×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Microsoft Has Been Watching, and It Says You're Getting Used To Windows 8

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the how-I-learned-to-love-windows dept.

Microsoft 675

Dupple writes "Microsoft's user data shows that users are getting used to dealing with the Windows 8 user interface, reports this article at MIT Technology Review. Despite some of the more scathing reviews of Windows 8, ordinary users are getting along with it just fine, according to Julie Larson-Green, the Microsoft executive who leads Windows product development. Data collected automatically from some Windows users, she says, show they are adjusting to some of the new operating system's controversial features without problems 'So far we're seeing very encouraging things,' Larson-Green says of the large volume of data that Microsoft receives every day from people using Windows 8 who have chosen to join the company's 'customer experience improvement program.' All users are invited to enroll in that program when they first log into the new operating system. If they do so, anonymized information about how they are using the operating system is sent to Microsoft. Referring to complaints from some quarters, Larson-Green says: 'Even with the rumblings, we feel confident that it's a moment in time more than an actual problem.'"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

675 comments

Seeing how most companies won't migrate... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313667)

I don't know a single company whose IT will implement Windows 8 on anything. I'm talking everything from tablets, phones, laptops, PC's, or servers. In fact my company said straight out "No" because of all the problems it would entail.

Did they ever fix the lack of command line for windows 8 servers?

Re:Seeing how most companies won't migrate... (5, Interesting)

WolfgangPG (827468) | about a year ago | (#42313703)

We have already deployed several Windows 8 Touch laptops and most of our IT staff is using Windows 8. We don't currently have plans to roll it out to the general population -- but we will be buying more surface Pros, etc...

Re:Seeing how most companies won't migrate... (3, Informative)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | about a year ago | (#42313865)

That's great, we're not. Rolling out Android and iPad tablets....sticking with Windows 7.

Re:Seeing how most companies won't migrate... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313955)

Because Win7 is 'good enough for me.' Once Microsoft drops support for Windows 7, you will be upgrading. Trust me. Or get left behind by the business community.

Re:Seeing how most companies won't migrate... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42314075)

Yep, but probably not to Windows 8. I'd sooner deploy Microsoft Bob.

Re:Seeing how most companies won't migrate... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313853)

I don't know a single company whose IT will implement Windows 8 on anything. I'm talking everything from tablets, phones, laptops, PC's, or servers. In fact my company said straight out "No" because of all the problems it would entail.

Did they ever fix the lack of command line for windows 8 servers?

I work desktop IT for a company in fortune's top 10. We are not moving everything there (yet) but we definitely are standardizing it for the enterprise and will probably move large numbers (tens of thousands) of users there. Enterprises aren't as scared of 8 as they were of Vista. Roll-out of a new os in a large enterprise takes time and I'm sure once the projects have been worked at various companies many will be moving.

Poor Sample Pool (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313675)

most techs-savvy users, or people who know what they're doing just click 'no' to any such data collection prompts so the sample is going to be severely skewed towards people who have ended up with this bundled and know no different.

Re:Poor Sample Pool (5, Insightful)

Motard (1553251) | about a year ago | (#42313757)

Well, if the population being measured does not include the 'tech-savvy', the results suggest a pretty successful transition.

Re:Poor Sample Pool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313937)

"Tech savvy" is always going to be an outlier groupo for stats tho, due to the ways tech savvy people tend to customise their workflows rather than having their workflows customised for them.

Re:Poor Sample Pool (4, Insightful)

Sockatume (732728) | about a year ago | (#42313761)

First of all, I'm not sure what bundling has to do with it. I mean, as opposed to all the Windows 8 user data they're getting from people who didn't have Windows 8 installed on their PC?

Secondly, surely if the user data was skewed to less-competent users then a more representative sample would should an even quicker rate of acclimitisation?

I'm sceptical of the kind of coarse-grain user data they're surely getting, and the conclusions themselves* but I genuinely can't tell what your point is here.

*That people are able to comfortably use Windows 8 within a few weeks shouldn't be a cause for celebration, that should be the level below which everyone in the project gets fired. The cheering shouldn't start until your design changes are shown to have led to improvements that are worth the cost.

Re:Poor Sample Pool (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about a year ago | (#42313967)

I'm sure there's some geeks who worked on win8 looking to see if their UI work has added productivity/usability. I'm also pretty sure the only thing Microsoft is using as a measurement for 'worth-the-cost' is revenue. The worth of their data analysis will be whether or not they can turn the tide of bad press to get that revenue.

Re:Poor Sample Pool (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42314039)

I would suspect that the tech savvy will have more trouble with the new interface simply because there is so much for us to relearn about it. I've gotten about 15 minutes of use with it so far, and I'm extremely bewildered by it. I'm actually kind of embarrassed by the new operating system, and it might be a couple of years before I'm willing to recommend it to someone who has used a computer before.

It would actually be nice if there were some kind of tutorial that ships with the OS, or if they included some visible cue when there was some completely hidden functionality that would be incredibly useful. I went over to a user to help them with something on their new laptop, and they had to show me how to operate their computer before I could get any work done. A good user interface should be something where fumbling around like an idiot reveals 99% of its functionality in a safe manner. Mac OS X does a fantastic job of this.

The total lack of visual cues about hidden functionality is the absolute worst aspect of the new interface, and I would likely find it less daunting to learn it if there was something that simply indicated that "hey, if you're looking for the Control Panel it's over here!" At least with Mac OS and Unity there isn't anything that's completely hidden from view unless you know about the secret part of the screen that you have to move your mouse over to make it appear. All of the basic functionality is out in plain view right from the start.

Although Microsoft got the memo about touchability, and they're intelligent enough to gather data about things, they seem to have completely missed the point of a tutorial. Tutorials are useful because they expose functionality that is otherwise non-obvious. Nobody walks away from a tutorial with 100% or even 10% of the actual skill learned, but they probably retain enough information that they know how to ask intelligent questions when the material that they were tutored on comes up later, and that's what's comforting. I'm not surprised at all that Microsoft doesn't care about comforting their users though. I've been yelled at by Microsoft support on the phone before.

When I started to work with Android, there was nothing about the interface that wasn't easy to intuit about it. You could see what zones of the screen were for touching, and the OS responds very quickly with feedback: it tells you when you are able to do what you think you can do. Windows 8 is very confusing for me and all of the other developers at work. We spent half a month setting up a demo system with a Windows 8 laptop, and our engineers had a lot of trouble locating simple things like the Control Panel. It wasn't nearly that difficult for us to learn Mac OS or Android or iOS.

I'm not going to deride it as a piece of crap UI because I haven't used it very much, but I certainly find it to be the most frustrating thing I've ever encountered in my entire career. I will say that if the VP in charge of this project decided that their interface shouldn't be comforting, then she's either stupid or deluded.

Re:Poor Sample Pool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313817)

You are arguing that a sample skewed to less sophisticated users makes for a bad argument on Microsoft's part. In reality, it makes their argument stronger. Regular unsophisticated users get along just fine because they aren't emotionally attached to things like user interfaces. It's only the whiny IT crowd who has a problem.

I upgraded my laptop just to check it out and so far I like it. I don't really ever use the Win8 apps, but the start screen is handy, the search works great, and my laptop is actually more stable than it was with Win7.

That said, in 4 months I will no longer need to run the one piece of Windows based software I am currently cursed with and some flavour of Linux will be my OS of choice.

Re:Poor Sample Pool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313939)

"Ordinary users" == people who use nothing but a browser?

Except people who join that program..... (5, Insightful)

Stickiler (2767941) | about a year ago | (#42313679)

Are already probably lenient towards Microsoft, so they will of course make themselves learn the new UI. About 80% of the people I know just automatically click no and go past it, and the other 20% make an active effort to click no and go past it. It's like polling the people at a major sporting event about how enjoyable they find that sporting event.

Re:Except people who join that program..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313833)

While your anecdotal evidence is like polling the people in a high school class on which is the best school in the area.

Re:Except people who join that program..... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313957)

Not to mention the people and organizations out there who is and will continue to flat out refuse windows 8. I'm pretty sure their numbers are *anything* but insignificant, but they sure as hell won't show up in the data set microsoft will draw their conclusions. This is just ridiculous; they are currently getting users who either are enthusiastically going along with the book-burning "Microsoft uber Alles" crowd, those who have no choice, and those who just plain doesn't know any bettter.

This piece of news reminds me of something.. oh, right "Forwards Comrade, we have to retreat." Wonder where that came from... /irony

"Good, Good... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313687)

... let the M$ hate flow through you."

Re:"Good, Good... (4, Interesting)

nozzo (851371) | about a year ago | (#42313779)

love to hate them but as long as they're putting out OS's it's keeping a large slice of us employed! You could say it is our destiny.

that what they call it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313691)

wanting to pound keyboard in frustration or fist through monitor is 'getting used to it'?

Re:that what they call it? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#42313883)

No, "getting used to it" means this only happens once a day instead of the original once a minute.

Re:that what they call it? (1)

nozzo (851371) | about a year ago | (#42313933)

funny thing is their data gathering can probably see multiple keys pressed at once (as fist repeatedly contacts keyboards) - I wonder if they can detect loss of monitor (as it flies through the window).

[12/12/12 14:12:35][log_event][42][multiple keyboard events]pressed keys 4,5,6,e,r,t,y,d,f,g,h,x,c,v,b,SPACE]
[12/12/12 14:12:87][log_event][42][multiple keyboard events]pressed keys 5,6,7e,r,t,y,d,f,g,h,x,c,v,b,n]
[12/12/12 14:13:22][log_event][42][multiple keyboard events]pressed keys 4,5,6,e,r,t,y,d,f,g,h,x,c,v,b,n]
[12/12/12 14:13:58][log_event][42][multiple keyboard events]pressed keys 3,4,5,6,e,r,t,y,d,f,g,c,v,b,SPACE]

uh-oh we got a keyboard pounder

Re:that what they call it? (3, Insightful)

Peristaltic (650487) | about a year ago | (#42314041)

"Getting used to it".... Right. After about 6 months my dad told me that he was getting used to his chemotherapy, too- somehow this wasn't a very good selling point for the experience.

Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (5, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | about a year ago | (#42313697)

I am not saying that Windows 8 is even remotely similar to prison rape (though some might suggest there may be some similarities, I am not saying that) but the very notion that a party or group is getting used to something does not mean they like it or want it.

I supposed I could have said "taxes" or any other thing people generally don't like, but I wanted to be a little edgy... a little dramatic.

So yes. We acknowledge Microsoft is shoving their things [Windows 8 in this case] through our [choose an orifice] and we acknowledge that we presently don't have much choice in the matter.

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (5, Insightful)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about a year ago | (#42313741)

That sums it up. Nothing in the article about people liking or preferring the New Windows Order. Just the limp pronouncement that people who must use Windows are finding ways of grinding through the experience.

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313765)

the very notion that a party or group is getting used to something does not mean they like it or want it.

No, but the fact that they went out to the shops and bought it, when they could just as easily have bought something else, does tend to suggest that some of them might have wanted it.

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (2)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about a year ago | (#42313823)

Uh, pretty quickly you won't be *able* to choose not to buy it. The only way currently is stock left in the pipeline isn't it?

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313873)

No, but the fact that they went out to the shops and bought it, when they could just as easily have bought something else, does tend to suggest that some of them might have wanted it.

Or that they wanted windows xp but were told that they can't buy windows xp but windows 8 is the latest greatest.

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (1)

Nadaka (224565) | about a year ago | (#42313897)

All new consumer PC's come with windows 8. It is pretty much unavoidable unless you have a legacy windows 7 license.

I still have windows 7, and in the 4 to 8 years it will take my top of the line PC to become hopelessly outdated, I am hoping that something other than windows 8 becomes a viable option.

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42314015)

Linux is already a viable option.

It won't be a painless transition and there will be things you'll miss. Wine might be able to help with that, or it might not. Expect a bunch of swearing and cursing as you work through the internet looking for drivers for that one last elusive bit of hardware, or to get that damn network running. Expect two weeks downtime as you relearn everything you thought you knew about computers.

In the end though, you'll have a system that runs the way *you* want it to, not the way Apple, Microsoft, HP, Canonical, Red hat, Novell or Google wants it to.

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (5, Insightful)

MatrixCubed (583402) | about a year ago | (#42313923)

Don't confuse "ignorance about alternatives" with "desire to purchase".

Many users only "see" Windows. They don't know about Linux, and consider Mac OS as "those things that aren't Windows that other people have".

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (1)

Custard Horse (1527495) | about a year ago | (#42314047)

+1

In my office if you ask most people what version of Windows/Word/Outlook they have, they usually say "I don't know". To them Win XP and 7 look the same and I would guess that Win 7 and 8 also look the same.

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#42313925)

Well, consider: You can either get Windows 7 and be forced to upgrade, and at full price, to Windows 8 in a year or two when most game developers stopped supporting it, or you could get Windows 8.

But please, customer, you have the free choice (*snicker*)!

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (2)

dissy (172727) | about a year ago | (#42313959)

No, but the fact that they went out to the shops and bought it, when they could just as easily have bought something else, does tend to suggest that some of them might have wanted it.

That's pretty funny, since I did exactly that by purchasing Windows 7, and yet I was never asked to join this program to tell them I purchased Windows 7 over 8.

So yes, you are right, as long as you totally and completely ignore everyone who purchased something else, then of the subset of people that purchased Windows 8, all of that subset purchased windows 8.

Why is that at all insightful or useful information again?

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (1)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about a year ago | (#42313969)

the very notion that a party or group is getting used to something does not mean they like it or want it.

No, but the fact that they went out to the shops and bought it>

Wrong. They went out to buy a new computer and were given exactly one choice -- Windows 8.

when they could just as easily have bought something else

And what would that "something else" be? A substantially more expensive Apple product?

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313785)

I prefer prison rape.
Windows 8 just annoys me so much that I end up attacking my laptop. That's getting pretty expensive over time.

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313825)

I am not saying that Windows 8 is even remotely similar to prison rape (though some might suggest there may be some similarities, I am not saying that) but...

I'm not saying you're saying that Windows 8 is even remotely similar to prison rape (though some might suggest there may be some similarities, I am not saying that) but...

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (3, Funny)

ElmoGonzo (627753) | about a year ago | (#42313841)

Yes. There is a Russian proverb from the Tsarist period that translates into something like: "You can get used to anything. Except dying."

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313887)

Supposedly some prisons provide condoms to stop the spread of STDs among prison rape. But I say go one step further and provide lubricant to prisoners. Although, that's still ignoring the problem of prison rape.

When a new computer is cheaper WITH Windows 8, you know you have a problem. I assume that's the case, but I haven't gone out looking to see if that's true. (We might be able to compare Windows machines vs similar machines with a Linux distro installed.)

I don't need the legal definition of monopoly to know that Microsoft has one, or perhaps is part of a duopoly or oligopoly. By that, I mean it feels like they have one even if they legally don't. There's little choice in the matter and I for would favor our (American) government to step in and regulate oligopolies. Not that capitalism is necessarily wrong, but we should have a choice to opt out and purchase said computers for a lower price if we do not want software that's part of an oligopoly. This also goes for cable and satellite companies. I do not favor cable companies buying media companies.

And while I'm ranting, don't you think the "light bulb" ban that kicks in for "inefficient" 75 watt bulbs this coming new year is a bit wrong? I mean, whom does it benefit? CFL bulbs makers of course! Notice how the incandescent bulbs burn out so much easier when located in heat and humidity (bathrooms) or perhaps outside in the elements.

In the Windows situation, our government is ignoring a problem in favor of a business. In the light bulb situation, the government is stepping in to benefit a business (in my opinion, and it is just an opinion).

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (1)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | about a year ago | (#42314049)

Actually, that is exactly what you are doing. So, why are you stating one thing in your subject and denying it in the first sentence of your post?

Re:Prisoners are getting used to being sodomized (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42314073)

Stop lying, you KNOW you want to say Windows 8 is prison rape.

You KNOW Windows 8 is prison rape.

This denial will not help you get over the fact that WINDOWS 8 IS PRISON RAPE.

3 month rule (5, Insightful)

weszz (710261) | about a year ago | (#42313707)

Anyone really surprised?

Give any big change 3 months and it will get accepted if you don't give in as the change forcer.

I've seen it at work too many times to count. Manglement makes a decision that upsets everyone and lots of people talk about how they are going to start looking elsewhere for employment and the sky will fall and this is terrible, but after the 3 month gripe period, everyone accepts the changes and life moves on.

It's how things work.

Re:3 month rule (1)

Lisias (447563) | about a year ago | (#42313921)

Manglement makes a decision that upsets everyone and lots of people talk about how they are going to start looking elsewhere for employment and the sky will fall and this is terrible, but after the 3 month gripe period, everyone accepts the changes and life moves on.

It's how things work.

Yep. Same thing here.

However, after de 3rd upsetting decision, the company where I used to work lost the fidelity of the higher valued professionals - a lot of them give this job the finger on the first acceptable offer they received from the competition. Hell, some of them accepted an offer with the same incoming - a 0% net incoming grow job exchange.

So, your mileage may vary. You can screw your staff now and then, but don't make it a business practice.

Re:3 month rule (1)

Lisias (447563) | about a year ago | (#42313953)

where I wrote "give this job", please read "gave this job".

(Yes, I know - I need to practice English a bit more...)

Re:3 month rule (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42314067)

However, after de 3rd upsetting decision, the company where I used to work lost the fidelity of the higher valued professionals - a lot of them give this job the finger on the first acceptable offer they received from the competition. Hell, some of them accepted an offer with the same incoming - a 0% net incoming grow job exchange.

Different company, same situation. Founders running company into the ground, fucking over the people who built it in favor of a bunch of agilistas. They spend more time fucking around with cue cards than coding. People have quit without even getting job offers.

Re:3 month rule (3, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#42313947)

That doesn't mean that they like the new situation more than the old one. And while at work there may be some good reason why you have to adapt to a management change because the primary concern is the well being of the company and not yours, pardon please if I put MY comfort ahead of that of MS.

Ahah (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313713)

I'm a Toydarian. Mind tricks don't work on me, only sensible user interfaces!

Mold-breaking (5, Interesting)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | about a year ago | (#42313723)

I've found that I use the mouse less for launching apps when using Windows 8 which I didn't in Windows 7, despite the functionality being the same. Press the Windows key, start typing an app / file name, and hit Return to launch. While the Start Menu existed, I was using the mouse, because we navigate WIMP UIs with a mouse. The Start Screen took that away; It was a full-screen interface all of its own, without menus, and that broke the psychological boundary between me pointing-and-clicking and moving over fully to the keyboard for launching apps.

So, now I've learned that behaviour instead, I've swapped back to Windows 7 with its sensible desktop UI :) Thanks again, Microsoft!

Warm feeling (4, Insightful)

morcego (260031) | about a year ago | (#42313727)

Data collected automatically from some Windows users

Oh, that gives me such a warm feeling inside...

Re:Warm feeling (0, Troll)

farlukar (225243) | about a year ago | (#42314001)

Data collected automatically from some Windows users

Oh, that gives me such a warm feeling inside...

If people just used Ubuntu, that wouldn't happen.

It's not terrible (4, Interesting)

cuppett (706711) | about a year ago | (#42313729)

I've noticed a couple different things:

1) It makes me a lot more selective about putting things on the taskbar and desktop.
    a) I put things I really do use out there, so things are highly geared to my workflow
    b) Things I find I'm not using get punted
2) The windows button finally has purpose. You can hit that button, start typing an app name and then space/enter to launch. I find I'm mousing less actually.

In addition, Windows 8 hasn't come with the alternating-release-something-new instability problems we've gotten used to. It's every bit as solid as 7 and has better integrated security features. Win, win in my book.

Re:It's not terrible (4, Informative)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about a year ago | (#42313857)

The windows button finally has purpose. You can hit that button, start typing an app name and then space/enter to launch. I find I'm mousing less actually.

This is Windows 7 functionality isn't it?

Re:It's not terrible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313961)

It was introduced in Vista, actually.

Re:It's not terrible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313891)

I find I'm mousing less actually.

That's not because typing an app name is better -- if it was, we'd have stuck with command lines -- it's because mousing sucks ass in Windows 8.

Re:It's not terrible (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | about a year ago | (#42313905)

2) The windows button finally has purpose. You can hit that button, start typing an app name and then space/enter to launch. I find I'm mousing less actually.

The problem I have with that is that for most apps, if I use the app often enough that I might remember the name of the app, it is going to have a shortcut on the taskbar or the desktop. Worse than that, I am pretty computer knowledgeable. I know people who refer to Adobe Acrobat as "Adobe". If they are on a computer with more than one Adobe app, they are going to have a hard time finding Acrobat (actually, they are likely to have trouble finding one of the other Adobe apps that they, also, call Adobe).

Re:It's not terrible (1)

Nadaka (224565) | about a year ago | (#42313941)

windows 7 has a text search in the start button, you don't need windows 8 for that.

Re:It's not terrible (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#42313965)

Well, Spain in Summer ain't terrible either, but frankly, I will only go there again if I get paid, and certainly not on my own time, I have better alternatives.

Get the idea?

Re:It's not terrible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313971)

since you don't think it's terrible, perhaps you can help me clear up a few things as I don't use W8. A female acquaintance recently bought a hp ultrabook with w8 and in less than 5 minutes I had to listen to complaints of how:
1) applications randomly switch, or at least switching from application to the desktop (I suspect it's some fancy hot-corner thingy but it would be nice if she was able to disable it).
2) There's no way to attach files when writing emails using the default email client?
3) Where did the explorer go? it was painful to see someone copy a powerpoint presentation by using the 'save as' functionality in powerpoint and using the explorer integration there.

and no "just press win-" doesn't cut it with this level of technical inemptitude.

Re:It's not terrible (5, Insightful)

pscottdv (676889) | about a year ago | (#42313975)

The windows button finally has purpose. You can hit that button, start typing an app name and then space/enter to launch

So... It's just like DOS except you have to hit the windows key before you type the name of the program you want to launch.

The more things change, the more they stay the same...

Re:It's not terrible (4, Insightful)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about a year ago | (#42314053)

I've noticed a couple different things:

1) It makes me a lot more selective about putting things on the taskbar and desktop.

    a) I put things I really do use out there, so things are highly geared to my workflow

    b) Things I find I'm not using get punted
2) The windows button finally has purpose. You can hit that button, start typing an app name and then space/enter to launch. I find I'm mousing less actually.

In addition, Windows 8 hasn't come with the alternating-release-something-new instability problems we've gotten used to. It's every bit as solid as 7 and has better integrated security features. Win, win in my book.

LOL!!

Type the name of an app and then hit enter. Welcome to DOS. Are we suddenly back in 1992?

So far, it seems to pass the Mom test (2)

LordSkippy (140884) | about a year ago | (#42313731)

My mother had to get a new machine this past weekend, all they had in stock came with Win8. I was dreading it the entire way back from the store, and while I was removing her old box and connecting up the new box, due to my experiences with the Win8 preview. Looked and acted pretty much like the preview did to me, but surprisingly, my mother liked it. I heard a lot more "oh wow"s than I did "oh no"s.

Much Like ... (5, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | about a year ago | (#42313745)

Microsoft Has Been Watching, and It Says You're Getting Used To Windows 8

Much like a kid who has broken his arm "gets used to" a cast or sling. Much like a cow who has been electrocuted many times by a fence "gets used to" staying away from it. Much like someone convicted of a DUI "gets used to" riding a bicycle.

'Even with the rumblings, we feel confident that it's a moment in time more than an actual problem.'

Under what circumstances, exactly, would someone who works for Microsoft ever say anything contrary to that? Anything could be going on, good or bad, and that is exactly what they would say to dismiss criticism.

Re:Much Like ... (2)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about a year ago | (#42313869)

Under what circumstances, exactly, would someone who works for Microsoft ever say anything contrary to that?

Depends, what's Ballmer drinking these days? ;-) Though I suppose it's an open question on whether he works 'for' MS or against them...

Steve Ballmer AKA Colonel Kurtz (4, Funny)

eldavojohn (898314) | about a year ago | (#42314023)

I'm amused how he looks a little more and more like Colonel Kurtz [blogspot.com] from Apocalypse Now [wikipedia.org] every year. I'm pretty sure that there's eventually going to be an investor meeting in a temple surrounded by spikes with iMacs and Apple computers skewered on them somewhere in Redmond. Ballmer will be sweating out [slated.org] and squeezing cool water over his bald forehead while rambling slowly in spurts to SEC reporters who are trying to make heads or tails of what he is saying. Minions will be slaughtering a cow with chairs in the background while he sputters on about Windows 8's success and how they said his methods were madness.

UI design (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313753)

Should not require the user to "become used to it" in order to use it.

Re:UI design (1)

Sun.Jedi (1280674) | about a year ago | (#42313849)

Should not require the user to "become used to it" in order to use it.

Pretty limiting flaw in your logic. If they never change anything, they'd never get better.

Disclaimer: Not a fanboy. I only use MS for gaming and have no plans to move to 8.

10% day 1 fail rate nothing to boast about (5, Insightful)

Jerry Atrick (2461566) | about a year ago | (#42313769)

It's mind boggling, only 90% managed to use the start screen and charms on day1.

So in that 10% are folk that failed to work out how to get the login prompt from the completely control free boot page. And people who failed to shutdown their PC making up the bulk of it - since that needs the charmless bar.

Just to install ClassicShell or fire up the desktop to use it with needs use of both the start screen and charms. So even if you never use them again you still count as a MS success in these stats.

Any other company would be panicking over a 10% fail rate just starting up their software, not claiming it as a success.

Re:10% day 1 fail rate nothing to boast about (1)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | about a year ago | (#42313931)

It's mind boggling, only 90% managed to use the start screen and charms on day1.

So in that 10% are folk that failed to work out how to get the login prompt from the completely control free boot page. And people who failed to shutdown their PC making up the bulk of it - since that needs the charmless bar.

Just to install ClassicShell or fire up the desktop to use it with needs use of both the start screen and charms. So even if you never use them again you still count as a MS success in these stats.

Any other company would be panicking over a 10% fail rate just starting up their software, not claiming it as a success.

I sort of agree. When you login to windows 8 you have to use the metro UI unless you install third party software to give you a start button. If you've got win8 and you're not savvy, you're going to be using metro. It's more interesting to me that 10% actually figured out how to work around it.

Re:10% day 1 fail rate nothing to boast about (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42314025)

Only Microsoft would call it a success when people work around their crappy UI solutions by installing 3rd. party software that restores previous functionality. IE: ClassicShell. It (or other similar tools) are basically a must to make Windows 8 and 2012 usable by anyone who wants to do things aside from browse the web.

Re:10% day 1 fail rate nothing to boast about (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about a year ago | (#42314043)

A company does not panic in public, it spins.

Keep your eye on all the shiny as she spins... take no note that she's falling slowly into oblivion

I pirated windows 7, bought windows 8 for £1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313797)

Success in my book.

Users will put up with just about anything (5, Interesting)

Rgb465 (325668) | about a year ago | (#42313803)

Many moons ago we got a new intern in the office. He was young, naive and hopelessly clueless about the corporate world. We took a liking to him immediately.
Of course, this meant that we had to play pranks on him. Because that's what you do to people you like, right?

Our best prank was what we did to his computer. We wrote a small program that ran in the background and drew a dot in the center of the screen on top of whatever was running. This dot grew bigger over time; at first it was just one pixel wide, but after a week it was over twenty.

One morning, just over a week after we'd secretly installed it onto the intern's computer, he called me into his cubicle and asked me if I had ever heard of "dead pixels on a CRT". I said no, holding back the laughter, and politely suggested that he try reinstalling his graphics card drivers. He declined, and said that was too much effort and he would just live with it.

The intern was fully prepared to live with this large, expanding, black dot in the center of his monitor. It was nothing but sheer annoyance, but he was willing to ignore it.
At this point we caved and uninstalled the software.

That experience taught me that users will put up with just about anything. As long as it doesn't outright prevent them from doing their job (eg, the network card has died), they will find some way to soldier on.

Re:Users will put up with just about anything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42314021)

You should definitively submit that story to The Daily WTF ( http://thedailywtf.com/ )

Re:Users will put up with just about anything (1)

deodiaus2 (980169) | about a year ago | (#42314085)

I suppose your office mates put tripwires outside of handicap access ramps?
With friends like you, who needs enemies?

Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313819)

Numerous people also get used to living with terrible diseases.

Doesn't help me do what I want to do (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about a year ago | (#42313821)

I don't have a problem using Windows 8, my problem is it is not helping me do what I want to do. Simple things like cutting and pasting between applications is a pain. Copying text from the Metro email app to a word document is far to difficult. I have been using it since the first preview, so it is not the learning curve. Too many times the item you are working on leaves the screen so you can do some Windows function full screen.

Where Have I Heard This Before? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313837)

Oh yea! Vista.

Re:Where Have I Heard This Before? (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about a year ago | (#42313987)

Vista was a pain, but not like Windows 8. Vista had software and driver incompatabilities. It asked for permission to do things way to often. But, if you knew how to use XP, you could use Vista. Not so with Windows 8. Now, 8 has software and driver imcompatabilities also, but the dual GUI thing is its major problem.

my sample pool is different (2)

iggymanz (596061) | about a year ago | (#42313847)

Most the people in my IT group at work are windows users. most of my friends and relative are windows users. No one likes windows 8, several have downgraded new gear because they hated the 8 so much. At work they say its the new Vista, useless rubbish that should be shunned, and that hopefully "9" will be a release Redmond gets a clue again and puts out something useful.

That's pretty funny when the die-hard windoze fangals/fanbois I know can only bad-mouth the windows 8. Microsoft has failed its own customers, driven dissatisfaction upward, regressed the state of the UI art.

Start8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313913)

Yeah, Windows 8 is fine, as long as you install a third party app like Start8 in order to giver yourself power user abilities from the Desktop.

Seriously Micro$oft, how boneheaded are you?

Re:Start8 (1)

znanue (2782675) | about a year ago | (#42314057)

Yeah, Windows 8 is fine, as long as you install a third party app like Start8 in order to giver yourself power user abilities from the Desktop.

Seriously Micro$oft, how boneheaded are you?

windows key->type what you want->launch desktop app == much faster than a start button. Always works for me quickly.

How boneheaded are you? (ooo invective is fun)

In all seriousness, I think windows 8 has some pretty neat features, although I spend most of my time outside of metro.

Z

OS... get out of the way of my apps (1)

vlm (69642) | about a year ago | (#42313927)

how they are using the operating system

If the great unwashed are "using" the OS then they're doing it wrong.

From the end user perspective the OS is supposed to be an app launcher, not much else.

Windows 7 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313929)

I recently overheard a staples employee state that they were no longer allowed to sell any Windows 7 machines. This is why Windows 8 is picking up market share. The couple he was talking to walked out when he said that. Microsoft is screwing itself over with moves like these. Our company has no plans to deploy Windows 8 any time soon, nor do we plan to roll out Windows Server 2012. Sorry Microsoft.

What about VISUAL STUDIO 2012? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313963)

Anyone getting used to VISUAL STUDIO 2012, where the UI is so flat you often can't tell where dialog box borders are, and the MENUS shout at you? This has got to be a usability disaster of historical proportions.

Re:What about VISUAL STUDIO 2012? (1)

znanue (2782675) | about a year ago | (#42314069)

Anyone getting used to VISUAL STUDIO 2012, where the UI is so flat you often can't tell where dialog box borders are, and the MENUS shout at you? This has got to be a usability disaster of historical proportions.

I couldn't hear you over the slashdot icon shouting at me. Z

If you're using Windows... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42313991)

...you're already pretty used to substandard things.

"getting used to it"??? (5, Insightful)

mark-t (151149) | about a year ago | (#42313997)

You can probably "get used to" almost anything when you aren't given a choice. Heck, you can "get used to" chronic back pain too...

But that's a far cry from meaning that a person actually prefers it

Ordinary! (1)

nospam007 (722110) | about a year ago | (#42314007)

"...ordinary users are getting along with it just fine..."

Ah, them! You do mean the ones that cannot distinguish between Microsoft Word and Microsoft Windows?

Re:Ordinary! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42314019)

"..the ones that cannot distinguish between Microsoft Word and Microsoft Windows?"

I always tell them they have to get used to it, the Director of the Internets unfortunately decided it that way, the bastard.

All I have to say is... (0)

Gerinych (1393861) | about a year ago | (#42314031)

Get with the times and stop bitching about change. No one likes change.

Do you remember a long time ago when people used to complain about a mouse-driven user interface? How did that turn out? How long did it take you to adapt to Windows 95's start menu after being used to use the Program Manager? When did you stop changing your Windows 7 taskbar settings to make it look more like in Windows XP?

Just... get used to it. You'll have to adapt to it eventually, so you might as well enjoy the process.

Upgrading from W8 to W7 (5, Interesting)

Serk (17156) | about a year ago | (#42314055)

The sheer number of friends and relatives bringing their shiny new computers to me (The resident geek) begging me to upgrade them from Windows 8 to Windows 7 says otherwise...

I suspect most of these people did not voluntary opt into Microsoft's "Track Me" program either.

Bashing it back into shape, rather (5, Informative)

obarthelemy (160321) | about a year ago | (#42314059)

I wanted to try it out, so I put it on my (non-touch) laptop. The Metro UI is an abomination. I wouldn't even want it on a touch tablet ("live tiles" compare very badly to Android's widget, notifications are a joke...), on a PC, it should be taken out and shot.

Which, luckily, you can do easily with http://classicshell.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net], and get back the Desktop shell that the IT gods intended.

Apart form that, the new features are:
1- Remote Desktop server...
2- and that's it. Not even ReadyBoost for SSD, nor some tiered storage like Apple has started doing.
3- and after Jan 31st, you won't even get Media Server.

MS is trying to force-feed Metro UI to their Desktop users, hoping to use that familiarity to get some traction on phones and tablets. The problem are that Metro UI 1) makes no sense on non-touch machines, and 2) lacks severely even on tablets and phones.

"It's a moment in time, not an actual problem" (1)

Dystopian Rebel (714995) | about a year ago | (#42314083)

Other famous Microsoft Moments In Time (MMITs) that were not Actual Problems:

= 8.3 filenames
= Microsoft Bob
= Windows XP security
= Microsoft Windows Vista, *.*
= Microsoft advertisement in which Seinfeld asks Bill Gates to "adjust his shorts"
= Microsoft Zune, whether brown or not
= Chief Executive Orificer, Squirts Ballmer, *.*
= Microsoft advertisement for the Surface tablet in which ungraceful, robotic people coordinate senseless movements that no one would ever do in reality... if anyone bought a Surface tablet in reality

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...