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South Korean Man Given Suspended Sentence For Retweeting NK Propaganda

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the don't-talk-about-it dept.

Twitter 90

tukang writes "Park Jung-geun, 24, of South Korea has been given a 10 month suspended prison sentence for violating the country's National Security Law, which prohibits 'praising, encouraging or propagandizing' North Korea, by retweeting over 100 North Korean propaganda posts."

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Thank goodness... (5, Funny)

hawks5999 (588198) | about 2 years ago | (#42057995)

If people keep retweeting that kind of propaganda it might infect South Korea with totalitarianism and restrictions on things like speech.

Re:Thank goodness... (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 2 years ago | (#42058105)

It's also important to ask if the retweets constituted actual agreement, or whether they were done in hipster fashion, ironically.

Re:Thank goodness... (3, Interesting)

ryzvonusef (1151717) | about 2 years ago | (#42058453)

From the articles:

Mr. Park, who is 24 years old, had told the court he spread the messages as a way of lampooning North Korea. ...

“There is something left to be desired in the court ruling that (my act was) intended to benefit the enemy though,” he added. “The National Security Law should be revised as quickly as possible.

In a North Korean post that he tweaked and sent out on Twitter, he replaced a swarthy North Korean soldier’s face with a downcast version of his own and the soldier’s rifle with a bottle of whiskey.

  In his ruling, the presiding judge, Shin Jin-woo, acknowledged that some of Mr. Park’s posts were parody. But he said Mr. Park’s overall acts were tantamount to “supporting and joining forces with an antistate entity.” The justice said his court suspended the prison term, however, because Mr. Park promised not to repeat his act.

  Prosecutors argued that Mr. Park’s Twitter posts served as a dangerous tool for spreading North Korean propaganda.

Re:Thank goodness... (2, Funny)

demonlapin (527802) | about 2 years ago | (#42059345)

This is the country that still believes in fan death [wikipedia.org] .

Superstition (2)

phorm (591458) | about 2 years ago | (#42060349)

No, it's not.
There may be some people in the country who believe in it, just like there are people in N. America that believe equally wacky stuff.

In Canada, there were warnings of people using the superstitions of Chinese immigrants to scam them for money (insisting they were followed by a bad spirit, charging them to "cleanse" personal items, and stealing said items).

Re:Thank goodness... (1)

travbrad (622986) | about 2 years ago | (#42061511)

To be fair fan death IS real. It just takes about 70-80 years to take effect. ;)

Re:Thank goodness... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42061551)

Hopefully you are not from a country with adults who still believe in imaginary friends [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Thank goodness... (1)

RaceProUK (1137575) | about a year ago | (#42065303)

Hopefully you are not from a country with adults who still believe in imaginary friends [wikipedia.org] .

Imaginary friends aren't the problem, it's the people that listen to them you need to worry about.

Re:Thank goodness... (1)

OakDragon (885217) | about 2 years ago | (#42058903)

Check if his avatar is a Pabst Blue Ribbon can.

Re:Thank goodness... (1)

harks (534599) | about 2 years ago | (#42058109)

If you can get prison time for "praising" the wrong country, I can't think of any better example of a totalitarian restriction on speech.

Re:Thank goodness... (1)

mat.power (2677517) | about 2 years ago | (#42058327)

*woosh*

Re:Thank goodness... (3, Insightful)

Meeni (1815694) | about 2 years ago | (#42061405)

They are still at war with NK, you know. It's been 60 years, but they are still at war. And not always cold, as the bombing of civilians last year recall, or the sinking of navy units 2 years ago by a submarine. Praising a country you are actively at war with is often seen as treason, even in free countries. You may or may not agree, but it is not unusual.

Re:Thank goodness... (1)

harks (534599) | about 2 years ago | (#42058127)

I can't believe I missed your sarcasm. Brilliant, sir.

Re:Thank goodness... (1)

schlachter (862210) | about 2 years ago | (#42058747)

North Korea tweets?

You see, North Koreans need Democracy (1)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | about 2 years ago | (#42058035)

Like they have in the Seoul military dictatorship! It's only propaganda if it isn't in favor of imperialism!

Defend the DPRK bureaucratically deformed workers state! For the revolutionary reunification of Korea! U.S. troops get out!

better a suspended SENTENCE than a suspended GUY (2)

RobertLTux (260313) | about 2 years ago | (#42058043)

i would bet if you flipped this backwards the guy himself would have been hung

Re:better a suspended SENTENCE than a suspended GU (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 2 years ago | (#42058263)

Hanging is so 1800's. The preferred method of execution in North Korea is live mortar shell these days:

http://www.bignewsnetwork.com/index.php/sid/210323137/scat/b8de8e630faf3631/ht/North-Korean-minister-killed-by-mortar-shell-for-drinking-in-mourning-period [bignewsnetwork.com]

Re:better a suspended SENTENCE than a suspended GU (1)

alendit (1454311) | about 2 years ago | (#42058391)

This makes it perfectly ok, then!

Re:better a suspended SENTENCE than a suspended GU (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058623)

i would bet if you flipped this backwards the guy himself would have been hung

This makes it perfectly ok, then!

The fact that he was working for the enemy makes hanging him perfectly ok. The usual, legal, ethical, etc treatment for a suspected enemy during wartime is an immediate bullet to the back of the head with no trial.

The Geneva Conventions brought some niceness to war through an agreement that this should not be done to enlisted men who follow a set of rules. Spies are exempt and can and should still be shot.

Re:better a suspended SENTENCE than a suspended GU (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42061325)

You're fucking mental.

Re:better a suspended SENTENCE than a suspended GU (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 2 years ago | (#42059531)

i would bet if you flipped this backwards the guy himself would have been hung

That's true. It is also irrelevant. The measure of a free society is not in the policies of possibly the worst society in the world. It is measured in how well it lives up to the ideals of freedom.

HANGED (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42061691)

Meat is hung, men are hanged.

Re:HANGED (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42062023)

no, some men ARE hung...

Re:better a suspended SENTENCE than a suspended GU (2)

mjwx (966435) | about 2 years ago | (#42062421)

This guy gets a suspended sentence for re-tweeting North Korean propaganda.

Yet PSY gets nothing for unleashing Gangam Style.

Worst Korea is seriously fucked up.

Different Counties Have Different Laws. (1)

lobiusmoop (305328) | about 2 years ago | (#42058255)

Man breaks local law and gets punished for it, film at 11. Why is this an issue? In Thailand you get thrown in jail for simply disrespecting the king, in Singapore you'll get hung (or at least caned) for carrying the smallest amount of illegal drugs. the world is not completely homogenous (at least not yet).

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 2 years ago | (#42058279)

Maybe we hipsters just like the irony of restricting speech in order to be free. Or maybe we like anything involving Best Korea.

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058329)

Canada also has laws against disrespecting the queen (more specifically, alarming her in any way). There's also a law that says you may not be in a residential area at night (prowling), amongst other silly laws that rarely get enforced. Let's not forget the hate speech laws...

This doesn't mean these countries (including mine) aren't absolutely idiotic for having them.

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (3, Informative)

tnk1 (899206) | about 2 years ago | (#42058791)

Canada also has laws against disrespecting the queen (more specifically, alarming her in any way). There's also a law that says you may not be in a residential area at night (prowling), amongst other silly laws that rarely get enforced. Let's not forget the hate speech laws...

This doesn't mean these countries (including mine) aren't absolutely idiotic for having them.

There are a lot of crazy people who, for some reason, like discharging unloaded firearms at or in the presence of royalty. I think it has happened to Queen Elizabeth at least once and it happened to Queen Victoria a few times, and neither perpetrator was doing it for any other reason than being crazy. Basically, since the firearm was unloaded, it was was not an attack, but discharging firearms or making loud noises like that around the head of state is usually not a good thing for anyone. That is why countries associated with the UK may have laws about "alarming" the monarch, because the usual cause of the alarm involves explosions, firearms, or situations that are particular to being a head of state.

I agree, though, there are a lot of silly laws out there, but something like lese majeste, used to be a very serious crime when monarchies were not as constitutional as they are now, and even most common people might call for it to be enforced. In Thailand, they still make great use of that law, but ironically, it is actually used more by the elected government against people criticizing the country than by the King himself. The King frequently pardons people accused of that crime. Of course, with everything having to do with Thailand, it is not entirely certain how much the King is involved in the actual governance. Some people think he's purely a figurehead, except his great popularity, and some think that he's quietly running the whole thing himself.

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (2)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 2 years ago | (#42060543)

Basically, since the firearm was unloaded, it was was not an attack, but discharging firearms or making loud noises like that around the head of state is usually not a good thing for anyone.

How does one discharge an unloaded firearm?`

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (2)

mjwx (966435) | about 2 years ago | (#42062399)

Basically, since the firearm was unloaded, it was was not an attack, but discharging firearms or making loud noises like that around the head of state is usually not a good thing for anyone.

How does one discharge an unloaded firearm?`

Hold the firearm away from the body.
Pull the trigger.
Shout loudly "Bang, I say Bang old bean"

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (1)

SourceFrog (627014) | about 2 years ago | (#42062803)

Load it with one round, then when you discharge it, it is an unloaded firearm.

yup i thnk its time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42059961)

to send the queen alarm clocks all hard set at different times....she then can get alarmed all day and night

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (1)

scared masked man (2776663) | about 2 years ago | (#42061675)

That's probably a precursor to the anti-hoax laws, so if you fire blanks at the you don;t just get let off with a breach of the peace charge (and so you can't complain when some policeman mistakes it for live firing and shoots back).

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42061947)

Try discharging a firearm in the presence of the President of the USA, and you'll very soon discover the limits of your freedom of expression in that context.

Thank god we have the (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058495)

libertarians.

Anarchy is the TRUE DEMOCRACY.

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | about 2 years ago | (#42059091)

Because we're all human beings, and therefore equally qualified to criticize any culture or government that would take away someone's rights.

"Freedom is the right of all sentient beings." - Optimus Prime

Re:Different Counties Have Different Laws. (2)

detritus. (46421) | about 2 years ago | (#42059525)

Man breaks local law and gets punished for it, film at 11. Why is this an issue? In Thailand you get thrown in jail for simply disrespecting the king, in Singapore you'll get hung (or at least caned) for carrying the smallest amount of illegal drugs. the world is not completely homogenous (at least not yet).

This is nothing but modern-day McCarthyism. Freedom of speech is a human rights issue, and we have to stop supporting governments who do this, even our own.

I'm curious... (5, Interesting)

ctk76 (531418) | about 2 years ago | (#42058285)

I'm genuinely curious. What would happen in the US if I tweet messages praising Al-Qaeda and retweeted their propaganda and warnings about terrorism?

Re:I'm curious... (1)

Spy Handler (822350) | about 2 years ago | (#42058317)

you would get more than a suspended sentence.

Re:I'm curious... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058411)

Twitter would probably lock your account. Someone might get assigned to watch your behavior, but since you're a non-trivial donator to Democrat causes, it would quickly get dismissed as anti-Bush behavior and perfectly acceptable. Within three months, your Twitter account will be mentioned in a presidential speach explaining the abundance of freedoms in this country.

Re:I'm curious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058561)

You should prepare to have your home raided, all your electronic gear confiscated, and be placed under arrest for providing "material support" to a Foreign Terrorist Organization.

Re:I'm curious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058613)

A while back, there was an imam or other clerical figure in New York praising 9/11. Because he didn't actively threaten people, he could not be hauled off for anything. To boot, anyone deciding to take matters in their own hands got multi-million dollar lawsuits aimed at them.

There is a certain church that has a very unpopular message with members winding up at funerals. They know the law exceedingly well, where to draw the line, and how to get large judgements when people decide to attack them.

So, knowing this, there are two things that can happen by praising AQ:

1: The person make lots of tax-free money by lawsuits.

2: A line gets crossed, such as an active threat, or some LEO can get "giving aid and comfort" to stick, and off to Gitmo they go.

retweet! (4, Funny)

schlachter (862210) | about 2 years ago | (#42058737)

You would need to pack your belongings and immediately retweet to a safer location like Iwan.

Re:I'm curious... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058945)

President Obama would come knocking on your door to shake your hand.

Re:I'm curious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058973)

It's legal, but be advised:
- You will get on a watch list, this may mean airlines won't transport you and your wires may be tapped and you may get followed. You may have employment issues if you work with or around the gov't
- If anything you retweet even SOUNDS like a threat, that isn't protected and they'll throw the book at you

I'd do this only if I had a civil rights lawyer in my employ. Everyone will hate you and want to find a way to put you in jail, but you can get away with it as long as you tread carefully.

Re:I'm curious... (2)

tnk1 (899206) | about 2 years ago | (#42058999)

If you simply retweeted them, and only let's say, typed an IRONY tag around them, you might have to deal with the government saying you were giving material aid.

If you made it pretty darn clear that you were lampooning them, particularly by adjusting the text to something ridiculous, you'd probably get away with parody.

You need to be careful with verbatim copies of that information, because often the messages themselves are crafted to have a psychological effect, and so one way that a real sympathizer could spread the material is a retweeting that says: "Just joking" after a very serious 160 characters berating the American devils and their European lapdogs.

Re:I'm curious... (2)

detritus. (46421) | about 2 years ago | (#42059583)

What the fuck are you talking about? These tweets aren't promoting terrorism, it's promoting nationalism and communism.
I don't think you know the first thing about the DPRK and why it's such a paranoid and authoritative government.
What South Korea did was just as bad as they are. The difference is the latter isn't isolated from the rest of the world.

Re:I'm curious... (1)

lcrocker (144720) | about 2 years ago | (#42060701)

You'd be called an asshole. You'd probably get a lot of threats. The Police might even come question you. But when they discover you're just a harmless jerk, they'd leave, and they'd even go investigate the people who made threats against you to see which of them might actually be dangerous. If you actually provided material aid to them in some way, we might have a different story.

Re:I'm curious... (1)

jd.schmidt (919212) | about 2 years ago | (#42061019)

Well, I think if you could show you were doing parody you would be fine but...

If you translated the tweet and re-tweeted you would potentially be guilty of giving "assistance" or a terrorist organization for your actions as a translations service.

There is a case where an NGO went to meet with people affiliated groups our country considers terrorist to teach them peaceful means of conflict resolution and tactics. Basically they wanted to show them that there were peaceful ways to get what they wanted. Our government arrested them for providing support to a terrorist organization. I don't know that they spent any time in jail, but no assistance laws don't usually have a common sense clause.

Re:I'm curious... (1)

istartedi (132515) | about 2 years ago | (#42061365)

I'm quite certain there are people advocating Sharia and other such craziness in the USA, and nothing happens to them. The problems would come if you actually started organizing. Also, you and your followers would be subject to intense scrutiny. IMHO, If you had a Twitter account that followed Al Qaeda, Hamas, etc. it would be fully Constitutional to do more intense surveillance on the person behind that. It could be warranted in every sense of the word.

I don't think it would be too hard to find such accounts, web sites, newsletters, etc. in the US. I also think there's some reasonable chance that they are FBI honeypots. From time-to-time you hear of plots being foiled because the would be terrorist was actually corresponding with an FBI agent. You know, "Welcome to the Internet. Where men are men, women are men, and children are FBI agents". Just s/children/terrorists.

Re:I'm curious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42065677)

Depends. Are you an upper-class white male? If so, probably nothing. Arab? Go directly to Gitmo, do not collect $200.

Re:I'm curious... (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year ago | (#42066641)

I'm genuinely curious. What would happen in the US if I tweet messages praising Al-Qaeda and retweeted their propaganda and warnings about terrorism?

Nothing. You just go right ahead.

Signed, your local Secret Service Operative.

sheesh (1)

HPHatecraft (2748003) | about 2 years ago | (#42058377)

Has anyone taken a look at some of the retweets this guy is responsible for?

'Best Korea: who has more Seoul? We do!'
'Don't shoot! Don't shoot, I'm typing as fast'
'KJU: Highest score Galaga'
'and Asteroids'
'KJU: The REAL King of Kong'
'Kim Jung-un 12"'
'Kim Jung-un retains championship belt for Real Korea Ultimate Fighting'

 

Re:sheesh (1)

OhSoLaMeow (2536022) | about 2 years ago | (#42058461)

And the perrential favorite: "All your base are belong to us."

Rule 101 of Activism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058381)

Park Jung-geun, 24, a photographer and social media and freedom of speech activist

If you are an activist, you know change is hard and sometimes requires sacrifice. Hopefully, he will win his appeal and the South Korean government will get down to defining what really constitutes material support for NK, and strike the absurdly vague "praising and encouraging" bits from the law. "Long Live Kim Jong-il!” Really? That's "dangerous propaganda"? Sheesh.

Banned (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058397)

You have been banned from /r/pyongyang.

War time (1)

agent_vee (1801664) | about 2 years ago | (#42058409)

South Korea and North Korea and technically still at war. He is lucky that he isn't tried as a spy.

Re:War time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058697)

No, the Korean Armistice Agreement in 1953 ended the Korean war. They've had a number of low intensity clashes over the decades, followed by some non-aggression pacts and unity agreements, but they are not "technically still at war"

Re:War time (1)

addie (470476) | about 2 years ago | (#42060599)

I'd agree with you if you argued that they are not at war in any practical sense, but they are indeed "technically" still at war. The Armistice Agreement was signed, but by its terms it's a ceasefire that is ongoing until "a final peaceful settlement is achieved."

Regardless, if you think I'm being pedantic, as someone who lived 30 minutes from the border for many years and participated in invasion drills every few months, I can tell you that reality is far more complex than technical definitions.

Re:War time (1)

J Story (30227) | about 2 years ago | (#42063565)

I'd agree with you if you argued that they are not at war in any practical sense, but they are indeed "technically" still at war. The Armistice Agreement was signed, but by its terms it's a ceasefire that is ongoing until "a final peaceful settlement is achieved."

Regardless, if you think I'm being pedantic, as someone who lived 30 minutes from the border for many years and participated in invasion drills every few months, I can tell you that reality is far more complex than technical definitions.

I wonder if you wouldn't mind expanding on this reality. Most Western nations (Israel excluded) do not face looming existential threats. Even though North Korea has in some ways regressed to the Middle Ages, it seems to me that the fact it has nuclear weapons only minutes from a major population centre must be viewed with alarm by at least some people. Or, are Koreans more or less fatalistic about it all?

Re:War time (1)

addie (470476) | about 2 years ago | (#42063771)

I think the best way I could describe it is: most people, but specifically those under 30-35, consider DPRK as some kind of media fantasy. It exists to them, but they've never been touched by it. Seoul is a huge, rich, confident city and it seems almost (tragically?) comical how close it is to the northern border. But I think that the vast majority of people go about their lives with barely a second thought to what's up there, except when something big happens.

Then the deep seated nationalism of South Koreans shines through (sometimes alarmingly). The shooting of an unarmed 53 year old woman [guardian.co.uk] at Mt Kumgang (that I had the honour of visiting two years previously), and the sinking of the Cheonan [wikipedia.org] are the two most recent examples. The invasion drills I mentioned above consisted of sirens, people in yellow uniforms seemingly appearing out of nowhere, and all traffic and pedestrians brought to a standstill. The whole thing would last a couple of minutes, and it was pretty eery each time it happened. These kinds of things, combined with the National Security Law as in the article, make the thought of DPRK and the threat it actually poses ever-present, if not immediate. The nuclear threat is alarming, sure, but I think most South Koreans are aware enough to know that it's still technically unlikely, and also... the Americans are still there, lots and lots [wikipedia.org] of them. The deterrence against North Korea right now is very serious.

I'm cautiously optimistic that there will be some kind of reasonable outcome to this standoff in the long run, perhaps 30 years from now. Koreans tend to think of re-unification as inevitable, and they're in no real hurry considering how much it would cost them. They've been invaded and fought back numerous times in their history, and in their collective heart (and that's quite a collective) they feel it's a matter of time.

Or at least, that's the way I've interpreted all this as well as an outsider can.

Re:War time (1)

v1 (525388) | about 2 years ago | (#42058735)

Makes one wonder who would be out of their mind enough to spy for north korea? Though I suppose there's good odds that anyone they let loose out of their borders has their entire family at gunpoint if they decide to run.

Re:War time (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year ago | (#42066703)

Makes one wonder who would be out of their mind enough to spy for north korea? Though I suppose there's good odds that anyone they let loose out of their borders has their entire family at gunpoint if they decide to run.

I think the point is rather more that if you were a spy for North Korea in South Korea you wouldn't blow your cover by posting pro-NK shit on the internet.

Re:War time (1)

tnk1 (899206) | about 2 years ago | (#42058861)

Yeah, it's a little silly, but it is important to remember that the people who are making and enforcing these laws are probably living and working in Seoul, which is in firing range of literally thousands of NK artillery pieces. They may be a little more unforgiving of anyone who repeats NK propaganda, even ironically.

So where are the tweets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058521)

Where are these tweets?

I would like to read them.

Editor fail.

actions reveal reality (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058523)

My perception was always that SK was some sort of bastion of freedom and laissez-faire. Boy was that an uninformed understanding of things. Best of luck to that man and his family.

Re:actions reveal reality (1)

tnk1 (899206) | about 2 years ago | (#42058911)

My perception was always that SK was some sort of bastion of freedom and laissez-faire. Boy was that an uninformed understanding of things. Best of luck to that man and his family.

Compared to NK, they're a paradise of freedom. Compared to everyone else, not so much. They tend to have a much more controlling government and they definitely have some serious government-corporation cooperation going on there, in the mold of Japan. It's not as draconian a place as Singapore or anything, but it is not one of those countries that you assume you have the right to say whatever you want about anyone.

Re:actions reveal reality (4, Interesting)

HungWeiLo (250320) | about 2 years ago | (#42059835)

You ain't kidding about the overreach of corporations in SK. It's as close to a real-life Omni Consumer Products as it's going to get.

In Korea, it's possible to leave from your Samsung-constructed apartment complex using the Samsung-constructed elevator, and get into your Samsung-built car to drive to a Samsung-owned eatery before going to work in a Samsung subsidiary.

Re:actions reveal reality (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 2 years ago | (#42062501)

Compared to NK, they're a paradise of freedom.

Compared to NK, even 1970s China was a paradise of freedom. That's not a joke but something I've heard from some Koreans that live in China that stare across the border in horror. When asked what should be done to NK one, who may or may not have living relatives over there (impossible to get a message to them if they are alive) said "wait until the wind is blowing the right way then nuke".

Re:actions reveal reality (1)

J Story (30227) | about 2 years ago | (#42063609)

Compared to NK, they're a paradise of freedom.

Compared to NK, even 1970s China was a paradise of freedom. That's not a joke but something I've heard from some Koreans that live in China that stare across the border in horror. When asked what should be done to NK one, who may or may not have living relatives over there (impossible to get a message to them if they are alive) said "wait until the wind is blowing the right way then nuke".

In cold, economic terms, nuking may be the cheapest solution, if you remove the human element. As I understand it, when East Germany rejoined West Germany, getting the former Soviet client state up to modern standards was a massive drain on the economy. What's more, East Germany was a relatively bright economic light in the soviet sphere. In order to integrate North Korea with the south, not only would pretty much everything need to be replaced, but almost everyone would need retraining and updated education. I doubt that South Korea would want to do that without asking for international financial aid.

Re:actions reveal reality (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year ago | (#42066713)

Compared to NK, they're a paradise of freedom.

Talk about setting the bar low.

Re:actions reveal reality (1)

asavage (548758) | about 2 years ago | (#42059131)

The thing is North Korea and South Korea are technically at war. The Korean war has never ended, they only agreed to a ceasefire. Doing anything to promote or aid another country that your country is at war with is a serious crime in every country in the world. In this case however it sounds like the reaction is totally overblown as retweeting their dumb tweets isn't helping North Korea in any way.

Re:actions reveal reality (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42063429)

South Korea requires a license to use the Internet, last I heard. No Anonymity allowed on SK sites -- you register with the SK equivalent of your social security # on sites.

Also, on the social level, Christians constantly harassing Buddhists and vandalizing their temples while the government turns a blind eye.

South Korea is turning into Rick Santorum's wet dream.

How to treat social media (1)

dehole (1577363) | about 2 years ago | (#42058541)

If you can be punished for saying the wrong thing on social media, then we should consider social media as a liability. Only post things that the court of law would deem appropriate.

It's like big brother gave you a terminal to type into. Whatever you say can and will be used against you.

Re:How to treat social media (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about 2 years ago | (#42058749)

Anything you say always could and would be used against you. The only difference here is how many people hear you. But as a test of this, try standing in your living room and saying, "everybody down, I have a bomb, give me all your money". They go to something where more people can hear you like a bank and do the same.

Re:How to treat social media (1)

dehole (1577363) | about 2 years ago | (#42058841)

Yes, I understand the "yelling fire in a crowded theater" concept. It just seems foolish to put on the record, all of your social speech.

Everything you say to your friends on facebook, for example, can easily be used against you. Or Google Chat, or any service like Twitter. You may not be required to use your real name, but they have your IP, and all of your "friends", so we have taken what we typically said in private at parties, and put it out in the open, so that at anytime in your life, it can be used against you.

Re:How to treat social media (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about 2 years ago | (#42059975)

Ah.. I see. I thought you were complaining that someone hearing your speech could get you in trouble when in reality, you are saying be careful where you make your speech because it can/will be used against you at some time.

Ridicule competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058653)

Everybody knows that in the world of ridicule, "North Korea is Best Korea". Keep this up, and South Korea will become a worthy competitor.

Watch It (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058687)

He'd better watch out, or someone will turn his fan on when he's asleep.

South Korea disputes Best Korea title (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42058709)

Taking advantage of the Glorious Leader's death, South Korea attempts to take the "Best Korea" title from the current title holder, North Korea. Experts claim Kim Jong-il will come back from the dead later this week to eat the brain of South Korean president Lee Myung-bak, bring an end to the conflict and prove, once again, that North Korea is the Best Korea.

Good thinking. (1)

Minwee (522556) | about 2 years ago | (#42058751)

If we all just ignore North Korea, maybe they will go away.

If you like primary sources... (1)

Minwee (522556) | about 2 years ago | (#42058819)

Here is his twitter feed [twitter.com] . Much to nobody's surprise, it's in Korean.

Give the stupid back their voice SK! (2)

geraldkw (534863) | about 2 years ago | (#42058975)

Dear South Korean government, The stupid need a voice too. How can people learn how stupid they are if they are not allowed to display their stupidity. Thanks, Concerned Citizen of the World

whoop 'em Gangnam style! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42059049)

whoop 'em Gangnam style!

Emigration, not punishment (2)

marvinglenn (195135) | about 2 years ago | (#42059317)

Instead of bothering with punishment in SK, why not just help him emigrate to NK? Maybe after he's lived there, he'll realize what a crap hole it is and try to help the place go Gangnam Style.

Re:Emigration, not punishment (1)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about 2 years ago | (#42064381)

Nice way to miss the point. Please look up "parody" and then try again.

anonymity is the only defense (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42059363)

the only defense the powerless have against the powerful is anonymity

that is why the powerful want to destroy the anonymous internet

if the guy had hadn't associated his real name with his account then used twitter through tor or an out of country vpn he would still have his freedom

lesson learned, if you do anything that might possibly get the attention of those with the power to harm you don't let them know it was you who did it

Give him to North Korea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42061377)

If he thinks North Korea is such a nifty place, how about throwing his ass over the border and letting him the party?

Later, when he's starving to death and trying to survive on grass, he might appreciate the benefits of living in a free Republic with free markets.

We Love the Leader! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42062127)

Better not go here then:

http://northkoreanradio.com/

reply (0)

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