never heard a single person say "USian." It's not slang - It's just made up by anonymous coward loonies in their mum's basement.

Re:Fracking (1)

mikael (484) | about 2 years ago | (#41864635)

Drilling a geothermal well would be the easiest solution - the hot water would just be needed to flow naturally rather than piped into a steam turbine/dynamo system.

Re:Fracking (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | about 2 years ago | (#41864807)

A diesel powered pump and heater may be more practical.

Who cares... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41864351)

...fuck Canada!

Obviously (3, Funny)

Progman3K (515744) | about 2 years ago | (#41864423)

God is angry at Stephen Harper

Re:Obviously (2)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 2 years ago | (#41864737)

God is angry at Stephen Harper.

Just like all Canadians.

Re:Obviously (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41864973)

I think it more likely the natives should be wondering who they've pissed off, since it's their sacred wading pool.

And while I appreciate that given the upcoming election - and pretty much the rest of the time too - most American's are utterly incapable of posting in a thread without making a redundant political comment. But do we Canadians really have to shit up every single thread too? It gets really tiring, regardless of which side is being crapped on with the same boring slings and arrows.

Sacredieu (1)

mevets (322601) | about 2 years ago | (#41864527)

Punishment for selling out to the ocean fertilization nut? Maybe the gods are not so crazy...

Damn global warming! (1)

elrous0 (869638) | about 2 years ago | (#41864673)

I joke, but I bet at least one hippie's gonna blame it.

Re:Damn global warming! (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | about 2 years ago | (#41864793)

Most tree-hugging dirt worshippers are smart enough to know that plate techtonics have been around much longer than the current bout of global warming... :)

Chances of building pressure? (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 2 years ago | (#41864921)

I wonder what the chances are that this will cause pressure to build up underground and eventually explode.

As a Canadia ... (0, Redundant)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 2 years ago | (#41864945)

I have to say that I had not heard of this island, its people, this hot spring, or this earthquake before.

Re:As a Canadia ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41864987)

It's OK. That just makes you ignorant. Now who's fault is that?

Re:As a Canadia ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41865631)

Posting AC since I've modded..

Seriously?! You haven't heard of the Queen Charlotte Islands? Yes they are now known as Haidi Gwaii, so only knowing them as their previous name would be ok (as you would have learned in school). I mean.. you know Vancouver island right? Weren't you ever curious what that other big island (or rather group of islands) above it was? It's bigger than PEI.

Maybe "the east" didn't televise it as much, but it was a 7.7 in Canada. When was the last time Canada had a quake that big? Quick research shows we haven't had a quake over 7 since the 60s. This is big news.

Re:As a Canadia ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41866879)

He's probably from Toronto and thinks Canada ends at Sudbury.

Re:As a Canadia ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41867325)

I hope you're referring to Hotsprings Island and not QCI/Haida Gwaii. I can understand not knowing about Hotsprings Island; it really is in the back of beyond. Very limited tourist access.

On the other hand, if you are referring to Haida Gwaii (now the legally gazetted name as of two-ish years ago), well... I'm reminded of the feeling I got leaning on Alexander McKenzie's Rock, at the point where he said "Fuck it", took the advice of the Bella Coola guides to avoid the murderous arseholes living on the outer coast and went back home. Carved in the rock: "Alex McKenzie, from Canada by land". At the time Canada consisted of Quebec and Ontario, but I couldn't help feeling that even today it's still a looonnnggg way from that rock to Canada.

And so ends the Mayan calendar (2)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 2 years ago | (#41865063)

Perhaps this is how the Mayan end of times starts ;-)

Re:And so ends the Mayan calendar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41866353)

Apparently the spirits of the sacred hot springs are leaving a bit early in order to avoid the rush before the apocalypse. No sense getting stuck in the inter-dimensional traffic for hours when all the rest of the gods and spirits finally leave this plane.

Re:And so ends the Mayan calendar (1)

sudo (194998) | about 2 years ago | (#41866375)

This is also the same type of dramatic build-up scene you see in the movie 2012, so it must be true.

Re:And so ends the Mayan calendar (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about 2 years ago | (#41867935)

Perhaps this is how the Mayan end of times starts ;-)

MEOT

And so ends the end times (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#41869847)

Perhaps the dried up springs is all the Mayans were trying to warn us about. They (the springs) were pretty popular.

Blame Time (0)

pubwvj (1045960) | about 2 years ago | (#41865197)

Obviously this was the White man's fault and caused by global warming! Quick, send out a press release! Never miss an opportunity to blame the power elite!

Re:Blame Time (1)

ScentCone (795499) | about 2 years ago | (#41865863)

PETA will demand a monument to the billions of microbes that died when the pools dried up. It's kind of their thing lately [redding.com] .

Re:Blame Time (1)

jgrahn (181062) | about 2 years ago | (#41871091)

PETA will demand a monument to the billions of microbes that died when the pools dried up.

Seriously, there are rare and unusual ecosystems around hot springs. This incident might be a significant loss of biodiversity, unless hot springs are common in the area.

The obvious (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41865479)

People seem to forget that the earth is an extremely dynamic environment, where climate changes, geography changes, environment changes, life changes.

Change is neither good nor bad and should be expected. It is natural.

People seem to forget there are fossils of tropical plants in the high arctic -- I don't seem to remember if man was around with major civilization at that time. I also seem to remember the location of major cities were under 1 km of ice 13,000 years ago -- so receding glaciers is a bad thing?

Problem is we have climate scientists trying to model climate with 150 years worth of data -- considering the planet is 4.5 billion years that is the equivalent of trying to model the history of the planet with one data point -- it is highly inaccurate.

The praries were once an inland sea thousands of years ago -- so should we be engineering this to prevent it?

Man should be going with the flow and compensate for a changing planet. Only an idiot thinks it can be prevented and only an arrogant idiot thinks it is mainly man made.

My two cents

Re:The obvious (1)

mikael (484) | about 2 years ago | (#41866431)

Continents shuffled about a bit - at a rate of 5cm/year, one million year allows movement of 5km, a few billion years and anywhere at the equator and poles could get swapped around.

Re:The obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41868505)

Those things were not caused by humans. There's no reason why we should be tinkering in natural cycles. Which is why we should be fighting global warming. It's caused by humans at a rate far above what a natural cycle would allow and the plants and animals can't evolve fast enough to adapt to it.

Re:The obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41869873)

Well, they better put their ass in high gear.

Re:The obvious (1)

Stuarticus (1205322) | about 2 years ago | (#41892415)

What about when it's not natural?

What are the odds... (2)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 2 years ago | (#41866583)

...that heated water will find another path to the surface?

Re:What are the odds... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41867349)

Greater than 0. The spring has dried up before, sometime following an earthquake in the 1940s.

Re:What are the odds... (1)

blackanvil (1147329) | about 2 years ago | (#41868903)

They know there's hot water down there, eventually someone will have the idea to drill down and let it out again.

Missing Conspiracy Theory: (1)

Hartree (191324) | about 2 years ago | (#41869459)

I'm surprised no one has mentioned the obvious truth that the earthquake was caused by the HAARP project.

It's all a plot to disrupt the huge tourist industry based on the hot springs.

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