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Scientists Develop Chocolate That Won't Melt At High Temperatures

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the melt-in-an-oven-not-in-your-hand dept.

Patents 161

Zothecula writes "One of life's less pleasant surprises is discovering the chocolate bar that you forgot you had in your pocket on a hot day. Two scientists working at Cadbury's research and development plant in Bourneville, U.K., are fighting that gooey surprise with the invention of chocolate that remains solid even when exposed to temperatures of 40 C (104 F) for more than three hours. Aimed at tropical markets, the 'temperature tolerant chocolate' is described in a World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) patent application."

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161 comments

New slogan (2)

oodaloop (1229816) | about a year ago | (#42169195)

Melts in your Mouth. Not in your pocket.

Re:New slogan (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169223)

Except that it wouldn't melt in your mouth and thus probably also be less delicious than normal chocolate.

Feature not Bug! (4, Insightful)

tempmpi (233132) | about a year ago | (#42169273)

Exactly: chocolate melting almost exactly at body temperature is a feature not a bug.

Re:New slogan (4, Informative)

timeOday (582209) | about a year ago | (#42169345)

Except that it wouldn't melt in your mouth and thus probably also be less delicious than normal chocolate.

RTA:

The problem was that making a chocolate bar that wouldn't melt wasn't hard. What was hard was to make one that people still wanted to eat. The military bars didn't melt and they were nutritious, but they were difficult to eat and they didn't taste very good. Thatâ(TM)s because the usual way to keep chocolate from melting was to either add fillers like oat flour and swap the cocoa butter for other fats, which made it taste like a candle, or adding water or glycerol to encourage sugar crystal formation, which made it gritty. Cadbury's approach is...

Well, I won't spoil it for you.

Re:New slogan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170639)

Except that it wouldn't melt in your mouth and thus probably also be less delicious than normal chocolate.

RTA:

The problem was that making a chocolate bar that wouldn't melt wasn't hard. What was hard was to make one that people still wanted to eat. The military bars didn't melt and they were nutritious, but they were difficult to eat and they didn't taste very good. Thatâ(TM)s because the usual way to keep chocolate from melting was to either add fillers like oat flour and swap the cocoa butter for other fats, which made it taste like a candle, or adding water or glycerol to encourage sugar crystal formation, which made it gritty.

Cadbury's approach is...

Well, I won't spoil it for you.

I read the article, it says nothing about the chocolate melting in your mouth.

Are you saying it still will?

Re:New slogan (2)

jfengel (409917) | about a year ago | (#42170973)

I had some of those bars, from mid-80s MREs. They were just awful: as one friend put it "the more you chew it, the bigger it gets".

If you thought of them as more akin to Tootsie Rolls than chocolate, they weren't so bad (though I'm not a fan of Tootsie Rolls, either).

Re:New slogan (1)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about a year ago | (#42171211)

Good thing you weren't eating MRE's in the late 90's/early 2000's then, they often included tootsie rolls, and I hated those.

Re:New slogan (4, Informative)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year ago | (#42169653)

You got it' It's why others that invented it years ago did not market it. It change the taste and mouth feel of chocolate. Test groups did not like it.

This is not a new invention, Back in 2009 another company already announced it.

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/2540765/Scientists-develop-new-type-of-chocolate-which-does-not-melt-in-the-mouth.html [thesun.co.uk]

Re:New slogan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169741)

Try further back. Look at chocolate and WWII.

Re:New slogan (5, Informative)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year ago | (#42170045)

I worked with/on Hershey's Desert Bar. In 1990.

http://www.hersheyarchives.org/essay/details.aspx?EssayId=39 [hersheyarchives.org]
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jasonliebigstuff/7290674224/ [flickr.com]

It was processing the egg whites to withstand structural changes at higher temps.

I put one in a flame on a gas stove. It burned, did not melt.

They were tolerable to eat, but not great. Much like last year's halloween candy.

It may actually be more delicious if in the Arctic (1)

art6217 (757847) | about a year ago | (#42170353)

They say, that their chocolate is going to be good even if it does not melt, as opposed to a "normal chocolate". As chocolate in general does not melt easily on very cold days and thus has taste problems, then perhaps their chocolate will actually taste better in the winter.

Re:New slogan (3, Funny)

uncanny (954868) | about a year ago | (#42169229)

chocolate that remains solid even when exposed to temperatures of 40 C (104 F) for more than three hours

If your mouth is 104 F you might want to see a doctor!

Re:New slogan (4, Funny)

bhartman34 (886109) | about a year ago | (#42170709)

I think you're missing an important point of physics: If it won't melt at 104F, it won't melt at 98.6F, either, which is the problem. :)

Re:New slogan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170729)

If your doctor is in your mouth on the other hand, you might want some real chocolate afterwards.

M&Ms (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169361)

Melts in your Mouth. Not in your pocket.

Are you misquoting the M&Ms slogan or did you just accidentally recapitulate it. You know that's why M&M were invented right? to solve the same problem for GIs in WW2.

Re:New slogan (4, Interesting)

cellocgw (617879) | about a year ago | (#42170813)

My wet-blanket reply of the day follows.
The primary mechanism for chocolate breakup in your mouth is dissolving (and some early enzymatic breakup), not melting. If you really waited around for even soft chocolates to melt at 37-ish degrees Celsius, you would not have a good time.
What would matter to the consumers of this new chocolate,then, would be its texture and dissolution rate, not its melting temperature.

1st Iraq war???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169197)

I could've sworn there was a news story back during the 1st Iraq war about a chocolate being developed to withstand the high heat for the American troops. Too bad i'm too lazy to Google it.

Re:1st Iraq war???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169351)

Could this be why the article states "the U.S. military commissioned companies, most notably Hershey’s, to develop and manufacture chocolate bars for soldiers that could be carried in a pocket or stored at tropical temperatures" perhaps? Too lazy to read the article too?

Re:1st Iraq war???? (5, Insightful)

vlm (69642) | about a year ago | (#42169467)

You'd have found it was just a remake of the WWII era tropical bars. I ate a couple (of the modern remakes, I was in .mil in the 90s). It was icky.

You know how cheap american chocolate (Hersheys) is like room temperature brown colored Crisco? The tropical stuff was basically the same stuff but a texture / mouth feel more like refrigerated brown Crisco.

I imagine this "invention" is about the 4th generation re-invention. Food science is just like IT, every decade or two, the same old ideas get lipstick and a new dress on the old pig and a big announcement about the new baby, while the old timers roll their eyes, not that crap again....

Re:1st Iraq war???? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169739)

I imagine this "invention" is about the 4th generation re-invention. Food science is just like IT, every decade or two, the same old ideas get lipstick and a new dress on the old pig and a big announcement about the new baby, while the old timers roll their eyes, not that crap again....

Yeah, it's really too bad you didn't read the article. Otherwise, you'd look far more clever in your silence.

Re:1st Iraq war???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170671)

You'd have found it was just a remake of the WWII era tropical bars. I ate a couple (of the modern remakes, I was in .mil in the 90s). It was icky.

You know how cheap american chocolate (Hersheys) is like room temperature brown colored Crisco? The tropical stuff was basically the same stuff but a texture / mouth feel more like refrigerated brown Crisco.

I imagine this "invention" is about the 4th generation re-invention. Food science is just like IT, every decade or two, the same old ideas get lipstick and a new dress on the old pig and a big announcement about the new baby, while the old timers roll their eyes, not that crap again....

I, for one, find your comment insulting. Hershey's tastes much better than most of those European brands that taste like powdered milk...YUK!!!

Re:1st Iraq war???? (3, Interesting)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about a year ago | (#42170859)

Hershey's tastes like brown paraffin wax.

I had a bar of Dairy Milk for the first time in a long while last week. It too was like wax. I suspect that quality has suffered since Kraft bought them out.

I stopped liking their mainstream products anyway - the cocoa solids content, at only 22%, isn't really worthy of the name "chocolate", but at least the mouth feel was OK previously.

They also own Green & Blacks, who produce some very nice everyday chocolate. Their milk starts at 34% cocoa solids, and they do bars all the way up to 70% and 80%.

Re:1st Iraq war???? (1)

coinreturn (617535) | about a year ago | (#42171307)

They also own Green & Blacks, who produce some very nice everyday chocolate. Their milk starts at 34% cocoa solids, and they do bars all the way up to 70% and 80%.

Everyday chocolate. Now that's what I call life.

Constipation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169199)

After this chocolate comes to market, sales of Exlax and Metamucil sky rocket in the countries where this chocolate is sold.

Can't wait to try it (3, Interesting)

ShooterNeo (555040) | about a year ago | (#42169217)

From TFA : Temperature tolerant chocolate has been around since the 1930s, but it sucks because it becomes too hard and tastes bad.

I can't wait to try a bar of this stuff and compare it to the normal kind. Obviously, since it doesn't melt in your mouth, it won't be the same, but if it is soft and easy to chew, and disolves in saliva, maybe the eating experience will be similar.

Personally, I find the most enjoyable chocolate to be Hershey's Symphony bars that have been frozen.

Re:Can't wait to try it (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169509)

Personally, I find the most enjoyable chocolate to be Hershey's Symphony bars that have been frozen.

If your favorite chocolate is Hershey's anything, the only explanation is that you've never tasted chocolate.

Hershey's chocolate isn't chocolate. I'm not saying this in an elitist, "it's so bad you can't consider it chocolate way." I mean, they don't use cacao, which is definition of chocolate.

Re:Can't wait to try it (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169959)

You're mostly right -- Symphony would not be included on a chocolate snob's list, but it's mainly due to the use of soy lecithin rather than cocoa butter.

Re:Can't wait to try it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170111)

Does that even qualify as chocolate outside the US? In EU it needs to have at least 25% cocoa mass to be called milk chocolate (or 35% to make it into the regular chocolate class).

this is clearly false (4, Informative)

Chirs (87576) | about a year ago | (#42170103)

If you look at a Hershey chocolate bar, it does in fact have "chocolate" listed in the ingredient list, which is by definition made from cacao.

Re:Can't wait to try it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170225)

You're a fucking cretin. Of course it contains cacao. What it does NOT contain is cacao butter.

Re:Can't wait to try it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169841)

Obviously, since it doesn't melt in your mouth, it won't be the same, but if it is soft and easy to chew, and disolves in saliva, maybe the eating experience will be similar.

This kind of sounds like a tootsie roll... meh.

Re:Can't wait to try it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169993)

Personally, I find the most enjoyable chocolate to be Hershey's ...

You lost me there. I thought you were talking about chocolate.

Unless you have a high fever, chewing crayons (2)

jbridges (70118) | about a year ago | (#42169221)

Not going to melt in your mouth unless you have a high fever.

So it's going to be like chewing on chocolate flavored crayons.

Re:Unless you have a high fever, chewing crayons (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169303)

Man, I can't wait then.
I was never able to get the brown crayon, I always got stuck with the black and green ones.

Re:Unless you have a high fever, chewing crayons (1)

TechForensics (944258) | about a year ago | (#42169325)

Well, if you got this chocolate to your body temperature in your mouth, is there any reason why your saliva still wouldn't *dissolve* it?

Re:Unless you have a high fever, chewing crayons (1)

bhartman34 (886109) | about a year ago | (#42170783)

Melting isn't the same as dissolving, is it? Your saliva will dissolve a Starburst, for example, but it doesn't exactly have a melting sensation. :)

It won't melt in your hand (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169241)

Or your mouth.

Already been done (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169265)

I had some tropical Hershey's from circa Korean War

Re:Already been done (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169491)

You were mislead, that was actually napalm.

Obligatory Warning (5, Funny)

Cruciform (42896) | about a year ago | (#42169285)

If your chocolate bar remains hard for more than four hours, please see a confectioner.

A gooey surprise... (1)

art6217 (757847) | about a year ago | (#42169295)

...is when I try to eat a frozen chocolate on a winter day. It tastes like goo. Can it be, because it does not melt?

I hope it tastes better (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169305)

Reactions to current high-temp chocolate has been mixed: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_chocolate There have been attempts since WWII.

Heat Tolerant Chocolate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169323)

No more hot chocolate, unless its waay to hot to drink. Whats the point of candy that won't melt in your mouth?

Does it taste better than a D-Bar? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169383)

High temperature chocolates are not new. In WWII, the US Military created emergency rations in the form of chocolate bars (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_chocolate [wikipedia.org]) that remained solid up to 120 degrees. It was kind of an in-joke how unpalatable they were, but this was part of the design. As an emergency ration, they wanted you to have to be *really* hungry before you ate them.

Re:Does it taste better than a D-Bar? (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#42169737)

I don't know whether I should be less surprised by the fact that mil-spec chocolate exists or by the fact that it doesn't taste all that good. :-)

Re:Does it taste better than a D-Bar? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169965)

I remember eating Hershey's 'Tropical Chocolate' up through the 70's. Kind of an acquired taste; but nobody ELSE liked it, so they wouldn't steal it from me in school(!).

During desert Storm Hershey's tried re-working the recipe but the project ran longer than the war: Hershey sold-off the remaining stocks to the public as "Desert Bars" (or something like that) with a desert-camo-colored wrapper. I liked those too until they ran out in the mid-90's.

Hopefully they'll market this new stuff in the US.

Re:Does it taste better than a D-Bar? (1)

jandrese (485) | about a year ago | (#42170883)

I still wonder if the company that made them was actually told "make them taste bad so Soldiers don't try to eat them early", or if they realized during production that the taste was horrible and some smarty pants in marketing sold it to the military as a feature.

110F chocolate already exists, and I've made it (3, Interesting)

MaxToTheMax (1389399) | about a year ago | (#42169405)

And Cadbury was already licensing the technology, IIRC. I read the recipe in a magazine years ago (apparently invented by some schoolkids) and actually made it. The trick is to melt the chocolate down, mix in a little glycerine, and let it set again. It works pretty well, although my chocolate is pretty soft even when it's not melted. Could be I did it wrong.

Re:110F chocolate already exists, and I've made it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170127)

Actually their process is quite different, they only have make a chance on the process, basically they found that making a change in how chocolate is made without changing the ingredients its melting point change to a higher temperature. Quite obvious that this is possible for people that actually had access to chocolate made with old traditional process, their melting point varies form one maker to another, and even between batches (and this is only using as ingredients cacao, cacao butter an, sugar and sin some cases vanilla).

Hershey did it decades ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169419)

Ok, not exactly sure the temperature, but back in the Desert Storm days (yeah, way back then), Hershey had a bar designed to survive as a solid in the troops' ration pack. They gave out free samples at the park, consistency was a little different, but still tasted like good chocolate.

I think it had something to do with the mix or makeup of the oils, we rediscoverred one of those about a decade later and the color change was different than usual with old chocolate (still tasty, as usual with old chocolate).

What do you think we have now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169461)

Seriously, what do they imagine we have now in tropical markets. I'm in Thailand, that ain't coco fat in that chocolate, it's some more stable fat with coco solids so it can be called chocolate. It's come a long way since the 1930 version, it doesn't taste like candles.

Same with cake decoration cream, it's not cream, it's not milk fat, that would be too soft at room temperature, it's called white butter and it ain't butter, it's a solid vegetable fat with a higher melting temperature, and it's how they can make cake icing and sell it without refrigeration in 35 degree heats.

Seriously hot markets are flooded with chocolate, if you want the cheap stuff it's solid at temps above 30 and does the fat trick, if you want fancy, Belgian chocolate is sold, but refrigerated.

There is no shortage of chocolate in tropical markets, so they imagine that a high temp melting chocolate will have a big market, but if it doesn't melt in the mouth, then what difference is it to the current high melt chocolates? Part of the mouth feel of chocolate is the melt part.

Re:What do you think we have now? (3, Informative)

magic maverick (2615475) | about a year ago | (#42169649)

Exactly. I'm living in a tropical (African) country, and have eaten both Indian Cadbury's (they call it "Silk") chocolate, and the local stuff. The Cadbury stuff is better, but still not as good as, say, Australian Cadbury chocolate. The local stuff is cheap and nasty, but also won't melt in your pocket. All the imported stuff just gets really soft if you leave it out at room temperature. Room temperature here is normally about 25 to 30 degrees.
Personally, I just keep chocolate in the fridge. It just works. And if I'm going somewhere I don't have a fridge, I just don't take chocolate, there are heaps of alternatives for sweet thing.

Re:What do you think we have now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170249)

It's come a long way since the 1930 version, it doesn't taste like candles.

But I like eating candles, you insensitive clod!

Melting (2)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about a year ago | (#42169469)

Isn't one of the "good" characteristics of chocolate is that it begins to melt in your mouth? If it doesn't melt at 104F, I don't see it melting in my mouth.

Choclate has long been equated with sex (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169479)

Think of the toys!

And the merchandizing challanges at your local confectionary.

Except that is the USP of Chocolate. (1)

Going_Digital (1485615) | about a year ago | (#42169481)

This is kind of missing the point that Chocolate is supposed to melt at body temperature, it is this feature of Chocolate that makes it unique.

Worse surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169497)

There's one worse surprise than finding melted chocolate bar (you can always stik it in the fridge and let it harden back up). What's worse in biting into a Reese's and finding out it's old, stale, and crumbly :(

Shatters when cold (4, Informative)

docilespelunker (1883198) | about a year ago | (#42169539)

Taking chocolate to the other extreme, dunking it in liquid nitrogen makes it shatter. I learnt a lesson that should not be repeated... Don't eat cryo cooled chocolate. When it shatters in your mouth it's like having a mouth full of cold knives. However after a while and some whimpering it did melt - so hurrah for melty chocolate!

Re:Shatters when cold (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169711)

I'm sorry, but you're an idiot. Putting something the temperature of liquid nitrogen in your mouth is pretty dumb. A girl lost her stomach that way not two months ago:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/9594000/Warning-over-liquid-nitrogen-drinks-after-girl-loses-stomach.html

Re:Shatters when cold (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170445)

You CAN have liquid nitrogen temporarily in your mouth but just don't swallow it. If you spit it out quickly, it doesn't have time to cool down your saliva to the point where frostbite inside your mouth occurs. Your mouth can tolerate it even more than your skin. I dipped my finger in LN2 and removed it quickly and nothing happened... and that was a DRY finger. This is because the heat capacity of LN2 is so low compared to water and it takes so long for it to cool your skin down to freezing. Drop an insect in liquid nitrogen and see that the insect boils the liquid nitrogen for a short while as his body drops to -320F.

Now, if you SWALLOW liquid nitrogen, you're gonna explode! :( It'll boil so fast inside you that you won't be able to burp that kind of volume... ewww!!

Safer to just cool your molten chocolate down with a little LN2 and then eat it.

Re:Shatters when cold (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170693)

I'm the one that just posted that you *can* put liquid nitrogen in your mouth quickly and then spit it out.

I just read that article about the girl in the UK. Uhhh that's a totally different story! A bar was actually serving cocktails with liquid nitrogen in it??? That's unbelievable! You either have to wait until it all evaporates, as the article said or, the best way is to put a chunk of dry ice in your drink. It's way safer. Nothing will enter your mouth that is below freezing and the chunk stays on the bottom cause it's so heavy. You still get that really nice cauldron effect, with mist pouring out of it. The only problem is the dry ice will carbonate your beverage! You can taste the difference.

Mexico already has this (2)

Billy the Mountain (225541) | about a year ago | (#42169541)

I thought that was the idea behind Nestle's Don Carlos V. Ten years ago I bought some in Mexico and left the bars in the car but they remained solid. Also, this chocolate is not gritty and is available in the U.S. (At least in some markets)

Great (1)

rossdee (243626) | about a year ago | (#42169599)

There would be a lot of uses for a material that won't melt at high temperatures for example a heat shield for spacecraft reentry, or containment vessel for nuclear reactors

Re:Great (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169723)

There are many fewer needs for such a material to also be a food. That is why existing materials (Ni-based alloys and such) are already employed to meet these needs. Yes, there is ongoing research into improving the materials available, but (to my knowledge) no one has added the requirement of "must be delicious".

no thanks!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169701)

I'll just keep eating my regular chocolate and carrying liquid nitrogen with me! Much simpler!
Like..DUHH scientists!

The Hostess Void (2)

guttentag (313541) | about a year ago | (#42169967)

It's interesting that we're suddenly seeing all these stories about engineered foods that don't behave like real food so soon after the collapse of Hostess. It's almost as though there is a perception that the world will be more accepting of new food-substitutes that last forever to fill "the Hostess void" and take the place of the Twinkie in our bomb shelters. Perhaps we will find that the new 60-day bread maintains a constant temperature of 105 degrees F, hot enough to ward off mold and melt the new chocolate, so you can have Nutella in your bunker. Because the comforts of chocolate offset the creepiness of bread that toasts itself.

Isn't that called *actual chocolate*? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42169997)

The concept of Cadbury making good chocolate is amusing. They can't hold a candle to Swiss or Belgian chocolate.

Of course it melts and gets all soft, when you replace real cocoa butter with cheap dairy butter or even worse: vegetable oil.

Real chocolate breaks very cleanly, and never ever bends or rips.

Chocolate....? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170101)

You sound fat. And female.

mooooooo.

Chocolate....rain... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170235)

So, how should we make "Chocolate Rain", if the main ingredient won't melt?

M%M's (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42170491)

Doesn't melt in your mouth, or your hands either.

Change the packaging, not the product (1)

istartedi (132515) | about a year ago | (#42170865)

Melted chocolate coming out of flat, squeezable plastic thing would be better than chocolate with strange chemical properties. For troops in the field, have an outer plastic wrapper so that they can put the inner plastic part in their mouth and squeeze out all the product without having to get dust and grime in their mouth. Oh, better yet don't make the inner wrapper plastic. Make it an edible product that's flexible but tasteless. How about gel caps full of chocolate? There would probably be too much gel though, and it might be confused as a medication. Of course there are M&Ms, but the hard shells crack and they still make a mess at high temperatore. I can't believe M&M Mars doesn't make a "battle hardened" version.

Oh No!! (1)

smarkham01 (896668) | about a year ago | (#42171089)

Hersey's gave us that stuff in Vietnam. True, it wouldn't melt, OTOH, it couldn't be consumed, either. The stuff was so bad that the rats would chew through a carton of cigarettes, crawl over the chocolate leaving foot prints and droppings, then continue with whatever else was available.

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