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Gate One 1.1 Released: Run Vim In Your Browser

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the until-it's-included-in-the-browser dept.

Cloud 150

Riskable writes "Version 1.1 of Gate One (HTML5 terminal emulator/SSH client) was just released (download). New features include security enhancements, major performance improvements, mobile browser support, improved terminal emulation, automatic syntax highlighting of syslog messages, PDFs can now be captured/displayed just like images, Python 3 support, Internet Explorer (10) support, and quite a lot more (full release notes). There's also a new demo where you can try out vim in your browser, play terminal games (nethack, vitetris, adventure, zangband, battlestar, greed, robotfindskitten, and hangman), surf the web in lynx, and a useful suite of IPv6-enabled network tools (ping, traceroute, nmap, dig, and a domain name checker)." Gate One is dual licensed (AGPLv3/Commercial Licensing); for individuals, it's pay-as-you-please.

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150 comments

Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (1)

PaulBu (473180) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896063)

Was suprised...

Paul B.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (0)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896081)

The slashdot effect is not what it once was. Also this place is full of MS and Apple folks these days. They would never know what to do with vim.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (4, Funny)

NotSanguine (1917456) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896455)

The slashdot effect is not what it once was. Also this place is full of MS and Apple folks these days. They would never know what to do with vim.

:q![return]
$ emacs[return]
--all the vi[m] you'll ever need to know.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41896841)

:x

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41897023)

ZZ

Re:Oh Please! (2)

menno_h (2670089) | about a year and a half ago | (#41898621)

The editor wars came to a standstill in the 90's! Why did you have to break the ceasefire?
But if we're flaming anyway, I would like to remind you that Emacs Makes Any Computer Slow and that it is a very nice operating system; it just lacks a text editor (but it's still infinitely better than nano or pico or notepad).

And real men use ed! [xkcd.com]

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (0)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896545)

:q!<return>
emacs

or :q!<return>
nano

or :q!<return>
aee

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896951)

emacs is one thing, but nano?
Nano is for children.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (4, Interesting)

davydagger (2566757) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897885)

oh seriously fuck off.

nano is by far the best, simplest, easiest choice there is for command line(curses) editing text files. Plus modern versions of nano do syntax highlighting for scripts and code.

emacs is hidelously over-complicated. emacs is also terribly overfeatured and violates the UNIX philosphy of "do one thing, do it well". Also 1975 called, they want vi back.

emacs X11 is also terrible and extremely awkward, clumbsy and unfeatured as a text editor. many modern heavy weight text editors like gnome's gedit are power powerful, as well as easier to use, and simply more intuitive.

How hard is it on a modern linux desktop to use gamin to read the shebang and auto highlight syntax??

Do I really need crypto, a calculator, a calender, or other text based anacronisms in my text editor when they've been replaced with really pretty, extremely functional X11+GTK/QT apps a very long time ago. (that all seems to inter-operate with eachother based on freedesktop.org open standards, accross all 4 desktop enviroments I have installed)

Nano is all that? (4, Insightful)

Fubari (196373) | about a year and a half ago | (#41899939)

So nano is an open source rewrite of pico; interesting to see nano has some fans (I'm guessing Pico isn't used so much in 2012).
From wikipedia [wikipedia.org]:

nano implements some features that Pico lacks, including colored text, regular expression search and replace, smooth scrolling, multiple buffers, rebindable key support, and (experimental) undoing and redoing of edit changes.

I poked around nano's website [nano-editor.org] and it seems pretty capable.
It sounds like nano does everything you need, so there is no reason to learn about other editors.
I have fond memories of pine and pico; maybe I will look at nano one of these days.

fwiw, I find some powertools worth learning to use well even if they have a non-easy learning curve (sed comes to mind). This also applies to text editors; they're just tools.
As for "1975 wants vi back", I actually get a lot of mileage from vim [vim.org] which is a bit closer to nano's era.
nano: born 1999 as TIP, inspired by pico.
(btw, the last item on the nano news page [gnu.org] is from 2009: "Now on Twitter and Facebook and Happy 10th Birthday nano". Is nano under active development these days?)
vim:born 1988, released 1991 (initially for amiga, much more widespread now), inspired by vi (note I do feel sorry for anyone stuck using "classic vi" in the same way I'd feel sorry for anyone stuck with edlin).
(side note: vi-style learning curve sucks. My first two weeks were Painful, but now that I have some skill (muscle memory) with the keys I find it very effective. Kind of like how touch-typing is harder to learn than "hunt & peck" but it is still well worthwhile to learn how to touch-type; it pays dividends. Most of vi-style power (for me) comes from the fast navigation+editing commands that are tied to a rather terse (and admittedly cryptic) "shorthand" language of key combinations... I remember actually being surprised at how clunky arrow key + mouse navigation felt when I first used conventional editors after driving vi-style for a while.)
One of the things I like about having learned Vim is it will be available pretty much wherever I might need to work: here are some of the targets from from wikipedia's vim page [wikipedia.org] (* indicates ports I have used):

AmigaOS (the initial target platform), DOS, Microsoft Windows 95/*98/Me/*NT/*2000/*XP/*Server 2003/*Vista/*Server 2008/*7, IBM OS/2 and OS/390, OpenVMS, QNX, *Unix, *Linux, BSD, and Mac OS. Also, Vim is shipped with every copy of Apple Mac OS X. Independent ports of Vim are available both for Android and iOS.

(I've also found vim for aix; useful if one needs to spend time there.) Note that vim seems pretty consistently fully featured on the various platforms I've used it on (*'s above).
By comparison, nano seems pretty content to excel in linux distributions (redhat & debian).
And maybe, possibly, kind of sort of windows: from the nano faq, 3.9 How about in Win32 [nano-editor.org]

We're still working on documentation for enabling synax highlighting on Win32; please bear with us. Note that the nano.rc file must remain Unix formatted in order for nano to understand it. In other words, you should use probably only use nano to edit its config file. Other programs like Wordpad and Notepad will either convert the file to DOS format when saving, and the latter does not even properly read Unix-formatted files to begin with.

*shrug* I'm glad nano is working for you in the land of the modern linux desktop.

As for emacs: I sincerely believe that emacs users enjoy the capabilities they find; I may find a need for something emacs does well these days. I've never heard anyone say "Yeah, I started using emacs because it has that incredible calendar and crypto capability baked right into it!"
I always thought the big "win" for emacs users was text navigation and their lispy macro magic (I mean that in a nice way; I haven't climbed that learning curve yet but I imagine a skilled emacs user can do amazing things).

Question: is "bloated" just another way of saying "it doesn't help me right now so who needs it?"

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (1)

jc42 (318812) | about a year and a half ago | (#41900193)

emacs is hidelously over-complicated. emacs is also terribly overfeatured and violates the UNIX philosphy of "do one thing, do it well".

I much prefer to express it with the old comment that emacs is a great operating system; too bad it comes with such a crappy editor.

I've forgotten who originated that one. Of course, you see all sorts of variants, insulting its editor in as many ways as you can imagine.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41900425)

emacs X11 is also terrible and extremely awkward, clumbsy and unfeatured as a text editor

"You're so dumb you don't even have wisdom teeth."

Slashdot right now has the QOTD that crystallizes what emacs users think of your comment.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about a year and a half ago | (#41898439)

I will stick with nano. When I need to work in a terminal emacs and vi(m) just seem to much of a pain in the ass. Why would in need to have a text editor be my browser, my mail client, rss reader and chess opponent (emacs)? Why do I need to switch modes to move around text files when I have arrow keys on my keyboard(vi(m)) to do that? Nano is clean and simple. It edits text files. If I need to do something else I would use something else. Emacs seems to me in my humble opinion to have forgotten the Unix philosophy of "do one thing and do it well" and has instead gone for the do absolutely everything you can cram in until you run out of key combinations to trigger them school of thought.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41896975)

joe was the default editor on Slackware in the early days of Linux. I don't if it still is, but it's remained my default editor for over 15 years. It's a pain in the butt, but I install it on every system I use. I can use vi (original vi, not merely vim) in a pinch, but only know a handful of commands.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41897129)

The slashdot effect is not what it once was. Also this place is full of MS and Apple folks these days. They would never know what to do with vim.

Of course they would! The Apple folks would scoff at the idea of a text editor — one without even a single rounded rectangle! — being offered for anything less than $40, let alone free. There's obviously something suspect about that; if it were truly good, it would be sold for a profit, and if it were the best, it would be the most expensive. QED.

The MS folks, of course, would grunt at it and hit it with sticks and rocks (only Genuine(tm) Windows(r) Rocks, though!) until it went away. But don't worry about them! They're REALLY patient on that front. Firefox, Opera, Chrome, and Safari WILL fall someday, damnit!

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (1)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897513)

Excuse me? I'm an MS person and I use VIM every day. I actually consider it obsolete, but I've been using Vi-like editors for 30 years and am too old to start over.

The Slashdot effect happens when somebody implements a simple-minded LAMP server and suddenly becomes popular. Modern web applications are more robust. They're implemented using lightweight frameworks that don't have such a high per-user cost and which can scale up quickly when unexpected demand appears. This is the sort of advance people overlook when they say "cloud" is just marketspeak for "server".

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (2)

Riskable (19437) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896243)

Well, I'm monitoring it in real-time. If the demo servers start getting overloaded I'll add more.

In fact, I just added two extra servers: http://gateone3.rs.liftoffsoftware.com/ [liftoffsoftware.com] and http://gateone4.rs.liftoffsoftware.com/ [liftoffsoftware.com] just to be safe.

The two, 1GB Rackspace instances that were up when this news hit the front page are still running fine at this moment.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (2)

PaulBu (473180) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896405)

Good job! ;-)

I liked ATDT5551212 touch... Feeling nostalgic today, I'd guess...

Paul B.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (1)

Riskable (19437) | about a year and a half ago | (#41900239)

If you like the ADTD part you should run the demo and hit 'q' for a special surprise =D

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (2)

EvanED (569694) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896677)

A couple comments:

1) I tried hangman but it wasn't working; Chrome 22.0.1229.94 on RHEL6. (It's slightly out of date -- see "RHEL6." :-))

2) I strongly dislike putting it into the browser (for a couple reasons, that just doesn't work with the way I use terminals); any plans for some stand-alone program (even if it's just a wrapper around a webkit widget or something)?

3) I like some of the recent efforts towards rethinking what it means to be a terminal emulator (embedded images and such), so kudos for that. You're not the only one, though you seem to have taken it further than most of the other projects I've seen.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (1)

EvanED (569694) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896809)

2) I strongly dislike putting it into the browser (for a couple reasons, that just doesn't work with the way I use terminals); any plans for some stand-alone program (even if it's just a wrapper around a webkit widget or something)?

I guess I should also say: a lot of the focus of this story's discussion has been in the context of connecting to remote system; in such a context, a browser is more reasonable. My comment is based on a "I want a cool terminal to use locally" viewpoint.

Re:Not even /.ed yet! ;-) (1)

Riskable (19437) | about a year and a half ago | (#41898457)

Hmmm... Not sure why Hangman isn't working. I'll fix it (not a priority). I suspect that I forgot to copy its word dictionary into the chroot jail.

Cool, (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896079)

but what's the point?

I.e., is there a need that vi, vim, and gvim don't fill?

Or is the point merely slashvertising?

Re:Cool, (2)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896125)

did you RTFS? Having a terminal emulator in your browser could be very useful in certain restricted environments you might come across.

Now lets see an X11 implementation :-)

There is an X11 server written in Java... (1)

PaulBu (473180) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896323)

... I think made by Citrix, and it "runs" in your browser, but I would not really recommend it to anyone. Total steaming POS...

The maskhouse we deal with uses(d) that for customers to verify that the layers are what they expect. The program they run on the other end is something from Apollo workstations era, window manager in that session was TWM (we are talking now, a decade into 21st centiry! :) ), and it was slower than when I first tried running X over dial-up modem in 90s, without compression... ;-)

So, I am not having high hopes about useability of X11-over-HTTP, but who knows...

Vim demo was impressive through!

Paul B.

Re:Cool, (1)

Riskable (19437) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896329)

Now lets see an X11 implementation :-)

It's in the roadmap. It's just a matter of priorities and time.

Re:Cool, (1)

Jailbrekr (73837) | about a year and a half ago | (#41899341)

Question:

Is there a handy HOWTO to make it a wee bit more embeddable, such as adding defaults for port, host and user?

Re:Cool, (2)

Compaqt (1758360) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896361)

Yeah, I read the summary, but it doesn't mention a raison d'etre.

Basically, it's supposed to be a method for violating your company's IT policies. Got it.

Define "your company" (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896445)

Basically, it's supposed to be a method for violating your company's IT policies. Got it.

By "your company", do you refer to the owner of the device that you're using, such as your employer, or the manufacturer of the device that you purchased, such as Apple or Microsoft?

Re:Define "your company" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41896511)

Please tell me this question is being sarcastic or "ironic " and that you aren't that stupid.

Re:Define "your company" (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896589)

The former not the latter. I'd say you have every right to run whatever you want on a device you bought (or your company bought, if it lets you run ssh, which it probably would).

However, there are plenty of iOS and Android SSH apps, so again, the question remains.

Re:Define "your company" (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897977)

In the past, people have recommended SSH and VNC clients as a workaround to run applications that Apple disapproves on a remote server and display them on an iPad. I just fear what will happen should reliance on remote desktop to work around Apple's policy becomes more widespread.

Re:Cool, (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896587)

Wow.... you live in a very limited world. It must be nice and simple there - how do I get there?

I can install whatever the hell I want on my computer at work.
However, to get a good reliable ssh client on an arbitrary tablet/phone, using something HTML5 is quite convenient.

Please, go out and exercise your imagination, don't expect us to do it for you.

Re:Cool, (1)

vux984 (928602) | about a year and a half ago | (#41898191)

However, to get a good reliable ssh client on an arbitrary tablet/phone, using something HTML5 is quite convenient.

What major tablet or phone doesn't have good ssh clients available?

Re:Cool, (-1)

drinkmoreyuengling (2768737) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896179)

Didn't you hear? Everything has to run in the browser now. I'm waiting for the operating system that runs in a browser so I can create an infinite recursive loop of stupidity.

Re:Cool, (1)

mu22le (766735) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896357)

Didn't you hear? Everything has to run in the browser now. I'm waiting for the operating system that runs in a browser so I can create an infinite recursive loop of stupidity.

And here you go [vitanuova.com]!

Re:Cool, (1)

greg1104 (461138) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896905)

There's Atomic OS [sourceforge.net], OS.js [github.com]...that building an OS is ECMAScript seemed like a good idea to multiple people makes me cry. For full buzzword bingo, run the local browser in a virtual machine, and host the browser OS code in the cloud.

Re:Cool, (1)

Kevin Stevens (227724) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896433)

The main use of this is being able to access an environment from anywhere. This includes networks that do not allow you to ssh out of their networks, which is becoming a common security practice these days.

I have this installed on my server, as my company's netsense filter is far too aggressive and I can not access personal email or chat programs from work. I find from time to time I need to answer personal emails in a timely manner (like when I bought a house), and tapping out messages on a phone doesn't cut it. Gate one is actually quite awesome. I used predecessors that had the same functionality, and they were only useful in the most dire situations because of the slight lag and other display issues they had. You can actually attempt to do some real work with Gate One, though obviously putty is preferred if you can use it.

Re:Cool, (1)

Desler (1608317) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896535)

The main use of this is being able to access an environment from anywhere. This includes networks that do not allow you to ssh out of their networks, which is becoming a common security practice these days.

So the main use is to get fired for violating your employer's IT security policy? Brilliant!

Re:Cool, (1)

rpresser (610529) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896823)

Can you not conceive of a roaming consultant who does not wish to install his whole toolset on his client's machine?
Also, browser -> remote ssh server -> remote network is still more secure than local ssh -> remote network.

Re:Cool, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41897107)

I can not conceive of hiring a roaming consultant who thinks my security policies don't apply to him. I can not think of retaining an employee who thinks that using a web server as a backdoor into my network (in violation of my policies) is a good idea.

Re:Cool, (1)

Kevin Stevens (227724) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897899)

It is a lot easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.

I run a few websites that generate a small but growing amount of traffic (and hopefully one day, revenue), so its also nice to know that from any computer, I can log in to my jump server, and take a look if something goes down, with nothing more than a web browser. It could be a locked down computer only offering a web browser, or a friend's computer I don't want to be fumbling around and installing putty on, etc.

But yeah 98% of my use is avoiding IT policies.

Re:Cool, (1)

bws111 (1216812) | about a year and a half ago | (#41898849)

Based on that, I'd say 100% of your use is avoiding good security policies. Seriously, you log into your server, to perform admin functions, from systems you don't control? That is beyond stupid.

Re:Cool, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41898259)

This includes networks that do not allow you to ssh out of their networks, which is becoming a common security practice these days.

The GateOne server is listening on port 443: that's the only trick it has for enabling this.

Many companies are now performing proxy-based MitM inspection of data passing through 443, which will shut this down in a blink.

Re:Cool, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41898661)

The biggest problem with ssh is that it allows the users to create an encrypted tunnel into the company network, other than that most sound companies would not mind if their employees spend a few minutes of ther lunch break managing their torrents over ssh or such things.

This is pretty neat, but... (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896103)

If I can run a browser, I can run a SSH client. Bonus: The stand alone terminal emulator / SSH client doesn't come with the attack surface of a web browser, or security vulnerability baggage of JavaScript's JITs (marking data as code, then running it).

I really want to like this, I'm just not finding any use cases for it that something like PUTTY wouldn't be better for. (Well, I did, but they were really freakin' out there edge cases.)

Re:This is pretty neat, but... (1)

vlm (69642) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896321)

It seems to be more a competitor of ajaxterm than a competitor of putty.

ajaxterm occasionally "jams up" and certainly doesn't have all these features, so they have a market they can work.

Re:This is pretty neat, but... (1)

dyingtolive (1393037) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897879)

Not to mention that ajaxterm sort of makes you want to pull your nails out with pliers as an alternative. I've been running GateOne for quite a while now, and I'll be upgrading to this version this weekend.

Re:This is pretty neat, but... (1)

Hatta (162192) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896395)

If I can run a browser, I can run a SSH client.

How do you run an SSH client on a kiosk?

Re:This is pretty neat, but... (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896603)

If I can run a browser, I can run a SSH client.

How do you run an SSH client on a kiosk?

On the other hand, it is really not advisable to trust a web-browser based kiosk with important ssh login details.

Re:This is pretty neat, but... (3, Interesting)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896735)

Earlier times with Windows Phone 7, and right now with Windows Phone 8 come to mind.

Also, if you find a site hosting it, that you can trust, it bypasses the issue of potential malware incursions into your mobile platform's app store.

And it provides you with one setup/config interface, regardless of platform.

There are conveniences/advantages to this setup.

Re:This is pretty neat, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41899299)

If I can run a browser, I can run a SSH client.

I really want to like this, I'm just not finding any use cases for it that something like PUTTY wouldn't be better for.

I figured this would be good for cases where it's inconvenient (or impossible) to install the tools of your choice. I can't see using it on my desktop, but it seems potentially useful if I'm elsewhere.

For example, let's say I'm on someone else's computer (or at the library, etc.) and want to log into my shell account, but ssh or putty wasn't installed. In that case, a web-based solution seems like it could be convenient.

Yo dawg... (5, Funny)

mrjb (547783) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896107)

I heard you liked browsing the web, so I put a browser in your browser so you can browse while you browse!

Re:Yo dawg... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41897199)

Yo dawg, I heard you like shitty meme's so I posted one.

Re:Yo dawg... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41897727)

I like browsing my companies unix WAN infrastructure with an editing environment enabled by default...

Re:Yo dawg... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41897827)

Must have been made by the guys behind emacs.

Not nerdy enough.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41896117)

to even know why I would want to run VIM in a browser

I guess I am not nerdy enough... (1)

freshmeathead (2708225) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896161)

I use various linux distros daily, but I guess I am not nerdy enough to know why I would want to run vim in a browser.

Re:I guess I am not nerdy enough... (1)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896319)

The only thing I can think of is that I'm working on someone else's computer and can't install anything locally, but even then this won't work because you still have to download it. I guess this is just a "because I can" sort of project.

Re:I guess I am not nerdy enough... (1)

norminator (784674) | about a year and a half ago | (#41898839)

You don't download it on the client machine. You download and install it on the host machine. When you run it on the host, it runs a web server, which you then access from the client machine via the web browser.

So, assuming you already have it up and running on your server, all you need on your friends' computers is the web browser.

Re:I guess I am not nerdy enough... (4, Informative)

vlm (69642) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896487)

I use a free competitor called ajaxterm to get around firewall insanity. So if the local restaurant blocks all SSH connectivity as a hacking tool (idiots), in fact only lets thru 80 and 443, this is perfect. Well, if the target machine didn't have a web server on it I could run SSH on 443 and connect to it, but if the whole point of the machine is web serving then I can't very well remove the SSL web server and stuck sshd on port 443.

This is not a daily thing, but more an OMG emergency back door when all else fails thing. My advice is put it under a mysterious URL, its too easy to scan "whatever.com/ajaxterm" on a guess, and don't link to it.

I've also used it in presentations, all I need on the client machine connected to the projector is a standard web browser. No admin rights to install stuff, etc. Just go to this page.. which doesn't work... then ask why the heck they are using MSIE 5.0 or whatever in 2012.. etc. But it does work great with a "modern" "real" browser.

Re:I guess I am not nerdy enough... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41899813)

http://www.rutschle.net/tech/sslh.shtml

Re:I guess I am not nerdy enough... (0)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897625)

Vim is just a demo. Lots of people run terminal apps every day, mostly to access legacy systems. Like any other application, a terminal is easier to deploy if it runs on the cloud.

putty replacement? (1)

Janek Kozicki (722688) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896291)

I guess that Gate One is windows-only, since on other OSes you have terminals by default. And on windows everyone that I know is using putty. So I wonder - is that going to be putty replacement, or too much hassle to get it to work?

Re:putty replacement? (2)

Riskable (19437) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896453)

Why would Gate One be Windows-only? It runs in a browser.

Don't think, "PuTTY replacement" or, "terminal replacement." Think, "I can use this from anywhere without having to install anything" or, "this could be embedded into an administration interface to provide a command line where previously there was none."

Though to be honest my end-goal with Gate One is to make it the best terminal emulator (and SSH client) ever. We've only begun to explore what's possible when you combine a terminal with capabilities of the browser (HTML5, specifically).

Re:putty replacement? (1)

Janek Kozicki (722688) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896529)

Why would Gate One be Windows-only? It runs in a browser.

Don't think, "PuTTY replacement" or, "terminal replacement." Think, "I can use this from anywhere without having to install anything" or, "this could be embedded into an administration interface to provide a command line where previously there was none."

Though to be honest my end-goal with Gate One is to make it the best terminal emulator (and SSH client) ever. We've only begun to explore what's possible when you combine a terminal with capabilities of the browser (HTML5, specifically).

ok. So how do you solve keyboard support on tablets? Think: arrows, pg-up/pg-down, special characters

major hindrance is that tablets don't have arrows on their "keyboards"

Re:putty replacement? (1)

Riskable (19437) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896689)

Oh the pain of software keyboards! Believe me, it drives me crazy. Gate One will work in Mobile Firefox and Chrome for Android using a software keyboard but not very well. You're much better off using a hardware keyboard.

Having said that, here's how it currently works in Gate One with software keyboards: There's an invisible input element on the page that gets focus when you load the page or tap somewhere. When that happens the software keyboard comes up and you can enter your keystrokes. However, whenever you tap "go" the input element loses focus! This will drive you crazy. I have opened bugs for both Chrome and Firefox to get a workaround of some sort.

I am planning on writing a thin "native" client of sorts to use Gate One on mobile devices (probably using PhoneGap) just for the sole purpose of getting control over the software keyboard (make it stay open!).

Re:putty replacement? (1)

Janek Kozicki (722688) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896781)

Does that mean, that in the browser window upper half of the screen will be a terminal, and bottom half will be a full keyboard - both embedded into the window? By this way you will not use the inferior tablet's keyboard, so this might work....

Re:putty replacement? (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896943)

Is the terminal parsing done server-side? That is, the client is served HTML to make things look right, but all of the vt10x escape codes are parsed on the server?

(I'm looking for a client-side js library that does actual vt100 parsing.)

Re:putty replacement? (1)

Riskable (19437) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897677)

Yes, the terminal emulator in Gate One is server-side (terminal.py). It converts the terminal's screen to HTML before sending it to the client. Actually, it only sends lines to the client that have been updated but that part is handled separate from the terminal emulator.

There's actually a pretty good overview of the differences between server and client-side terminal emulation here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web-based_SSH [wikipedia.org]

Re:putty replacement? (1)

Tarlus (1000874) | about a year and a half ago | (#41900311)

If you have to do work that requires the use of a terminal, then a tablet is probably the wrong thing to be carrying around.

Re:putty replacement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41897459)

I don't understand what this is. Why is there a demo if this is open source? Where is the link to the thing that I download to start using it in a browser? I went to the downloads page and it has links to linux installs. Installs of what? The homepage makes clear that this is not a browser plugin. So what is this? What do I have to do to use it?

On Android I had to install ConnectBot (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896467)

on other OSes you have terminals by default

On Android I had to install ConnectBot to get an SSH client. Or were you thinking only of desktop PC operating systems?

Re:On Android I had to install ConnectBot (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41899325)

Even desktop operating systems are a mixed bag. Most users don't get an ssh client with their operating system.

Speaking of connectbot, I complained previously about it not working on my rooted Nook Simple Touch. It does now. I used a different root method this time, but I imagine it's also had updates in the interim.

Re:putty replacement? (2)

Kevin Stevens (227724) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896473)

No, its not. It runs in a browser and is thus cross platform. The main point is that the ssh session runs on the server side, so you are essentially tunneling ssh through http. Very nice if you need ssh access in an environment that won't let you ssh out of the network.

Re:putty replacement? (1)

John Hasler (414242) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896683)

> The main point is that the ssh session runs on the server
> side, so you are essentially tunneling ssh through http.

So the session is encrypted and authenticated between the browser and the server?

Re:putty replacement? (1)

greg1104 (461138) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897053)

There are multiple solutions already available for Web-based SSH [wikipedia.org]. GateOne says it needs a Python app installed on the server to support the tunnel. If that's hosted on their servers and this gets popular, expect that site to get blocked at the same sort of shops that block ssh. The main claims they seem to be making are for a higher quality of terminal emulation than the other ways around this issue that already exist.

Re:putty replacement? (1)

Kevin Stevens (227724) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897483)

Yeah there are. Most are pretty crappy. GateOne just performs far better, to the point where you can actually use it for useful work. I used to use ajaxterm, it worked, but had weird bugs. Later I moved to webshell, which was a big improvement. GateOne is an improvement further still. I use this on my personal server, so unless they are inspecting packets to see that this is an app, which currently my very paranoid company does not do, this won't get blocked.

Re:putty replacement? (1)

Riskable (19437) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897759)

Just an FYI: You can't inspect SSL packets without a MitM attack. Some proxies support this (Blue Coat) but none of them work with WebSockets. So as it stands right now it is impossible to sniff your Gate One session unless you're using a very weak SSL certificate.

Whoever is looking at your Gate One traffic in a sniffer will only see a destination and a source IP. They won't even see the URLs you're hitting.

Not in the browser? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41896309)

Last I checked out Gate, it was really a python-based server of some sort that was accessed via the browser, not run inside the browser. Not as exciting as it first appeared. Is that still the case? I mean, if you have a python installation with all the libraries supporting SSL, HTTP, etc, is it surprising that you get an ssh client? The pseudo-terminal is in the browser, but all the ssh client part is in the python-based server.

Re:Not in the browser? (1)

corychristison (951993) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896653)

Yes. Still the same.

I remember a few months ago that booted a linux kernel in Javascript.... now THAT was impressive. Didn't have network access when I last looked at it.

I am sure there are better terminal emulators out there for in browser administration, because I've seen them in many VPS control panels... although I've never furtherem or looked unto them further.

Also look at shellinaboxd (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41896851)

http://code.google.com/p/shellinabox/

very cool (1)

unique_parrot (1964434) | about a year and a half ago | (#41896999)

Looks very promising, localised characters working excellent in vim !
Don't know if i would allow portscan.
Would like to have x11 too :)

Re:very cool (2)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897533)

Can't manage to get it to execute shell stuff, trying to make vm :read !:(){ :|:; }

Re:very cool (2)

Riskable (19437) | about a year and a half ago | (#41898419)

That's because the demo is inside of a chroot jail and the user it runs as only has read-only access to its home directory. Also, the version of vim running is actually rvim which doesn't let you execute shell commands (for good reason).

If you figure out a way to break out of the jail let me know so I can close that hole! ;)

The terminal app is kewl, but... (1)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41897571)

... not something I'd ditch SSH for. The implementation is impressive, though. I'd encourage these guys to work on creating more web-based apps and frameworks,.

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