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NZBMatrix Closes Their Website

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the gone-for-good dept.

The Internet 144

An anonymous reader writes "Hot on the heels of the closure of Newzbin2, this morning the usenet NZB indexing website NZBMatrix closed shop in the face of another DMCA notice. NZBMatrix allowed users to sift through messy usenet groups and quickly find data for download. NZBMatrix's API allowed automated polling from various clients, making it one of the more popular NZB sites. This is one of the last public NZB indexing sites, leaving mostly invite-only underground sites. A sad day for usenet users everywhere."

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No More Public Usenets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233469)

What? I havn't used usenet for years, but this is the last one? Comeon... Just googles and I was able to find a couple sites that seem to offer the same service.

Re:No More Public Usenets (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 2 years ago | (#42233479)

What?

I havn't used usenet for years, but this is the last one? Comeon...

Just googles and I was able to find a couple sites that seem to offer the same service.

indexing != access. though, since you're going to end up paying for binaries access anyways, it's not that much of a hassle to use some other nzb site or find nzb's with the usenet providers search.

Re:No More Public Usenets (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233669)

The best combo is predb.me / nzbindex.nl

Astranews sucks now too much content is missing.

Going to need to use a NL only provider without US Servers.

Re:No More Public Usenets (1)

landofcleve (1959610) | about 2 years ago | (#42234465)

Going to need to use a NL only provider without US Servers.

Any suggestions? Anchordudes used to be a good source for usenet servers, but the info that they have seems to suggest that there aren't any non-US based services that they know of anymore, and that most of the hundreds of usenet providers are just reselling the few backends that exist.

Re:No More Public Usenets (1)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about 2 years ago | (#42235315)

I use a combination of astraweb and sunnynews. It tends to be that if one doesn't have it, the other does. Combined the two will run you $16ish a month. Worth every penny IMO.

Re:No More Public Usenets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42237035)

See, now if the studios had a service for $20/month that let me download the episodes I wanted as they came out, I'd be giving my money to them... not some dodgy usenet provider...

Re:No More Public Usenets (1)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about 2 years ago | (#42237149)

They could make pretty big bucks with a service like that with that price point as well, but the problem is you have to get basically all of them on board. This is difficult because all of them want to lay down their own terms and prices, and they all think that they deserve a bigger slice of the pie than the next guy.

I think the major issue is that they're still ensconced in the cable world right now. When that falls apart (which I strongly believe it will) they'll have to find a new distribution model. Will it move to something like this? Probably not, what we'll likely end up with are monolithic content providers that operate over the internet, and you either subscribe to it all or nothing at all, like we have now.

I think what would be nice is a unified distribution system that allows you to subscribe or unsubscribe to individual studios willy nilly, or even pay per episode if you'd prefer. They provide their own content servers, and there's an open standard way that any client can connect to them. If they charge too much or you don't like their shows, cancel any time.

You'd probably pay more for the content than you do watch, but you'd probably also pay less than you pay now. Right now I pay $50 a month for digital cable services and only watch maybe 3 channels. If I pay any less, I lose two of the channels I watch. I'm about to just ditch the thing entirely though.

Re:No More Public Usenets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234801)

Thanks for the idea. I'm lost without NZBMatrix.

Re:No More Public Usenets (4, Informative)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about 2 years ago | (#42235343)

There are some good newznab based providers that I tend to rely upon the most. They work great, and there's basically nothing stopping anybody from building their own.

There's also binsearch.info. Binsearch is easily the most comprehensive nzb index in existence, only downside is that it is also unfiltered, but the bad stuff is easy to spot (e.g. passworded rars are marked as such, and NZB's that aren't anywhere near large enough to be what they claim to be are obviously not what you're looking for.) Generally if I need something obscure, binsearch is a great last resort if nobody else has it.

Re:No More Public Usenets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42236447)

never used binsearch before? how do i download the files? i use giganews but wont come up - novice here lol

Re:No More Public Usenets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42236413)

hi guys - my friend set all this up for me - i used giganews and nzbmatrix - what do i do now?

Automation? (1)

nuckfuts (690967) | about 2 years ago | (#42236607)

The best combo is predb.me / nzbindex.nl

I don't see any API links on those sites. Is it possible to configure them as search providers in automated download tools like SickBeard and CouchPotato?

Re:No More Public Usenets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42235137)

Which ones?

NZBMatrix had a great community, like Demonoid (5, Insightful)

BenJeremy (181303) | about 2 years ago | (#42233507)

You could always rely on a decent number of comments for popular releases to filter a good download form a bad one.

Sad to see this one go, as I had relied on it more and more well before Newzbin closed its doors.

Re:NZBMatrix had a great community, like Demonoid (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42238717)

You could always rely on a decent number of comments for popular releases to filter a good download form a bad one.

It's almost like there should be some sort of NET that people could USE to talk about things, sorta like a web forum, but not requiring the use of a web browser, and definitely not requiring a central point of failure like a web server. Servers could pass forum posts between each other via TCP over some unused port, like, say, port 119.

Another 10 bucks wasted (4, Insightful)

Spritzer (950539) | about 2 years ago | (#42233509)

How nice of them to accept premium payments up to the day they closed.

Re:Another 10 bucks wasted (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233591)

A website that is based around and promotes copyright infringement is dishonest... shocking!

You mean tens of thousands of dollars* saved. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233593)

Oh quit your bitching. You didn't pay that $10 for the purposes of downloading Linux isos, now did you?

Even if you only managed to download a single recent movie, you're still in the net positive compared to buying the DVD/BR.

Anybody complaining about having 'wasted' a few bucks really needs to take a step back and look at the bigger picture.

* by MPAA accounting

Re:You mean tens of thousands of dollars* saved. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234283)

He paid $10 for higher retention, what he used that for is his business.

What if he used that for Linux ISOs? Do you know if he did? What if he didn't? He has no rights otherwise?

Does he even live in a country where Big Content have their hands in lawmaking? That's right, you don't even know any of that, so don't assume.

Re:You mean tens of thousands of dollars* saved. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42237607)

Flash didn't decide a month ago he was going to shutdown today, he decided when he got the mass DMCA takedowns. Not like it was a plot to get your $10 bucks and run.

Re:Another 10 bucks wasted (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233659)

I share the feeling. I switched just recently with the downfall of Newzbin2...

Re:Another 10 bucks wasted (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234195)

Dispute it with your bank. If it was with PayPal, dispute it with them. You should be able to get your money back unless you sent them cash in the mail.

Re:Another 10 bucks wasted (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234837)

Paypal does not handle disputes for non-physical items (learnt this the hard way). They sit on the dispute for a month, only to decline the claim. Your bank may or may not want to interfere with online service. Their terms allow them the discretion to not reverse transaction for non-physical services.

Re:Another 10 bucks wasted (1)

Fallenhalo (1911940) | about 2 years ago | (#42236787)

How nice of them to accept premium payments up to the day they closed.

I joined 3 months ago, best $10 i ever spent!

Re:Another 10 bucks wasted (2)

0100010001010011 (652467) | about 2 years ago | (#42239701)

$10- 3 years ago. Definitely the best. I wonder what this means for sickbeard and the like.

Re:Another 10 bucks wasted (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42238793)

I just bought a subscription a week or so ago.

Only one thing (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233535)

Google != Internet
Nzbmatrix != Usenet.

A sad day for whom, you say? (2)

Shag (3737) | about 2 years ago | (#42233647)

*.binaries.* downloaders are a much smaller set than "Usenet users everywhere."

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (1)

BenJeremy (181303) | about 2 years ago | (#42233667)

Are you really sure about that?

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about 2 years ago | (#42233787)

Yes, its not even a little bit hard to confirm, you just open a client, list groups that have new messages 'today'.

Once most people grow up, they just buy software rather than warez it.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233837)

I'm not concerned about stealing software, though I do it sometimes out of necessity.

The movie and TV downloading experience is phenomenally better than anything you could ever pay for.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234149)

Hear hear. I don't think I've illegally downloaded a game since Steam's selection got so big pretty much anything I'm ever interested in gets released there. The situation when it comes to getting TV shows and movies legally online is simply atrocious. If outside the US, it's pretty much non-existent.

Sickbeard + Usenet has been my savior for a number of years now. I guess it won't be long until I should cancel my Usenet subscription and put that money into a VPN service and use torrent instead.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (2)

1u3hr (530656) | about 2 years ago | (#42234063)

you just open a client, list groups that have new messages 'today'.

And find 90% of them are spam selling sport shoes or fake watches, or Bollywood porn.

Thanks to Google Groups, spam has swamped just about every text newsgroup. I was an avid news junkie for more than 10 years, but have barely looked in in the last five. It's so sad to check on what used to be an active community and find a few forlorn posts in a sea of spam.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234215)

Yeah but most of the binaries users never post, they just download.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42236511)

Most PC software cannot be bought these days. It can only be rented. Especially games.

If there's an online authentication required, that software's as good as useless when they take the servers down.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233739)

nonsense. binaries are the only reason usenet is still alive.If it weren't for binaries, usenet would have gone the way of gopher a long time ago.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 2 years ago | (#42233771)

I'm still using usenet discusion (i.e. non-binary) groups. They have both advantages and disadvntages over webfora. One advantage is that you can really say what you like - no forum mailtainer that bitches about blocking XXX remarks or discussions about cracked software.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (2)

houghi (78078) | about 2 years ago | (#42233863)

Having the ability to use Usenet clients and thus have threads that you can follow is another plus.
Having all the discussions in one place is also nice. No need to browse through several websites and on that website several threads is also a HUGE plus.
The distributed part is also very nice. No central server that can be blocked.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#42236847)

Unless you want to drown in Gucci spam, you're still going to be moderated.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (1)

scared masked man (2776663) | about 2 years ago | (#42238759)

Apart from the Scary Devil Monastery, which has a trivial but adequate CAPTCHA, some of the comp.* groups are pretty clean even without moderation. They are mostly high-volume groups, but even ones like comp.lang.lisp have a pretty good SNR (although for the comp.* groups, it might help that spamming them is likely to attract the ire of at least a few grey-hats).

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (2)

safetyinnumbers (1770570) | about 2 years ago | (#42234551)

I people won't believe this, but I used to get usenet to read the articles.

Re:A sad day for whom, you say? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42239193)

I think you mean it dwarfs the small non binary downloading set of usenet users everywhere.

Need to decentralize (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 2 years ago | (#42233759)

In the ongoing battle between artificial monopolies against free sharing all centralized single point of failures are under attack. Now they attack usenet by attacking the search engines. Decentralized systems with also decentralized search technology are the future - try shutting down something like the eMule KAD network. Combined with tools like PeerBlock to keep the spyfirms out this is still pretty secure.

Re:Need to decentralize (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about 2 years ago | (#42233795)

There are no 'decentralized' systems on the Internet. Not even newsgroups, which are about as close as you can get.

Just because you apply the word decentralized to something you don't understand, doesn't make it true.

Re:Need to decentralize (1)

cultiv8 (1660093) | about 2 years ago | (#42233905)

The Tor2Web [tor2web.org] project is pursuing just this. See the .onion nym system proposal [torproject.org] specifically, one of the more exciting projects towards anonymity and decentralization on the internet (short of a decentralized dns system, but I digress).

Re:Need to decentralize (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 2 years ago | (#42234157)

eMule is close enough. Each node is equivalent to another, and searches are done through the nodes, so there is no single website to block. Further, the software is open source so going after the maintainers (like they did with Limewire and edonkey) won't work too.

Re:Need to decentralize (1)

mister_playboy (1474163) | about 2 years ago | (#42236749)

LimeWire was GPL... that's why FrostWire existed. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LimeWire [wikipedia.org]

The network was so centralized that the openness of the program didn't mean much. FrostWire went Bittorrent only soon after LimeWire was shutdown to avoid legal trouble.

Re:Need to decentralize (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 years ago | (#42234235)

I was starting to talk about Overnet/eDonkey, but it appears that it has been taken down by RIAA. Apparently it wasn't truly decentralized.

Re:Need to decentralize (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 2 years ago | (#42235341)

eDonkey had a single point of failure: the software was closed-source and maintained by a company that could be sued to bancrupcy. eMule, that was developed als an open eDonkey client, does not suffer from that problem. It is open source and several forks are in widespread use.

Re:Need to decentralize (1)

nogginthenog (582552) | about 2 years ago | (#42233807)

Or host a TOR NZB site...

Re:Need to decentralize (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233829)

As long as there are thieves, they'll find a way to steal.

In politics, heads still roll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233861)

...for suggesting anything happening to The Greatest Heist of the 20th Century: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/12/07/republican_fired_copyright_reform/

Re:Need to decentralize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234167)

Combined with tools like PeerBlock to keep the spyfirms out this is still pretty secure.

Blacklists have a 100% failure rate in every security problem in which they have ever been used. But this one is different, huh?

You've almost certainly already been infiltrated, but if you haven't, it's because they don't care, or haven't cared yet. One thing's for sure, though: it's trivial for them to do so.

Re:Need to decentralize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234485)

Combined with tools like PeerBlock to keep the spyfirms out this is still pretty secure.

Blacklists have a 100% failure rate in every security problem in which they have ever been used. But this one is different, huh?

Yes, blacklists are so fucking wonderfully effective the spyfirms tremble at the mere thought of them being deployed agin them..like they aren't already using their employees (Read: paid investigators) home broadband connections as part of their information gathering network..
I'm not saying that blacklists are useless for every situation, but in this day and age they are almost totally useless as a means of stopping the MAFIAA from snooping on who's sharing what.

Re:Need to decentralize (4, Insightful)

Mascot (120795) | about 2 years ago | (#42234189)

They're going after the Usenet providers as well, via automated DMCA takedown requests. The providers have no choice but to comply (and to keep up, also automating the process), which means content is effectively gone within hours of being uploaded.

The irony when it comes to TV shows/movies is the same as it used to be with the music industry: the stuff being downloaded is largely not available to buy online legally. I wish they would put their efforts into making this content available for purchase instead of wasting their time trying to stem the flood of copyright infringement.

Re:Need to decentralize (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 2 years ago | (#42235367)

The providers have one very big choice: move to a country with more freedom than the US, like Ukraine. Especially countries that are pissed off by the US and are more than happy to return the favor.

Re:Need to decentralize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42236047)

To UKRAINE? Where Ukraine's government, PM resign en masse?
I'm with ya, but UKRAINE? maybe pick another one?

        Ania Tsoukanova
        From: AAP
        December 04, 2012 12:35PM

The Ukrainian PM (pic) and the entire government have resigned in a surprise move. Source: AAP

UKRAINIAN Prime Minister Mykola Azarov and the entire government resigned on Monday in a surprise move after controversial elections as the economy teeters on the brink of recession.

Yeah I'll pass on movin my unmanaged co-lo NNTP servers there for a bit.

Though I hear the spirit of what your sayin

Re:Need to decentralize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42239221)

While the thought is a nice idea...but you have to be retarded to think the ukraine is a reasonable country to work in.

Re:Need to decentralize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42239795)

Perhaps that's his point, that the US has copyright laws putting it on par with, or perhaps worse than countries like the Ukraine. Yeah, I'm old, get over it. :P

I am not sad (1, Insightful)

houghi (78078) | about 2 years ago | (#42233781)

Binaries killed Usenet. Because of these binaries, many providers stopped, because it was taking up too much space and bandwidth.
Because they stopped, many people stopped using the real discussion groups.

So instead of having one place where I can get to ask questions in one place in an easy way, I have to go to multiple websites that all have a lousy way of interfacing with other people.

The websites do the filtering, where with Usenet I am able to do it myself. OK, binaries are not the only ones to help kill it. Others were webtv and Outlook (Toposting and HTML posting) and Google (By buying and then changing deja.com).

Yet I am sure that binaries are the most important one. Text based can be done by almost any provider with very limited resources.

Re:I am not sad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42233881)

bullshit! It's easy to filter binaries tree and many did so.

Re:I am not sad (1, Troll)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 2 years ago | (#42234345)

Binaries killed Usenet. Because of these binaries, many providers stopped, because it was taking up too much space and bandwidth.
Because they stopped, many people stopped using the real discussion groups.

So instead of having one place where I can get to ask questions in one place in an easy way, I have to go to multiple websites that all have a lousy way of interfacing with other people.

This.

The loss of NZBmatrix and it's bastard ilk are no loss for actual Usenet users - only for those (mis)using it to share and download files. Good riddance to bad rubbish I say, don't let the door hit your ass on the way out.

Re:I am not sad (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234443)

How is this moderated up so high. No provider was forced to shudder their doors because of the huge size of the binaries groups. Just dont carry the group. Usenet discussion died because of spam and web forums.

Re:I am not sad (5, Informative)

StormyWeather (543593) | about 2 years ago | (#42234665)

This comment is factually correct, although it's modded down because it is contrary to someones worldview, that's often the case with Slashdot negative moderation. I used to run a NNTP server for a small ISP in 1994. I just filtered out the worst offending binary groups when the cost became prohibitive. I ran an NNTP server on a 486 with a couple scsi drives just fine with just the text groups. I can't imagine it being a "huge cost" to any ISP without the binaries.

Re:I am not sad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234831)

Agree, I stopped using usenet for discussion groups about 10 years ago, nobody paid attention to the rules, there were so many flame posts it was insane, it ended up being a painful way to use the net.

As you say nobody HAS to carry binaries groups, Ive been using them in one form or another for 20 years...yes, 20.

I've used them to upload images to photography groups and hobbyist channels, muppets slagging off binaries for the end of index sites are uninformed bandwagon hoppers. As for newsgroups themselves its a painful way to work these days.

Re:I am not sad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42236889)

Shutter.

Re:I am not sad (2)

quenda (644621) | about 2 years ago | (#42238267)

Usenet died when it was opened to the great unwashed masses. AOL was the start.
The golden age of usenet was only possible because it was largely restricted to intelligent educated grown-ups. Or at least college students who were a minority enough that they soon got pulled into line with netiquette. That was the day with everyone used their real names, and many had their phone number in the .signature footer.

Re:I am not sad (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about 2 years ago | (#42234875)

Binaries never killed usenet. It only forced some providers to go text only (there are many and pretty much all are free, google them). Email and groups (yahoo groups, gmail groups and other newsletter service) is what really killed usenet.

Re:I am not sad (1)

MMC Monster (602931) | about 2 years ago | (#42234987)

What about the ability to handle spam?

Spam was a problem for usenet in the early 90s (when I left). Can't imagine what it's like now.

Re:I am not sad (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 2 years ago | (#42235397)

Spam is on the groups I am on not much of a problem anymore: the marketeers seems to have forgotten the textgroups on usenet. Sometimes I do have problems with other kinds of spam, like the sci.physics.* groups being overrun by crackpots, but for that there are moderated groups like sci.physics.research.

Re:I am not sad (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | about 2 years ago | (#42239711)

That's why you have an indexing service like nzbmatrix and nzb files. You never actually usenet itself.

Re:I am not sad (5, Informative)

water-and-sewer (612923) | about 2 years ago | (#42235899)

The text groups are not dead; not by a long shot, and for some topics they're still a great first place to look (Perl questions or Lisp for example).

Go to aioe.net (org?) for a free text group provider. Albasani is another, although the owner, Alexander Bartolich sadly passed away suddenly earlier this year so it's not clear how much longer that site will be around. EndlessSeptember - or something like that - is also providing free text groups.

And the forum at www.dictatorshandbook.net is technically a news server. Connect to it with a news client (Unison, SLRN, Knode, TIN, Pine, Thunderbird) to give it a try and remember how much awesomer NNTP threads are relative to web forums or -- gack -- AJAXy Facebook-type stuff.

Re:I am not sad (1)

antdude (79039) | about 2 years ago | (#42238879)

Any free fast binary usenet services? [grin]

Re:I am not sad (2)

SecurityTheatre (2427858) | about 2 years ago | (#42239363)

how much awesomer NNTP threads are relative to web forums or -- gack -- AJAXy Slashdot-type stuff.

FTFY

Indexing Bots (1)

Adrian Lopez (2615) | about 2 years ago | (#42234233)

They say once they're done with this latest DMCA notice they'll be left with "an impossible task of policing our indexing bots." I'm not aware of any law requiring content to be filtered as it arrives, so why would they have to police their indexing bots?

Re:Indexing Bots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234373)

They say once they're done with this latest DMCA notice they'll be left with "an impossible task of policing our indexing bots." I'm not aware of any law requiring content to be filtered as it arrives, so why would they have to police their indexing bots?

That's probably just code for, "we're tired of dealing with all this DMCA heat." It's sad, but I guess I can't blame them.

What's wrong with binsearch? (2)

StormyWeather (543593) | about 2 years ago | (#42234615)

Binsearch.info is coming back with relevant results still, that's what I've always used, and it does an acceptable job.

Re:What's wrong with binsearch? (1)

antdude (79039) | about 2 years ago | (#42238467)

But how long will it last? It won't last forever. What other good ones are there like it?

Too many people... (5, Funny)

spagthorpe (111133) | about 2 years ago | (#42234699)

Too many people violated the first rule of USENET.

Re:Too many people... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42234833)

It's not like Usenet is older than the internet.

Re:Too many people... (5, Interesting)

unr3a1 (1264666) | about 2 years ago | (#42235261)

That's not really the point. Yes, Usenet is old, but it was generally unknown to the majority of your average computer users. For years, the MAFIAA has been going after torrenting, with seemingly no knowledge of the capabilities and common use for Usenet. Now all of the sudden, NZB sites and Usenet providers have been getting hit with the DMCA notices. Again, seemingly it's apparent that the MAFIAA has only recently become aware of Usenet, so spagthorpe was using a funny and appropriate movie reference to point out that a lot of people couldn't keep the Usenet secret to themselves.

Re:Too many people... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42235763)

People have been saying that for quite some time now http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r27718884-Newsgroups-DMCA-catching-up-to-Usenet- usenet hasn't been secret for a while.

Re:Too many people... (1)

BenJeremy (181303) | about 2 years ago | (#42235769)

That's because of the sophistication of the people the RIAA and MPAA employ to battle copyright violations. They are gettign better, or perhaps, people who have been in the "scene" for a long time are more than willing to cash in (sell out) and collect bounties on takedown notices.

Torrents offer a revenue stream through legal intimidation of its users, but usenet is still a problem for the RIAA and MPAA, so as the legal revenue stream of suing (or threatening to sue) torrent users dries up, they are left with cleaning up the remaining sources of pirated media.

This can be solved, though. Safe havens are few and far between, and even so-called "private" invite-only sites are far from untouchable - what is needed is for a new binary news client that can handle encrypted binary packets. and an infrastructure that can track, using users' signatures, who accesses what files from a "secure indexer" - when a takedown notice appears, you can isolate the infiltration to that block of users. Such a pro-active approach could then even provide false results to ferret out the spy among legitimate users.

Many indexers already use logins and API keys, so the idea of using a digital signature isn't farfetched. Tracking users because they, for example, are accessing a TV series file that has had takedown notices (Fringe, as an example), then determining how many of them actually accessed the specific search or pulled down the encrypted NZB should be trivial. With a few more references, you could cross-reference the culprit down to a small number, then. Once you identify the user who is working for the media companies, you simply return useless results or delay valid results by days or weeks - or block them out entirely. Eventually, such a "user" will be unable to get a valid invite into the secure index service (and those that invited the spy would also no longer be able to do invites, etc...)

You can go many levels and still have a practical, workable system.

Re:Too many people... (1)

wild_quinine (998562) | about 2 years ago | (#42235781)

It got popular, because it just got sooo mucy easier to use over time, and the tools got better. Some were really, really spectacularly mature. The changes were welcomed as they made it more convenient for the knowledgeable, but things also more accessible for the novice demographic. If it had been anything other than the internet's last dirty little secret, usenet would have exploded in the next two years.

Re:Too many people... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42239009)

This first rule/second reference to fight club needs to die a terrible death.

The movie/book are completely overrated and making references to it make you look like a tool.

Same goes for 1984

Re:Too many people... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42239815)

Damn right

Why not use another method? (0)

loufoque (1400831) | about 2 years ago | (#42235291)

It's not like NNTP is the best way to download stuff anyway.
Bittorrent, HTTP and IRC/DCC all have their advantages, and they're alive and well.

Re:Why not use another method? (4, Insightful)

SealBeater (143912) | about 2 years ago | (#42236303)

I wish I could convey in words how obvious it is that you have no idea what you are talking about.

Re:Why not use another method? (0)

loufoque (1400831) | about 2 years ago | (#42236395)

You're welcome to try.
NNTP to download things has become irrelevant. Nowadays it's costly, annoying, has short history and isn't really faster than other methods.

Re:Why not use another method? (3, Insightful)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#42236927)

You've just further reinforced our impression.

Re:Why not use another method? (0)

loufoque (1400831) | about 2 years ago | (#42238529)

You sir, are a troll and an idiot.

I take it you think only the scene makes proper releases too?

Re:Why not use another method? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42236865)

lol.. good one..

Re:Why not use another method? (1)

SilverJets (131916) | about 2 years ago | (#42238131)

ROFL

bittorrent

ROFL

Re:Why not use another method? (2)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about 2 years ago | (#42239417)

Care to mention any IRC channels or DCC hubs where I can download stuff. I thought not. I can point you to a number of usenet indexes and servers. That is advantage of usenet is, you dont need secrecy, and you dont get nailed like bittorent.

deja vu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42235985)

it's just some out there don't want indexes

you want an answer if google cared about NG's, look at it's dejavu. now google groups, she looks like a basic phorum script with a google frame around it now. file_id.diz what's that?

I still wouldn't boot NG's so fast. Boot bad ISP's instead.

I love this ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42236565)

This type of thing facinates. I spent almost a year to find a legal system that gives me what I need. Guess what. It was not available.

It just does not make sense that a person copying files gets sent to prison for 25 years and a rapist (raping a 3year old child) goes to jail for 15.

I'd really like to see the following figures:
1. Money spend on litigation
2. Money lost because of file sharing (excluing litigation)
3. Money that file downloaders are willing to spend on download sites. (NZBMatrix was not really free).

I have a feeling if the movie industry simply take all the money they spend on litigation and build a proper sharing site they would make more money.

thanks for the motivation! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42236713)

I went from reading this this morning to running my own newznab in 4 hours.

Re:thanks for the motivation! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42237821)

You running the "free" version?

I've got it setup but not without issues as the only thing working is "raw search".

If i click on any category its blank (it shouldn't be) nor does the searching work (if i search raw i get results from a category , but if i search that category nothing).
I feel i have missed a steps somewhere and its not sorting and cataloging the results correctly.

Some sort of regex issues? when it runs it only has 2 regex.

GREED wins again. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42237453)

Greedy MPAA and cable giants making more than there share strike again.
It's not like people that were downloading episodes of TV shows are suddenly going to buy the $50 season on blu-ray or ay $150 a month for overpriced cable TV..
At least I hope not. They will either do without, or get Netflix... Until greedy ISP's start charging you by the megabyte kills off the Netflix, Hulu, AOD, etc.. option.

Why not (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42238207)

Why can't somebody set a site up in china....
Or another place where they don't have such brain dead rules

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