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Microsoft Steeply Raising Enterprise Licensing Fees

Unknown Lamer posted about a year and a half ago | from the linux-still-free dept.

Microsoft 571

hypnosec writes "Microsoft is trying to make up for below expected earnings following Windows 8's and Surface RT's lack luster adoption rates by increasing the prices of its products between 8 and 400 per cent. Trying to make more out of its enterprise customers who are tied under its Software Assurance payment model, Microsoft has increased user CALs pricing 15 per cent; SharePoint 2013 pricing by 38 per cent; Lync Server 2013 pricing by 400 per cent; and Project 2013 Server CAL by 21 per cent."

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How to treat a loyal customer (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176251)

Microsoft method: Milk them for every cent.
Linux method: Free is free. Nobody can hold a gun to your head under the GPL.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (3, Informative)

Moblaster (521614) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176267)

It's a free market. Microsoft is not forcing anyone to buy its products. If may be mildly coercive in the short term to companies that feel they "must" use Microsoft products, but raising prices is also the best method to charge customers what the product is really worth to them. If it's worth it to switch, they will. But if not, then fair is fair.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (5, Insightful)

Raven42rac (448205) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176275)

It's strong-arming if you vendor lock a customer than steeply raise rates. blah blah free market blah blah still an adversarial dick move.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (5, Informative)

Tough Love (215404) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176439)

It's strong-arming if you vendor lock a customer than steeply raise rates.
blah blah free market blah blah still an adversarial dick move.

Not merely a dick move, but illegal under the Sherman and Clayton [justice.gov] antitrust acts.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176483)

It's strong-arming if you vendor lock a customer than steeply raise rates.
blah blah free market blah blah still an adversarial dick move.

Not merely a dick move, but illegal under the Sherman and Clayton [justice.gov] antitrust acts.

Not illegal, because this awesomely freetarded hobby OS breaks people free from using MS. If you use Linux, you'll never go back to M$, so there is no trust or monopoly. Linux can do everything a Windows desktop can do (except 95% of day-to-day computing), and it's free, as in free beer.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176519)

Funny, I've been running my Linux desktops for like 15 years, so I guess I'm not doing 95% of whatever the Windows people are using. Of course, we also use Linux on our desktops at work, which is like 200 machines, so I guess we don't get any work done either.

Windows is required for gaming, nothing else.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (5, Funny)

crutchy (1949900) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176579)

95% of day-to-day computing for Windows is either playing freecell or masturbating under the desk... Linux users can do both just as well so the op is just full of shit :)

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176499)

Nobody is locked. They can choose to switch to any of the Linux, BSD or whatever OS distros that they want at any time. Just because they want to be lazy doesn't mean Microsoft is strong arming them.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176547)

it's not due to laziness..

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176557)

Then the only logical reason for staying with Microsoft would be that the alternatives aren't as good as Microsoft for their purposes.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (3, Insightful)

crutchy (1949900) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176583)

apparently you're not familiar with the concept of "vendor lock-in"

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176597)

"Vendor lock-in" is your way of saying that their are no viable alternatives. But wait, I thought Linux was just as good as Windows and could do everything anyone would need to do.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176675)

No, it means the switching costs are high. Which can be the case even if you are using an expensive, shitty product and there is an absolutely perfect, free alternative.
Even if the switching costs were certain to be amortized within a year you might not be able to switch e.g. because there is no money for a steep short-term investment.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176657)

One license to hold them, and in the darkness bind them!

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176683)

My response to Microsoft dick move. SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY. Medical institutions have no plan B.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176307)

How do you feel about those locked-in Office document formats, proprietary communication protocols and single-vendor ecosystems now, loser?

And don't forget to pay your $699 over and over and over, you cock-smoking teabagger!

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176321)

It's a free market. Microsoft is not forcing anyone to buy its products. If may be mildly coercive in the short term to companies that feel they "must" use Microsoft products, but raising prices is also the best method to charge customers what the product is really worth to them.

If it's worth it to switch, they will. But if not, then fair is fair.

A free market? Are you shitting me? Microsoft has a near monopoly on corporate workstations. If it was a free market then you wouldn't need to make a free operating system like Linux just to try to compete. Microsoft has worked long and hard to make sure that nobody can compete with them by erecting barriers to the free market. The free market is Microsoft's enemy number one.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (1)

gcnaddict (841664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176555)

Microsoft has worked long and hard to make sure that nobody can compete with them by erecting barriers to the free market.

What barriers to switching exist on a fully deployed enterprise Microsoft-based platform that wouldn't otherwise manifest itself on any other platform?

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176605)

exchange, asp, access databases... not to mention software that only runs on windows (thanks very fucking much adobe and autodesk)... etc

most software for linux is GPL'd FOSS (except for blob drivers from nvidia etc) and so can be (and often is) readily compiled for many platforms

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176407)

It's a free market.

You might think only a moron would mod parent informative, but...

Around 2007, Microsoft realised tech sites like Slashdot had a significant involvement in the very public rejection of Vista as a replacement for XP. They hired several reputation management companies, including Waggener Edstrom and Burson Marsteller to manage their online presence before the W7 release.

One of the results of that was that the reputation mangers ran hundreds of sock-puppets in blogs and news aggregators, like Slashdot and Reddit. They swamped the discussions, including those unrelated to their OS with scripted comments based on a few themes - "Have you tried it yet?" "Much faster than XP" etc etc. There was no opportunity to discuss Linux/FOSS or any other non-proprietary effort without wading through dozens of highly moderated pro-Win 7 postings. Pretty much every first post was a Microsoft-favorable pamphlet.

The result was that almost anyone with a real interest in tech abandoned the site. There are still a few of the old die-hards here, but it's mostly marketers and sock-puppets now.

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176527)

What? [slashdot.org]

Re:How to treat a loyal customer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176289)

Dirty commie hippy.

great news for open source! (5, Interesting)

jsepeta (412566) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176253)

corporations are more responsive than ever to finding and deploying alternatives to Microsoft software. let's hope this spurs more open source development.

Re:great news for open source! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176319)

I know this is where, traditionally, someone drops in to say, "companies don't much care about these costs because they represent such a small fraction of their IT budget", but at our small business, this actually hurts.

We're burdened with some aging Windows infrastructure, and nobody has a lot of spare change sitting around. Increased CAL pricing will have an effect on our decision making.

That said, I don't think this actually has anything to do with Surface, or likely even the early Win8 adoption rates.

Re:great news for open source! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176525)

Feel free to download Linux and use that then. At the same time, stop whining.

Re:great news for open source! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176431)

As much as I love Linux, I just hope this does not spiral out of control. And really, that is very unlikely to happen, but I feel I must voice my concerns anyway. Microsoft is still a big employer, they keep programmers employed, and they compete with Linux fairly evenly in the server market, perhaps even at a disadvantage. Like most fields, competition is good. Linux adds one must have feature, Microsoft tries to add or mimic it in Windows server, and vice versa. And they have even added code to the Linux kernel, albeit mostly to further their own ends.

Anyway, all I am trying to say is, it is very easy to hate MS (especially on the desktop), but they do provide a nice counter balance to Linux vendors in the server field, and that is a good thing. At the very least they employ a lot of programmers and help keep people in the industry. If the price hikes move more system admins towards Linux at a serious detriment to Microsoft, it would be good AND bad.

Re:great news for open source! (4, Funny)

ozmanjusri (601766) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176591)

Microsoft is still a big employer, they keep programmers employed,

Never has the broken Windows fallacy been more apt or more fallacious...

Re:great news for open source! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176713)

-------------

One of the results of that was that the reputation mangers ran hundreds of sock-puppets in blogs and news aggregators, like Slashdot and Reddit. They swamped the discussions, including those unrelated to their OS with scripted comments based on a few themes - "Have you tried it yet?" "Much faster than XP" etc etc. There was no opportunity to discuss Linux/FOSS or any other non-proprietary effort without wading through dozens of highly moderated pro-Win 7 postings. Pretty much every first post was a Microsoft-favorable pamphlet.

---------------

Re:great news for open source! (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176531)

it wont, it will go back to custom in house specified software

Re:great news for open source! (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176537)

corporations are more responsive than ever to finding and deploying alternatives to Microsoft software

You are on drugs.

Re:great news for open source! (1)

hcs_$reboot (1536101) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176679)

So maybe something changed(?). I've always been amazed by how CIOs behave in big organizations. The trend is "we change hardware on a regular basis" but regarding the OS (ie Windows) there's never been even a question about alternatives. Homogeneity (all the same OS) and certainly no revolution. The very high licensing cost is not even discussed - the same who chose the most expensive Verisign certificatea - CIOs are used to it, and it's budgeted. "That's the way it is". Microsoft may raise Enterprise licensing costs and I'm not sure they have to worry at all about the consequences in the industry.

Re:great news for open source! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176703)

corporations are more responsive than ever to finding and deploying alternatives to Microsoft software. let's hope this spurs more open source development.

Yeah more open source?

Where everything is so god damned fragmented with different versions put out by people you dont know or can trust to keep running their product and updating it often.

Id rather use microsoft. With them you got a billion dollar company with the tech and manpower to back their products up and when something needs patching they do it and they run universal operating systems which means hardware and game manufacturers can gear their products towards a more expectant market with better results instead of trying to support 2 dozen morons OS's.

Open source is a pipe dream for the masses. Its fine for niche techies to play with but the majority of people want to use something familliar and that anything they want to work on it, it will. With open source you dont get that for the masses.

Who the hell wants linux in the real world? I use windows 7 and I can play any game I want, find drivers for any piece of hardware I want virtually, I can use any third party software I want and everything just works for it. I like a hassle free pc experince and windows gives it to me.

Oh no I have to pay a little more for windows? Thats fine with me because I only buy 2 licenses and they last me between 4 and 6 years or more if the next version of windows sucks. Hell Id have paid 200 bucks for windows 7 because it will last me for years till windows 9 comes out, just like what happened with XP.

Streaming media, playing old and new games, taking full advantage of my hardware, easy to find and constantly updated drivers, constant OS updates, 98% of all software released working 100% with my OS, having full time customer support, an OS billions of other people use so its easy google tips and help, and easy to use HTPC, works with all my oddball devices like cell phone and wireless madcatz ps3 fightpad just by plugging it in and a dozen other reason why I want windows. Can you do all that with anything open source? Nope. And you never will because it will all be half assed and compartmentalized. It would take decades and billions of dollars for a open source OS to be able to do everything windows can and be as reliable.

Does Microsoft have any friends? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176255)

Someone I know raised this point. Is there anyone they haven't alienated? Customers, suppliers, ISVs, OEMs?

Re:Does Microsoft have any friends? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176343)

Bill Gates?

Re:Does Microsoft have any friends? (0)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176395)

Well, at least when W. was the President of the U.S., the Justice Department was their friend.

Not sure what that means now that Obama / Holder are running things.

Re:Does Microsoft have any friends? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176479)

Well, at least when W. was the President of the U.S., the Justice Department was their friend.

Not sure what that means now that Obama / Holder are running things.

it means niggers.

Re:Does Microsoft have any friends? (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176571)

I see what you did there, you classy fella'.

Re:Does Microsoft have any friends? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176673)

I see what you did there, you classy fella'.

Classier than niggers'.

Re:Does Microsoft have any friends? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176495)

Developers developers developers developers
(jump)
Developers developers developers developers
(yeah)
Developers developers
Your comment violated the "postercomment" compression filter. Try less whitespace and/or less repetition.

Ballmer needs the net profit (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176261)

For Ballmer to keep his job, Microsoft needs to make a profit. Last quarter it made a loss, Ballmers excuse was a one-time write off. However Windows 8 is flopping, Surface is failing, and he needs to show a profit.

So he's massively ramping up the prices for the locked in customers, in the long term, they'll move away from Microsoft products, but in the short and medium term, they'll have to bend over and take it.

After Ballmer has run the company for 10 years and it's been in decline, you have to realize that astroturfers cannot save him, he needs to go. No more excuses.

Re:Ballmer needs the net profit (5, Funny)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176387)

After Ballmer has run the company for 10 years and it's been in decline, you have to realize that astroturfers cannot save him, he needs to go.

Actually, given the way things are going, I'm quite content with him staying.

Re:Ballmer needs the net profit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176445)

What could be more fitting than Ballmer pulling an Elop on microsoft.

The only question remaining is who controls the board or directors that allows this to continue.

Economic Geniuses (5, Insightful)

ryan.onsrc (1321531) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176271)

I see: so if demand goes down, price goes up?

Good luck with that ...

Re:Economic Geniuses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176317)

Of course. Now corporations have more money than ever (piles of money gathered during low taxation). If you lower the prices they think there is no value. When the price (=value) goes up, huge demand will be created. Luxury products are also more valued than ever (iPad over cheapo Android tabs).

Re:Economic Geniuses (0)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176443)

I have the most expensive iPad you can buy, but I use my Nexus 7 more.

Re:Economic Geniuses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176553)

I have the most expensive iPad you can buy, but I use my Nexus 7 more.

s/tablet brand/car make/g

So?

Re:Economic Geniuses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176327)

I see: so if demand goes down, price goes up?

Good luck with that ...

I see Balmer studied in Italy.

Re:Economic Geniuses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176533)

I see: so if demand goes down, price goes up?

Good luck with that ...

I see Balmer studied in Italy.

At least he went to College and graduated. Unlike you.

Re:Economic Geniuses (3, Insightful)

lightknight (213164) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176593)

Could it be possible that he is shorting his own company's stock? I mean, he must be getting paid to drive the OS industry's equivalent of the Titanic into an iceberg; it's not possible for someone to remain so daft with so many of his customers screaming at the top of their lungs.

Re:Economic Geniuses (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176433)

Actually that works quite well when customers have no choice.

Re:Economic Geniuses (2)

lightknight (213164) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176585)

Indeed. Raising your core product prices by an extravagant amount, when you are flush with cash, because your most recent bet did not pay off, is dumb.

MS putting out a stinker, in the form of Windows 8, will prevent customers from upgrading to this OS.

MS raising their prices, because of this mistake, will cause their customers to look at other long term options.

And the sad part, as I highlighted above, is that they are doing it purely to meet Street 'expectations.' Probably one of the more important follies of the current age: pissing off your customer base, driving away / disowning techs because of their non-commitment to Windows 8, screwing up the developer tools, and not giving a damn, because your only worry is your stock price is entirely the ass-ended way to run a business.

Many of the financial traders have shown, in recent times, that they care more about a short-term gain than a long-term gain. For them a half-penny increase today is worth more than a $30 increase a year from now. And these are the people MS is listening to? They'd set the company on fire if it would get them an extra dollar.

Not that there aren't a handful of sane traders out there, but I think they divested themselves of this nonsense a long time ago. It simply wasn't profitable enough.

Re:Economic Geniuses (2)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176653)

That's exactly how Bell thinks (Canada). Payphones are less and less used, and they're trying to *raise* the fees to 1$ (double of what it already is).

Sound business strategy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176281)

Their hardware and software are all losing ground, so to make up for lost profit they don't decide to innovate or anything like that. Instead, the obvious solution is to raise prices to make up for their losses. ... Too bad there are forces at work in the market called Supply and Demand. With strategies like this, MS's days are numbered.

Palmer, Steve Ballmer's alter ego (1)

Kethinov (636034) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176283)

"Rate hike! Rate hike! Tra, la, la!"
- Palmer, Final Fantasy 7. Steve Ballmer's alter ego.

SharePoint is like a Swiss Army Gun (4, Informative)

Nova Express (100383) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176285)

It does a number of things, some of them vaguely useful, but none as well as other stand-alone tools, it's awkward as hell, and people hate using it.

Raise the price on it and even some of the most MS-centric IT shops will go "Fine, we'll just set up an internal Apache server and Confluence instead."

Re:SharePoint is like a Swiss Army Gun (4, Insightful)

CodeBuster (516420) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176505)

Raise the price on it and even some of the most MS-centric IT shops will go "Fine, we'll just set up an internal Apache server and Confluence instead."

You might think so, but remember that SharePoint is usually not purchased by the IT department. It's purchased either outside of the IT department for use by non-technical people, good luck with that btw, or it's forced upon everyone by clueless management at the urging of consultants who have a vested interest in plugging SharePoint as the "solution" to whatever "problems" management thinks exist. Microsoft should just change the marketing pitch to, "SharePoint is right for anyone with a credit card" because that's basically how they sell it. Anyway, it's only after the purchase has been made and the consultants are gone that people realize just how much SharePoint sucks. Of course by then it's generally to late too do anything about it because the expense of the project has blown the IT budget for the next three years. In fact, I've yet to hear of a SharePoint project that either delivered on its promises or didn't go way over budget, so raising the price can only makes matters even worse. For those of you out there who haven't experienced any of this, do yourselves a favor and push back against "PainPoint" or you'll regret it later guaranteed.

Getting tough to support (4, Interesting)

asmkm22 (1902712) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176293)

I'm a Microsoft guy through and through, when it comes to the enterprise. These licensing costs are just getting really difficult to justify. I know there's some open source replacement available, but it's not all very coherently tied together the way MS stuff is. I'd love to be able to move away though.

Re:Getting tough to support (4, Insightful)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176453)

I think that was the point made in this story [semiaccurate.com] . Microsoft has worked hard over the years to make its systems not interoperable with others', so that customers had to buy the whole collection of enterprise services from just them.

Now that their products are apparently a worse deal in some cases than competing products from other vendors and/or open source software, their all-or-nothing strategy is at risk of backfiring spectacularly.

The tragedy, if one can call it that when Microsoft is suffering, is that this appears to be almost a play-for-play repeat of IBM's mistakes in the 1980's and 1990's, if I recall correctly. Microsoft should have seen this coming miles and miles away.

Re:Getting tough to support (1)

evil_aaronm (671521) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176517)

They're lazy and mailing it in. Why try hard when you've got your customers by the balls?

For anyone but a prostitute, that is.

Re:Getting tough to support (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176635)

I think that was the point made in this story. Microsoft has worked hard over the years to make its systems not interoperable with others', so that customers had to buy the whole collection of enterprise services from just them.

In fairness, they have also developed (directly or via acquisitions) a lot of the best software on the market over an extended period, and for much of that time they have also invested a huge amount in supporting developers at other software companies whose products would therefore get built on Microsoft platforms. One could debate how successfully they still perform either of those roles today, but their dominant position didn't happen by accident, and I don't believe for a moment that it's entirely or even mostly down to the much criticised indiscretions that led to antitrust proceedings and the like either.

The thing is, while sticking with Microsoft platforms may bring benefits to businesses, sooner or later the cost will become too high and start to outweigh those benefits. Other things being equal, Microsoft still has the best software products in many of the markets it operates in, but other things aren't equal and apparently they're going to be even less equal now. On the other hand, maybe MS have done their homework, and rather than this being some sort of act of desperation, they have simply concluded that these products really are worth that much more than what they've been charging for them so far and by implication than any alternatives that might be available.

Re:Getting tough to support (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176497)

The article is highly misleading, Microsoft did a full rework of a lot of their licensing, the article cherry picks worst case scenarios for licensing.

Re:Getting tough to support (4, Interesting)

MightyMartian (840721) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176687)

I've been working with my rep for major upgrades of Server and Exchange. I'm not seeing how any of this is cherry picked. CALs are being hiked in price. We've abandoned the idea of moving to server 2010 RDP CALs because the costs are just too difficult to justify. We will also be retaining our Server 2003 DCs at our branches until EOL. Not an ideal situation, but we can't currently justify the costs.

score 5 for linux (1)

Xicor (2738029) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176309)

a few more points and linux will take over, finally.

and this is why linux is now king (3, Interesting)

denis-The-menace (471988) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176315)

in the 80s various flavors of UNIX locked their customers' data in expensive licensing deals.

then one day, windows NT came out and showed a cheaper way. around the same time Linux also came but only a few saw Windows as just another trap.

Now we have a prophecy realized.

Now we have a property realized (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176375)

Now we have a prophecy realized?

Now we have a property realized.

Re:Now we have a property realized (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176551)

no one cares professor douche

Very good decision (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176353)

Cities are moving back to Microsoft products after failed Linux experiments. This is the best time to raise the prices as much as possible.

Re:Very good decision (2)

lightknight (213164) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176617)

They moved back because the re-training costs were so high. These large price increases are likely to have them revisit those decisions.

It has been one of my more painful experiences that the market does not like to be cornered -> any time you think "And that's why they will have to go through me, and I will soak them for all they're worth!" you wake up with a live badger in your trousers. If MS is thinking "they have nowhere to run!" then the market is thinking "2 for 1 sale! Live badgers and wolverines! Get 'em while you can!"

And people wonder why I have a slight case of the nerves.

Okay, so which is it? (2)

UltraZelda64 (2309504) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176357)

It wasn't long ago I saw on OSNews that Windows 8 was selling great; now supposedly it's not. To be honest, I had a hard time believing that it was pushing new PCs faster than they would go to begin with, despite the artificial sales boost in the form of dirt-cheap upgrade discounts. So really, given the fact that Microsoft basically has all the OEMs in their pockets and a "Windows sale" is really just a "new PC sale," how the hell can any such claims of "Windows sales" be made anyway? Isn't that an impossible number to pin down, given that most new PC buyers will be stuck with Windows 8 due to Microsoft pushing it and all the OEMs pre-loading it by default as a result?

Re:Okay, so which is it? (4, Informative)

guruevi (827432) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176427)

Not only OEM's but Enterprises as well and basically all Microsoft shops. You want Windows 7? You have to buy 8 with Software Assurance. You want Windows XP? You have to buy 8 with Software Assurance. You want Windows Server? You get 2 licenses of Windows 8 for their VirtualPC software. You want to build your own computer? Here's 8. You want to renew your contract for SA for 10,000 computers, they're now all eligible to run 8, also $1M please.

Australian prices (5, Informative)

mjwx (966435) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176369)

Microsoft has increased user CALs pricing 15 per cent; SharePoint 2013 pricing by 38 per cent; Lync Server 2013 pricing by 400 per cent; and Project 2013 Server CAL by 21 per cent."

Allow me to translate, for Australian license partners,

Microsoft has increased user CALs pricing 45 per cent; SharePoint 2013 pricing by 114 per cent; Lync Server 2013 pricing by 1200 per cent; and Project 2013 Server CAL by 63 per cent."

Re:Australian prices (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176441)

Australian license suckers.

Re:Australian prices (2)

Artea (2527062) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176507)

And here I thought they were just trying to match the Australian prices to avoid the government inquiry into software pricing, but you're right - They would need to triple the prices to match.

Re:Australian prices (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176543)

Allow me to translate for Canadian licence partners,

CAL's pricing 35 percent, SharePoint 2013 pricing by 80%, Lync Server 2013 by 900 percent and Project 2013 Server by 55 percent.

Go Red Hat ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176377)

OK I'm not a fan boy, don't like gnome 3 (aka Red Hat Gnome 3), don't know if I like Lennart Poettering^H^H^H... I mean PulseAudio and SystemD, but I do like their open source stance and use their products.

So any increase in MS prices is good for Red Hat and, I hope, by extension, good for the Linux community.

It's also good for Oracles' Unbreakable Linux, which sucks.

Samba4, here we come (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176393)

Samba4 is looking pretty good now.

We may well shift to Samba 4 over then next year or so, just maybe just the straw that broke the proverbial camel's back.

Re:Samba4, here we come (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176705)

I'll probably build a Samba 4 test bed in the spring. Our Server 2003 domains would be the target if it works, with replacement before 2003 EOL.

Excellent (4, Funny)

Tough Love (215404) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176409)

These idiots who didn't see it coming from miles away deserve to be squeezed by these assholes.

Re:Excellent (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176661)

Such poetry it makes me cry. I thank you tough love.

Microsofts income is down so to make up (2)

kawabago (551139) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176425)

They raise prices and drive more business away. Does Ballmer think he's running a phone company or something?

Re:Microsofts income is down so to make up (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176561)

yes, yes he does, what choices do you have? seriously at an enterprise level

Obviously not (2)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176663)

If that was the case, he'd add an extra fee per document and per megabyte of data stored as well.

How I read the summary... (2)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176429)

"Tired of holding sway over a group of clients who have remained steadfast in their use of Microsoft products, the tech giant is doing all it can to give them reason to leave the fold by incentivizing alternatives and souring relations."

I mean, seriously, Microsoft? In the face of a less-than-expected level of consumer response to your recent flagship products, you decide to punish your remaining, loyal client base by raising their prices at a time when viable (and oftentimes cheaper) alternatives are becoming available and are being adopted in greater and greater numbers? This makes no sense.

When will Ballmer be kicked out already? Microsoft has smart people working there. If someone actually managed to clean house and eliminate all of the ridiculous middle management they have, I wouldn't be surprised if they could start putting out some decent stuff again. And, I'm saying that as someone who lumps himself in with Apple fanboys. I want to see Microsoft strong again and making products that people actually consider instead of scornfully rejecting, but I want to see them earn that spot through innovation and good design.

Re:How I read the summary... (3, Insightful)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176689)

OSs are irrelevant. Cross platform everything is the bright future. There is no place for companies like Microsoft or their vendor lock-in strategies. They signed their own death warrant, it's only a matter of time now.

Looking to implement SP (2)

Bomarc (306716) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176451)

As a small business owner, I was looking to implement SharePoint Server. I've downloaded the evaluation, getting the hardware together (have the server, need the drives/more RAM). Now I see that this already bloated {overpriced} software is going to go up by 38%. I don't know where I'm going to turn to, but it was on the outside edge of what I could afford. Now, to research the market for other options. Viable suggestions would be appreciated. Is it time to add a section to Slash that would have replacement recommendations options or for overpriced [MS] software?

Re:Looking to implement SP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176471)

Would love to see some references for the article, we literally just got our licensing details and the cost of sharepoint for us has dropped dramatically not increased.

Re:Looking to implement SP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176473)

SharePoint Foundation is free. As a small business owner what would you need SharePoint for? There are many alternatives.

Re:Looking to implement SP (1)

muphin (842524) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176629)

Many? name them for the rest of us.

Re:Looking to implement SP (1)

Bomarc (306716) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176667)

As a small business owner, I don't have time to edit / mange / update much of the mundane work with my webserver (Work to be done at a "developer level" -- right now it is so out of date, it isn't funny). I was hoping to use SharePoint for the, and to use its document management abilities. Though I will look at “SharePoint Foundation”, I suspect that as it is "free", it will be hobbled to the point that I won’t be able to use it for my needs.

Great news. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176503)

Their customers will either take it up the ass or finally switch to something else. Here's hoping that there's a mass defection from these assholes and criminals.

Re:Great news. (3, Insightful)

lightknight (213164) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176655)

Indeed. Short term, their customers will probably pay; long term, they'll quietly move away.

The people at MS will probably applaud the revenue increase, thinking to themselves "Why didn't we do this sooner?"
In a few years, they will be thinking instead "Ah, that's why we shouldn't have done that."

Ballmer is really dropping the ball here. All he needs to do now is announce that MS is getting out of the software business to pursue next year's Big Thing (the micro-tablet market), and MS will officially be done. It will rank up there with HP's announcement that they were considering selling off their hardware division, and will have business majors everywhere groan at the memory of it.

This has nothing to do with Surface RT or Win8 (3, Insightful)

Barlo_Mung_42 (411228) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176521)

Both have only been out for about a month. It's too early to really tell how either of them are doing. It also takes time to make decisions about pricing.

Re:This has nothing to do with Surface RT or Win8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176565)

Well, the Surface RT is the Kin of tablets. That much we know.

Re:This has nothing to do with Surface RT or Win8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176691)

Plus word on these price rises was in the channel about 4 months ago, and specifics about 2 or 3 weeks ago.

Re:This has nothing to do with Surface RT or Win8 (1)

slomike1 (1125421) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176697)

Surface RT wrokes well for what it does. It is v1.0 product in a new ecosystem. More apps are being made available everyday. Windows 8 sales will improve when the OEMs finish with their new hardware. There are very few windows 8 PC available and most don't take advantage of the new windows 8 features.

Exchange rate (2)

Branka96 (628759) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176573)

This is an Indian news site. You have to ask yourself how much is due to changes in the exchange rate? I think at least some of the increases could be attributed to that.

Re:Exchange rate (1)

whoever57 (658626) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176637)

This is an Indian news site. You have to ask yourself how much is due to changes in the exchange rate? I think at least some of the increases could be attributed to that.

Perhaps you could try using Google news (or even Bing) and you will find that many non-Indian websites are reporting the same thing.

I miss Ray Ozzie and Old Microsoft Projects (1)

asm2750 (1124425) | about a year and a half ago | (#42176639)

I wish Ozzie would have caused a shareholders revolt and made Ballmer get fired back in the Vista days. It's too bad Bill Gates won't open his eyes and see that his business partner is sinking the company he created. Ballmer will go down as one of the worst CEOs in history if the company even survives in the future. Sure Apple is making billions in iPad and iPhone sales but, it's only a matter of time before they alienate their user base, and Android vendors starts churning out even cheaper tablets that do the same thing, that even a lawsuit can't stop. Just because the grass is greener on the other side doesn't mean you should be doing the same thing. Sustainable growth is key not one time profits, and enterprise is probably the one market area Microsoft should never abandon, but as time goes on it's apparent they would rather try and make a cash grab at markets they are obviously too slow to respond to. Maybe if they actually made the Courier back in 2008 and pushed the Surface table PC at an affordable price they wouldn't be in such an awkward postion.

Perfect timing (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176669)

Just before the release of samba4

"percent" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42176707)

not "per cent"

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