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Cox Comm. Injects Code Into Web Traffic To Announce Email Outage

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the sorta-clever-but-only-sorta dept.

Communications 271

An anonymous reader writes "Cox Communications appears to be injecting JavaScript and HTML into subscribers' traffic, as part of their effort to announce an email service outage. Pictures showing the popup."

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271 comments

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Is this News? (5, Informative)

omega6 (1072658) | about 2 years ago | (#42303853)

Providers have been doing similiar things for a while...If you want security, use https.

Re:Is this News? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42303879)

Butt it's Cox so it's funny bathroom humor.

Re:Is this News? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304095)

I just love Cox. That's my favorite part of the internet. I'm on Cox for several hours a day, every day. You might say I'm a Cox addict. If Cox wants to deliver a friendly payload during my regular service, I don't find that hard to swallow. I'm quite pleased when Cox injects this sort of material for me and I'm always eager for more. If you haven't tried Cox, you really should. There's nothing quite so fulfilling or satisfying as Cox.

Re:Is this News? (5, Funny)

craigminah (1885846) | about 2 years ago | (#42304265)

Don't want to complain or you might get Cox blocked.

Re:Is this News? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304487)

I just love Cox. That's my favorite part of the internet. I'm on Cox for several hours a day, every day. You might say I'm a Cox addict. If Cox wants to deliver a friendly payload during my regular service, I don't find that hard to swallow. I'm quite pleased when Cox injects this sort of material for me and I'm always eager for more. If you haven't tried Cox, you really should. There's nothing quite so fulfilling or satisfying as Cox.

So you're an Apple fanboi, huh.

Re:Is this News? (3, Funny)

religious freak (1005821) | about 2 years ago | (#42304497)

Just remember to pay your bill. Otherwise they'll cut off your Cox.

Re:Is this News? (5, Insightful)

Pedrito (94783) | about 2 years ago | (#42303941)

No, not like this. At least I've never seen it before. This is intrusive. I've had it show up in my browser at least 3 times in the past couple of hours and it's about a service I don't even use. I don't care if their e-mail is out. I don't use their e-mail. I don't want this stuff and there ought to be a simple way to opt out.

Re:Is this News? (5, Insightful)

sabri (584428) | about 2 years ago | (#42303977)

No, not like this. At least I've never seen it before. This is intrusive. I've had it show up in my browser at least 3 times in the past couple of hours and it's about a service I don't even use. I don't care if their e-mail is out. I don't use their e-mail. I don't want this stuff and there ought to be a simple way to opt out.

There is, it is called: Vote With Your Money...

Re:Is this News? (5, Funny)

Pedrito (94783) | about 2 years ago | (#42304003)

Actually, that's exactly what I'm going to do now. I was already pissed because my connection has been going down a lot lately. Then they pull this crap. Bye Cox!

Re:Is this News? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304351)

I wish I could do the same. Sadly, Cox is my only option.

Re:Is this News? (-1, Offtopic)

xSauronx (608805) | about 2 years ago | (#42304499)

come on...are you really trying to say that you dont love cox?

Re:Is this News? (4, Interesting)

GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) | about 2 years ago | (#42304013)

Too bad you can't vote with your money when there is a monopoly/oligopoly. I remember Comcast suing the government for competing in certain areas. Why isn't UPS and Fedex suing the Post Office?

Alternative title: Cox acting like a bunch of dicks.

Re:Is this News? (2, Interesting)

paiute (550198) | about 2 years ago | (#42304117)

Why isn't UPS and Fedex suing the Post Office?

They have found it much more promising to give contributions to certain members of Congress to burden the USPS with debt so they sink and clear the way for UPS and Fedex to take over.

Re:Is this News? (5, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | about 2 years ago | (#42304343)

That and they need someone to deliver the last leg on unprofitable routs. More privatized profits and socialized losses.

Re:Is this News? (-1, Flamebait)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | about 2 years ago | (#42304445)

Did you just fucking say that?

That the USPS cannot operated on its own proceeds is an example why you can't be a "quasi-governmental" monster with a union workforce while pretending to be a business with arrest powers, not an example of secret corruption and money in politics. [wikipedia.org]

Our government spends the plurality of it's funds (taxed and borrowed) to buy votes from an increasingly dependent population. Sorry if there's not enough left over to fund the USPS when it can't balance its checkbook.

Re:Is this News? (4, Insightful)

paiute (550198) | about 2 years ago | (#42304553)

http://www.esquire.com/blogs/politics/post-office-default-11215023 [esquire.com]

"In other words, we can no longer have nice things from what is still, in theory, our government, because we have placed what is still, in theory, our government into the hands of vandals and madmen, so the solution is to hand everything over to a private sector that repeatedly has shown that, in the pursuit of an extra nickel in profits, it would sell your grandmother to the Somali pirates and drill an oil-well in Lincoln's nose on Mount Rushmore."

Re:Is this News? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304451)

Because the USPS already uses them for deliveries. The USPS uses FedEx for their flat rate boxes (not sure what else)

Re:Is this News? (1)

rickb928 (945187) | about 2 years ago | (#42304029)

Around here, that means voting for Centurylink. great choice.

Re:Is this News? (4, Insightful)

mwvdlee (775178) | about 2 years ago | (#42303993)

there ought to be a simple way to opt in.

FTFY

Illegal? (3)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 2 years ago | (#42304085)

"At least I've never seen it before. This is intrusive."

I'm not certain, but isn't there a law against messing with your packet stream, and inserting their own content?

It might depend on your user agreement, but I would never intentionally agree to a provision that would let my ISP alter my content.

Re:Illegal? (3, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 2 years ago | (#42304101)

I'm not certain, but isn't there a law against messing with your packet stream, and inserting their own content?

There used to be. Nowadays is the law is basically "You, pathetic peon citizen. Them, corporation. They win."

Re:Illegal? (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 2 years ago | (#42304215)

"There used to be. Nowadays is the law is basically "You, pathetic peon citizen. Them, corporation. They win.""

Funny. But I don't think it's quite that bad in the U.S. yet. In fact, I have been beginning to see a popular trend in the opposite direction. The pendulum swings...

Re:Illegal? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304311)

Technically, it's their network. It's only your network on the other side of your firewall.

Now, if you're running noscript and have not allowed cox.com (.net, whatever), and you still receive the pop-up, that might be hacking...

Re:Is this News? (4, Interesting)

theskipper (461997) | about 2 years ago | (#42304147)

Or instead there ought to be a simple way to just opt in. Or they could produce a FF/IE addon. Or put a big notice on their homepage with this info. Or automated social media notifications. Etc.

Messing with DNS to redirect bad domains to ad parking pages is still around but no one cares anymore. However, this is right in the user's face which feels different, like it's an offensive volley, like one ISP is finally ready for war. The first battle in ISPs training users to accept a tainted connection.

In all honesty, I think they picked the perfect application to start the ball rolling. Few average Joe customers would argue against email outage notifications because it seems like it's an important function that the ISP should provide. More importantly users are used to dynamic pages now, it "feels" like a Facebook or Twitter thing. So in their mind it's probably ok, or at least something that would be hard to argue against from a layman's perspective.

So it's a good starting point to start boiling the frog. I'll bet that their internal calculations show no more than one year to completely boil the poor beast (i.e. ad insertions). That's the holy grail.

Re:Is this News? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304435)

Or instead there ought to be a simple way to just opt in.

There is a way of opting in. It is called: "visit their web page, where they can announce outages and anything else they like"

This sort of intrusion ought to be illegal. Would you accept a postman that opens your letters in order to put extra information inside the envelope? This is the same thing. Of course - if this goes well for them, the next thing is to attach advertisements to any web communication . . .

Re:Is this News? (2)

Nutria (679911) | about 2 years ago | (#42304237)

FF's pop-up blocker and ABP must be effective at stripping injected code, because I have the email outage, too, but have not seen the Cox windows.

(BTW, Cox HSI is probably a bit expensive, but my service has been sturdily reliable. Other than hurricanes, I can't remember the last time I had a Cox outage.)

Re:Is this News? (4, Informative)

DarkTempes (822722) | about 2 years ago | (#42304247)

You can use noscript or any adblock addon to block this.

Look for something like <script src="http://184.178.98.*/static/FloatingContent/243/floating-frame.js" type="text/javascript"></script> in the head.
Craft rules as appropriate.

Re:Is this News? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304413)

Well, run some kind of communication over port 80. But it shouldn't really be http, only something vaguely like it. When they insert something, sue them for disrupting your communiocations.

Those that want notification won't need this sort of mess. To opt-in - simply visit their info page. Or use their page as homepage...

Re:Is this News? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#42304427)

There is.... use a secure protocol.

Re:Is this News? (5, Insightful)

guttentag (313541) | about 2 years ago | (#42304079)

It's the modern equivalent of the phone company playing a recorded message while you are talking to someone on the phone. Or the post office opening your mail and gluing a message to the contents, ransom-note-style, about your mail carrier being out sick. It wouldn't happen. But cox wants to condition people to think of the web like cable TV, where thy can cover part of the picture with service announcements. The FCC needs to weigh in on this and stop it.

Mod Parent Up (0)

skywire (469351) | about 2 years ago | (#42304443)

It's about time someone with a three-digit IQ weighed in.

Re:Is this News? (-1)

Nutria (679911) | about 2 years ago | (#42304591)

Except that the little X button which closes the window means that your analogies are bogus.

Re:Is this News? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304727)

No, it's nothing like that at all. In your phone company case, you cannot control their message over the top of your conversation. In this case, you are in control of your computer, and it only runs their scripts if you want it to. If you don't want it to, it won't. You get to pick. In fact, you get, as a general policy, to pick whether to let 3rd parties run scripts on your computer *at all*. If you chose to do that, this is the sort of thing that can happen, either from your ISP or from a random web site.

Don't volunteer for X, and then get upset when X happens. You can't have it both ways. Your computer is YOURS(*), and will obey YOU(*). No one else is responsible for it but you.

(*) Apple users not included

Re:Is this News? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304561)

This sort of thing is illegal tho, as it violates copyright laws, specifically the reproducing of derivative works. I'd let the websites know so they can get their lawyers to send the C&D letters, Cox would soon stop, unless they want to risk their common carrier status!

Causing web outage to announce email outage? (4, Insightful)

billstewart (78916) | about 2 years ago | (#42304587)

I'm sorry, but if you're injecting Javascript and other text into my web sessions, that's a Web Outage (and a serious security threat.) If you're doing it to announce that your email service is down, that's probably annoying to customers who do use your email service, and much more annoying to customers who don't.

(Unlike many people here, I actually do use my ISP's email service, because it includes a shell account where I'm running procmail, in addition to the spam filtering they do, so email that gets forwarded by my primary email address does go through there. But otherwise I'd be running the filters somewhere else. And it still doesn't justify breaking my http sessions.)

Re:Is this News? (1)

rs79 (71822) | about 2 years ago | (#42304669)

So I click on the first link in the article "Pictures" and I get a fucking ad and have to click through to something far more reasonable looking to me than the fucking ad.

I've really had enough of those things, they're everywhere now. If they don't go way soon I'll make them go away (at least for me).

They should have warned us (5, Funny)

icebike (68054) | about 2 years ago | (#42303857)

Shouldn't they send an email warning us about injecting stuff in our web traffic?

Re:They should have warned us (-1)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | about 2 years ago | (#42303921)

They're announcing an email outage so I'm not quite sure how your plan would work.

Re:They should have warned us (5, Funny)

WWJohnBrowningDo (2792397) | about 2 years ago | (#42303957)

I just injected a woosh into your HTTP stream.

You should feel it soon; or maybe it'll just go over your head again.

Re:They should have warned us (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304399)

meta-woosh

Re:They should have warned us (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 2 years ago | (#42304363)

the email would go:

"we are announcing that our email service is currently out.

PS: if you didn't get this mail, let us know and we'll send it again."

signed "IC&H". not sure what that refers to. must be a victim of circumstance..

Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 2 years ago | (#42303865)

Not seeing any sort of injections here. I do have DNS set to 8.8.8.8. though.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (1)

Dan667 (564390) | about 2 years ago | (#42303907)

that is google's dns. It would be useful to know what is the best dns to use.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (1)

DeusExCalamus (1146781) | about 2 years ago | (#42303935)

Using Google DNS & L3 DNS here (Gulf Coast). It doesn't matter what DNS provider you use, I don't think, it hits you anyway. I don't think the west coast is affected by the outage, though. At least, that's what Cox says.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304347)

I've seen a lot of people suggest "just use Google DNS", but frankly it's a disturbing trend (unless, naturally, your existing DNS provider is even less trustworthy.)

By using Google's recursive DNS servers you should be aware that you're offering them even more information about your online habits, as if they probably didn't have enough already. I'm pretty sure that a capitalist [telegraph.co.uk] company like Google isn't offering free recursive DNS for purely altruistic purposes (or just to 'speed up browsing').

It's also no secret that Google are proposing including the original source IP in EDNS in recursive lookups too, again obstensively for routing edge services, but of course it also has that side effect of offering all that extra juicy information to slurp up.

Before I get jumped on as a troll, I'm not anti-Google or pro-anything else, I'm not suggesting you run away from Google and use $competitor, which basically is a choice of no difference, I'm just saying before you decide to move all your services over like that, just think about the disconcerting amount of trust being placed in a company that is in the business of getting as much personal information about you as possible for their ad networks.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (2)

icebraining (1313345) | about 2 years ago | (#42304453)

I'm pretty sure that a capitalist company like Google isn't offering free recursive DNS (...) just to 'speed up browsing'

Why not? They spend a lot of money keeping Search as fast as possible, because they know that requests above a certain threshold lead people to search less, meaning less ad impressions, meaning less revenue. So what's so implausible about spending some more money on a few DNS servers?

And the data from a DNS server is almost useless; just the domain (not even full URL) and the IP, which often is of some router in front of dozens or hundreds of clients. Considering that a huge percentage of websites out there have some kind of JS code from them (e.g. Analytics, AdSense, etc), it hardly seems worth it to mess their data with such noise.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (2)

muon-catalyzed (2483394) | about 2 years ago | (#42304043)

What the DNS has to do with injecting code into webpages? Do they inject stuff into banking or SSL connections too? Isn't this against net neutrality or something? I mean how cocky the ISP has to be to actually resort to this kind of s****.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 2 years ago | (#42304213)

Do they inject stuff into banking or SSL connections too?

There are ways to do that (eg. using the IMHO dangerous and pointless perversion of a https proxy that gets both ends to trust the thing in the middle - you can buy appliances that do that), but unless you are working for a place that wishes to snoop on all their employees encrypted web traffic and using their web connection it's not likely to happen.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 2 years ago | (#42304319)

What the DNS has to do with injecting code into webpages

It doesn't have anything to do with DNS since the injecting is something done with a web proxy. A way round it is to get your web traffic via a different port (requires agreement from the webserver on the other end) or to completely leapfrog their web proxy and use a different one at the end of a VPN.
All these things of course depend on your ISP upstream letting you do it. It's trivial for an ISP to block all direct connections of any kind if they really want to be restrictive, and with transparent proxies it can even look like a direct connection (eg. all name requests can be sent to their name server even if you ask for one of the google ones).

However I don't really see injection of a notification message as a major abuse of a web proxy. I think people are upset because they didn't realise that such a thing has been possible for many years, and may be thinking it's a new thing that will drown them in advertisements in the future.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (3)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about 2 years ago | (#42304679)

If you find a way to inject data (in a useful way) into an HTTPS stream without adding your own certificate to the person's computer, there are a LOT of government agencies that would LOVE to talk to you.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (1)

neokushan (932374) | about 2 years ago | (#42304141)

What's "best" depends on what your needs are and where you are. For many people, their ISP's DNS should be faster than a 3rd party, but that depends on their ISP being somewhat competent and not dicks who will redirect you whenever they can.

Google's DNS is a solid one, it's generally got a fairly low ping and, surprisingly, they don't filter anyhting or inject ads (they may be tracking your every site request though, so it depends on how you feel about them. Easiest to remember, though: 8.8.8.8

My personal favourite is OpenDNS - fast, they refuse to filter sites if governments request it (such as thepiratebay) and I've yet to have them ever go down. Easy enough to remember - 208.67.222.222 (or 208.67.220.220). They also have a dashboard you can use to filter out sites and such, or adjust their anti-malware protection.

I actually use a combination of the above, primary being OpenDNS, Google as a secondary and my own ISP's as a tertiary backup. Haven't had DNS issues in years.

Re:Posting from Cox in Irvine, CA (1)

stephanruby (542433) | about 2 years ago | (#42304383)

Not seeing any sort of injections here. I do have DNS set to 8.8.8.8. though.

Can you receive email? If you can, you're probably not affected anyhow.

Important Notice! Email Outage (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42303871)

We apologize for the inconvenience. Cox is experiencing a residential email outage in your area.

If you use Outlook Express or another email client you are able to send email. However, incoming email is not available at this time. Incoming messages are being stored and should be available when service is fully operational.

Restoring service remains our top priority. Unfortunately, we estimate at this time service may not be restored until tonight. We again apologize for the inconvenience. Please visit cox.com/support for regular updates.

Thank you,
Cox Communications

The amusing part (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42303875)

is that it refers to Outlook Express, a mail client that was deprecated over 5 years ago.

Re:The amusing part (1)

neokushan (932374) | about 2 years ago | (#42304149)

Having worked for an ISP not that long ago, I can confirm that a LOT of people still use this.

Re:The amusing part (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#42304201)

is that it refers to Outlook Express, a mail client that was deprecated over 5 years ago.

I remember deprecating Outlook Express at least 10 years ago.

Re:The amusing part (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304241)

Windows Mail replaced Outlook Express and functions nearly the same.

Re:The amusing part (1)

Phroggy (441) | about 2 years ago | (#42304431)

Outlook Express replaced Internet Mail and News, and was nearly the same.

Windows Live Mail replaced Windows Mail, and was mostly the same, but dropped support for Usenet newsgroups.

Mail is now the included client in Windows 8, and has dropped support for POP3, but added ActiveSync.

Re:The amusing part (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#42304541)

Windows Mail replaced Outlook Express and "functions" nearly the same.

FTFY.

If they are doing this.... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42303877)

Who knows what else they are injecting.....

the truth is out there (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#42304005)

the truth is out there

Re:If they are doing this.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304091)

Yes, you need to be sure what Cox is injecting.

A lot of people think Cox suck and other are so fed up that they felt blown by Cox and their service. I'm sure doing business with Cox is hard for some folks, but then again, there have been some good times where there harsh feelings have gone limp.

CAPTCHA: "meanings"

Re:If they are doing this.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304259)

Some people like a good Cox injection every now and then

You are right. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42303903)

This is the not the first time they have done this. I feel that they are listening/eaves dropping between me and my communication with another server. I wish there was a law that would stop them. Reminds me of the great firewall of china.

Layer 7 switches (2)

suso (153703) | about 2 years ago | (#42303911)

Well hey, someone has to put those layer 7 switches to good use.

Nice single point of attack (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42303925)

Just compromise Cox's servers, and deliver your payload. Very blackhat friendly.

Re:Nice single point of attack (1)

ELCouz (1338259) | about 2 years ago | (#42304263)

I agree with you... not very secure!

nothing of that nature here (1)

kbdd (823155) | about 2 years ago | (#42303959)

Nothing to be found here. Yet, I have no email. Running Firefox with default settings.

Well, DUH! (2, Insightful)

Crypto Gnome (651401) | about 2 years ago | (#42304035)

Obviously Cox are a bunch of DICKS.

It's your own fault for not realising it.

For those who wonder why people think this is EXTREMELY POOR FORM:
- Their ability to do this is based on them intercepting all your HTTP data, all the time, every day - insert massive invasion of privacy yadda yadda etc etc etc

Re:Well, DUH! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304203)

Wait. You mean ALL of my traffic to the internet is passing THROUGH my ISP?! Outrageous. That isn't what I pay them for!

Re:Well, DUH! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304287)

Not around here, the ISP lends us a little black box with 4 flashing lights on the front that's got the internet on it. :P

Re:Well, DUH! (1)

sjames (1099) | about 2 years ago | (#42304519)

There IS a rather large difference between blindly passing packets through the network and inspecting each one deeply enough to inject additional content into the stream.

Re:Well, DUH! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304617)

You mean ALL of my traffic to the internet is passing THROUGH my ISP?!

Parsing your random web page views, inserting their own content, and then passing it on to you. It's the ultimate man in the middle attack.

Cox: Hey, buddy! The email service is down.
Customer: Ahh! How did you get into my house?!
Cox: Don't worry, we'll fix the email outage soon.
Customer: What? You're trespassing, get the **** out!
Cox: Our service guarantee includes notifying you.
Customer: No! Get out!
Cox: (consults the service handbook) Okay, hug time!

Re:Well, DUH! (1)

hraponssi (1939850) | about 2 years ago | (#42304643)

no, they are a bunch of cox. now, if only my wife also was so much into my cox and injecting it everywhere..

i dont care.... (1)

metalmaster (1005171) | about 2 years ago | (#42304061)

about your damned severe weather advisory! So what if a tropical storm is going to destroy my property, You're interrupting my TV time

Golly (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 2 years ago | (#42304097)

I have never used my ISP-provided email address since abandoning AOL as my provider some time before half of you were born, and that's about 5 moves and 8 providers ago.

Slashdot injects animated gifs in RSS feed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304103)

Seriously, guys. I don't want to download them over mobile. Stop this crap.

Re:Slashdot injects animated gifs in RSS feed (1)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | about 2 years ago | (#42304317)

Seriously, guys. I don't want to download them over mobile. Stop this crap.

Install a system-wide ad blocker on your phone.

My ISP does this for far worse reasons. (5, Interesting)

damnbunni (1215350) | about 2 years ago | (#42304107)

I use Millenicom, who resells Sprint, and in my area Sprint started injecting JavaScript into every page that comes over HTTP to recompress all the jpegs to a much lower quality setting.

That, at least, I could block. Now they just recompress all jpegs that come over http to a horrible level. If I want to keep the internet from looking like ass, I have to use a secure tunnel. Which is obnoxiously slow on 3G.

(Unfortunately, there's nothing Millenicom can do about it. It's up to Sprint. And there's no opt-out.)

Re:My ISP does this for far worse reasons. (1)

timothyb89 (1259272) | about 2 years ago | (#42304367)

I seem to remember a similar issue when I had an Evo 4G device from Sprint a couple of years ago. The device came preconfigured with a system-wide HTTP proxy that was not only incredibly slow, but also compressed images badly. It would also affect most methods of tethering, if memory serves. Perhaps you're seeing the same proxy?

As far as I know there isn't actually any requirement by the network to proxy anything, and I've been able to disable it from the system settings on all of my devices since I learned about the proxy. I'm not sure if you have any access to the configuration for your wireless modem, but you might be able to disable it from there.

Re:My ISP does this for far worse reasons. (3, Insightful)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#42304551)

Yea, it's obnoxiously slow because the images haven't been compressed to shit.

They are trying to hide that your connection is garbage.

I have Sprint myself. Horribly slow.

What a crap (0, Flamebait)

Janek Kozicki (722688) | about 2 years ago | (#42304111)

Give me some news for nerds, not this regional crap. I don't care what is Cox & don't what to know.

They are looking for spin-2 particles at LHC, and they have a hint about two Higgs bosons. IPv6 isn't adopted yet. Quantum computers are being sold commercially. Ziegler et al. are setting up a quantum encrypted communication channel over a satellite link! There was life on earth 60 billion years earlier than previously thought.

Guys, that's what I call news. I know all that from reading slashdot (you can look it up yourself). Who cares, really, about this Cox crap?!

C'mon, do your moderating job on http://slashdot.org/recent [slashdot.org]

Re:What a crap (3, Insightful)

DarkTempes (822722) | about 2 years ago | (#42304197)

You'll care when your ISP starts doing this because no one cared when it happened to others...

First they inject for "emergency notifications" and then next they'll inject for "advertisements to keep your bill down" or something even worse.

Re:What a crap (1)

Kjella (173770) | about 2 years ago | (#42304249)

IPv6 isn't adopted yet.

That's your idea of news, that nobody gives a crap and continue to not give a crap about IPv6? Personally I feel the last oh... decade? or so of IPv6 stories have been flogging the same dead horse.

Re:What a crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304273)

If you don't think ISPs infringing on your HTTP isn't something a nerd should care about, then I don't think you are much of a nerd. So suck on that.

And whoever modded parent as "insightful" should have their head examined.

Re:What a crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304389)

Even if you don't live in the area, don't use Cox, or are even in the US, this is still news. I've called out some articles for not being news recently, but this is actual news. That affects nerds. Who are pretty much the only ones in a place to understand or care about it.

Re:What a crap (1)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | about 2 years ago | (#42304565)

Cox is one of the larger US cable ISPs. This is certainly regional to the US, but not exactly a minor detail.
Also, you may want to check on that 60 billion years. That's a bit longer (over 45 billion years) than the age of the universe. You want "million".

Raise your hand.. (5, Insightful)

claar (126368) | about 2 years ago | (#42304135)

Yep, I received this too, right on Netflix. Um, thanks, Cox, but even if I used your email service, I'd really rather watch my movie..

Keep your hands off my traffic, please. Is it too much to ask for you to simply carry my bits back and forth for the agreed-upon amount?

Re:Raise your hand.. (1)

cawpin (875453) | about 2 years ago | (#42304661)

I agree but do have a question. When did the warnings start? I've been online all day today and haven't seen it.

No means no (0)

karniv0re (746499) | about 2 years ago | (#42304161)

All these Cox injections are wearing me out. I have a headache and I'm really just not in the mood.

How is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304195)

Most ISPs have this ability.

SOURCE: ISP

Don't you guys hate it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304223)

When your Cox unexpectedly pops up like that?

Alternative (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#42304261)

Cox should just have sent an email to the affected users.

Adsense (1)

hey (83763) | about 2 years ago | (#42304271)

I wonder if they could have done the same thing with Adsense.
Target the ads for a specific area.

Still waiting for a 360 from lockerz (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304391)

Anyone else?

All jokes aside.

I like how they are all legitimate now.

Bad practice.. (5, Insightful)

Nezic (151658) | about 2 years ago | (#42304511)

So now internet companies are essentially trying to train users to trust whatever information shows up on a web page that claims to be from 'known' sources?

After all the problems that spoof emails cause for people who don't know better, you'd think an internet provider *would* know better.

stop injecting cox into my (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304573)

pr

That wasn't an outage - it was a test (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304597)

My intuition says the mail outage may have been faked as an excuse to test and demonstrate widespread ad injection tech on the sly.

Only for people that have the Cox software? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304623)

I run Linux, I see none of these pop-ups.

Wait, there are sites that don't use https yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42304639)

Oh, right, I'm on one. _

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