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Steam For Linux Is Now an Open Beta

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the start-playing dept.

Games 353

New submitter jotaass writes "In news that is guaranteed to make the Linux gaming community (in particular, but not exclusively) excited, Valve has just announced that the Steam for Linux client Beta is now open to the public. A .deb package is available here. Interesting as well, they are using an empty GitHub repository solely as an issue tracker, open for anyone to submit, edit and track bugs, with no actual code in the repo."

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It begins..... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344239)

Let the games begin!

Re:It begins..... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344361)

For both linux gamers!

Re:It begins..... (4, Insightful)

SomePgmr (2021234) | about 2 years ago | (#42344497)

I think the goal here is to fix that, but credit where credit's due, I laughed.

In a hurry, eh? (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 years ago | (#42344259)

Not taking their time with this one.

Re:In a hurry, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344299)

They kind of already built it twice...

Re:In a hurry, eh? (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 2 years ago | (#42344325)

how do you mean, this is still "beta" just as the limited audience release was with beta version. now if they DON'T work out the bugs found and push it into production, then it would be rush-job. but so far not fair to accuse them of rush.

Re:In a hurry, eh? (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 years ago | (#42344405)

Not where I was going with that. I'm excited to see them making good progress so quickly.

Re:In a hurry, eh? (4, Insightful)

Dexter Herbivore (1322345) | about 2 years ago | (#42344887)

What gets me is that this story has been tagged "donotwant". Who is so cynical that they believe that games via Steam on Linux is a bad thing? I can understand an individual choosing not to use the service, but branding it as "donotwant" for all Linux users?

Re:In a hurry, eh? (4, Funny)

oakgrove (845019) | about 2 years ago | (#42344935)

It's called trolling. Ask for it by name.

Re:In a hurry, eh? (0)

skade88 (1750548) | about 2 years ago | (#42344759)

Valve started making steam for Linux over a year ago, they kept it to themselves until it was almost ready.

Good for Linux. (5, Insightful)

dstyle5 (702493) | about 2 years ago | (#42344267)

I got in the November wave of beta invites and so far I l like what I've seen. The only reason I've stuck with Windows at home is for gaming and if Valve can get enough traction behind Linux gaming I can finally cut out Microsoft. It will take years for that to potentially happen but Steam on Linux it can only serve to help Linux in general. Valve has already worked directly with AMD, Intel, Nvidia and Canonical to name a few companies and if consumers and game companies see some success more will (hopefully) follow.

Re:Good for Linux. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344313)

Don't count on it. Just go and look at the number of titles that aren't available for OSX via Steam even though the publishers have OSX clients and you'll see that either Steam doesn't take "3rd party" platforms seriously or publishers aren't as warm and cozy to supporting non-Windows sales as one would be lead to believe. And while Steam's support of the OSX client has increased in the past couple of months there is still a large and noticeable gap between Windows and OS X support from Steam.
 
Don't expect Linux to be much better.

Re:Good for Linux. (5, Insightful)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#42344339)

That's okay, a huge percentage of games are crap.

We just need a number of really good ones.

Re:Good for Linux. (4, Interesting)

DMJC (682799) | about 2 years ago | (#42344367)

Actually the entire problem with Macintosh Steam is ASPYR Media. Those asshats want to run their own shitty web based store and aren't allowing Steam to publish any of their native ports. Since Most companies port to Mac through ASPYR they have the Mac market by the Balls. Linux doesn't have this problem most ports were done in-house by their respective companies or done by the now dead Loki Software. As far as I am aware those rights reverted back to the original software makers when Loki went Bankrupt. Games like Unreal Tournament1/2003/2004, and Quake/Doom's Linux ports should be coming to Steam.

Re:Good for Linux. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344507)

Linux doesn't have this problem most ports were done in-house by their respective companies or done by the now dead Loki Software.

+1 LOL, Linux doesn't have this problem because it has no big publishers doing ports.

Re:Good for Linux. (1)

richlv (778496) | about 2 years ago | (#42344599)

why should publishers, instead of actual developers (covered by "in-house" above), do any porting ?

Re:Good for Linux. (0)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 2 years ago | (#42344791)

Because most game developers are concerned about making the game be fun and the actual game mechanics rather than strict programmers who think in terms of, oh, we need to optimize this subroutine.

Publishers though specialize in making sure the platforms are compatible and they have the resources to do such a thing fairly easily.

For example, consider Minecraft. Mojang doesn't have the resources to port the game to Xbox and iPhone/Android so they used publishers to do that. Because of this Mojang can focus on what they do best (making Minecraft fun) instead of having to spend resources making Minecraft work on different platforms.

Re:Good for Linux. (2)

richlv (778496) | about 2 years ago | (#42344833)

that's increasing the role of a publisher into a "real" developer.
it also creates situation where initial development is not concerned about cross-platform compatibility, thus making ports much more complicated and expensive.

i reject the argument about umping all developers in a group that is only concentrating on the game mechanics - they (all developers) do have to interact with underlying architecture anyway, so you could have "designers" who care about game mechanics, and lower level specialists who would ensure that the overall architecture is flexible and portable :)

Re:Good for Linux. (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344629)

Obviously you only read what you wanted to read. Even the client has problems and lacks Steam support.
 
I'll also add that even some native Valve games run less-than-ideal on OS X. It's pretty obvious that a lot of effort wasn't put into it and if this is the best that Valve can produce do you really expect a better Linux product? Come on now.

Re:Good for Linux. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344793)

Correct me if I'm wrong, but all of the older games on Steam that run on top of DosBox (like I suspect Doom does) should be pretty trivial to port to Linux.

Re:Good for Linux. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344775)

My understanding was that SteamBox (or whatever it gets called) will be linux based, so I imagine linux support may actually surpass OSX support in time

Re:Good for Linux. (5, Insightful)

MachDelta (704883) | about 2 years ago | (#42344811)

There is a huge and important difference between OSX and Linux though. Gamers want to have more control over their systems, and they demand the ability to assemble their own machines. In a practical sense, Mac offers neither but Linux offers both. Gamers hate pre-built systems because they are either gutted of any respectable performance, or they are outrageously marked up. Many gamers would prefer to move towards open software, but the DirectX ecosystem has them by the balls. If Valve can build momentum on the Linux side of things, there will be a greater shift towards Linux than there ever will be towards Mac. It will probably be slow at first, but it does have potential down the road. So I would not judge the motions of one by the other, at least not yet.

Re:Good for Linux. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344343)

Blah blah blah, "I can finally quit winders and microsoft'. If you cared, you'd have enjoyed the soda-masochiitc choir of running games under wine.

Re:Good for Linux. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344437)

I enjoyed your mom. Does that count?

Re:Good for Linux. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344893)

No for reals. Does it?

Re:Good for Linux. (2)

SCPRedMage (838040) | about 2 years ago | (#42344451)

I don't think I've ever heard of someone enjoying beating themselves with a 12oz can of Pepsi before...

Re:Good for Linux. (2)

aiht (1017790) | about 2 years ago | (#42344667)

I don't think I've ever heard of someone enjoying beating themselves with a 12oz can of Pepsi before...

Drinking the damn things is masochistic enough for me.

Re:Good for Linux. (5, Interesting)

sheehaje (240093) | about 2 years ago | (#42344545)

I never felt Windows was bad enough to cut out for gaming, until I tried Windows 8. I use Linux for a lot of things, even bought all the Loki games when they were around, but never had too much of an issue with Windows Gaming to say I would drop it if Linux caught up.

I changed my mind. Windows 8 has been horrid on the desktop for gaming. I've had several crashes due to DirectX driver incompatibility.. Most of them due to having the XBOX 360 Controller plugged in. I have older hardware no longer supported - and no word if it will be. Metro isn't really that intuitive for launching games (although it is for buying them I guess). My AMD Radeon card has been overheating lately because their drivers aren't up to snuff on Windows 8, go figure... It's been overclocking itself. Which I know isn't all Microsoft's fault - but it does seem like PC Gaming is an afterthought over tablet gaming with the newest release. Seriously, bejeweled type games are at the forefront of the metro store.

Gabe got a lot of flack for looking at linux as a platform that steam will run on, but I'm all for it. A game distributor gets all access to the OS that they will be delivering on? I'd be hard pressed to think of real reasons that game producers won't want to jump at it. Definitely like the idea of a SteamBox too... I can play the same game on my laptop, desktop and console? and have all my save games with me to jump right in at the same point I left off on? Sounds damn good to me.

Steam also gets some flack for pricing - but I always wait for the deals. Trine 2 cost me $4, a game I would've never tried unless it was on the Linux Beta, and loving it... so is my son.

I'm not overjoyed.. maybe 8 years ago I would've been... When enlightment kicked Windows XP out of the water... When Linux Desktop was promising some hope... But, I would definitely replace Windows with Linux as my desktop if gaming went that way... Gaming sucks on tablets for me... and tablet OS's suck for gaming.. So maybe it is finally the year of the linux desktop.

Re:Good for Linux. (2)

Belial6 (794905) | about 2 years ago | (#42344821)

The reason that tablets suck for gaming is that the touch interface is only good for a few specific types of games and the screens are too small. With more and more tablets supporting HDMI and bluetooth controllers starting to be supported, that could change.

Portal 2 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344303)

So does this put pressure on game companies to refine and maintain their Linux ports or how exactly does this unfold?

Re:Portal 2 (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 2 years ago | (#42344347)

first the game companies would wait until production release, then see how many Steam users become Linux ones, and how well Valve can hold that market.......say in a year it would be obvious if the effort worth the expense

Re:Portal 2 (0)

multiben (1916126) | about 2 years ago | (#42344389)

It gives game developers an *opportunity* to port games to Linux, but nothing more than that. And with a market share of 1-2% that's going to be a hard sell. The Linux market is going to have to prove itself to be worth the added development costs, otherwise games companies won't invest.

Re:Portal 2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344429)

It really depends. If they are using something like unity, where they can just check another box, its not a hard sell. If they have to port their custom engine written in C# with DX12 to Linux, well I don't see that happening.

Re:Portal 2 (4, Informative)

dririan (1131339) | about 2 years ago | (#42344531)

Even some games that use un-managed code (such as games that use the Source, Unreal Engine, or id Tech engines) don't need much work to get Linux support. The current Humble Bundle contains the first Unreal Engine 3 game (Dungeon Defenders) ported to Linux, and apparently it was done by one person! It all depends on the engine's portability. If, as you say, they use a custom engine in C# with DirectX 12, it's going to take a bit of effort to get ported. Fortunately, Steam on OS X has increased the number of games on OS X quite a bit, and because both OS X and Linux are Unix-ish (hell, OS X is UNIX on x86) and only support OpenGL, it's not super hard to port from OS X to Linux. Granted, there still is work to be done, but not as much as is needed to port from Windows to OS X or Linux without proper engine support.

Re:Portal 2 (1)

bloodhawk (813939) | about 2 years ago | (#42344949)

Nothing is ever just a check box, They need support/documentation and testing for the platform, testing costs alone can make some games non viable. However many of the bigger games if they have reasonably portable code could definitely be an option.

Re:Portal 2 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344501)

See the Humble Bundle stats.
Linux gamers there makes up much more than 1% or 2%, and they consistently spend more than their Windows counter parts.
Linux and Mac gamers may even be under-represented in their stats as the default is to represent you as a Windows purchaser.

Re:Portal 2 (1)

JazzVoid (1235278) | about 2 years ago | (#42344795)

Humble Bundle is not an indicator. It's great that Linux users spend more, but if you'll take Windows or console game market in account, $2 per game spent by Linux users is nothing. All these games on Steam together worth around $60.

Re:Portal 2 (1)

Belial6 (794905) | about 2 years ago | (#42344845)

The key to getting people to switch is to offer multi-platform support. If you get access to both the Linux and Windows version when you buy a game, many people would consider running Linux if that is the only game they play. If you only get the single platform version, buying the Linux version creates the risk that if you must revert to Windows, you lose your favorite game. This means that people who would rather purchase the Linux version get pushed back to Windows as a safety net before Linux gets a chance.

Fuck Valve. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344311)

Valve has no commitment to free software, they should stay off the platform. This will just push the social retards of the computer world (gamers) into using our OS.

Re:Fuck Valve. (2)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#42344323)

Our OS?

Re: Fuck Valve. (1)

skitchen8 (1832190) | about 2 years ago | (#42344345)

Pretty sure "our" in the Linux sense means "everyone's" so what exactly is your point?

Re:Fuck Valve. (1)

Johann Lau (1040920) | about 2 years ago | (#42344495)

"social retards of the computer world (gamers)"

As somenoe who has been a gamer since childhood, who sometimes plays multiplayer games, who has seen a video or two on youtube, I have to say this made me laugh and nod. Fuck em if they can't take the truth ^^

Re:Fuck Valve. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344909)

Precisely, which is good for GNU/Linux. More users means more hardware support, and they will be using more free software. The only losers with this move are Microsoft and, maybe, console makers with Valve's console (which I don't know if will run GNU/Linux or Windows).

Segmentation fault, core dumped (-1, Flamebait)

DiSKiLLeR (17651) | about 2 years ago | (#42344329)

I installed the .deb on my stock standard Ubuntu 12.10 system.

It installed fine. I ran it. It came up and started updating itself fine.

It installed said updates.

And now it dies with Segmentation fault, core dumped.

This is why linux fails on the desktop, sigh...

And this really truly is a stock standard 12.10 ubuntu system barely used :/

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (5, Informative)

Wizy (38347) | about 2 years ago | (#42344335)

It is still beta. This is one of the reasons its still beta.

I've been in the beta for about a month now, and it works great for me.

Re:WorksForMe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344527)

WorksForMe(TM) [tmrepository.com]

Re:WorksForMe (-1, Flamebait)

iggymanz (596061) | about 2 years ago | (#42344849)

if it Works for Most(tm), then one must consider the possibility, however remote, that one may in fact be a dumb-ass who has no business using a GNU/Linux system, and should instead buy That Which Panders to Morons(tm)

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344755)

Seriously, I get sick of people who don't quite seem to understand what a "beta" is.

There seems to be this expectation developing, that a "beta" is actually the same thing as production-ready but just hasn't been released, or something like that.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (1)

Microlith (54737) | about 2 years ago | (#42344359)

Yup, it fails due to factors entirely outside its control...?

It's an open beta, file a bug report and post the core. Or avoid it until it exits beta.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344937)

Yep. All programs crash due to factors outside their control right? Can't be Valve's fault, no sirry. Let me just loosen your lips from Gabe's member.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (2)

halivar (535827) | about 2 years ago | (#42344399)

I'm pretty sure that in an open beta a core dump is useful info. After all, that's the purpose of a beta, no?

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (1)

Nutria (679911) | about 2 years ago | (#42344443)

This is why linux fails on the desktop, sigh...

Because all Windows software runs perfectly bug- and hassle-free?

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344553)

For the most part, it's rare for a Windows program to actually take the whole system down unless there is actually an issue with the computer at the hardware level (bad ram, etc). Closest thing I've seen to a serious crash was a program crashing the video card drivers, but Vista and higher automatically restarts the graphics drivers when this happens without the need for rebooting.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (1)

aiht (1017790) | about 2 years ago | (#42344713)

For the most part, it's rare for a Windows program to actually take the whole system down unless there is actually an issue with the computer at the hardware level (bad ram, etc). Closest thing I've seen to a serious crash was a program crashing the video card drivers, but Vista and higher automatically restarts the graphics drivers when this happens without the need for rebooting.

For the most part, it's worth reading posts that you reply to; nobody said anything about bringing the whole system down.
BTW, that handy feature where the video card drivers restart after they crash? The drivers do that, not Windows Vista and higher. It worked on XP too.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344763)

Most of what you download as a binary package runs problem free. The whole concept of binaries just bombing out hasn't been an issue in Windows for a decade.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (4, Insightful)

Georules (655379) | about 2 years ago | (#42344457)

Yeah, that's why it's a beta. Did you submit the segfault information to steam? That's exactly the information they want to collect.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (-1, Troll)

wadeal (884828) | about 2 years ago | (#42344487)

Watch all the Linux Fanboys jump on this post

Should probably of added about the atmosphere these kind of people create that makes Linux intimidating and makes you feel as if everything that breaks is your fault.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344565)

Watch all the Linux Fanboys jump on this post

Should probably of added about the atmosphere these kind of people create that makes Linux intimidating and makes you feel as if everything that breaks is your fault.

I don't see anyone jumping on the post, just saying "Hey it's still beta and be sure you file a bug report!" The same thing that would be said about any BETA. NOBODY is implying it's their fault and if you can't comprehend that Slashdot is not the place for you. Even in the state /. is today.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344537)

I think they suggest the 12.04 LTS. Probably for this reason.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344593)

12.04 LTS is the supported version.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344709)

Works great on my 12.10 for team fortress. What game were you playing, and can you report the bug?

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344741)

Right. You're using the bleeding edge Ubuntu, which is Debian with a lot of "secret sauce" thrown in, and will only be stable for a few years. If you want a vaguely stable Ubuntu or Debian, use the "LTS" release, which would be "12.04 LTS".

It's not stable to always have the most recent version of everything, you *WILL* trip over bugs that couldn't be tested before the other components were published.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344747)

Ummmm. It's written for 12.04. They don't recommend 12.10 yet.

Re:Segmentation fault, core dumped (1)

Skapare (16644) | about 2 years ago | (#42344947)

Why do you think it is Linux's fault that the program had a segmentation fault?

Let's get the perspective right. The programmers at game companies are simply not experienced enough at writing good code to make sure it is reliable on a "new to them" platform. If it bugs out on Windows, they are used to that. But they are NOT writing proper portable code. So they have to write a bunch of NEW code just to go on Linux, given the bad way they have everything structured. Then they don't know what to do to debug it.

It's not Linux's fault these guys are not experienced with Linux.

mod, Ldown (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344393)

implementAtion to 'doing someThing'

Oh boy! (-1, Troll)

geminidomino (614729) | about 2 years ago | (#42344411)

Now we'll have TWO OSes giving us the choice to accept whatever shit Valve wants to shove down our throats, or lose access to every game we've 'bought.'

What a wonderful advancement for the Linux platform!

Re:Oh boy! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344493)

So tired of this crap. Valve wants to have things go well. Why? Because they want you to buy more. The terms of service have updated once in 7 years. They let me install and play on any machine I want with little hassle. And if they suddenly pulled the plug don't you think a "patch" from the gaming community wouldn't just fix that anyways? They aren't perfect, but I haven't seen valve push any draconian crap down my throat?

To be fair I will probably still dual boot, but Linux and Linux games partitions and bye bye windows.

Re:Oh boy! (-1, Troll)

Arker (91948) | about 2 years ago | (#42344533)

Even if there were some way to guarantee that they wouldnt die or pull anything 'draconian' they are still requiring you to install a rootkit to access the software you bought. I wouldnt even install it on my windows box, and I wont give another penny to a company that already ripped me off in the past.

Re:Oh boy! (4, Insightful)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | about 2 years ago | (#42344867)

You either have absolutely no concept of what a rootkit is, or absolutely no concept of how to accurately present information. Pick one.

I'd be willing to respect your opinion if you said that using Steam to access software you purchased is an unacceptably large amount of DRM, or somesuch argument. I'd be willing to respect your opinion if you said that it was too much power to put in any company's hands, or even Valve's in particular. But when you start calling Steam a rootkit, you veer off into pure bullshit land. It's just ridiculous.

Re:Oh boy! (3, Insightful)

geminidomino (614729) | about 2 years ago | (#42344625)

The terms of service have updated once in 7 years

And it was a doozy. And an irony, since it was just a few days before that that I finally said "I've been holding out for years, and they haven't done anything like it yet. Maybe I'm being paranoid" and bought my first few Steam games.

Two days later, I don't own the games anymore. Just like when Facebook/Instagram says "We don't intend to sell your photos, even if the TOS says we can," Valve (and its knights) says "We won't fuck you over with more unacceptable terms, even though we know the contract says we can, and we know you'll bend over for it so you can keep your library."

Rule #0 applies to Valve just as much as to Facebook.

Re:Oh boy! (1)

AaronLS (1804210) | about 2 years ago | (#42344541)

No one is shoving it down your throat. You know what Steam is. Don't buy games from it if you don't like risks involved and it leads you to fits of cussing and rage.

I don't like some aspects of the system, but I take the good with the bad. I think they'd be just as successful without the DRM. I buy games through steam just because it's alot simpler than going to the store+having to swap discs everytime I want to play a game. I love being able to sit down and very quickly get into a game without hassle.

Re:Oh boy! (0)

geminidomino (614729) | about 2 years ago | (#42344653)

No one is shoving it down your throat. You know what Steam is. Don't buy games from it if you don't like risks involved and it leads you to fits of cussing and rage.

And two years ago, this would have been good advice. Now, it's pretty much "Don't buy games," full stop, since even boxed games off retail shelves require this malware to be installed these days[0]. They've managed to get themselves injected as a third-party into transactions that used to be a way to avoid them.

[0]Skyrim, Deus Ex, Darksiders 2, Borderlands 2 to name the ones I've, personally, passed on despite wanting to buy, because of this.

Re:Oh boy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344701)

I used to think that adding DRM to games was utterly without benefit, but if it keeps people like you out of the gaming community it has at least one advantage.

Re:Oh boy! (0)

geminidomino (614729) | about 2 years ago | (#42344743)

Oh, it has nothing to do with the DRM. The "gaming community" itself is more than sufficient incentive to stay away from it.

Re:Oh boy! (4, Insightful)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | about 2 years ago | (#42344873)

malware

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Seriously, stop that bullshit. There are legitimate arguments to be made against the use or acceptance of Steam. I personally feel it is worth the drawbacks and/or risks, but I have no problem with those who feel otherwise. But slinging about terms like "malware" is complete bullshit, and does the community a great disservice.

Re:Oh boy! (1)

Dynedain (141758) | about 2 years ago | (#42344549)

Now we'll have TWO OSes giving us the choice to accept whatever shit Valve wants to shove down our throats

Don't you mean, as a Linux user you now have access to digital game distributions that were previously only available for the two bigger OSes?

Re:Oh boy! (1)

geminidomino (614729) | about 2 years ago | (#42344595)

Nope, there's no evidence of that yet. This just gets us the DRM on linux, none of the games have followed yet.

Re:Oh boy! (1)

flimflammer (956759) | about 2 years ago | (#42344561)

What a wonderful advancement for the Linux platform!

It is. You would be an absolute fool to think it isn't, regardless of your views of Valve or their business practices.

Re:Oh boy! (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 2 years ago | (#42344693)

Maybe you should realize that you're barking at the middle-man? It's the publishers who insist on using DRM and therefore buying a modern game entails the very thing you said: you lose access to it sooner or later anyways, whether or not you use Steam or something else. All Ubisoft-games, for example, insist on using UPlay these days and when UPlay goes down... well, a quick google tells you everything you need: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=uplay+down [lmgtfy.com]

With the above in mind I actively choose to support Steam. Atleast Valve tries to do well by its community, their DRM-measures are very benign and they offer features in Steam that are actually useful to me. If I avoided any game whatsoever with no DRM I'd be left with out-of-date games or Indie crap, neither of which I want to touch.

The only Question worth Answering.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344413)

Steam on linux blah blah - who cares - can it play dota 2?

crazy idea.. buy AMD/ATI (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344605)

AMD is tanking. Valve should buy them up and really get into the hardware business...

Re:crazy idea.. buy AMD/ATI (3, Interesting)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 2 years ago | (#42344957)

Since AMD is worth about twice what Valve is and has 60x the employees, I think it'd be the other way around.

64 bit? (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | about 2 years ago | (#42344607)

\subject

Re:64 bit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344673)

Use dpkg --force-architecture

You'll need ia32 libs

Re:64 bit? (2)

Bill Currie (487) | about 2 years ago | (#42344827)

Or install and enable multiarch. After a bit of futzing with the package [aspensmonster.com] , it works on 64bit debian sid, though you'll probably want to run xsetroot -cursor_name left_ptr after running steam (already a bug reported for that one:#2).

Re:64 bit? (4, Informative)

deek (22697) | about 2 years ago | (#42344877)

I'm running Steam on a 64-bit Debian system. I had to enable multi-architecture for i386, and manually install the 32 bit version of the glx libraries for the driver I'm using. Other 32 bit drivers needed were automatically installed with a simple "dpkg -i steam.deb" / "apt-get -f install" combo. Also, specifically for debian, I had to modify the steam package and rename a few dependencies by hand.

All good and running TF2 beta beautifully. Also, Cogs was another game that worked. Many other games on the "Linux" list aren't installable just yet. I believe that Valve have to properly link them in their system first.

Client for FreeBSD may avoid a GPL law suit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344627)

Linux is GPL encumbered. If you develop closed source applications for Linux have to be extra careful. Developing a client for a commercial friendly OS such as FreeBSD is always safe and can fully concentrate on development rather fear of GPL violations.

excited day! (1)

blackC0pter (1013737) | about 2 years ago | (#42344631)

Nice! I'll gladly be a testing ground for their soon to be released linux console. if that means more games eventually come to linux it is a win / win. However, i really hope when the console is released that they still support both platforms and don't make titles linux console only. If you use the community to build a product, at least let us buy guys for that platform outside of your walled garden. Thanks!

SWEET!!! (1)

future assassin (639396) | about 2 years ago | (#42344731)

Just got my HTPC built and running STEAM on WINE but its a bit slow to start up. Now the kids can fuck right off when I hear "Can you load up windows on our computers so we can play games" With my Winows 8 experience http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3321547&cid=42315901 [slashdot.org] this is just another nail in the coffin.

Re:SWEET!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344751)

great, now your kids wont know a single thing about how to operate a computer in the real world

Re:SWEET!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344789)

Isn't Steam pretty much just a package manager for games? It doesn't mean all the games available through Steam on Windows will now be available for Linux, does it?

Re:SWEET!!! (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 2 years ago | (#42344815)

Isn't Steam pretty much just a package manager for games? It doesn't mean all the games available through Steam on Windows will now be available for Linux, does it?

Correct, only the games that specifically support Linux will be available. That means almost no already-released games will be supported, and it still remains to be seen how many of the not-yet-released ones will support it.

Re:SWEET!!! (1)

sourcerror (1718066) | about 2 years ago | (#42344915)

I'm sure a lot of older games will be packaged with Wine and sold through Steam Linux.

Re:SWEET!!! (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#42344953)

why not just run steam on wine in the first place then?

Re:SWEET!!! (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 2 years ago | (#42344859)

you don't have to buy Windows 8, you can still buy win 7 online. Microsoft sure made the major brick and mortar retailers pull it from the shelves quickly though

Surprisingly works on Linux Mint 10 64-bit (5, Informative)

RedHackTea (2779623) | about 2 years ago | (#42344757)

Just had to do this:

$ sudo dpkg --force-architecture -i steam_latest.deb
$ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
$ steam

System I tried it on:

$ uname -a
Linux XXX 2.6.35-32-generic #67-Ubuntu SMP Mon Mar 5 19:39:49 UTC 2012 x86_64 GNU/Linux
$ lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID:____LinuxMint
Description: _____Linux Mint 10 Julia
Release:________10
Codename:______julia

Re:Surprisingly works on Linux Mint 10 64-bit (4, Interesting)

RedHackTea (2779623) | about 2 years ago | (#42344835)

However, completely purging it is crap. "dpkg" and "apt-get" remove and purge didn't delete the really big directory, which is ~/.local/share/Steam. This is where your ~1GB went.

Re:Surprisingly works on Linux Mint 10 64-bit (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344853)

Your virginity is secure once again!

Out of town for the night (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42344785)

And the linux beta of Steam is FINALLY open!!!
Arrrrrghhhhhhhhhhhh!

This laptop runs linux, but an older distro and nowhere close to ubuntu 12 as far as code, so it isn't going to work.

Home tomorrow, so I'll be running then.
(Not Ubuntu at home either, but a spinoff that is 99.9% compatible and I KNOW the beta client runs on it.)

Two minor warnings (5, Informative)

Psicopatico (1005433) | about 2 years ago | (#42344843)

1) The client is currently shipped in .deb format.
If you use an .rpm based distribution, the Alien [joeyh.name] script will do the conversion so you can install it (hint: alien.pl -r steam_latest.deb --scripts ).
2) The client requires GlibC 2.12 or later. So if by any chance your distribution was released prior to may 2010, you're out of luck (example: my OpenSuse 11.4, released on march 2010 :( ).
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