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Verizon To Throttle Pirates' Bandwidth

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the arrr-me-hearties dept.

Piracy 224

another random user sends this excerpt from the BBC: "U.S. net firm Verizon has declared war on illegal downloaders, or pirates, who use technologies such as BitTorrent to steal copyrighted material. Verizon has said it will first warn repeat offenders by email and voicemail. Then it will restrict or 'throttle' their internet connection speeds. Time Warner Cable, another U.S. internet service provider pledging to tackle piracy, says it will use pop-up warnings to deter repeat offenders. After that it will restrict subscribers' web browsing activities by redirecting them to a landing page. The Electronic Frontier Foundation, which campaigns for digital freedom, is highly critical of the imminent campaign, saying: 'Big media companies are launching a massive peer-to-peer surveillance scheme to snoop on subscribers.' ISPs will be acting as 'Hollywood's private enforcement arm,' it added."

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IN OTHER WORDS !! EAT - SHIT - DIE- !! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003335)

If they catch you !!

I've got a way around this (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003339)

I've got a way around this, but I don't want to post it here, lest it be targeted.

It's easy, but it costs money. I've never heard of someone getting sued using one, but that doesn't mean I'm confident enough to post my technique / service here...

Re:I've got a way around this (4, Funny)

alostpacket (1972110) | about 2 years ago | (#42003395)

Starts with a V and ends with PN?

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

planckscale (579258) | about 2 years ago | (#42003449)

or starts with a P and ends with a ROXY? or starts with OPEN ends with WIFI? or starts with SERVER and ends with RENTAL? or or or

Re:I've got a way around this (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003595)

Or starts with NET and ends with a FLIX? Seriously, its 7 bucks. At some point its going to be easier and cheaper to pay the content creators than to avoid being caught by the ip police.

Re:I've got a way around this (5, Insightful)

fredprado (2569351) | about 2 years ago | (#42003669)

Not when the IP vendors do not sell what you want to buy...

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

HermMunster (972336) | about 2 years ago | (#42003729)

Netflix is Microsoft's pony. It only rides in Microsoft's fields. There's a huge segment of people that can't run it. It's also country specific.

Re:I've got a way around this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003819)

OSX too.
iOS
Android
Roku.
built into TV.
xbox
ps3
wii

You have a point about geography, but "It only rides in Microsoft's fields" is laughably wrong.

Re:I've got a way around this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003887)

Hey now, he was bashing Micro$$$$oft... don't let facts get in the way of the daily Two Minute Hate on Slashdot.

Re:I've got a way around this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003821)

I never knew the PS3, Wii, various Android tablets, etc, were from Microsoft.

Or did you just mean you can't run it on Linux?

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

darkain (749283) | about 2 years ago | (#42004065)

Except that Android and GoogleTV are flavors of Linux too, so yes, at least SOME Linux distributions support it.

Re:I've got a way around this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42004131)

Netflix is Microsoft's pony. It only rides in Microsoft's fields. There's a huge segment of people that can't run it. It's also country specific.

Get your facts straight netflix run on ios, android, windows, and apparently even on linux now.

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

LurkingSince1999 (2698703) | about 2 years ago | (#42004493)

Have you checked the Netflix catalogue lately? Pretty sparse unless you want to watch >1 yr old TV series. I'm 0 for my last 5 attempts at trying to watch the movie I'm in the mood for. After enough searching I can usually settle for *something* but most likely I'll just turn it off.

Re:I've got a way around this (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003425)

I can do a triple back-flip followed by a double somersault and land on gracefully doing a handstand as finish without even getting a running start.

I just don't want to right now.

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

NFN_NLN (633283) | about 2 years ago | (#42003471)

In other words people are just going to embed BitTorrent traffic within https packets.
Use port 443 with https headers and just change the payload. They can do deep packet inspection all they want but they can't go into the encrypted payload.

Re:I've got a way around this (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003495)

Maybe not, but it would be obvious from usage pattern exactly what is going on. It would quickly be shut down.

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about 2 years ago | (#42003559)

Maybe not, but it would be obvious from usage pattern exactly what is going on. It would quickly be shut down.

Use encryption, go to (internet) jail.

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003599)

The usage pattern might tell them something, but it wouldn't tell them what you're downloading and whether or not its copyrighted.

Re:I've got a way around this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003637)

It may be obvious that it is bittorrent traffic, but they won't know if it is pirated or legimate.

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

fredprado (2569351) | about 2 years ago | (#42003703)

And more importantly: cannot prove it.

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#42003889)

Sure they will. They'll just make a whitelist of 'good' trackers, like the WoW updater. If you're doing BT but not communicating with one of the good trackers, they they assume you're a dirty pirate. The only legal users to be hurt will be people like linux downloaders and people getting CC-licensed films... and those people aren't a huge part of the market, so may safely be ignored.

Re:I've got a way around this (1)

Zemran (3101) | about 2 years ago | (#42003671)

I just host shit on Google Drive as soon as I get something good and my friends dl and do the same... Pandora cannot get her shit back in her box...

Re:I've got a way around this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003845)

they can deploy transparent proxy at the gw and initiate/hijack your ssl session from there...

Re:I've got a way around this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003953)

Fingerprinting encrypted traffic is an active research topic.

Re:I've got a way around this (4, Insightful)

datapharmer (1099455) | about 2 years ago | (#42003981)

as someone who runs deep packet inspection on a few networks I can tell you a) it is pretty easy to tell what shouldn't be passed through and b) a little sand in the underwear bites - Throwing in some junk data in the right ratio can wreak havoc on an ssl encapsulated torrent connection. Send all you want over ssl but it will be throttled and so much garbage by the end you won't want to waste your time after a few days. I can also tell you it is pretty easy to block this even without deep packet inspection. Hint: dns tends to be required to get your torrent information in the first place, and it is pretty easy to send you a response from my dns server that looks like a response from your manually configured dns server. You won't know the difference and will just assume thepiratebay is down.

DPI to burn you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003659)

Anyone "catch my drift" on the above? I hope so, IF you *think* you're going to "outsmart" the gatekeepers, you are in for a HUGE surprise...

APK

P.S.=> Let me tell you all about 1 thing: You piss someone off enough? They'll get you, & they WILL make it personal, especially if/when you offend their egos (which is HUGE in geeks) or worse, their livelyhood.

Only a matter of time... because, sooner OR later, if/when you are pulling shit? You will make a mistake... it happens. For every thing you can think of, 10 more can go wrong.

Ok - put it this way, I've seen it happen, & so have most of you I suspect:

E.G. #1 - Ever heard of Kevin Mitnick?? He played those kinds of games, & pissed off "the cyber samurai" (don't recall the guy's name, but he was burned REPEATEDLY & shamed by Mitnick, who of course, only really had the advantage of 'surprise' (sort of))... in the end, you all know what went down!

E.G. #2 - What I feel should be "required reading" for security pros no less in Cliff Stoll's "The Cuckoos Egg" - all it took was one VERY determined guy to take down a German spyring in league with the KGB, to burn a LOT of very skilled 'hacker/cracker' types who made a very fundamental oversight in whom they were using as a conduit to attack our military installations (1 of which my brother was stationed at in Richmond Hill).

So, don't be fools... despite being "hidden in the crowd" & what-not, it is YOU @ the disadvantage in the end...

... apk

Re:DPI to burn you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003911)

*Yawn*

Re:DPI to burn you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42004193)

Whooa, for a moment you frightened me until I realized that you're a clueless douchebag.

Makes sense for them. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003341)

1. Reduces traffic on their networks
2. Should reduce the number of inquiries from RIAA etc that they need to deal with, and the staff to do it

Re:Makes sense for them. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003381)

3. Reduces their profit margin as people move away from these services to ones that don't give a fuck whats on the wire.
4. Makes them liable for all the other 'bad' things their customers do. They have displayed they DO have the level of control needed to stop spam or other crap comming from their customers machines.

Re:Makes sense for them. (3, Informative)

jythie (914043) | about 2 years ago | (#42003543)

(4) might be a real concern, but (3) is not. In the US, very few areas actually have any competition. The regulation that allowed viable competition to exist were removed so even even urban areas are unlikely to have more then 2 options, most areas will only have 1.

But yeah, (4) might come back to haunt them.

Re:Makes sense for them. (3, Insightful)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | about 2 years ago | (#42004083)

What regulation that allowed viable competition was removed? As far as I am aware, both cable providers and telephone providers have been regulated as local monopolies for almost as long as the former has existed and since before I was born for the latter. Unless someone else is allowed to run the cabling/fiber there can be no real competition. The fact that there are no more than two options just about everywhere is a product of regulation, not a product of the removal of regulation.

Re:Makes sense for them. (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about 2 years ago | (#42003561)

RIAA obtains access to Verizon logs, since Verizon publicly acknowledges having them, sues everybody who ever got flagged, nobody uses Verizon ever again.

capitalism (2)

Xicor (2738029) | about 2 years ago | (#42003357)

if they keep doing stuff like this, they will be shooting themselves in the foot, as people will switch to companies that arent.

Re:capitalism (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 2 years ago | (#42003415)

Except that they are pretty much a monopoly in their markets. If you are lucky, you have competing service through your cable company, which is probably already capped and for many will be Time Warner.

How hard is it to kick off municipal broadband, anyway?

Re:capitalism (1)

Xicor (2738029) | about 2 years ago | (#42003467)

google fiber will eventually spread out to the entire country... and they are also pushing to becoming wireless service providers. both of these will affect verison

Re:capitalism (2)

jythie (914043) | about 2 years ago | (#42003577)

Google already bent to the will of the RIAA/MPAA. They might provide a little competition, but functionally they are unlikely to be any different.

Re:capitalism (1)

jythie (914043) | about 2 years ago | (#42003565)

The major ISPs lobbied to make municipal broadband illegal.

Re:capitalism (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about 2 years ago | (#42003519)

Mhm, and the rest of the ISPs are made of rainbows and sunshine. I like the https solution, I wonder what the pitfalls are besides lower performance, but bittorent started back when AOL was still around w dial up and hasn't changed a whole lot since. But there's a part b to this and that's they ask why is this computer connected to 500 others in seemingly unrelated circumstances, etc... Oh well, I've always been a proponent of get it away from the mainstream and back to the nerds and let it slip back under the radar, unfortunately now it won't look the same at least under the hood.

I look forward to the innovation this will cause (1)

Jimmyisikura (1274808) | about 2 years ago | (#42003377)

I hope that the brighter pirates devise even more inventive ways to keep their privacy, perhaps that creativity will spill over into the more legal realm of the internet.

Re:I look forward to the innovation this will caus (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003473)

You bet it won't take long for some people to figure out how to mask where they are etc. I don't think this is going to stop anyone. Information is free, Free as in free beer!

This is BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003379)

I think these companies need to get out of peoples business and provide the service that was promised. I can't see how this is legal?

what are the chances... (4, Insightful)

Steven_M_Campbell (409802) | about 2 years ago | (#42003383)

What are the chances that this will simply be used to target anyone who uses the bandwidth they paid for?

Re:what are the chances... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003509)

Probably slim. You could easily eat through your bandwidth by using legitimate content services such as Netflix, Pandora, Amazon, iTunes, etc. If they were to use this to throttle customer who wasn't doing anything wrong, they'd probably get sued and have to deal with all kind of regulatory crap. The real question is whether or not they'll be targeting anyone who uses torrents in a non-copyright infringing manner (e.g. distributing FOSS).

Re:what are the chances... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003585)

You're contradicting yourself.
Using torrents in a non-copyright infringing manner == using legitimate content services.

Re:what are the chances... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42004399)

No he isn't.

The GP said that they're not likely to use this to throttle people who use lots of bandwidth but don't use bit torrent. Instead it's likely just going to be people who do a lot of torrenting that get hit, and the interesting question will be if they bother to distinguish between copyright infringing and non-infringing use of bit torrent.

Re:what are the chances... (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about 2 years ago | (#42003539)

Verizon already got sued for this once, it was a good day when I received a check for $50 for my old broadband card when I got kicked off their network at the very end of my contract (I had another ISP so I didn't give a f').

How do they differentiate non-infringing files? (3, Insightful)

kawabago (551139) | about 2 years ago | (#42003811)

We have seen all kinds of examples of some entity claiming ownership of a work they don't in fact own. What protects consumers from spurious claims? Good will of the entertainment industry? They don't have any. This kind of practice will make consumers turn against the entertainment industry and demand it be muzzled.

Re:what are the chances... (1)

Mitreya (579078) | about 2 years ago | (#42004411)

What are the chances that this will simply be used to target anyone who uses the bandwidth they paid for?

Not to mention the lucrative $35 review fees [pcworld.com] involved. It's a win-win for Verizon.

Soon this will turn into highly desirable insurance -- i.e. "pay extra $10/month and we will protect you from lawsuits by not releasing your info". (or at least actually fight for you in court before releasing it)

Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (3, Informative)

Cito (1725214) | about 2 years ago | (#42003427)

I've had it when it was plain adsl at 1.5 megabit down in the late 90's all the way to now vdsl with 20 megabit down. They still offer newsgroup access free with all their accounts, and ability to generate emails at will up to 20, then you can delete ones not needed and recreate sorta as a anonymous email service of their own.

every year or so they claim on dslreports forum that they'll never keep logs more than 1 week for legal purposes mainly to do with child porn, and they so far have not responded to letters from antip2p companies like mediadefender, claiming they get trashed.

Now things may change in future, but there is no bandwidth cap and it's truly unlimited, I know according to DUmeter, adding upload/download together I used 418 gigs last month and average 317 to 422 gigs per month, most of it is torrent traffic seeding and downloading. And never got a letter or even bothered.

I always tell people stay the fuck away from cable and big name dsl like at&t and stick to local telco services, local landline small companies most all offer dsl2plus to vdsl services and are much much better than cable.

No bandwidth caps, no filtering, and no bother, true freedom at least for now.

I've been pirating since 1996 though when I cut my cable tv off. Starting on newsgroups and IRC old "fserve" bots for television episodes and movies.

Now it's torrent RSS downloader on the seedbox connected to my western digital WDTV Live plus box on my tv.

I definitely support local telco's cause most ignore the bullshit of the big isp's, hell my isp even sent out letters letting customers know they will not be taking part in this "6 strike" shit and marketed as if it was a cable only problem so it keeps their customers from wanting to go to cable.

great marketing move imo

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003521)

I've been pirating since 1996 though when I cut my cable tv off. Starting on newsgroups and IRC old "fserve" bots for television episodes and movies.

Now it's torrent RSS downloader on the seedbox connected to my western digital WDTV Live plus box on my tv.

Allow me to be the first to say, FUCK YOU.

No, seriously, fuck you. It's assclowns like you who think "ooh I has interwebz I can download anything I want" that are ruining it for everyone else. I'll download a TV episode or three that I may have missed, but gimme a break. All these years of all of us bitching that there is no viable paid option to support, and now that we're starting to get them, dipshits like you wave around your e-peen like downloading everything in sight is some badge of honor. No, what you accomplish is to end up proving the douchenozzles in the content industry right. You get used as a statistic to "prove" that everyone is pirating everything.

End result, data caps and packet snooping so it's a pain in the ass to download ANY large amount of data because we're automatically assumed to be dirty pirates. So to end with: FUCK YOU.

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003947)

Yeah, exactly. It's people's total inability to be moderate about it that has caused the problem. Also, I pirated everything in the 90s because I was a teenager and my weekend job washing dishes for minimum wage wasn't going to buy a lot of DOS games. Now that I'm grown I can afford to buy what I want. Sure, I still pirate some music but I try to support artists I really enjoy and listen to a lot. These guys who are like "never pay for software!" or "why are you buying music? lol" are the worst. I guess you never plan on working as a software developer for a small company that sells products to consumers? Or you don't care enough to support the music scene in your city/state/country?

If Verizon just cracks down on the idiots who have 100 torrents from TPB seeded wide open all day and night then I say no problem. Now if they wanna bust my balls because I torrent an occasional album or audiobook, that's bullshit because I buy as much as I pirate, in fact I often end up buying the stuff I pirated!

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (1)

Redmancometh (2676319) | about 2 years ago | (#42003541)

In every place ive lived...3 states there are NO "local" telco providers.

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (1)

michrech (468134) | about 2 years ago | (#42003943)

There are two local telephone providers in my general area (that I know about), though neither serves my town with DSL. The one that also offers fixed wireless (which I *can* get) is twice as expensive for lower bandwidth, AND they have absolutely no issues in passing your information over to media companies wanting to sue you...

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (1)

KrazyDave (2559307) | about 2 years ago | (#42003575)

Amen. Earthlink DSL customer here in California since 2000, no worries about ISP monitoring, throttling, peak-time congestion, etc. and likewise I cut off even cable TV infiltration 2 years ago (just watching OTA antenna TV and loving it.) Gosh bless my little copper phone line.

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003727)

except their max speed here is 3Mb with a pitiful upload speed. makes it difficult to do actual work.

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 2 years ago | (#42003583)

Same here, I also have a local DSL provider, i don't get the same speeds cable users do but I've literally no hassel from my ISP with regards to my bandwidth usage which can be up to a terrabyte a month on really high months.

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (1)

Cito (1725214) | about 2 years ago | (#42003681)

Yup, always support your local telco's dsl service. You'll never be harassed, get letters or be bothered about bandwidth caps like cable companies do.

Earthlink, Windstream dsl, and all the local telco isp's are 1000x better for true unlimited bandwidth and they don't monitor you

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (1)

zlives (2009072) | about 2 years ago | (#42003923)

agreed. if you are lucky enough to still have one... support local business

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (1)

HermMunster (972336) | about 2 years ago | (#42003839)

Hey man, that anonymous poster saying fuck you is your judge jury and executioner.

Re:Why I stick with my local telco VDSL (1)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about 2 years ago | (#42004327)

You local 'telco' as opposed to, ahem, VERIZON?

It's an elegant solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003441)

Both from a technical and a legal standpoint.

What is the EFF talking about, "surveillance"? Subscribers have to specify the URL of the content they want to download, and Verizon maintains a list of known piracy sites. A file download can take many minutes, sometimes over an hour. It's not like Verizon needs to snoop through people's posts to get this done.

Re:It's an elegant solution (4, Insightful)

miltonw (892065) | about 2 years ago | (#42003913)

No, it damn well isn't elegant. The fact that you think so simply means that you haven't a bloody clue what you're talking about.

Those URLs of "known piracy sites" are the same URLs of sites that host significant amounts of perfectly legal content.

There are two scenarios that Verizon can follow:
- Invade everyone's privacy and inspect everything being downloaded, or
- Assume everyone who downloads more than a "certain amount" is "a pirate -- even when they aren't.

Whichever scenario Verizon chooses, it will be very wrong.

No, not "elegant" at all. Really, really bad. You really haven't a clue what you are talking about.

Demand a refund, (1)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about 2 years ago | (#42003445)

If they start throttling bandwidth and advertise they are providing certain speeds, or if they sell plans with certain bandwidth, then you should be able to demand a refund for bandwidth payed for but denied.

Re:Demand a refund, (1)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about 2 years ago | (#42004313)

It's pretty clear you're violating the contract you signed if you are, indeed, pirating stuff. Hence, no reason for them to refund anything.

You're thinking of throttling people for using the advertised speed 'too much' when that 'too much' isn't defined and means you can only use the advertised speed for about 3.4 minutes before you get throttled. THAT is a contractual violation by THEM. Pirating is a contractual violation by YOU.

Link to the story... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003447)

...just got slashdotted? (by pirates...?) lol

Two-Way Street (4, Interesting)

guttentag (313541) | about 2 years ago | (#42003489)

In other news, Verizon customer John Doe has declared his Web browsing history and related Internet activity to be a "work of art" created by him and subject to copyright protection. On Friday he announced that any company caught illegally downloading, storing or sharing his copyrighted work will be subject to throttling: a process by which he reduces his payments for their services to pennies per day.

Why isn't this a two-way street? If the consumer did this, Verizon would simply say he had not paid what he owed in full. But here Verizon is unilaterally deciding not to provide the service in full. Perhaps the consumer should have the right to charge the company late fees for services not rendered in full.

Re:Two-Way Street (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003623)

But here Verizon is unilaterally deciding not to provide the service in full. Perhaps the consumer should have the right to charge the company late fees for services not rendered in full.

They're unilaterally changing the agreement with their subscribers, which the subscribers agreed to let them do. At least they're announcing the change; I'm not sure the agreement requires that.

Re:Two-Way Street (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003777)

Maybe if users stopped using Verizon and Time Warner, they'd get the message. But afterall, both companies are run and employed by republican losers who prove every day they can't run things properly.

Re:Two-Way Street (1)

HermMunster (972336) | about 2 years ago | (#42003881)

Though you may think you can do that you can't. Unfortunately. Congress determined pretty explicitly what types of works are covered by copyright. There has been a number of cases where things such as live broadcasts were not covered by Congress's copyright protection and the rulings have been that those events don't get that sort of protection (complete protection). Read the techdirt.com article about the UW restricting journalistic tweets to X #. I think you'll understand why his claim of copyrighted works would not hold water.

mechanism? (3)

pla (258480) | about 2 years ago | (#42003511)

Time Warner Cable, another U.S. internet service provider pledging to tackle piracy, says it will use pop-up warnings to deter repeat offenders.

How, exactly, do they plan to accomplish this? Yes, obviously, they have the capability to do the ultimate "man in the middle" attack, but I have rather a huge problem with them analyzing my traffic and modifying it enough to intelligently inject malicious scripts into pages I view.


More to the point, ISPs keep announcing grand plans like this, but not mentioning how they plan to detect "pirates" or what appeals process they plan to put in place. And yes, I know we'll all joke and say "none, of course", but realistically, you don't just lose all your rights as a result of engaging in minor civil offenses against a third party. Hell, even serial killers still get their day in court.

Re:mechanism? (1)

Derekloffin (741455) | about 2 years ago | (#42003747)

I'd like to know how they are going to go about detecting such, without incurring complaints that they aren't outright blocking such. If it is just 'you're using bittorrent' then they are also blocking lots of legitimate bittorrents (including a major MMO). If it is just detecting connection to known pirate sites, why don't they just block them outright?

Re:mechanism? (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#42003971)

I'm guessing they'll make a whitelist of 'legal' trackers, or at least those large enough to be noticed by Verizon (like the MMO) and just assume all others are piracy. It'll mean blocking things like niche linux distributions and independent free media, but Verizon may well consider that an acceptable loss.

Hopefully you can switch telcos (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003567)

The first two alerts will result in a simple notification email informing the users that their connection has been flagged for copyright infringements.
(pretty sure no one under 40 checks their ISP given email.)

After the second warning comes the acknowledgment phase in which a popup is delivered users. ( I am assuming that they illegally intercept and replace all my communications using a man in the middle attack? Because installing popups in SSL encoded pages Isn't going to get them far.)

    Once received subscribers are required to read and confirm, a process designed to ensure that they are aware of the unauthorized sharing that’s taking place via their account. (If you get this far, just drop your subscription and demand a refund for your time lost. Money is one of the few things that corporate executives see.)

google fiber (1)

Xicor (2738029) | about 2 years ago | (#42003571)

with any luck, google will take this as a reason to expand google fiber more quickly and basically kick out the rest of the providers

Incorrect headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003589)

It should be "Verizon to Throttle Bandwith, Sometimes for Piracy".

The shroud of the dark side has fallen (1)

akpoff (683177) | about 2 years ago | (#42003593)

"Begun the Clone War has" - Yoda

Doesn't this open themselves up to more lawsuits? (1)

BLToday (1777712) | about 2 years ago | (#42003601)

When they were just "common carrier" they can't be sued for things that goes across their network. Anyone know the legal implications of this?

Re:Doesn't this open themselves up to more lawsuit (1)

Derekloffin (741455) | about 2 years ago | (#42003695)

ISP's aren't considered common carriers as I recall. They do have some protections but it isn't the same as common carrier protections and as one would easily conclude they don't have the same obligations either. I could be wrong though, as I'm running on foggy barely awake memory here.

Switch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003645)

Glad I have Charter for this one. They have not decided to go full evil yet. If you have the option (and most of you don't) you should take these warning to switch to a company that is either local and doesn't care, or has officially denounced the six strikes. Also tell your less technical friends who may not be on Slashdot.

Seems like an ideal setup for a class action... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003647)

Lawyer finds say 3000 educated Verizon subscribes, they then stop all illegal use of bittorrent (if there actually was any) and radically increase there use of legal bittorrent files (update WoW on 64 machines- sure, need to grab the latest Linux distros (all of them, and then seed like crazy!), absolutely; all 3000 of those subscribes sharing daily videos and journals with each other, also awesome- just for good measure they should use the piratebay to access the legal torrents.

Wait for a good number of them to be throttled for 'illegal' activity- and launch the class action suit for breach of contract slander, and whatever else can stick.

Re:Seems like an ideal setup for a class action... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003705)

I'd do it.

Re:Seems like an ideal setup for a class action... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003813)

Agreed. This is effortless to honeypot.

Re:Seems like an ideal setup for a class action... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42004001)

sign me up

so meanwhile at verizon (4, Funny)

nimbius (983462) | about 2 years ago | (#42003683)

attorney: "the RIAA is threatening serious litigation if we dont crack down on piracy"
exec: "ok, we've been there before. what do they want"
attorney: "they want us to crack down"
exec: "done. tell them we will warn pirates and throttle their internet connection:"
engineer: "thats not really feasible or possible given our resources and the nature of the internet as a self healing..."
exec: "its a completely feasible way to solve this problem, i have complete confidence in its ability."
engineer: "how would you know??"
exec: "because the problem is a lobbying group, not a pirate."
engineer: "how do they verify it works?"
exec: "tell them to test from their phone."

Warning Letter (1)

unique_parrot (1964434) | about 2 years ago | (#42003699)

Dear Customer,

notify yourself herby informed that you have used more than 15 megabytes of your download volume in a week. This has been monitored as pirating use of our great services.
Should you continue pirating your credentials will be sent to our share^h^h^h^h arm of^h^h^h^h^h^h you have to pay without reciving any content (not even great advertisements).

Your favorite Verizon

What's next (1)

future assassin (639396) | about 2 years ago | (#42003709)

Computer/phone manufacturers installing piracy tracking chips on all computers? After all without a computer you can't pirate at all. What stop there, maybe have a Best Buy employee make you sign a No Piracy contract before you buy anything with storage that can connect to the internet?

So will torrenting Ubunu ISOs get me throttled? (1)

scorp1us (235526) | about 2 years ago | (#42003711)

And the link is 404

The kickback for them is video streams. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003743)

Since time Warner and Comcast do video streaming for HBO and the like, I presume they had a back-room deal where if ATT and Verizon cooperate on the f-sharing, then they'll get a special deal on pricing, or consideration when they come back and ask the video companies to be able to stream their videos on a pay video streaming service. Isn't this what they really want to get into and thus must do the movie industries bidding?

Here come the Pinkertons (2)

rtp (49744) | about 2 years ago | (#42003755)

The Internet is still very much the wild west.

The equivalent of train robberies, bank heists, Indian raids, and muggings in the mining towns on payday are a common occurrence in today's online environment.

You and I may not think copying electronic bits is a big deal, but many corporations are ruthless enough to pursue a dollar anywhere. Never underestimate greed. The larger the corporation, the further away from reality sit its leadership, the more ruthless the organization becomes.

Big government isn't very effective in the new frontier. The early decades are always chaos.

Thus, corporations turn to their own methods for protection, enforcement, and collection of revenue.

If it's profitable, can you blame them?

History clearly renders our future.

The west was free. The west was lawless. Those who were weak, those who were greedy, complained, and plotted. The west was then tamed.

Freedom suffers at scale.

The more individuals that are granted freedom, the more likely some knot of individuals will coalesce around seizing freedom from others for their own selfish gain, returning humanity to prison. When you're out numbered and out gunned, what happens?

Re:Here come the Pinkertons (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42004041)

When you're out numbered and out gunned, what happens?

Use more gun. That's how you stop some big, mean mother-hubbard from tearin' you a structurally-superfluous behind.

I download music podcasts free - is that piracy? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 2 years ago | (#42003787)

Seriously, because a bitstream of legal music may appear to be piracy (same bits) but isn't.

I trust Verizon as far as the next guillotine for their CEO and top execs.

Thepromobay (3, Interesting)

phorm (591458) | about 2 years ago | (#42003791)

So how will they determine what's piracy and what's legit?
Heavy bandwidth/bt users are pirates?
Those who use thepiratebay are pirates?

The last few things I downloaded off TPB were legit promo albums given out by bands (one band: "Stockholm" is pretty good).
The last few linux ISO's I downloaded, also bittorrent, as well as a few FOSS games.
Wow and many games use BT for updates.
So how would Verizon determine whether I'm a "dirty pirate" or just a guy who makes use of technology?

Re:Thepromobay (2)

Vicarius (1093097) | about 2 years ago | (#42004251)

... So how would Verizon determine whether I'm a "dirty pirate" or just a guy who makes use of technology?

Easy-peasy! If you use more bandwidth than a grandma checking emails, then you are a dirty pirate!

Recently Switched to Frontier (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003831)

Been having gameing lags and other issues with Comcast last several months. Could not even do uploads on Speed tests due to filtering. Guess what.. After switching to Frontier.. No more lags.. And can do Uploads on speed tests and throttleing tests work.. hhhmmmmmm.....

Can you say "TOR" (1)

morganjayp (2775505) | about 2 years ago | (#42003857)

If you really want to do this (or anyone else you don't want folks to monitor), and you don't want to get throttled just use a TOR client to proxy your traffic. For Android, use Orbot. If you use iOS (flame suit ON), well, you have bigger problems...

Re:Can you say "TOR" (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#42004109)

And watch TOR grind to a halt under the load. TOR wasn't made to handle something like that. There are precious few exit nodes, as only those either very stupid or very dedicated to free speech are going to run them and risk being mistakenly accused of trafficking in child porn or hacking into the network of someone with serious money. An onslaught of torrenters would bring TOR to it's knees.

Verizon throttling its bandwidth? (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about 2 years ago | (#42003885)

How could you tell? More seriously, Verizon is simply too cheap to upgrade its network to handle more traffic (Here's a hint, Verizon. It's called a "mesh network: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesh_networking [wikipedia.org] ." Try asking an engineer instead of a marketing oaf or a bean counter.)

the difference..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42003921)

after reading the parent article I am still concerned as to how they plan to tell illegal file sharing with bittorrent from legitimate file transfers using bittorrent

either way, chances are they will get it wrong before they get it right. with that being said, what penalties are they liable for if they terminate or throttle my service as a result of them flagging legit p2p torrents as 'illegal file sharing'. and with that being said, ALL these companies have already made sure that they cant be on the receiving end of a class action lawsuit from their users so at first glance, it appears that we have little to no power to stop them from abusing their own system to deprive legitimate p2p users of the bandwidth they are paying for

Police Judge Jury and Sentencing (1)

trevize42 (1086179) | about 2 years ago | (#42004011)

So the phone company now believes they have the right to: #1 - Police/observe what you do #2 - Judge what you are doing with no Jury or defense or proof #3 - Sentence you as guilty #4 - hand out a sentence of cut your internet access or re-direct you. If the government tried this people we go nuts. But I guess it's ok for a company.
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