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Catfish Strands Itself To Kill Pigeons

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the step-away-from-the-water dept.

Science 115

SternisheFan writes "In Southwestern France, a group of fish have learned how to kill birds. As the River Tarn winds through the city of Albi, it contains a small gravel island where pigeons gather to clean and bathe. And patrolling the island are European catfish—1 to 1.5 meters long, and the largest freshwater fish on the continent. These particular catfish have taken to lunging out of the water, grabbing a pigeon, and then wriggling back into the water to swallow their prey. In the process, they temporarily strand themselves on land for a few seconds. Other aquatic hunters strand themselves in a similar way, including bottlenose dolphins from South Carolina, which drive small fish onto beaches, and Argentinian killer whales, which swim onto beaches to snag resting sealions. The behavior of the Tarn catfishes is so similar that Julien Cucherousset from Paul Sabatier University in Toulouse describes them as 'freshwater killer whales.'"

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Sample Video ... catfish catching pigeons (2)

Press2ToContinue (2424598) | about a year and a half ago | (#42234535)

Here's catfish catching pigeons

Makes me happy there are catfish in the world.

Link went mising - here it is (5, Informative)

Press2ToContinue (2424598) | about a year and a half ago | (#42234573)

The link went missing - here it is [youtube.com]

Re:Link went mising - here it is (4, Insightful)

v1 (525388) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235583)

That video wasn't very clear. It didn't look like the catfish really "beached" itself, it was more of a lunge from the water's edge. When I hear "beached" I'm thinking mostly or completely out of the water like you see killer whales going up on shore and taking sea lions and seals off the dry beach. These birds were practically wading in the shallows.

Also, it looked like every time they got a pigeon, it managed to get free within a few seconds and get back up on shore?

I prefer this video, a snapper snagging a pigeon: Snapping turtle eats bird [youtube.com] Much clearer outcome. (those snappers have an insane strike speed, as well as a very unexpectedly long range)

Re:Link went mising - here it is (3, Interesting)

durrr (1316311) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235619)

One link mentioned a 28% kill rate. While not very impressive it's a free meal every 3rd time.

Re:Link went mising - here it is (1)

spokenoise (2140056) | about a year and a half ago | (#42239541)

Who put the catfish amongst the pigeons?

Re:Link went mising - here it is (3, Interesting)

icebike (68054) | about a year and a half ago | (#42236339)

When I see the word "strands", both in the linked story and the summary, I assume a terminal event. If the fish can get back in the water under its own power at will, it certainly does not amount to a stranding. Beached is more appropriate, but even it suggests something of an irreversible predicament.

Neither is exactly true, since there is no mention of fish deaths. The fish have the ability to get back in the water.

A poor choice of words to add sensationalism. Sort of akin to calling every human venture into the water a drowning.

Further, fish going ashore for other reasons is not that rare. Many fish spawn ashore [oxfordjournals.org] including the Grunion. [wikipedia.org] Dolphins chase fish ashore [scwildlife.com] too. Which is interesting because two species are going ashore for two different reasons, one to escape, one to eat.
.

Re:Link went mising - here it is (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42237131)

This.

Not only are the fish not stranded on land, they aren't even leaving the water in the first place.
The birds they attack are all standing in the water.

Re:Link went mising - here it is (1)

thomasw_lrd (1203850) | about a year and a half ago | (#42238191)

I was expecting something much more dramatic. As in the mother catfish sacrificing herself to save her babies from the rabid rats with wings. Not, here's a fish that does things like some other animals.

I drowned at least twice yesterday. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42240451)

It was raining.

Re:Link went mising - here it is (1)

ultranova (717540) | about a year and a half ago | (#42236627)

The link went missing

There must be a terminal near the shore!

Re:Sample Video ... catfish catching pigeons (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42234697)

Can we teach them to catch niggers? Niggers are a much more serious pest than pigeons you know.

Re:Sample Video ... catfish catching pigeons (5, Funny)

tobiasly (524456) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235285)

Amen!! Forget sharks, I want a goddamn pigeon-eating catfish with a laser on its head!

Re:Sample Video ... catfish catching pigeons (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42238851)

Amen!! Forget sharks, I want a goddamn pigeon-eating catfish with a laser on its head!

AH hahahahahahaha I saw that movie ten years ago too! I too have read somebody repeating that meme hundreds of times on slashdot. Man oh man. We are like brothers, you and I.

Quick, somebody at Slashdot Admin hand-code a +10 Hilarious rating just for him. Such a thoughtful and original contribution like this deserves nothing less.

Re:Sample Video ... catfish catching pigeons (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42239141)

Only if they hand-code a -10 Delete This Bullshit just for you.

Re:Sample Video ... catfish catching pigeons (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42236435)

This must be how the first fish crawled onto land.

Oh wait.

Re:Sample Video ... catfish catching pigeons (1)

mikael (484) | about a year and a half ago | (#42236589)

Being caught out at low tide in river deltas would have driven the need to survive in freshwater. Being caught out in small pools would probably have been the driving force to survive in air.

Re:Sample Video ... catfish catching pigeons (1)

able1234au (995975) | about a year and a half ago | (#42237305)

Especially as there were probably no pigeons at the time :)

But yes, you can see how the evolution would have worked and how the desire to fill every niche selects the fish who can adapt the best.

Re:Sample Video ... catfish catching pigeons (1)

adokink (1094097) | about a year and a half ago | (#42240143)

Here is another sample. This was shot in Zaragoza, Spain. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KFBevfHJAo [youtube.com] Catfish were introduced in the seventies by the germans, with no license to do so and for recreative reasons. 40 years later, catfish have become the main predator in Aragon rivers. The fact is that from a biodiversity point of view it has been a disaster, but from the economic one, a whole new tourist industry has arised.

The article forgot to mention... humans (1, Funny)

Press2ToContinue (2424598) | about a year and a half ago | (#42234555)

"Argentinian killer whales swim onto beaches to snag resting sealions" ... and humans: Bad day for a swim, man eaten by an orca killer whale [youtube.com]

With a giant catfish I doubt it could not do the same to an adult, but perhaps a toddler unattended.

Re:The article forgot to mention... humans (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42234705)

"Argentinian killer whales swim onto beaches to snag resting sealions" ... and humans: Bad day for a swim, man eaten by an orca killer whale [youtube.com]

Uhh that video on youtube isn't real.. it's an ad.

Re:The article forgot to mention... humans (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42234725)

The following video is only an ad for a pen. Don't bother clicking.

Re:The article forgot to mention... humans (1)

Cwix (1671282) | about a year and a half ago | (#42234797)

Lol that is a pencil ad.

Re:The article forgot to mention... humans (2)

vivtho (834049) | about a year and a half ago | (#42239025)

WRT catfish eating humans .... It's already happened ... Kali River goonch attacks [wikipedia.org]

Oh great (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42234621)

Now people'll have to start emptying the litters of stranded catfish.

Temporarily stranded? (5, Insightful)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#42234715)

In the process, they temporarily strand themselves on land for a few seconds.

Not really stranding themselves, then, eh?

Fish eating birds though... seems wrong, somehow...

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

i.r.id10t (595143) | about a year and a half ago | (#42234773)

I've seen the sterotypical scene of a momma duck and her babies floating out along behind her, touring the pond in the shallows....

And then a big swirl, maybe a splash, and there is one less duckling in the parade...

Only difference is these catfish are going where they don't really belong to do it. I'm assuming that the same species in other locations doesn't display the same behavior on a fairly regular basis...

Re:Temporarily stranded? (4, Interesting)

LourensV (856614) | about a year and a half ago | (#42234819)

I'd say this is like a cat leaping into the air to catch a bird, or an Osprey diving down into the water to catch a fish. Seems like many species happily leave their domain temporarily if there's food to be had. Still, interesting that these fish have picked up the idea (maybe it's the "cat" in their name?), and anything that gets rid of pigeons is a good thing :-).

Re:Temporarily stranded? (2)

CanadianRealist (1258974) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235377)

I'd say the cat leaping into the air is not quite at the same level. The cat is in no danger of suffocating while up in the air. The catfish and and the bird are both going into a domain where they cannot "breathe".

Re:Temporarily stranded? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42235465)

Well it depends where it leaps. Family cat fell 15 meters off a building to catch a bird. Survived all right as she was young enough.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42238095)

A better example probably would have been a cat climbing a tree since they can easily climb them but getting down isn't easy. They often do this to nab birds.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about a year and a half ago | (#42240075)

I know for a fact that some species of catfishes - corydoras come to mind - can breathe air, absorbing oxygen through their gut. Can't say about this kind of catfish, though.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

AsmCoder8088 (745645) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235403)

...and anything that gets rid of pigeons is a good thing :-).

But then we might run into a shortage of carrier pigeons.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (4, Funny)

gmhowell (26755) | about a year and a half ago | (#42237731)

...and anything that gets rid of pigeons is a good thing :-).

But then we might run into a shortage of carrier pigeons.

Then how will I implement my company's RFC1149 compliant network?

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | about a year and a half ago | (#42238505)

...and anything that gets rid of pigeons is a good thing :-).

But then we might run into a shortage of carrier pigeons.

I was wondering why I was getting packet loss to some French domains in my IP over carrier pigeon implementation.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

i.r.id10t (595143) | about a year and a half ago | (#42239043)

You should try here in the southern US... mid September you start getting more packet loss, but the packets that do make it thru are moving faster :)

Re:Temporarily stranded? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42235579)

Maybe it's the other way around, and they gained their name exactly because of this behaviour. Just because it's documented for the first time, doesn't mean it's seen for the first time as well.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

pspahn (1175617) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235693)

Indeed. I see cats jumping out of the water to catch birds quite often!!! This must be the origin of the name, and absolutely nothing to do with the cat-like whiskers on their face!

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#42240737)

interesting that these fish have picked up the idea (maybe it's the "cat" in their name?)

Yes, and similarly dogfish can bark and lick their balls.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (4, Interesting)

Palamos (1379347) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235265)

It's wrong to say that the catfish do not belong on land, they are known to cross land to move from pond to pond as they dry up and there is some evidence that they migrate, at least once in their lifetime. They usually leave ponds at night when it's more humid so it's not a well known phenomenon. Nonetheless, this is very interesting behaviour.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42241271)

More humid at night?

Check your facts please.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (2)

Sulphur (1548251) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235717)

I've seen the sterotypical scene of a momma duck and her babies floating out along behind her, touring the pond in the shallows....

And then a big swirl, maybe a splash, and there is one less duckling in the parade...

Only difference is these catfish are going where they don't really belong to do it. I'm assuming that the same species in other locations doesn't display the same behavior on a fairly regular basis...

Birds gotta swim and fish gotta fly.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

Macgrrl (762836) | about a year and a half ago | (#42238723)

Birds gotta swim and fish gotta fly.

But they don't last long if they try.

- Tom Lehrer, Pollution.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (2)

ldcroberts (747178) | about a year and a half ago | (#42234809)

yeah it's usually the birds temporarily drowning themselves to catch fish

Re:Temporarily stranded? (2)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year and a half ago | (#42234883)

In the process, they temporarily strand themselves on land for a few seconds.

Not really stranding themselves, then, eh?

I was thinking the same thing. Many catfish can stay out of water for long periods of time. [wikipedia.org]

Fish eating birds though... seems wrong, somehow...

I've seen northern pike [wikipedia.org] eat ducks a few times and even a small dog once.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

the gnat (153162) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235203)

I've seen northern pike [wikipedia.org] eat ducks a few times and even a small dog once.

Is it sick and wrong that my first thought on reading this was, "I would pay at least $25 to see this happen"?

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

pspahn (1175617) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235743)

Of course, there are a number of "fly" patterns devoted to mimicking a bird. It is fairly common for those sport-fishing for taimen [wikipedia.org] to use a fly pattern resembling a bird with a broken wing, for example.

There are plenty of bird-eating fish. At so many various points, fish are the ultimate opportunists. They eat what falls out of the shrubs and into the water, be it birds, rodents, insects, frogs... It's mostly the same to them.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

NFN_NLN (633283) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235005)

Fish eating birds though... seems wrong, somehow...

How about cows eating birds then?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXhElaGCZVU [youtube.com]

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

mikael (484) | about a year and a half ago | (#42236663)

That looked set up - looks like the cow was being starved and the bird trapped there by string.

There's the pelican that ate a pigeon:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0b4TU_R7J3c [youtube.com]

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

KiloByte (825081) | about a year and a half ago | (#42238503)

That looked set up - looks like the cow was being starved and the bird trapped there by string.

Animal proteins are better and easier to digest than plant ones, even for herbivores. It's just that cows are so lousy hunters they know they shouldn't even try.

My relatives had a cow who kept breaking into the henhouse for a snack, despite having plenty of regular fodder.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#42240757)

Fish eating birds though... seems wrong, somehow...

How about cows eating birds then?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXhElaGCZVU [youtube.com]

Aren't cows herbivores?

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

nospam007 (722110) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235351)

"Fish eating birds though... seems wrong, somehow..."

I guess the pigeons shat one time too many on that fish's head.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#42236123)

What do you do if a bird shits on your car?

Don't ask her out again.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#42240771)

What do you do if a bird shits on your car?

Don't ask her out again.

There are people who pay good money for that sort of specialised service.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42236169)

Fish eating birds though... seems wrong, somehow...

Republicans caused too many digestive problems

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

Barsteward (969998) | about a year and a half ago | (#42236437)

Its called a catfish for a reason but i guess that was pure luck in hindsight

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

ByteSlicer (735276) | about a year and a half ago | (#42238167)

Fish eating birds though... seems wrong, somehow...

I had the same reaction the first time I saw a spider catch and eat a mammal (mouse). Predator and prey switched places.

Re:Temporarily stranded? (1)

Turmio (29215) | about a year and a half ago | (#42238771)

Fish eating birds is not that unusual.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_E4BUt1z8Y [youtube.com] for instance. Ducklings belong to pike's menu. I've witnessed a similar attack, too.

Sounds fishy to me. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42234807)

Just sayin'

Evolutionary selection pressure? (1)

CanadianRealist (1258974) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235043)

If the food is more plentiful at the water's edge than in the water then a better ability to temporarily leave the water to go after food could give a survival advantage.

Re:Evolutionary selection pressure? (1)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about a year and a half ago | (#42237159)

Catfish already evolved the ability to cross mud flats between water bodies. The amount of time they spend out of the water here is trivial by comparison.

However, I'm surprised the pigeons haven't learned to avoid the much larger animal very obviously moving through the shallows toward them. Pigeons are usually pretty good at avoiding predators, such as hawks, vehicles, and children. Good pattern recognition and very twitchy reflexes.

Re:Evolutionary selection pressure? (1)

CanadianRealist (1258974) | about a year and a half ago | (#42237915)

Then consider the example of catfish crossing mud flats. Presumably there's a reason to do this. (Why did the catfish cross the mud flats?) Let's say that there's a benefit in being able to move on land, from one body of water to another. Being able to survive longer out of water and being able to move better on land could both be good for survival. Both for the individual and for genetic changes which favour such abilities. Where might such genetic traits lead?

As for the pigeons: It could be a vision problem, that they don't really see the fish. Either an optics issue with being too close to the water or something about the pigeons eyes. Or it could be something else such as a preference to watch overhead more since that's where most predators come from. Seems reasonable since most of the time there not that many things ready to spring up out of the ground at you, although in some sense the fish could be seen as doing something similar to this.

Re:Evolutionary selection pressure? (1)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about a year and a half ago | (#42239535)

[Note: I wasn't criticising the general idea of catfish adapting to more time out of water, just pointing out that this hunting isn't likely to contribute to it. I would expect other adaptation, to increase the success rate (I noticed that even when they get the bird underwater, it often can get free, that's a prime situation where small differences between fish probably make a big difference.)]

Or it could be something else such as a preference to watch overhead more since that's where most predators come from. Seems reasonable since most of the time there not that many things ready to spring up out of the ground at you,

However, they must deal with cats/foxes/etc, all of which are sneak/ambush predators. And I noticed in the video, the catfish's back is well out of the water before it strikes, meaning there's plenty of disturbance on the surface of the water. It's a weird blind-spot for an animal that has to deal with much sneakier/faster predators, and which is normally a fast learner.

(Why did the catfish cross the mud flats?)

To get to the other tide!

Leave it to the French... (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235151)

Well of course, the French have always been into the "country cuisine" of squab [wikipedia.org] and the like. I be interested to know what kind of wine, with their refined palate, these catfish are drinking?

Not Really "News" (1)

paleo2002 (1079697) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235269)

This isn't really news. I'm pretty sure marine animals have learned to come up on land in search of food at least once or twice before in the past.

Killer carp of yore (1)

darkfeline (1890882) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235313)

Reminds me of the killer carp from Dwarf Fortress. What'll we have next, stampeding hordes of elephant that can only be wiped out by flooding the surface with lava?

Firefly (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235387)

Replace river Tarn with River Tam (which looks almost identical in many fonts) and you get a bonus Firefly episode centering around River wandering through a city destroying birds.

Re:Firefly (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42240985)

It has been scientifically established that all Firefly fans are paedophiles.

It's a catfish, after all... (5, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235561)

Gee, it's a CATfish. What did you expect? Had it been a toadfish, it would have been catching flies. (A French boarfish would probably take a stroll into the nearest forest to dig for some acorns.)

Re:It's a catfish, after all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42236611)

Acorns? It's French, so it would look for truffles.

why the blog link? (2)

Goldsmith (561202) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235713)

Why are linking to something on yahoo when this was published in an open access journal?

Press releases for science are bad for everyone.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0050840 [plosone.org]

Re:why the blog link? (1)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about a year and a half ago | (#42236231)

Why are linking to something on yahoo when this was published in an open access journal?

Press releases for science are bad for everyone.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0050840 [plosone.org]

Blame the submitter (me) for the confusion. I actually linked to Discover's take on the story, and copy/pasted from the Yahoo blog.

The reason being... I am (at times) using an older version Android smartphone to submit stories to Slashdot. Discover.com (and other more sophisticated sites) uses some copy blocking tech that prevents my phone from copying and pasting the text. So I used the text from the yahoo blog and linked to it in the body of my story submission while linking to Discover.com's story. I'm not up on what's legal to do, giving proper credit to all involved. It just seemed to me like it would be a cool little story/video for /.'ers to comment on.

Re:why the blog link? (1)

Goldsmith (561202) | about a year and a half ago | (#42239811)

It's a cool story to share, nice submission. I'd like to see the editors here include links to scientific papers with the front page stories.

Re:why the blog link? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42240065)

Bloggers have to eat too... Not just catfish... ;)

Economy of the pigeons (1)

roguegramma (982660) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235731)

What I really wonder about is the reason that the pigeons don't move elsewhere.

Is hygiene so important for them?
Have they become oblivious to dangers by constantly exposing themselves to them (just look how close they come to humans in the city)?

Or do pigeons who became smart by escaping (there is one such in the video) lead the other unknowing pigeons there for sport?

Is it a mating ritual where the brave get all the girls?

Re:Economy of the pigeons (1)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about a year and a half ago | (#42237189)

They're just drinking. No need to read anything more into it. Why they don't see the threat of the catfish, I don't know. But why they are there in the first place is pretty mundane.

Ancestors of Cats (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42235793)

This lends credence to the long debated theory that cats evolved from catfish. But, where's the missing link?

The ones that are good at it... (1)

erroneus (253617) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235821)

... reproduced. And of those that were better at it than their parents reproduced. Fins became more leg-like.

We've seen it all before right?

Evolution just never stops does it?

Re:The ones that are good at it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42238299)

Evolution just never stops does it?

No, but you do have a pretty poor understanding of how it works. There's much randomness involved. Evolution isn't survival of the fittest, it's the death of the unfit. A creature doesn't necessarily evolve to become better suited to their environment, they just die if they're ill-suited for their environment. Some species develop pretty bizarre features that don't contribute to their survivability at all -- they just don't have a negative impact, either. Not to mention that more often than not a creature that's ill-suited for its environment survives by migrating (common among catfish) rather than evolving.

Basically, there's no reason to conclude that the catfish that succeed in eating the birds reproduce at a higher rate unless we know more about them. For all we know, catfish that are poor at collecting food by other means make up for it by going after pigeons. With only a 28% success rate they may starve at a higher rate than the other catfish nearby and their genes could be out of the pool within a couple generations. Do the observations reported suggest an evolutionary factor is involved? Yes. Can we conclude that as of now? No - this could be pretty normal behavior that just hasn't been widely observed until now. Or maybe the pigeons are doing something different (mice, for example, can get a parasite that makes them attracted to the smell of cats -- the cats eat the mice and the parasite uses the longer-living cat as a host). There are a number of possibilities.

Sorry if I'm being pedantic but I think this is one of the main reason that evolution is considered controversial. People don't describe it accurately and therefore it seems like voodoo to the common man.

Could be a solution a to a pest (1)

Grayhand (2610049) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235861)

Now if they can be engineered to live on land and adapt to city life.

Re:Could be a solution a to a pest (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#42241007)

Now if they can be engineered to live on land and adapt to city life.

They already have. They're called cats. Where do you think the name "cat" came from? It can hardly be coincidence.

Bottom feeders (1)

emaname (1014225) | about a year and a half ago | (#42235913)

I had always been told catfish were "bottom feeders." I guess they're not, huh? Next thing you know, they'll grow legs and run up on land and catch squirrels and rabbits and the occasional, unsuspecting small dog.

Re:Bottom feeders (1)

twistofsin (718250) | about a year and a half ago | (#42236119)

I had always been told catfish were "bottom feeders." I guess they're not, huh? Next thing you know, they'll grow legs and run up on land and catch squirrels and rabbits and the occasional, unsuspecting small dog.

Smaller catfish scavenge for most of their food but the larger ones get most of their meals hunting. If you want to catch a big Blue or Flathead Catfish the best bait is a live fish, Bluegill and Perch work well.

strand (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42236099)

I do not think that word means what you think it means.

Not the only sea to land predator (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42236257)

Don't forget those far more hazardous Sand Sharks [imdb.com]

A new level of evolution (1)

shoor (33382) | about a year and a half ago | (#42236383)

Not the catfish, but the killer whales coming up on land to snag prey.

The whales' early ancestors lived in the sea and came up on land. Then they went back to the sea though still air breathers. Now they are starting to go back on land again. Will they evolve new legs or just wriggle along like snakes?

Re:A new level of evolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42236477)

Not the catfish, but the killer whales coming up on land to snag prey.

The whales' early ancestors lived in the sea and came up on land. Then they went back to the sea though still air breathers. Now they are starting to go back on land again. Will they evolve new legs or just wriggle along like snakes?

Get yourself stored for a billion years, go to a library, get to the time masheen and let us know of what you have discovered. Thanks.

Re:A new level of evolution (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42236585)

Not the catfish, but the killer whales coming up on land to snag prey.

The whales' early ancestors lived in the sea and came up on land. Then they went back to the sea though still air breathers. Now they are starting to go back on land again. Will they evolve new legs or just wriggle along like snakes?

What you describe is terrifying... orca-sized meat worms sliming around beyond the beach hunting for seals. How do we stop the whales from evolving?

fish eat birds....yawwn (2)

turkeydance (1266624) | about a year and a half ago | (#42237297)

bass eat ducklings. bluefish eat seagulls. sharks eat whatever.

Fish Story (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about a year and a half ago | (#42237313)

Nope... we were fresh out of nightcrawlers when I caught this beast with the wife's mouthy parrot... mmmm, Polly want a fish hook?

Wow (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42237719)

A slashdot posting about a yahoo-article about a Business Insider article about a ... youtubevideo. Thats at least three unneeded, adinfested sites to get to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded

So who wins? (1)

Coppit (2441) | about a year and a half ago | (#42238087)

So if an eagle catches fish, and the catfish catches birds to eat, who wins?

Cats again! (2)

mynameiskhan (2689067) | about a year and a half ago | (#42238211)

Cats in whatever form have never been up to anything good ever. They are killing the one bird, people around the world love because they poop on the heads of politicians' statues.

Re:Cats again! (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#42241027)

Anyone who would prefer a pigeon over a cat has such severe psychological problems that they should probably be banned from the interwebz for life, in case they infect someone else.

I miss "The Far Side" (1)

sootman (158191) | about a year and a half ago | (#42238601)

One of several cartoons titled "Great moments in evolution" [oocities.org]

Wherever he is these days, I hope Gary Larson sees this story and smiles.

Please introduce these in Amsterdam. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42240419)

We offer an abundance in food of the avian variety.

Thanks in advance.

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