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Federal Officials Take Down 132 Websites In "Cyber Monday" Crackdown

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the law-won dept.

Government 153

coondoggie writes "A team of world-wide law enforcement agencies took out 132 domain names today that were illegally selling counterfeit merchandise online. The group, made up of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations and law enforcement agencies from Belgium, Denmark, France, Romania, United Kingdom and the European Police Office, targeted alleged counterfeiters selling everything from professional sports jerseys, DVD sets, and a variety of clothing to jewelry and luxury goods."

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153 comments

Question (5, Insightful)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098279)

Why is Homeland Security dealing with counterfeit product sales?

Are sales of fake professional sports jerseys jeopardizing our national security now?

Re:Question (5, Funny)

hduff (570443) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098311)

Why is Homeland Security dealing with counterfeit product sales?

Are sales of fake professional sports jerseys jeopardizing our national security now?

You do not need to ask questions, citizen. Move along. Nothing to see here.

And turn off that camera!

Re:Question (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098529)

You must be living in some kind of fantasy. Out here in the real world, they beat the crap out of you for any of those things. Oh wait, is that what you did, and severe brain trauma made that fantasy seem real.
Sorry.

Re:Question (2)

dimeglio (456244) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100013)

Why is Homeland Security dealing with counterfeit product sales?

Are sales of fake professional sports jerseys jeopardizing our national security now?

You do not need to ask questions, citizen. Move along. Nothing to see here.

Perhaps profits from counterfeit merchandise finances terrorism?

Re:Question (1)

KingAlanI (1270538) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100145)

yeah, if they don't care about being legal when making money, they might not care about being legal when spending it either.

Re:Question (0, Troll)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about a year and a half ago | (#42101127)

If you define "terrorisim" as threatening corporate profits - then yeah.

Re:Question (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42100383)

Homeland Security is doing what they always do. Protecting corporate profits exclusively. They have yet to do anything meaningful otherwise. You don't really think the body scanners are safe and effective, do you? They don't care if they're safe, and we know they're not effective, but that doesn't matter as long as the contracts get paid.

Re:Question (3, Informative)

Thud457 (234763) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098339)

"when you buy that fake Movada, you're rolling with al Qaeda [nytimes.com] ."

Re:Question (5, Informative)

MrEricSir (398214) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098353)

Because Homeland Security is just an umbrella for several pre-existing agencies, one of which is Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE.)

Re:Question (4, Informative)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098569)

Because Homeland Security is just an umbrella for several pre-existing agencies, one of which is Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE.)

HSI (Homeland Security Investigations) appears to be at least a separate branch of ICE. The article even implies that these are two organizations working in tandem

From the website:

HSI investigates immigration crime, human rights violations and human smuggling, smuggling of narcotics, weapons and other types of contraband, financial crimes, cybercrime and export enforcement issues. ICE special agents conduct investigations aimed at protecting critical infrastructure industries that are vulnerable to sabotage, attack or exploitation.

One of these things is not like the others (emphasis mine).
Good to know that designer handbag manufacturers are now part of the "critical infrastructure industries".

Re:Question (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098705)

Some things, while superficially very different, require mostly the same methods to control. While you're checking for drugs, you might as well take a quick look to check for counterfeit items. Why duplicate agencies, if you can add another task to an existing one, thereby saving paperwork and cash?

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098907)

Human rights violations, smuggling, smuggling, smuggling, smuggling, financial crimes, cybercrime, and smuggling.

I'm willing to bet a lot of the financial crimes and "cybercrime" (ugh, horrid term.. unless they mean "crimes committed by Steve Mann and Keven Warwick") have a smuggling element (hint: moving the money to Grand Cayman) to them, Human rights violations are probably related mostly to human smuggling.

So, which one is not like the others?

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42099583)

Good to know that designer handbag manufacturers are now part of the "critical infrastructure industries".

When the nation produces literally nothing at all except "intellectual property", you're damn straight they conciser the only product as critical infrastructure :/

Not exactly right (2)

alostpacket (1972110) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099639)

I believe HSI (Homeland Security Investigations) is a directive or division within ICE but ICE is also and agency under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

http://www.ice.gov/about/offices/homeland-security-investigations/ [ice.gov]

(Note the link to DHS.gov at the bottom of the page)

Granted, it's a clusterfsck of terminology that makes you wonder about priorities, but I think the parent was correct.

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42101099)

HSI is the investigative arm of ICE. Customs Enforcement is enforcement of all customs issues, rather than having separate infrastructure for counterfeit goods and illegal goods. It's less expensive to have one group, rather than split these missions and pay twice as many govt employees and contractors.

Conglomeration of several agencies into the DHS umbrella was done to better permit info sharing between different investigative arms of the government. This allows one group to gather intelligence to fight multiple missions, rather than have disparate intelligence data sets. That helps to combine intelligence data to make connections between multiple criminal organizations, helping them catch the bad guys, no matter what the bad guys goal is...be it terrorism or fake Nikes.

Re:Question (2)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098935)

Exactly. Don't "You, Mr. America", remember "demanding" all this stuff be brought under one agency in your panic after 9/11? Trillions of extra dollars have been spent on it, money that would have been much better spent on medical technology, saving-lives-wise.

Re:Question (2)

tnk1 (899206) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099609)

I think you're making a point about government waste, but you're failing to address the real issue.

There is nothing wrong with taking a dozen or whatever organizations that all had useful information that they would not or could not share and adding them to one umbrella so they actually do their work better. That was what people demanded.

The problem was that instead of just doing that, they managed to somehow spend a crapton of money doing it and also adding a lot of crap no one wanted.

As far as spending money on medical technology, what makes you think they would have spent it any more efficiently on medical technology than they would have on Homeland Security?

Re:Question (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098385)

yes .. didn't you know that buy purchasing a fake NFL jersey from some guy in Wisconsin, who gets his supplies from the guy operating the jersey making machine on nightshift and is selling them out the back door, you are funding terrorism in a foreign country?

a Couple LEO rules (1)

RobertLTux (260313) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098409)

1 if you ever deal with %bignum% amount of actual cash in a bust then the Secret Service will just about call you

2 anything that goes overseas will cause HomeLand Security to start noticing (possible vector for THEM) of course i think HS is sort of a Macro Dial to most of the TLA stack anyway.

Re:a Couple LEO rules (1, Troll)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098669)

1 if you ever deal with %bignum% amount of actual cash in a bust then the Secret Service will just about call you

2 anything that goes overseas will cause HomeLand Security to start noticing (possible vector for THEM) of course i think HS is sort of a Macro Dial to most of the TLA stack anyway.

Right; because, as Iran-Contra (among others) taught us, the Federal Government maintains exclusive right to funding third-world authoritarian dickheads.

Re:a Couple LEO rules (1)

Nostromo21 (1947840) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099969)

I have a couple questions:

1. This guy in Jersey - he's a licensed exporter/freight forwarded with a customs license I take it?
2. Isn't there an assumption that most other countries outside the US even know what 'NFL' stands for, or would want to watch it, much less buy junk paraphernalia related to it..?

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098455)

They're also helping with hurricane sandy. Gonna complain about that to? Or would you rather form an even larger number separate departments designed to deal with a single and specific task.

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098573)

'Help' in this instance would be relatively relative.....

Re:Question (1, Informative)

Tontoman (737489) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098493)

"Intellectual property rights theft is not a victimless crime. It threatens U.S. businesses and robs hard-working Americans of their jobs, which negatively impacts the economy. It can also pose serious health and safety risks to consumers, and oftentimes, it fuels global organized crime." Here is a link to Homeland Security's rationale: http://www.dhs.gov/topic/intellectual-property-rights [dhs.gov]

Re:Question (4, Interesting)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098709)

Find: Intellectual property rights theft
Replace With: The Drug War

"The Drug War is not a victimless crime. It threatens U.S. businesses and robs hard-working Americans of their jobs, which negatively impacts the economy. It can also pose serious health and safety risks to consumers, and oftentimes, it fuels global organized crime." Here is a link to Homeland Security's rationale: http://www.dhs.gov/topic/intellectual-property-rights [dhs.gov]

Fun with words.

ooh can i play (1)

zlives (2009072) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099295)

"The endless masturbation is not a victimless crime. It threatens U.S. businesses and robs hard-working Americans of their jobs, which negatively impacts the economy. It can also pose serious health and safety risks to consumers, and oftentimes, it fuels global organized crime." Here is a link to Homeland Security's rationale: http://www.dhs.gov/topic/intellectual-property-rights [dhs.gov] [dhs.gov]

Re:ooh can i play, should have used (1)

zlives (2009072) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099311)

"The Circle Jerk is not a victimless crime. It threatens U.S. businesses and robs hard-working Americans of their jobs, which negatively impacts the economy. It can also pose serious health and safety risks to consumers, and oftentimes, it fuels global organized crime." Here is a link to Homeland Security's rationale: http://www.dhs.gov/topic/intellectual-property-rights [dhs.gov] [dhs.gov]

much more applicable

Re:ooh can i play, should have used (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099357)

"Circle Jerk" is definitely the better term.

Re:Question (1)

tnk1 (899206) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099695)

There is a point to this rationale. How do you maintain a skilled workforce, benefits, and innovation if as soon as you make something, if you can immediately have it copied by someone who treats their workforce as little better than slave labor?

Lots of people around here like unions, or at least "living wages" for those who are less fortunate, but they fail to explain how they will achieve that without protectionist activities, which would only increase the need for ICE/DHS to make these sorts of raids?

They pay people so little in China, they artificially deflate their currency, have little regard for environmental and occupational regulations to the point where it costs less to make it *and* ship it all the way across the Pacific Ocean than it does to have American workers make it at home and simply have it trucked a few hundred miles. People want to pay less for what they buy, and then wonder why they don't get paid more.

There's only two ways to maintain high earning standard for workers: protectionist tariffs and the sort of fiscal meddling that China does, or somehow raise the watermark for the rest of the world so their wages become equivalently competitive and ours more so. #1 is problematic, but possible, but #2 is something that is happening on its own, but don't expect the process to complete in our lifetimes.

Re:Question (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100237)

> They pay people so little in China, they artificially deflate their currency, have little regard for environmental and
> occupational regulations to the point where it costs less to make it *and* ship it all the way across the Pacific
> Ocean than it does to have American workers make it at home and simply have it trucked a few hundred miles.
> People want to pay less for what they buy, and then wonder why they don't get paid more.

At the same time though, conditions in China do seem on a path to improvement. I have seen articles where members of labor unions (illegal in china) interviewed, and they have even had strikes at plants. Should we really expect that we can fight tooth and nail for higher wages and living standards here, and just...export that around the world without struggle?

There can be no labor movement without labor, and no labor without economic activity.

In the end though, this is not even related to the issue. How many of those knock off goods from first world companies were themselves being produced in chineese plants under the same conditions as the knock offs?

Not knocking the operation though, as meh as I am on the issue in general, claiming something is something that it isn't is dishonest, and fraud, so on that level, I do applaud it.

Though by the same token, when I was in Paris I bought a couple of knock off jackets from a street vendor. They were fine jackets for the price (which, knowing they were knock offs, I felt no shame offering him a fraction of what he was asking.... and he took it). I could say he was trying to defraud me but.... I highly doubt anyone is actually fooled by these guys. (seriously, he told me it was a promotion and he needed money for gas back to Italy lol... he was the second guy that day to pull over in a car and tell me the exact same story)

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42100161)

it fuels global organized crime.

No part of that statement is a lie... exactly.

Selling illegal ripoffs of products is a crime (at least in the US) and one has to be organised to create the ripped off products... and since most of the products are probably not manufactured in the US, it's 'global organised crime'.

Where you live (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098525)

It's a corporatocracy

Re:Question (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098683)

Homeland Security is what tons of government agencies all roll-up to. I believe the Secret Service historically has been in charge of dealing with counterfeit product sales, and now they roll up to Homeland Security.

Re:Question (1)

alexander_686 (957440) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099083)

IIRC, The Secret Service investigates counterfeit money, not counterfeit items in general. Customs investigates the import of counterfeit items.

Re:Question (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099201)

I'm sorry, you're correct. Brain fart on my part.

Re:Question (1)

Rich0 (548339) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099337)

No, you're just a victim of the fact that the jurisdictions of federal agencies make no sense whatsoever. Just the name of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms exemplifies this problem.

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098711)

Are sales of fake professional sports jerseys jeopardizing our national security now?

I wasn't interested in the article so I skipped to the comments.
I am ashamed to have thought you were joking about the fake professional sports jerseys bit.

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098819)

Because selling those goods are a good way to laundered money.

Re:Question (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098881)

WHICH IS TERRORISM!!!

#FoxNewsHeadline
#AlsoCapsFilter

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098833)

HSI oversees the agency's international affairs operations and intelligence functions

From the http://www.ice.gov/about/offices/homeland-security-investigations/ [ice.gov] .

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098863)

And it's headed by a man looking just like Jim Carrey.

Re:Question (0)

Nostromo21 (1947840) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098877)

They are jeopardising the payola big content needs to pay off the politicians who control the DHS officials. Even I know that & I'm a skippy! ;-p

Re:Question (1)

helix2301 (1105613) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099427)

Alex Jones says it all the time Home Land Security is the most powerful agency in the US. They do what they want when they want.

Re:Question (1)

poetmatt (793785) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099481)

because it has nothing to do with security - and like any politician, they have to look like they're doing *something!*

and no consumer was harmed from some kind of magic counterfeit goods site that won't buy it from another counterfeit goods site.

Re:Question (1)

macraig (621737) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099541)

"Homeland" in this instance doesn't mean what you think it means. Think "corporate". :-|

Re:Question (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099599)

Why is Homeland Security dealing with counterfeit product sales?
  Are sales of fake professional sports jerseys jeopardizing our national security now?

If you believe the hype, yes.

Because a sale of a fake jersey funnels money into terroristist organizations who sell the stuff to raise cash to do more attacks on America.

Counterfeit goods have traditionally been a way for gangs and mobsters to raise money for their operations in the past, and modern era fundraising for terrorist organizations also involves the same.

Re:Question (1)

timeOday (582209) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099913)

That line of argument would make a lot more sense if they'd been pursuing a particular criminal organization and then moved to take down their illegal source of income, which happened to be trademark violation.

That's not to say global intellectual property rights should go unprotected; only that it should not be rolled into "national security." For that matter, I wouldn't mind seeing it accounted for separately, so that whiny companies and CEOs can be reminded why they deserve to pay a tax rate above 0%.

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42099675)

Why did I see an SUV with "Homeland Security" driving around my neighborhood today? I live 500 miles from a coast.

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42099815)

Like this, Alqaeda is against the colonization of the middle east. Jews uses patents and copyrights to own your culture and sell it back to you. This then gives them money to fund the colonization of the middle east. So bypassing the Jew = Support for Alqaeda. Jews and Arabs are the same race so I dont see the problem.

Re:Question (1)

dnaumov (453672) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099971)

Why is Homeland Security dealing with counterfeit product sales?

Are sales of fake professional sports jerseys jeopardizing our national security now?

When IP becomes your country's biggest export, you bet.

It's for your own damn good (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42100221)

Didn't the US just vote for the candidate that wants the government to take care of your every need?

Well, get fucking used to the government taking care of your every need. Even if you don't need it. Or even want it.

Oh wait, you don't agree with all the choices that huge government makes? Too late. You gave it all that power that it's now misusing.

But maybe you can take some of that misused power away from the government next time you vote.

Next time you get a chance to chose between two candidates, one who wants lower taxes and one who wants higher taxes, next time vote for the one who wants lower taxes.

Because taxes fund the power that's used against you.

How many of these (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098363)

How many of these sites were taking down for selling properly counterfeit goods, and how many were taken down for buying products made by a foreign arm of a international corporation and reselling them in a different market.

If these are proper forgers, good deal. If these are "grey market importers," fuck this.

(I hate the term "grey market," once you sell me something it's mine. If I choose to resell it, that's my business. You don't want me to resell it, don't sell it to me)

Re:How many of these (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42099079)

I'm for one am looking forward to the obligatory article in coming days:Cyber Monday Crackdown Takes Down 131 Websites by Mistake

Re:How many of these (1)

Nostromo21 (1947840) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100009)

+131

Re:How many of these (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42099087)

I believe the ones that were taken down here were site like: realgenuinecheapcanadiangoose.something advertising canadiangoose for 1/5 of the normal price
on facebook
Canadian Goose were annoyed that people thought the the crap they got was real Canadian Goose, and those who bought were apparently to dumb to know that it would be fake at that price so they were annoyed that what they got was crap
   

Re:How many of these (1)

Nostromo21 (1947840) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100019)

So basically, DHS protects stoopid ppl from themselves by circumventing Darwin's principles? Got it.

This is news? (0)

davidwr (791652) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098443)

In the modern copyright/MPAA/RIAA/trademark-enforcement era, such events are hardly newsworthy.

"Information for Nerds," yes. "News for nerds" or for anyone else, no.

In other "news," Homeland Security agencies busted drug dealers, child-porn traffickers, human-traffickers, and people making allegedly threatening posts on social networking sites.

Yawn.

Re:This is news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098677)

In the modern copyright/MPAA/RIAA/trademark-enforcement era, such events are hardly newsworthy.

"Information for Nerds," yes. "News for nerds" or for anyone else, no.

Just because something outrageous happens on regular basis, should not make it less outrageous.

In other "news," Homeland Security agencies busted drug dealers, child-porn traffickers, human-traffickers

That is not news because one could see why Homeland Security is actually tasked with busting human traffickers. That's not a ridiculous application of the agency. Protecting against counterfeit goods is.

Re:This is news? (1)

davidwr (791652) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099277)

I think you've proven my point for me:

The use of Homeland Security to protect copyright interests hasn't been "news" for years.

Outrageous? Yes. Ridiculous? Yes. News? Sadly, no.

So what you're saying is... (4, Funny)

AioKits (1235070) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098487)

I in fact DID NOT get a good deal on my new Sorny 52" plasma flat screen or my Magnetbox bluray player?

Re:So what you're saying is... (1)

Trepidity (597) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098533)

au contraire, you got a deal so good the feds had to shut it down!

that's blur-ray player. (1)

swschrad (312009) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098825)

first tip-off should have been them claiming 1080-HA! resolution.

Re:So what you're saying is... (1)

organgtool (966989) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099081)

I in fact DID NOT get a good deal on my new Sorny 52" plasma flat screen or my Magnetbox bluray player?

Nope. Now if it was a genuine Panaphonics...

Re:So what you're saying is... (1)

temcat (873475) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099235)

I've even seen Panashibas.

Re:So what you're saying is... (1)

Nostromo21 (1947840) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100065)

Can anyone recommend an 8K ultra hi def system with 22.2 surround sound for under a grand?
I also need a list of filthy Asian pr0n that's out in this format. TIA! ;)

Re:So what you're saying is... (1)

Kittenman (971447) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100855)

Our local junk-chain sells T-fal pots and pans...

Re:So what you're saying is... (1)

cashman73 (855518) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099223)

I thought there was something funny about my Appel iPADD,. . .

Re:So what you're saying is... (1)

HPHatecraft (2748003) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099435)

you think you got problems? What's the return policy for ocelot cubs?

Re:So what you're saying is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42099681)

Simpsons did it

Re:So what you're saying is... (2)

timeOday (582209) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099957)

Heh. Although, "counterfeit" does not necessarily imply inferior quality. Sometimes it is nothing but an unlicensed extra production run on the same assembly line that makes the "real" thing. Or, sometimes it is simple arbitrage; "grey imports" of brand-name goods that were supposed to be sold for less profit in poorer markets.

Which ones? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098587)

Where is the list of the 132 websites?

Re:Which ones? (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098797)

I'm sure ebay.com and alibaba.com are in there somewhere.

I hate Mondays! (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098601)

I'll bet the people who own these domains hate it worse than I do, though.

Running low on IPV4 addresses ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098741)

Maybe they're just trying to free up some space so they can avoid having to upgrade their router to IPV6.

Repercussions (2)

Enderandrew (866215) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098759)

I'm not endorsing crime, nor advocating that criminals and suddenly the victims, but is the US federal government in the right to seize domains?

If the websites are breaking laws, aren't there other due processes to follow? Shouldn't we be working with foreign law enforcement agencies to go after those people rather than simply taking their domains?

A domain is property. Simply taking the property of others without due process (especially of people not in your jurisdiction) isn't exactly fair or Constitutional. I fear this behavior will add credence to the argument of the US relinquishment of key TLDs and possibly splintering the internet in the future.

Re:Repercussions (1)

Warhawke (1312723) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098913)

The domains in question are licensed (i.e. not property) via a U.S. based registrar for .com, .net, etc. TLDs. In essence, this puts you under U.S. jurisdiction since you are agreeing to licensing terms with a U.S. business. Or at least this is how the argument goes. I fear you may be correct that that argument will further the US relinquishment of key TLDs. At least the strong majority of these domains were pretty evidently selling infringing goods. It also helps that trademark, patent, and copyright issues are often internationally legislated through trade agreements, so a split in due process won't be as dramatic.

Re:Repercussions (2)

Nostromo21 (1947840) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100167)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guantanamo_Bay_detention_camp [wikipedia.org] (& dozens others like it).

I think 'due process' in the US got a major rewrite during the Clinton era. Justice is for the just and the poor only it would seem. If they can seize human beings & detain them without any substantive evidence required, then I don't think web domains are high on the list of human rights violations you should be concerned with. Just sayin...

Re:Repercussions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42100919)

I think you mean Bush era, Gitmo was set up by Bush Jnr!

Re:Repercussions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42100233)

1. Browse pr0n ^H^H^H^H^H^H Investigate global organised crime websites.
2. Shut down counterfeit website
3. Wait for counterfeiters move to new domain
4. $$$$ (by getting government money to do this job into infinity)
Goto 1.

Re:Repercussions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42100345)

That's why they use these usurped 'powers' to go after actual criminals, just to get you used to the idea that they think thy can take your domain too. They think WRONG!

Amazing (4, Insightful)

JustNiz (692889) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098783)

So the world governments do nothing to cut off spammers, scammers, child pornographers or anything that actually burns members of the public, but the moment some big corporations profits from monopolistic practices look like they are being challenged they spring into action and kill it dead in seconds.

Re:Amazing (1)

Omnifarious (11933) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098923)

Though, in reality, I have few actual problems with this sort of enforcement (aside from the fact that cutting off domain names shouldn't be possible for a government without a trial). Though the hypocrisy of the situation is still not lost on me.

Re:Amazing (1)

Nostromo21 (1947840) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100193)

Hey, you can even pay off foreign governments to let you arrest people on false charges, at the same time as you seize all their domains & assets, both business & personal, as well as 3rd party IP & data as collateral damage. Just ask Kim Dotcom. Might is right & there is nothing mightier than the almighty dollar, as we al know :).

Re:Amazing (2)

cmseagle (1195671) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099121)

Or, you know, people selling counterfeit merchandise have to be relatively easy for customers to consistently find, while the other criminals you mention are actively avoiding detection, and have no reason to stay on the same domains/servers for very long, making them much harder to shut down.

Re:Amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42099127)

I like a good government bashing too, but in this case it is not warranted. Great lengths are taken to limit spammers, scammers, and child pornographers. There just happens to be a great deal more of them than companies that mass produce counterfeit goods. Simply due to the size and complexity of making and distributing tangible goods, it is easier to find and shut counterfeiters down. That does not mean progress is not being made against other criminals.

Aside from the ease of enforcement, you could think of the situation in this fashion:

If you eliminate 50% of all software patents, but only 20% of all patent trolls, the patents would still outnumber the trolls.

Re:Amazing (1)

timeOday (582209) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100091)

It's interesting that the government is more jealous in protecting the interests large corporations (e.g. the article to which we are responding) than defending the solvency of the government itself:

Using complex schemes to shift U.S. revenue overseas, Microsoft was able to avoid paying taxes on $21 billion in revenue between 2009 and 2011, amounting to about half its total U.S. sales, according to the subcommittee report. The company avoided paying $4.5 billion in taxes, or about $4 million per day, during that time, according to the report.

Using similar schemes, Levin said, Apple avoided taxes on $34.5 billion between 2009 and 2011, and Google has dodged taxes on $24 billion.

Hewlett-Packard, meanwhile, used a series of constantly revolving short-term loans between itself and its subsidiaries that have helped it avoid paying billions of dollars in taxes since at least 2008, according to Levin. Though he didn't say how much money H-P has avoided paying, Levin did say that H-P has kept billions of dollars in cash offshore -- more than $17 billion in 2010, for example -- that it would then "lend" to its U.S. parent company in a steady stream.

Forget a few jerseys, we're talking about billions of dollars here. Clearly it's not that the government is being bamboozled [senate.gov] , rather it has been bought out or intimidated. I think it is time to put our foot down; if these companies really think they can do better from Bahrain, let them move there and try.

Re:Amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42101119)

Spammers are more annoying then dangerous... who really cares.
These ARE scammers.
And there probably 100 times as many child pronogprahy arrests per year as there are for this.
http://www.cnn.com/2011/CRIME/08/03/us.child.porn.ring/index.html
This one story alone is over half the number from this story. What is the outrage again?

Next (2)

Richy_T (111409) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098839)

I wish they'd bust the thieves in Washington who are counterfeiting dollars...

(Ooh, a little bit political)

Re:Next (1)

Krojack (575051) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098963)

They don't need to counterfeit it. They just add some pork in a bill that funnels the dollars to some company they or a family member owns.

Re:Next (1)

Nostromo21 (1947840) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100213)

To be fair guys, they aren't really counterfeiting it, per se. More like laundering it repeatedly as they adjust the value in their favour. Only problem is, as every housewife knows, you can only launder shit so many times before it falls apart!

Re:Next (1)

WGFCrafty (1062506) | about a year and a half ago | (#42101133)

When you own legitimate intaglio presses and plates, it isn't counterfeiting. No matter how much linenthatfeelskindalikepaper they press it will never be counterfeit, always legitimate. At least in the foreseeable future.

Thank God They're Protecting Us (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42098843)

from buying cheaper versions of expensive products rather than wasting their time saving companies billions of dollars and people millions of man-hours by tracking down and incarcerating spammers and malware distributors. ICE and HSI should be commended ... no wait, fucking disbanded is what I meant to say.

Re:Thank God They're Protecting Us (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year and a half ago | (#42099067)

I 've often wondered why Rolex knockoff makers don't come up with their own awesome designs and sell them the normal way. If they can still turn a profit at $10, why not?

Anyone with the money to buy overpriced "premium" stuff, and wants to, more power to you. The rest of you go hoof it to K-Mart.

And if the UN controlled the Internet (1)

Krojack (575051) | about a year and a half ago | (#42098939)

This would have taken months of blabbing over and most likely blocked by China because they make most counterfeit products.

Just sayin'.

Any idea which domains? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42099425)

Any idea what sites were taken down?

Also, I was surprised they even got a court order this time. Didn't they just leverage the Root DNS servers the last few times without any oversight?

And court order or not, did they still override the respective domain registrars, again by just changing entries in the root servers?

Yeah, dat guy is totally stealing my idears. (1)

mpgalvin (207975) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100063)

I'm waiting for the followup that details how many of them end up staying down. The possibility for regulatory DOS'ing competitors is just too broad, given the verification method claimed in TFA.

Due Process (2)

Tokolosh (1256448) | about a year and a half ago | (#42100135)

Due process, what an archaic concept!

This kind of law enforcement behavior eradicates any lingering sympathy I might have had for the "copyright holders."

that's why.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42100561)

That's why i support the ITU to take control on the master DNS. If the ITU announce their agreement for a new root server, i will pointing my DNS server to them. US gov't becoming more idiot by the day...

Might makes right ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42101053)

Until might gets a bullet in the head, at which time
might becomes fertilizer which actually reveals its true
substance.

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