×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Scientists Develop Sixty Day Bread

Unknown Lamer posted about a year ago | from the not-in-my-back-pantry dept.

Earth 440

Hugh Pickens writes writes "BBC reports that scientists have developed a technique that can make bread stay mold-free for 60 days that could also be used with a wide range of foods including fresh turkey and many fruits and vegetables. At its laboratory on the campus of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Don Stull of Microzap showed off the long, metallic microwave device that resembles an industrial production line. Originally designed to kill bacteria such as MRSA and salmonella, the researchers discovered it could kill the mold spores in bread in around 10 seconds. 'We treated a slice of bread in the device, we then checked the mold that was in that bread over time against a control,' says Stull. 'And at 60 days it had the same mold content as it had when it came out of the oven.' Food waste is a massive problem in most developed countries. In the US, figures released this year suggest that the average American family throws away 40% of the food they purchase — which adds up to $165 Billion annually. There is some concern that consumers might not take to bread that lasts for so long and Stull acknowledges it might be difficult to convince some people of the benefits. 'We'll have to get some consumer acceptance of that. Most people do it by feel and if you still have that quality feel they probably will accept it.'"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

440 comments

If you want bread from today... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166595)

...you have to come back tomorrow.

this is great news (1)

madmayr (1969930) | about a year ago | (#42166627)

especially if it can kill the mold of other stuff too as for me, bread won't be the main usage - because it gets either eaten or too hard to eat before mold comes

Re:this is great news (1)

Zorpheus (857617) | about a year ago | (#42167173)

If you put it into something like a plastic bag it will never become hard. But it doesn't taste that well anymore after like 3 days. I guess the best is some storage form in between, not too dry and not too damp.

I know how to do this (1)

backslashdot (95548) | about a year ago | (#42166637)

Just put the bread out in the hot sun .. it will dry out. Then 60 days later SLOWLY steam use a moderate steam setting for a 2 hours (not longer) .. it'll be like new.

OK I haven't tried it and just came up with the idea, but it sounds like it would work. F it.

Re:I know how to do this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166751)

Old news: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crisp_bread

60 days! Thats nothing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166947)

I bought some bread "Mrs. Baird's" brand from the local H.E.B,in Texas, that sat on top of the fridge for a least 4-months, yet there was no signs of mold after all that time. I became scared to eat it, yet I would just look at it and put it back. Eventually I just threw it away and promised myself to never buy that "Forever Bread" again, scary I've never seen bread not go moldy after at least 8-weeks.

Re:60 days! Thats nothing. (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | about a year ago | (#42167161)

I'm an Aussie. I met a guy from Chicago in Amsterdam, it was his first trip overseas, he said to me "what's wrong with Dutch milk, why does it go off in a few days", I still haven't stopped laughing.

anti-preservative yawping (1)

mrmeval (662166) | about a year ago | (#42166639)

I remember when several bread makers quit using preservatives over some FUD or other. It benefited the entire bread supply chain since the bread would spoil faster. I think most have started using them again.

I'd like to know if that destroys C. botulinum spores. (botulism)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001624/ [nih.gov]

I'm starting to grow and can food again due to cost. If that could help reduce or maintain food costs it would be welcome.

Re:anti-preservative yawping (5, Informative)

Cyberax (705495) | about a year ago | (#42166747)

Botulinum bacteria are obligate anaerobic, they can't survive in oxygen atmosphere. So you're safe with bread. And C. botulinum _spores_ are ubiquitous, so there's no sense in trying to prevent those.

Re:anti-preservative yawping (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | about a year ago | (#42167089)

So, you're saying if I'm ever thrown out of a spaceship airlock I'll be attacked by flesh eating bacteria long before I can get picked up by an impossibility drive? Bummer! Would it help if I was turned into a penguin?

Real bread goes stale after 1 day (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166641)

I've always been very suspicions of bagged, mass-produced bread. Normal, homemade bread goes stale and hard after a day or two at most. What could they be possibly putting in there that lets it last ten days, let alone sixty?

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (5, Insightful)

ratbag (65209) | about a year ago | (#42166669)

Quick heads up - they put the ingredients on the side of the bag.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (0)

narkosys (110639) | about a year ago | (#42166701)

and have you seen how much of that is chemicals? well over 90% of it. good bread should consist of four basic ingredients: flour, yeast (fresh yeast is best), salt and water.

I would rather bake on a regular basis then ingest all the crap they put into store bought bread. besides, the bread I bake at home gets eaten fast enough to not get a chance to go stale :P

P

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (2)

ratbag (65209) | about a year ago | (#42166729)

Please note - I make no comment on the quality of bagged vs home-baked bread - merely that our "suspicious" consumer can quite easily see what goes in to bagged bread to make it last.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (5, Insightful)

khallow (566160) | about a year ago | (#42166827)

I imagine 100% of a bag of bread is chemicals just like 100% of a person's body is chemicals. It's a good fit.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (1)

jimshatt (1002452) | about a year ago | (#42167115)

Yeah mass percentage, but just a tiny volume percentage of bread is chemical. They should really advertise that :)

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (2)

Yetihehe (971185) | about a year ago | (#42166833)

and have you seen how much of that is chemicals? well over 90% of it.

10% is not material? I thought bread was 100% chemicals, like everything else. If you have something which is not 100% chemical, you may be on track to winning 1 million GBP [rsc.org]

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (4, Insightful)

mosb1000 (710161) | about a year ago | (#42167001)

100% of everything is chemicals. But if you're insinuating that 90% of what's in bread is chemically altered or produced by some artificial means, you're insane, It's obviously mostly flower. Any preservatives they put into it are salts of one form or another. And sometimes they put high fructose corn syrup in it, which keeps it seeming fresh while lowering the water activity. But there's no need to speculate about any of this, because the ingredients are listed on the label.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (2, Informative)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about a year ago | (#42167011)

Well, everything we put into our bodies is a chemical, even O2 and H2O.

The question is, how harmful are these chemicals? The flour is actually probably the most harmful ingredient in the bread. Our digestive tract isn't really equipped to process any kind of wheat unlike most herbivores (which we are NOT, in spite of what vegetarians/vegans/peta tells you) and it does have a substance that is rather toxic to our intestines - gluten (which by the way, they almost always list as a separate ingredient, even though it is part of the flour.)

Though probably worse than flour is bleached flour, which happens to have most of the nourishment removed from it, so you mostly just end up with the bad stuff.

Soy is also bad for you, pretty much on par with flour if not worse, and bread often includes it. Yeah, I know, the Chinese lived off of it for some long assed time, and so did blah blah other culture. These guys lived off of it because they literally had nothing else to eat, so either eat soy or starve. The Irish lived off of eating grass for a while as well, but I don't see anybody eating that, primarily because it mostly just goes right through you. Unlike say cows, we only have a single chamber stomach, and it pretty much doesn't do shit to break down the grass into anything that our intestines can absorb. The hippies had it wrong, stay away from soy.

http://www.utne.com/2007-07-01/Science-Technology/The-Dark-Side-of-Soy.aspx?page=3 [utne.com]

Your homemade bread might include soy as well, namely from the oil you put in the pan to keep the dough from sticking to it, and most vegetable oils include soy as an ingredient (especially the cheap ones.)

To be honest, it's best to avoid bread entirely. Beef for protein and salad are generally the best things you can eat, dress it with extra virgin olive oil and vinegar.

Better than that, replace the beef with ostrich meat if it is available where you live, tastes much better, more nutritious, and is very lean. Plus if you're an eco geek, ostriches require less resources to raise than cows. If nobody sells it locally, you'll pay a lot for it unfortunately.

http://products.mercola.com/produce/free-range-ostrich/ [mercola.com]

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167035)

replace yeast with sourdough and we can talk

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (1)

dejanc (1528235) | about a year ago | (#42166711)

Quick heads up - they put the ingredients on the side of the bag.

If you are buying your bread in a bag, you are doing it wrong.

Best tasting bread, in my opinion, is bought in bakery and has 4 ingredients: flour, yeast, salt and water.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (1)

ratbag (65209) | about a year ago | (#42166753)

See my answer to a similar comment - I'm not commenting on the quality of bagged bread. FWIW I buy fresh-baked daily from the local bakery when possible, but I do occasionally use the bagged stuff.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (2)

thegrassyknowl (762218) | about a year ago | (#42167183)

That's interesting. I go to my local bakery and they put my fresh bread in a bag. Am I doing it wrong?

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (3, Funny)

ratbag (65209) | about a year ago | (#42166811)

Note to mods - I certainly wasn't aiming for Insightful/Interesting/Informative :)

More a sort of "+1 stating the bleeding obvious"

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (1)

PiMuNu (865592) | about a year ago | (#42166817)

The bread I make at home lasts about a week. Store it in a bread bin or a bag on your bread and yours will to.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166951)

Quick heads up - they put the ingredients on the side of the bag.

Quick heads up - the ingredient list is a list of chemicals neither you nor I nor most people on /. could describe the purpose and effects of. And that's if the specific ingredient is listed at all; one ingredient listed on my current loaf of bread says simply "dough conditioner".

So, Mr. ratbag, do you have anything intelligent to add to the conversation or are you just gunning for cheap mod points from the low IQ crowd?

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (4, Informative)

ratbag (65209) | about a year ago | (#42167041)

Okay, in the spirit of your comment:

What the freak is Google for?

Here's what you get when you lookup "hovis bread ingredients" (Hovis is the most popular brand in the UK and sadly plain white bread is still the most popular loaf): http://www.hovisbakery.co.uk/our-range/soft-white/soft-white [hovisbakery.co.uk]

On that page it lists the ingredients (the same as it does on the bag) as follows:

Wheat Flour (milled from 100% British Wheat), Water, Yeast, Salt, Soya Flour, Fermented Wheat Flour, Vegetable Fat, Emulsifiers: E472e, E471 (made from Vegetable Oils); Flour Treatment Agent: Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C).

Starting from the end, I think your "dough conditioner" is out "flour treatment agent". Even some home bakers use Vitamin C in their breadmaking.

So I do some more Googling (try it, you'll like it) and discover that an 800g loaf typically has about 500g of flour and 7g of yeast and may be up to 45% water - we're running out of room for the "chemicals" now.

Onwards:

Vegetable fat - fat extracted from vegetables. Ha. Binding agent, also controls the gluten development to avoid over-rising.

Emulsifiers (binding agents, prevent the separation of ingredients, improve the texture). See http://www.laleva.cc/food/enumbers/E471-480.html [laleva.cc] for the specific ones used by Hovis.

Now, was that so difficult? Use your loaf, as we might say in Britain. Don't be "suspicious" of a product, investigate. You might not like what you find, but at least you'll know and your mind can be put to rest.

And yes, as I mention in another comment, I was being "funny" - I just have a hard time when people have the means to discover information, but instead choose to sit there and develop preconceptions.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (1)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about a year ago | (#42166869)

Bread goes stale from losing its moisture. If you keep it sealed in plastic it will last longer. There might be some viscous ingredients (e.g. HFCS) that hold in some of the moisture better, but I really doubt that it is anything as arcane as you'd otherwise think.

One trick to "un-stale" bread is to put it next to a fruit that is porous and has high water content, e.g. a strawberry or a banana, and seal both in plastic wrap. It'll add a slightly fruity flavor as well as make the bread moist again because the bread absorbs moisture from the fruit.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (1)

Ubi_NL (313657) | about a year ago | (#42166927)

the answer is the amount of fat that is added. Anyone claiming their bread lasts over 2 days and is still edible either has no taste or simply adds some form of fat into the dough. Cheap UK bread always lasted for a month as was still not stale.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167099)

flour, water, yeast, sugar... lasts longer than 2 days and tastes the same. It always depends how you store it.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166983)

Speak for yourself. Where I live there is wonderful bread that is delicious for five days. Of course it's none of the white bread you Anglo-Saxons eat.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167075)

No, homemade bead does not go stale and hard after a day or two. I know this, I've made bread a lot.
You need to bag it to preserve it's moisture, otherwise it... loses it's moisture. My bread usually lasts about 2 weeks, if I don't use it all.

Re:Real bread goes stale after 1 day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167169)

Depends on the bread. Normal, homemade bread made with just water, salt and rye flour can stay good for two weeks and the taste improves over time.

Fridges (1)

tinkerton (199273) | about a year ago | (#42166643)

So when are they going to build it into the fridge?

Re:Fridges (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about a year ago | (#42166789)

I would tend to argue against building a microwave into a refrigerator because of difficult-to-anticipate interactions between the EM and the packaging. More likely we'll see this in the form factor of a typical microwave oven, or even as an alternative setting thereon. The article notes that they implemented a system whereby the radiation is evenly distributed through the chamber, too, which I'm sure would be a welcome addition to present home microwaves.

Similar to UV Sterilizer Lights in Fish Tanks (1)

detain (687995) | about a year ago | (#42166657)

Sounds just like how the UV Sterilizer Lights kill surrounding bacteria. Depending on how much this costs I could see it becoming a standard issue item in most households.

Re:Similar to UV Sterilizer Lights in Fish Tanks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166765)

You've misunderstood the research.

At the (factory) bakery they churn bread off the production line, zapping it for 10 sconds before bagging it. Once at home there are no live mould spores inside the bread, so it doesn't go mouldy.

You'd never see this in the home itself.

Acceptance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166667)

Well, I for one already accept it, for I have read about it on Slashdot.

Preservation has it's downside (4, Insightful)

Grayhand (2610049) | about a year ago | (#42166671)

The problem is over time nutrician in food declines. We're so obsessed with keeping food forever it may all end up with the nutricianal value of card board. On the bright side it may reduce waste but it would tend to be abused. Bakeries may decide they can run just one day a week and take their sweet time getting to you or better yet centralize so there are a couple of mega bakeries in the country that take their time shipping all over the country. Their idea of fresh bread may be a month old. It may not form mold but it could all taste like crap but if it saves corporations money get used to it. Remember tomatoes taste like rubber because they are picked green to make them easier to transport. Corporations only care about profit.

Re:Preservation has it's downside (4, Insightful)

F'Nok (226987) | about a year ago | (#42166695)

Really? Because most places here have options on the source of the tomatos, or bread.

You want bread baked today, you buy the one that says "baked today".
If people are willing to buy 30 day old bread, it's not really the fault of corporations, there are plenty of independent bakeries that could cater to your needs.

See the organic food supply for the same effect in action. Or a local farmers market. etc

Re:Preservation has it's downside (3, Interesting)

bazorg (911295) | about a year ago | (#42167039)

Really? Because most places here have options on the source of the tomatos, or bread.

I live in London and I am concerned about what happens to food quality when large supermarkets use certain food products as "loss leaders" until there are no alternatives in the region other than gourmet/specialty items that I really can't afford.

Re:Preservation has it's downside (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166733)

Remember tomatoes taste like rubber because they are picked green to make them easier to transport.

And here I thought it was my smoking and city air.

Jokes aside, you do have a point.

Re:Preservation has it's downside (1)

simoncpu was here (1601629) | about a year ago | (#42166737)

If that day ever comes, I'll make lots and lots of money by selling authentic fresh bread for twice or thrice the price of standard bread.

Re:Preservation has it's downside (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166961)

Unfortunately it doesn't work that way. Most people just look at the price. There is already a generation living that claims that real strwaberries taste artificial and rather go to McDonalds than a real restaurant for a wedding dinner. You can train taste and we are on the best way that future generations wont care about what they eat.

Re:Preservation has it's downside (1)

guises (2423402) | about a year ago | (#42166757)

This isn't for fresh bread, this is for packaged bread. Sliced bread. There's no nutrition degradation and the plastic will keep it from going stale and losing any volatile flavors. I don't think your tomato comparison is really apt, I don't see how it relates to packaged bread.

Re:Preservation has it's downside (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167109)

You mean, of course, that the bread keeps the plastic from going stale.

Re:Preservation has it's downside (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166759)

Bakeries may decide they can run just one day a week and take their sweet time getting to you

What the hell kinda bakeries do you shop at???

I will gladly pay you money to see a bakery that randomly decides to open for business one day a week. Whatever recipe that baker uses, I WANT IT.

Re:Preservation has it's downside (1)

Lee_Dailey (622542) | about a year ago | (#42166769)

nutricianal => nutritional

/crikey! i've become a spelling nazi ... [*sigh ...*]

Re:Preservation has it's downside (1)

cffrost (885375) | about a year ago | (#42166993)

nutricianal => nutritional

/crikey! i've become a spelling nazi ... [*sigh ...*]

Well, that's better than becoming an Illinois Naz, Neo-Nazi, Soup Nai, or Original Flavor Nazi.

Re:Preservation has it's downside (1)

Twinbee (767046) | about a year ago | (#42166837)

Wouldn't the market allow for an expensive tomato that more wealthy and/or more picky customers would choose to want? If the demand is there, then surely we should be able to have these nice tomatoes?

Re:Preservation has it's downside (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166949)

And then you realize that if they did do this and the bread was terrible tasting that nobody would stand for it and fork off to another store that isn't awful tasting.

Even a giant can fall if the market wills it. Shame the governments are all too happy to waste our money in keeping them alive even if nobody wants them.

Microwaved bread? (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | about a year ago | (#42166675)

It can still technically be considered organic. Finally a solution to buying certified organic sandwich bread and having it go bad after 2 days.

Other Effects (2)

Apu de Beaumarchais (2023822) | about a year ago | (#42166689)

The article doesn't mention whether it has other effects on the food. My main concern would be with the food getting dried out, hard or otherwise unpleasant to eat as can happen when you microwave it. Instead they talk about people being potentially concerned with it not spoiling for so long and cost, but it could easily go the other way since a lot of people are concerned about the effects of preservatives and people understand cooking things makes them safe to eat and having food last a lot longer means it can go a lot further. Especially interesting with bread for me since I love to eat bread, but will only have a few slices most weeks and have to either throw out most the loaf or freeze it and defrost a few slices a week.

Really fascinating though. I hope it proves to be a wonderful way of treating food that gets widely accepted.

Staleness? (2)

Twinbee (767046) | about a year ago | (#42166699)

Okay, it resists mould, but does the bread resist going stale and hard?

Re:Staleness? (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year ago | (#42166743)

I came here to say this. Why wouldn't the bread get stale all the same? Staleness isn't caused by mold at all. The starch in bread degelatinizes and crystallizes over time, causing the hard texture.

Re:Staleness? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#42167053)

I keep my bread in the bag it came in. It goes moldy long before it goes stale. If I open it up and spread the loaf out, it goes stale within hours.

"bread" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166709)

It's more like a medical supplement preparation than actual food. Extremely purified starch. Without any of the essential B vitamins and fibers that are required to digest starch without getting sick, fat and stupid. (Which is also true for all white "bread".)
Not "can"... You *have* to eat this with a wide range of fresh foods. Otherwise it's outright dangerous for your health.

If you eat this thinking it's food, have fun with your diseases when you get old... (Please don't. I don't wish suffering upon anyone.)

Also, except in extreme situations, why would you need bread to last that long anyway? A normal bread (not a starch sponge) lasts a couple of days at room temperature, even without cooling. A normal 500g bread is eaten in 2 days. 3-4, if you bought a 1000g one for you alone, which is a stupid mistake that won't happen again. And the bakery has fresh bread every day. Even Sundays. They bake about as much as is bought... and leftovers go to the food bank to feed the poor. Nothing is wasted.
So this is a solution looking for a problem that doesn't exist.

Source: Medical knowledge about nutrition that is well-known since the 60s, but apparently hasn't reached bread makers and consumers yet. And basic damn common sense.

Re:"bread" (2)

jamesh (87723) | about a year ago | (#42166771)

It's more like a medical supplement preparation than actual food. Extremely purified starch. Without any of the essential B vitamins and fibers that are required to digest starch without getting sick, fat and stupid. (Which is also true for all white "bread".)
Not "can"... You *have* to eat this with a wide range of fresh foods. Otherwise it's outright dangerous for your health.

If you eat this thinking it's food, have fun with your diseases when you get old... (Please don't. I don't wish suffering upon anyone.)

Also, except in extreme situations, why would you need bread to last that long anyway? A normal bread (not a starch sponge) lasts a couple of days at room temperature, even without cooling. A normal 500g bread is eaten in 2 days. 3-4, if you bought a 1000g one for you alone, which is a stupid mistake that won't happen again. And the bakery has fresh bread every day. Even Sundays. They bake about as much as is bought... and leftovers go to the food bank to feed the poor. Nothing is wasted.
So this is a solution looking for a problem that doesn't exist.

Source: Medical knowledge about nutrition that is well-known since the 60s, but apparently hasn't reached bread makers and consumers yet. And basic damn common sense.

Happy to hear that you live near a bakery and can go to the shop every couple of days, but not all the rest of the world[1] lives that way. The problem does exist, but maybe this isn't quite the solution.

I live in a household that is essentially gluten free, and all the commercial baked gluten free breads that I've found are pretty horrible (except for one fruit loaf which is only edible because it's put in the toaster first and smothered with butter), so I normally make it from a pre-packaged bread mix. The same solution should work with minimal effort for regular gluten bread.

[1] "rest of the world" is a term that may be foreign to you, but the concept is an actual real thing.

Re:"bread" (1)

ldobehardcore (1738858) | about a year ago | (#42166925)

It's strange, I must be in some kind of culture jam, but my family, and everyone I know (IRL) steers clear of whitebread. We all eat 9 or 7 grain bread (the wholegrain stuff). I don't really know why. I grew up with it, and can't even stand the taste of whitebread. It's like there's nothing in it.

We aren't Amish or anything. I think there might have been some literature the family and friends read many years ago that must have made them jump the whitebread ship.

There are bakeries, and we go there for non-sandwich bread, but not that often.

In Germany, I buy fresh bread daily ... (3, Funny)

acidfast7 (551610) | about a year ago | (#42166773)

... 60-day old bread sounds worse than the usual pre-sliced white (Wonder) bread that you guys usually eat :(

Re:In Germany, I buy fresh bread daily ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166867)

I know! ...and then they wonder why they're all so FAT!

Re:In Germany, I buy fresh bread daily ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166903)

You are saying that because you don't have good bread.

Re:In Germany, I buy fresh bread daily ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167055)

No, that's Bavarians. They don't eat pesky things like bread, they eat sausages [wikipedia.org] !

Re:In Germany, I buy fresh bread daily ... (3, Interesting)

khasim (1285) | about a year ago | (#42166907)

I miss BrÃtchen. Particularly with a Rindswurst and slathered in mustard.

Or with Nutella and coffee for breakfast.

Re:In Germany, I buy fresh bread daily ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167129)

Incredible! There wouldn't be another country on earth with this 'fresh bread daily' technology.

Re:In Germany, I buy fresh bread daily ... (1)

macraig (621737) | about a year ago | (#42167177)

You make it sound as if possessing fresh mass-produced bread suddenly makes it any less insipid. It doesn't. Tasteless bread is still tasteless bread regardless how fresh it is. I never liked bread until the first time I baked my own. Even the fresh bread from supermarket bakeries is terrible. The attention to detail is absent and the ingredients and process are inferior to reduce expenses. Mass production of food just never ends well in general. The vegetables I eat now neither taste as good as those from 40 years ago nor do they even have the same nutrient value. Oh but they do have better shelf life, so there's that.

Figure out how to use it on a house (1)

Belial6 (794905) | about a year ago | (#42166813)

Figure out a way to make one of those fumigation tents into a microwave blocker, and blast the inside of houses with it.

Or... (4, Insightful)

jampola (1994582) | about a year ago | (#42166821)

Purchase 40% less food. Duh!

Re:Or... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166957)

THIS! How is it even possible that 40% is thrown away in America? Over the past month I had to throw away just one clementine, which went mouldy probably because it got damaged in transport, but nothing else. Things nowadays are so fresh when they lie in the supermarkets that their use-by date is usually weeks in the future. And you can make it months if you freeze them. Is food in America so cheap that people don't buy fridges? And why buy so much if almost half of it has to be thrown away? I just don't get it.

Beat by McDonalds (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166825)

McDonalds have them beat by years. Their stuff does not mold. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1319562/McDonalds-Happy-Meal-bought-Sally-Davies-shows-sign-mould-6-months.html

To be honest I thought their first picture was the old 6month old meal when I opened the page and was disgusted by it. Turns out it was the meal on day 1, than all that happened was the food dried out a bit.

Jesus warns against hoarding (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166859)

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done
on Earth as it is in Heaven.

Give us this day our DAILY bread,
and forgive us our sins,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,
and the power, and the glory,
for ever and ever.
Amen.

Re:Jesus warns against hoarding (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | about a year ago | (#42167159)

No, no! It's an ALLEGORY! God created BREAD that lasts 60 days, then he went to work making the WORLD and MAN. On the 70th day, he squeezed the bread absent-mindedly, saw that IT WAS GOOD, and went to his bookshelf, to take down the book marked "To Serve Man".

5 years old swiss roll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166861)

Recently a known tv / radio host Enbuske tasted a 5 years over due date swiss roll - and told it was just fine. 60 days for bread doesn't seem far fetched.

http://www.mtv3.fi/uutiset/kotimaa.shtml/2012/11/1666871/enbuske-toteutti-lupauksensa-soi-viisi-vuotta-vanhaa-kaaretorttua ( in Finnish only )

This is a step back (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166885)

Take a McDonalds burger, it will stay like new for a few years.Bread, meat etc.
I don't see anything new here, except if this bread starts to get moldy after 60 years. Then it is a step backwards from the McDonalds bread.

The problem in developing countries (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166931)

Isn't food waste, it's lack of nutrition; What other kind of effects does this treatment have, e.g. on the nutrition value of the products?

Of course nobody actually develops stuff for developing countries but for the fat ass Americans who will be forced to eat anything. (See Monsanto)

my bread (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166939)

I bake my own bread. No special ingredients. Only water, flour, yeast, sourdough. It stays perfect for about 6 days. After that it gets chewy. But 90% of the time it's gone within 3 or 4 days anyway... Why would you keep break for 60 days? It's for eating!

Re:my bread (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167015)

why do you add yeast? Sourdough is enough to make the dough grow. Is it too slow for you?

Flour already lasts forever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42166945)

If we stop shipping it from factories, we could eliminate most of the wastage.

Waste is a problem, but a social problem that needs a social solution.

No thanks. (1)

TractorBarry (788340) | about a year ago | (#42166967)

I like my bread freshly baked either from my local baker (first choice) or from my trusty bread machine. I have no interest in old, crappy preservative riddled, chemical crap in my food thank you very much. Maybe useful for astronauts or arctic explorers etc. but this is exactly the sort of thing that is simply not needed.

Not to mention the fact that a bit of bread mould is good for you !

Freeze it (2)

Alain Williams (2972) | about a year ago | (#42166985)

I buy 1/2 sized loaves and freeze them, these loaves are sold in a breathable wrapping. I take them out a few hours before I need them (or pop in the microwave if I am in a rush). I don't buy bread that is wrapped up in a plastic bag - such bread is generally tasteless mush.

What? Just Ask McDonalds! (2, Informative)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about a year ago | (#42166987)

What's the big deal here?

McDonalds has figured out how to make an entire hamburger, including the bun, last for 20 years [youtube.com] without molding.

no great news. (1)

ruir (2709173) | about a year ago | (#42167017)

The operation comes with a cost, probably losing most of the nutrients after the "treatment". Food already loses most of the value after being irradiated, and this is a worrisome trend.

Re:no great news. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167049)

And why would you think this exactly?
Delicate cell structures can be disrupted by microwaves, etc. In general vitamins, minerals, and other such structures aren't really affected.
Complicated Amino acids and proteins, maybe, but a statement like "food already loses most of the value..." needs at least some kind of scientific backing.

Well this is great, except... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42167037)

Once you OPEN the bread it will go bad. Most of the bread in my house goes "bad" because my girlfriend opens it and leaves the open package out on the table until it gets hard. Even if you re-closed it properly like a normal human, mold spores would still get in when you opened it, so it would still be a problem. I think this technology would only really help people to keep unopened packages for loner.

NEWSFLASH: PRESERVING BREAD (1)

MrKaos (858439) | about a year ago | (#42167043)

Bread actually can be frozen and taken out slice by slice when required. It remains quite fresh if it's wrapped and sealed. An amazing piece of technology called a "Freezer" can do this for you at minimal expense.

Now, if it says fresh after sixty days - then you have a breakthrough. Bread without mould after sixty days could be re-used as quite an effective mallet for woodwork.

"Quality feel"? (1)

macraig (621737) | about a year ago | (#42167125)

Considering that nearly all commercially mass-produced bread is insipid uninviting junk made with homogenous inferior ingredients and yet consumers still buy it by the truckload, I don't think "quality feel" will be an issue at all. People who aren't super-tasters won't even notice the difference, if they're willing to eat the junk that is mass-produced now.

Great, but... (1)

peppepz (1311345) | about a year ago | (#42167139)

...what does it taste like? Scientific progress aside, food should always be a pleasure, that's why we don't eat astronauts' food unless we need to.

Evolution (1)

kbg (241421) | about a year ago | (#42167197)

If the process kills all mold spores and this is repeated again and again, doesn't that imply that if this becomes widespread practice that nature will develop super mold that can survive this process?

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...