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Mobile Raspberry Pi Computer: Build Your Own Pi-to-Go

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the two-slices-of-cherry-and-a-pumpkin dept.

Handhelds 97

An anonymous reader writes "Everyone has seen Raspberry Pi Computer, the credit card sized mini PC circuit board that costs only $35. Now there is a new Mobile Raspberry Pi called Pi-to-Go, with a mini LCD, 10-hour battery, and 64GB SSD, all packed together in a 3D printed case. See if you are up to the task to build your own."

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Nice (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42371855)

I like Pi

Re:Nice (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42371903)

I think that the first person to post to a Slashdot story should be permanently banned. Yes, in order for us to have a conversation, one person will have to take a bullet for the good of the group, but we will sing songs of your heroic sacrifice forevermore.

Re:Nice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42371981)

So you, Anonymous Coward, wants Anonymous Coward banned?

Re:Nice (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372019)

niggers

Re:Nice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42378563)

About the only way this can happen is if they ban the IP address of the poster who posts AC like that. I think about any slashdot poster worth his salt will have the ability to change IP addresses. Hell, I have 4 blocks of 5 of my own and several other IP's I can VPN into.

Re:Nice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372373)

I'd like to think that I have an idiosyncratic enough posting style that people could recognize me when I post anonymously, but that's probably just delusions of grandeur.

Re:Nice (1)

SiggyTheViking (890997) | about 2 years ago | (#42372515)

Delusions, yes.
We only recognize each other by our sig lines.

Re:Nice (1)

History's Coming To (1059484) | about 2 years ago | (#42372959)

I'll quite happy to support that proposition under my account name. Genius. Yes, it'll free us from the tyranny of pseudonymity.

Re:Nice (1)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | about 2 years ago | (#42374849)

I like Pi

I'm more of a Copeland–Erds man myself...
I know it's irrational, but that's how I roll...

Batteries (4, Informative)

NixieBunny (859050) | about 2 years ago | (#42371895)

The author could have done some research on battery packs instead of hacking up a laptop pack as he did. There is a company called batteryspace.com that sells multi-cell Li-ion packs with a protection circuit built in. They're not cheap, but they are reasonably safe.

Re:Batteries (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42371905)

author is a n00b nothing to see here folks

Re:Batteries (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372001)

See if you are up to the task to build your own

If your a nigger, youre not.

Re:Batteries (2)

Nyder (754090) | about 2 years ago | (#42372031)

The author could have done some research on battery packs instead of hacking up a laptop pack as he did. There is a company called batteryspace.com that sells multi-cell Li-ion packs with a protection circuit built in. They're not cheap, but they are reasonably safe.

The author stated in the article that he worked for 10 years repairing Dell laptops, and that was why he choose a laptop battery.

Re:Batteries (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 2 years ago | (#42372037)

The author could have done some research on battery packs instead of hacking up a laptop pack as he did. There is a company called batteryspace.com that sells multi-cell Li-ion packs with a protection circuit built in. They're not cheap, but they are reasonably safe.

The author stated in the article that he worked for 10 years repairing Dell laptops, and that was why he choose a laptop battery.

actually he stated he had more then 10 years experience and owned his own Dell laptop repair shop.

Re:Batteries (1)

NixieBunny (859050) | about 2 years ago | (#42372293)

Indeed. But how many of the readers have their own laptop repair shops? A general source of such batteries is a requirement to get this project in the hands of the average tinkerer.

Re:Batteries (2)

LordKronos (470910) | about 2 years ago | (#42372703)

Indeed. But how many of the readers have their own laptop repair shops? A general source of such batteries is a requirement to get this project in the hands of the average tinkerer.

But that's exactly the point in picking something like this. You don't need your own repair shop. You're a million times more likely to find a cheap, generic dell-compatible laptop battery on ebay than you are to find any other sort of high capacity battery very cheap and widely available.

Re:Batteries (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372919)

That link earlier in the thread looks like it might actually have what you'd need for cheaper then a 90 dollar laptop battery

Re:Batteries (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#42374929)

You're a million times more likely to find a cheap, generic dell-compatible laptop battery on ebay than you are to find any other sort of high capacity battery very cheap and widely available.

That is a load of dingo's kidneys, because R/C cars now typically run on 2S or 3S Li-Ion packs, which are generally high-capacity for their size because if they aren't, you don't get much runtime.

Re:Batteries (5, Insightful)

node 3 (115640) | about 2 years ago | (#42372437)

The author could have done some research on battery packs instead of hacking up a laptop pack as he did. There is a company called batteryspace.com that sells multi-cell Li-ion packs with a protection circuit built in. They're not cheap, but they are reasonably safe.

As with anything, the person in question could have done many things differently. So what? The fact stands that this person actually did *something*, which is infinitely better than doing nothing other than telling him why he supposedly did something wrong.

I'll take one not-quite-perfect nerd project like this that actually gets created over a million permutations that *might* be slightly better in one way or another but don't actually exist.

Re:Batteries (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 years ago | (#42372865)

Well said, sir!

Re:Batteries (1)

NixieBunny (859050) | about 2 years ago | (#42373505)

The guy states in his article that the battery pack hack was not something that he'd be comfortable with other people duplicating. That's why I brought it up.

I, too, applaud his doing of the thing. I make things too, but I try to use parts that are available to the general public when I post how-to articles about the things that I build.

Re:Batteries (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#42374923)

The fact stands that this person actually did *something*, which is infinitely better than doing nothing other than telling him why he supposedly did something wrong.

He got far less product than he could have gotten by simply buying something from aliexpress or dealextreme, and in a really lame and ugly case. I could make a better-looking case out of sheet metal, but I wouldn't get on the front page of slashdot, because it wouldn't be 3d printed.

I'll take one not-quite-perfect nerd project like this that actually gets created over a million permutations that *might* be slightly better in one way or another but don't actually exist.

There are hundreds of permutations which already exist if you want a display, a keyboard, an ARM core, and HDMI out. Virtually all of them are superior completed products to a gigantic plastic brick based around a Raspberry Pi.

Now, that doesn't mean there's nothing cool about this, using what he had on hand. But don't pretend for a second that there is any utility whatsoever in this device. He could have done much better. And if that were his goal, maybe he would have. I think it's cool that he hacked up what he had lying around, it's a cool exercise. It's just not a cool device. It is, in fact, extremely lame as a device.

Re:Batteries (1)

History's Coming To (1059484) | about 2 years ago | (#42372969)

Yeah, and what's with the processor? It's rubbish, and as for the graphics card and expandable port system. Of course, that'll take more power, and the supply is woefully inadequate, so better add that. And a heat sink. And fan. And casing...

Re:Batteries (1)

Svartalf (2997) | about 2 years ago | (#42375297)

And the author could've done a bit more research on SDHC cards and wear levelling. While he's right that SD's are slower than a USB to SATA and an SSD, the concern about lifespan on the SSD, especially the one shown in his pictures, has no basis in reality. It's true that it's not in the spec and that early CF's and SD's didn't have wear levelling, all but the cheapest of both types fail to provide it in their designs. SanDisk hasn't shipped anything of theirs without wear levelling in YEARS.

strangled by the chocolate bunny in my pocket (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42371979)

TEMPEST Attacks! LCD Monitor leaks system noise to FRS

This post is one example of why Tor developers should focus on anti-TEMPEST-ing the Tor Browser, in color, fonts, etc.
===
I don't operate any wireless equipment at my living location. This includes computers, computer equipment, routers, non-computer equipment, etc.

I'm having a problem with one of my LCD monitors.

It works without problems. That was until I picked up some heavy static noises from a hand held radio. I eliminated all sources of generating this type of noise until I came towards an LCD monitor. When the monitor is on and there is content on the screen the radio makes several types of garbage(static) sounds. As I manipulate contents on the screen, maximize and minimize windows, open different applications, the radio responds with scratchy(static) noises to match the activity on the screen. This includes typing and mouse movement.

When I switched the desktop background to a solid black color without wallpaper, the radio noise went down to almost nothing. But when I loaded any program with a white background, the noise from the radio exploded in volume.

When I passed the radio across different computer and non-computer electronic devices other than the LCD monitor, the wired mouse made a high pitched squeal sound within the static. None of the other computing devices such as the tower generated any noise.

I tried CRT monitors and separate computers attached to the CRT monitors but they did not generate any noise in the radio. On the computer connected to the net, I unplugged the cable leading to the router to rule this out but it made no difference, the LCD monitor is at fault.

While monitoring the radio noise, there were several instances where the noise on the channel being monitored stopped, and I switched to another channel and the same noise appeared. Why would the noise from the LCD switch channels during normal use of the LCD? Back and forth throughout the day the noise generated by the LCD would switch from one channel to the next and back to the first channel again.

The noise extends several steps within my living location. I'll test this another day to determine if it extends outside my living location and if so by how many feet.

The computer/monitor are grounded and attached to a surge protector. I'm not sure what I need to do to stop this, or if I should ignore it.

I assumed LCDs would be quieter than CRTs when it came to noise.

Unless I have a radio tuned to a specific channel, the LCD does not generate any noise which I can detect, unless it's above my hearing capacity.

The LCD monitor also functions as speakers, and while the sound cable is connected to the tower, I have disabled the onboard sound in my BIOS. The only other connection is the DVI cable to the tower.

How may I decrease this noise or eliminate it? It seems like the LCD is a mini radio station. When I turn it off the noise in the radio stops, if I blacken the screen the noise lessens. When I switch to a colorful background or load white screened applications like a web browser the noise jumps up loudly. I've tried grabbing and moving a browser window around the screen and the movement matches the noises in the radio.

Would any of this be considered normal?
==-
This certainly isn't unheard of, it's because some part of the monitor is unshielded. The more fix-it stuff is at the top of the following, with the technical backdrop that just might be good to know is at the bottom.

Unfortunately, the issue is most likely the panel charging the LCs. The only thing you can do is see if the manufacturer will replace it or upgrade you. Complain to the manufacturer, be sure to come up with some important thing it's interfering with(if I recall some medical devices use some sort of radio).

If the issue is actually internal wiring which is highly unlikely as detailed below, and it isn't in warranty, attempt to shield it yourself. To shield it yourself, you'll need thin foil(not kitchen foil) and electrical tape.

So, in any given monitor, there's 3 main parts. Input, logic, and output. Output, as previously mentioned, can't really be shielded. To shield both of the other sections, all you really need to do is manipulate the wiring to reduce the number of holes in the foil wrap needed to put it all back together. Obviously this will take some trial and error, and time.

USEFUL INFO THAT ISN'T REQUIRED:

Shielding wires can best be thought of as a encasing a wire in a Faraday cage, made of foil. If you want to see an example, Apple's iPod charging cords are all shielded, strip the insulation and see for yourself. This shielding acts doubly, keeping EM noise from messing with the signal, and keeps the signal's own noise from leaving.

WHY IT IS THE CHARGING PANEL AND NOT WIRING:
Because of the specific details you provided( bravo to you, the amount of data provided helped ), I can conclude that the charging panel(the array of electrodes responsible for producing the image) is putting out the interference. Three of your observations prove this.

First, you state the noise ceases completely when the monitor is turned off, which is consistent with it being EM noise.
Second, the noise's perceived pitch changes when the display is manipulated, which is to be expected, as the electrode charges would change as the display changes.
Third, a black screen is "quieter" than a white screen. Black is the lowest charge state, with the only power in use going to the backlight.

As for your questions:
Noise hopping channels isn't unheard of, though I don't know the science behind it. My best guess is that because the noise isn't an intended result of the electricity, small changes in voltage/amperage result in those hops.
(indirect question-ish) The mouse was likely the only other emitter because it has a fairly high density of wires + it emits light.
===-
@W00t:

What 1s the d1fference between - and where may 1 obta1n the non-k1tchen "foil" you ment1oned?

The d1sturbances sound l1ke a bugged env1ronment. The squeal com1ng from one area and/or dev1ce could mean the locat1on of the bug has been found - and 1 know adding a small dev1ce and/or mod1f1cation to a keyboard and/or mouse 1s s1mple enough - espec1ally for a quick 1n and out the door type bugging.

1s there an affordable method of sh1elding the equ1pment while not violating FCC/TEMPEST laws? Would a simple screen d1mmer attached to the monitor bring the no1se down? Or would 1t be best to put out the extra money requ1red by purchas1ng spec1al paint or wallpaper wh1ch blocks RF signals?

Whether or not 1t's a bug, at this point you are broadcast1ng your computer mon1tor and 1ts activ1t1es, down to the keyboard and mouse movements. What 1s the use of using Tor or any other l1ke serv1ce 1f you are pwned over the a1r waves?
====-
You could use kitchen foil, it's just more unwieldy to work with.

Yes, it could be a bug, I was running under the assumption you had no reason to believe you were bugged, and if you did you ran bug sweeps. If you believe you are bugged, you should definitely dismantle things to make sure a bug isn't simply piggybacking on the same power source.

Dimming the screen would reduce noise, but not completely eliminate it.
=====-
Thanks, W00t.

"Dimming the screen would reduce noise, but not completely eliminate it."

I have modified my browser to function with a black background and my choice of text colors and unchecked the option for all pages to use their own colors, so every page I visit is black with my choice of font/links colors. I'll rescan to determine if this lessens the noise. It's ugly, but tolerable. Coupled with a black theme for the desktop, including the background and system wide applications should also help - including disabling images in the browser.

You mentioned foil. I'm not an electrician, but wouldn't wrapping cords with foil and finishing the job off with a layer of strong black tape possibly conduct electricity? Are you suggesting I cover all wires leading to the computer(s) using this method? Wouldn't they each require special grounding? How many repeating layers of this and/or other material is needed? Have you tried "conductive tubing?"

While I want to shield enough to block noisy RF, I don't want to create a microwave type scenario where RF is contained but it still remains and is possibly amplified so as to add to the degeneration of my health, if that's possible.

1. Ferrite beads
2. Split beads
3. Toroids

CONDUCTIVE TUBING & FERRITE SNAP BEAD
http://www.lessemf.com/wiring.html [lessemf.com]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_interference [wikipedia.org]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_radiation_and_health [wikipedia.org]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_shielding [wikipedia.org]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMF_measurement [wikipedia.org]

I could try some or all of the three options above in addition to your advice? TY
===-
Anyways this reminding me of Van Eck phreaking look it up, some pretty interesting stuff.

Yep, had the same thought.

Countermeasures are detailed in the article on TEMPEST, the NSA's standard on spy-proofing digital equipment. One countermeasure involves shielding the equipment to minimize electromagnetic emissions. Another method, specifically for video information, scrambles the signals such that the image is perceptually undisturbed, but the emissions are harder to reverse engineer into images. Examples of this include low pass filtering fonts and randomizing the least significant bit of the video data information.
====-
can someone please point me to techie LCD monitor internal guides? If I'm going to take it apart I'd like to know what to expect. I've read more about Van Eck and Tempest than anyone can teach me here. Now I'm looking for LCD guides of what's inside.
===-
To be honest, its not the whats inside the LCD monitor you should be worrying about if you want to phreak LCD's . You should be worry more about the RF side of things, and figuring out the spread spectrum clock signal so you can pick up the signal. Top if off background noise is going to be bitch when it comes to LCD. Old CRT monitors are way easier to phreak those thing throw off EM radiation like nobody business.
===-
The noise coming from the LCD monitor is appearing on FRS channels:

- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_Radio_Service [wikipedia.org]

It continues for several minutes before it jumps to another channel then after a few minutes jumps back to the original channel. One of my concerns is the ability for others to pluck this noise from the air (Van Eck/TEMPEST) and monitor my activity, or possibly use an attack against the computer somehow. A recent UN report mentioned a high tech method(s):

* U.N. report reveals secret law enforcement techniques

"Point 201: Mentions a new covert communications technique using software defined high frequency radio receivers routed through the computer creating no logs, using no central server and extremely difficult for law enforcement to intercept."

- http://www.unodc.org/documents/frontpage/Use_of_Internet_for_Terrorist_Purposes.pdf [unodc.org]
- http://www.hacker10.com/other-computing/u-n-report-reveals-secret-law-enforcement-techniques/ [hacker10.com]

In addition, I don't want my LCD monitor constantly sending monitor and/or system activity to a FRS channel(s) for others to hear. I choose wired over wireless for a reason, and there shouldn't be any noise coming from my LCD monitor and appearing over FRS, unless there is a bug or problem with the monitor. All of my
CRT systems are silent on FRS.

When I position the radio near different components, the power supply doesn't emit any noise on FRS, but it could be a problem, I don't know, I'll move to that once I resolve the LCD monitor problem, unless the PSU is the problem and not the monitor.

I may take apart the LCD monitor, I'm looking for a good list of what I'll find if I do.

I peered inside the vents on the top/back left hand side with a strong flashlight and came across a strange piece of silver tape inside, here's how I describe it:

OOGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG__

OO = a small thin black material coming out from underneath the silver piece of tape
GG = the strip of silver tape
__ = the bottom right hand portion of the silver tape is raised enough to allow a pinky finger entry

The silver tape/material/opening under tape is on the top left corner inside the monitor. The rest of the length and area inside that I can see contain no tape or black material. I've seen photos of planted bugs in people's living spaces and most if not all of the invasive ones are wrapped/covered in silver foil. I've found no other reason for that strip and material to be there, but what do I know.
=====
In addition, my CDROM drive light blinks once every second, sometimes with a second or 1/2 second in between, and I found this:

http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/19.60.html#subj9 [ncl.ac.uk]

"I'd worry about a Tempest virus that polled a personal computer's
CD-ROM drive to pulse the motor as a signalling method:

* Modern high-speed CD-ROM drive motors are both acoustically and
electrically noisy, giving you two attack methods for the price of one;

* Laptop computer users without CRTs, and the PC users that can afford
large LCD screens instead of CRTs, often have CD-ROM drives;

* Users are getting quite used to sitting patiently while their
CD-ROM drives grind away for no visibly obvious reason (but
that's quite enough about the widespread installs of software from
Microsoft CD-ROMs that prompted Kuhn's investigation in the first place.)"
===-
I don't think there should be anymore blinking if you remove the CD/DVD inside.
If it keeps blinking, find out which process uses it.
Anyway, you can disable it when you're not using it, if it's bothering you.

And shield your monitor.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_shielding [wikipedia.org]
====-
"I don't think there should be anymore blinking if you remove the CD/DVD inside."

Does Tails support this at boot?

If not, is there a Linux LiveCD which allows this and does not give you root access at boot?

I've looked at several different distributions which allow you to boot into RAM and remove the CD, but they all give you root and that's a very insecure environment to run TBB in!

"If it keeps blinking, find out which process uses it."

It doesn't blink on the several distros which boot into RAM, but I don't want to run Tor as root or reconfigure the permissions/PAM/etc. just to use TBB. As above, with Tails and many LiveCDs which don't boot into RAM, 99% of them have this blinking light issue. The actual INSTALLS I've done to HDD experience constant light activity too, even more so, without anything to explain them.

For Linux, I've ran rkhunter, chkrootkit, tiger, and other tools and nothing malicious is found. Without a deep binary analysis I don't know what else I could do.

For Windows, I use a few programs in the SysInternals Suite and they display strange usage on the system and reference programs which cannot be found with a search on the system, references to impersonation, spoofing, and more. I've ran almost every N.American scanner on the Windows systems, including command line only rootkit detectors and I've seen some strange 'strings' of binaries mentioned, but have no idea on how to clean the system.

I prefer to run LiveCDs because all installations, Windows and Linux, contain unexplainable frenzies of blinking lights, far worse than the blink every second on most LiveCDs. I'm wondering if this is firmware malware on my NIC or the CDROM itself. This has existed for years and never goes away, no matter what system I use, this strange baggage seems to re-infect everything.

"Anyway, you can disable it when you're not using it, if it's bothering you."

Disable what?

"And shield your monitor."

Thanks. I'm investigating and most of the guides require specific addons to the computer's cabling system. Most of the guides appear incomplete, or are in another language other than English.

Any comments on the Tempest/blinking light possibility?

Any comments on why it's spewing out noise to FRS stations and freq hopping?
===-
More comments from elsewhere:

@kb2vxa:

"You're making a mountain out of a mole hill."

I respect your opinion and I don't wish to argue against it, but please look at it from the way I and some others have. I want to eliminate the noise created by the LCD monitor. If this was such a common experience, I would expect at least one of the dozens of other electronic equipment to generate some noise, however faint, on FRS - but they do not.

"You are under the wrong impression that somehow RF hash from the back light can somehow carry data. A liquid crystal display (LCD) does not generate its own light like a CRT or plasma screen and requires a light source to make the display visible. Even those that do cannot transmit computer data being none reaches the monitor."

The LCD is connected to a tower, which other devices connect to. Under testing I've heard the CDROM drive accessing data noises within the FRS channels, along with mouse movements and keyboard activity, along with other noises. When I disable the LCD monitor, all of these disturbances vanish. This means the weakness is in the monitor, and my tower is well shielded or shielded enough so as not to generate any noise in radios I can notice. The reference I made to the strange tape and material within the back side of the LCD monitor at the top could be a sign of some type of antenna or device for amping.

"Their FRS radios will only hear what yours does, RF hash, no data whatsoever THAT IS if one is standing outside your house tapping the radio and scratching his head wondering what's the matter with his radio. You and only you know what it is and where it's coming from."

And what of experienced and curious sysadmins? Rogue crackers? Bored HAMs?
Are there any remote radio injection attacks against systems? This is something I'll research later, as I do believe it was mentioned in at least one whitepaper on side channel attacks.

"Thanks for the chuckles, if the report reveals secrets it would not be published but sent by secret courier to the KGB in Moscow."

I'm not aware of any secrets revealed within the document. But it did raise an interesting point without exposing the method(s) delivered to us from an interesting party. This wasn't just some random article written by some anonymous, disturbed fellow and posted to a pastebin or conspiracy minded blog or forum. And one cannot deny the dozens of TEMPEST attacks available today.

"So... all this and no word on moving the radio farther from the monitor. Why don't you try talking somewhere besides in front of the computer if it bothers you so much?"

Thank you for considering conversation as my reason for posting this, but it is not. I would not choose a noisy channel to talk on. Clear conversation is not the point of this thread. I desire the elimination of this garbage coming from the LCD monitor. I don't care if no one in the world can pick up on it and hear it, I would like to properly resolve it and not ignore it.

One can also dredge up the subject of EMF on health, too, but I have not experienced any disturbance of health from exposure to this noise and most people would argue any possible EMF effects on health to be one of one's over active imagination and not real world application.

[-]

A continued discussion was posted elsewhere, this may be useful in the voyage to remove this "noise":

[-]

In addition, my CDROM drive light blinks once every second, sometimes with a second or 1/2 second in between, and I found this:

[-]

http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/19.60.html#subj9 [ncl.ac.uk]

"I'd worry about a Tempest virus that polled a personal computer's
CD-ROM drive to pulse the motor as a signalling method:

* Modern high-speed CD-ROM drive motors are both acoustically and
electrically noisy, giving you two attack methods for the price of one;

* Laptop computer users without CRTs, and the PC users that can afford
large LCD screens instead of CRTs, often have CD-ROM drives;

* Users are getting quite used to sitting patiently while their
CD-ROM drives grind away for no visibly obvious reason (but
that's quite enough about the widespread installs of software from
Microsoft CD-ROMs that prompted Kuhn's investigation in the first place.)"

[-]

Any comments on the silver tape and material inside the back of the LCD? ...Disconnection of the LED CDROM and HDD lights could be something I should do to relieve one possible issue.

[-]

Some articles with examples:

"If everything is just right, you can pick up signals from some distance. "I was able to eavesdrop certain laptops through three walls," says Kuhn. "At the CEBIT conference, in 2006, I was able to see the Powerpoint presentation from a stand 25 metres away."

uhn also mentioned that one laptop was vulnerable because it had metal hinges that carried the signal of the display cable. I asked if you could alter a device to make it easier to spy on. "There are a lot of innocuous modifications you can make to maximise the chance of getting a good signal," he told me. For example, adding small pieces of wire or cable to a display could make a big difference.

As for defending against this kind of attack, Kuhn says using well-shielded cables, certain combinations of colours and making everything a little fuzzy all work."

- http://www.newscientist.com/blog/technology/2007/04/seeing-through-walls.html [newscientist.com]

=!==-!=
TO EASILY VIEW THE PDF files below:
=!==-!=

Online viewer for PDF, PostScript and Word:

"This is an online viewer, with which you can view PDF and PostScript files as browsable images and Word documents as web pages. Given a URL on the net or a file on your computer, the viewer will try to retrieve the document, convert it and show it to you. No plugin software is required."

http://view.samurajdata.se/ [samurajdata.se]

The viewer software is open source, licensed under the GNU Public License.
=!==-!=

Electromagnetic eavesdropping risks of flat-panel displays
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/pet2004-fpd.pdf [cam.ac.uk]

=

Eavesdropping attacks on computer displays
- http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iss2006-tempest.pdf [cam.ac.uk]

=

Compromising emanations: eavesdropping risks of computer displays
- http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/UCAM-CL-TR-577.html [cam.ac.uk]
- http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/UCAM-CL-TR-577.pdf [cam.ac.uk]

=

Compromising emanations of LCD TV sets
- http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/emc2011-tv.pdf [cam.ac.uk]

=

"Q: Can I use filtered fonts also on flat-panel displays

My experience so far has been that with LCDs, the video cable is the most significant source of radiated information leakage. Where an analogue video cable (with 15-pin VGA connector) is used, low-pass filtered fonts have the same benefits as with CRTs. Where a purely digital video cable is used (DVI-D, laptop-internal displays with FPD/LVDS links, etc.) only the last step, namely randomizing the least-significant bits, should be implemented.

Where the video signal is entirely encoded in digital form, the low-pass filtered step will not have the desired effect. In fact, it can actually increase the differences between the signal generated by individual characters, and thereby make automatic radio character recognition more reliable."

- http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/emsec/softtempest-faq.html [cam.ac.uk]

=

Remotely Eavesdropping on Keyboards (and read the comments!)

"The researchers from the Security and Cryptography Laboratory at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne are able to capture keystrokes by monitoring the electromagnetic radiation of PS/2, universal serial bus, or laptop keyboards. They've outline four separate attack methods, some that work at a distance of as much as 65 feet from the target.

In one video demonstration, researchers Martin Vuagnoux and Sylvain Pasini sniff out the the keystrokes typed into a standard keyboard using a large antenna that's about 20 to 30 feet away in an adjacent room."

- https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2008/10/remotely_eavesd.html [schneier.com]

=

Video eavesdropping demo at CeBIT 2006
- http://www.lightbluetouchpaper.org/2006/03/09/video-eavesdropping-demo-at-cebit-2006/ [lightbluetouchpaper.org]

=

Optical Emission Security â" Frequently Asked Questions

"Q: What about LEDs?

For devices with RS-232 serial ports, it is customary to provide a status indicator LED for some of the signal lines (in particular transmit data and receive data). Often, these LEDs are directly connected to the line via just a resistor. As a result, anyone with a line of sight to the LED, some optics and a simple photosensor can see the data stream. Joe Loughry and David A. Umphress have recently announced a detailed study (submitted to ACM Transactions on Information and System Security) in which they tested 39 communications devices with 164 LED indicators, and on 14 of the tested devices they found serial port data in the LED light. Based on their findings, it seems reasonable to conclude that LEDs for RS-232 ports are most likely carrying the data signal today, whereas LEDs on high-speed data links (LANs, harddisk) do not. Even these LEDs are still available as a covert channel for malicious software that actively tries to transmit data optically.

I expect that this paper will cause a number of modem manufacturers to add a little pulse stretcher (monostable multivibrator) to the LEDs in the next chip set revision, and that at some facilities with particular security concerns, the relevant LEDs will be removed or covered with black tape.

The data traffic on LEDs is not a periodic signal, and therefore, unlike with video signals, periodic averaging cannot be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The shot-noise limit estimation technique that I used to estimate the CRT eavesdropping risk can even more easily (because no deconvolution is needed) also be applied to serial port indicators and allows us to estimate a lower bound for the bit-error rate at a given distance. I have performed a few example calculations and concluded that with a direct line of sight, and a 100 kbit/s signal (typical for an external telephone modem), at 500 m distance it should be no problem to acquire a reliable signal (one wrong bit every 10 megabit), whereas for indirect reflection from the wall of a dark room, a somewhat more noisy signal (at least one wrong bit per 10 kilobit) can be expected to be receivable in a few tens of meters distance.

- http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/emsec/optical-faq.html [cam.ac.uk]

=

Ancient Story on Slashdot: Coming to a Desktop near you: Tempest Capabilities

"New Scientist has an interesting article about a new toy we will all want. It's a card that plugs in one of your PCI slots and allows you to scan the EMF spectrum and read your neighbours terminal. In about 5 years you might be able to get one for just under £1000. (Modern Tempest Hardware costs about £30000) "

http://www.yro.slashdot.org/story/99/11/08/093250/coming-to-a-desktop-near-you-tempest-capabilities [slashdot.org]

=

"Any unshielded electrical device with a variable current (including LCDs) will give out EMF radiation. It's the nature of the beast.

For that matter, light is EMF radiation, so unless you have your LCD in a coal-mine, it's reflecting EMF all the time it's switched on.

Then, there's the fact that screen monitoring isn't the only monitoring you can do. I used to use a radio, tuned into the bus for the PET, as a sound card. Worked surprisingly well, for all that very clunky metal shielding. What's to stop a much higher-quality receiver from seeing the data, in an unshielded box, being sent TO the LCD, or to any other device on the machine?

It's a mistake to assume that Tempest technology is single-function and that that single-function only works in a single situation."

- http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=2333&cid=1553178 [slashdot.org]

=

800Mbps Wireless Network Made With LED Light Bulbs
- http://science.slashdot.org/story/11/08/02/1322201/800Mbps-Wireless-Network-Made-With-LED-Light-Bulbs [slashdot.org]

=

There are a lot of other files, many in PPT format, which can be found easily on this subject of LCD monitor (and other computing devices) TEMPEST sniffing.

===

Sources for this discussion:

- http://forums.radioreference.com/computer/255488-lcd-monitor-broadcasts-noise-radio-why.html [radioreference.com]
- http://clsvtzwzdgzkjda7.onion/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=10919 [clsvtzwzdgzkjda7.onion] .onion link above requires a running Tor client session in order to view. (https://www.torproject.org)

This on-going discussion backed up to Pastebin(s) in order to retain it as an artifact. Many of these
types of discussions are REMOVED from the net because of the nature of the discussion (TEMPEST).

Nice hobby project (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372025)

LCD Screen – $17.95
Raspberry Pi – $35
Mini Keyboard/Mouse – $29.95
Standalone Battery Charger- $75.00
Powered 7 Port USB Hub – $14.95
64GB SSD Hard Drive – $129.95
Dell D600 Battery – $88.50

$391.30 (not including 3d printer and other tools).

Nice hobby project if you have money to burn.

Re:Nice hobby project (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372087)

Instead of spending $391 to make a kludge of shit, you could spend half that and get a netbook.

I've tried to understand why people want a Raspberry Pi, but I just still don't get it, I guess.

Re:Nice hobby project (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372103)

Same here. I used to make mock ups out of cardboard and bought tons of useless miniature keyboards and stuff to try to make "sci-fi" small computers and what not. Thing is, I was 15 and it was the 1980s. Now you just need to do some shopping and you can buy anything you want along those lines for less than what it cost in time and money to build the Pi project.

Re:Nice hobby project (4, Insightful)

Erikderzweite (1146485) | about 2 years ago | (#42372115)

What are you folks doing at the "news for nerds" page anyway?

Re:Nice hobby project (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372175)

New for nerds doesn't mean "anything, no matter how trite, expensive and useless as long as it uses a 3D printer".

Re:Nice hobby project (1)

toygeek (473120) | about 2 years ago | (#42372721)

New for nerds doesn't mean "anything, no matter how trite, expensive and useless as long as it uses a 3D printer and a Raspberry Pi."

FTFY

Re:Nice hobby project (1)

Vermifax (3687) | about 2 years ago | (#42373063)

The only thing that can reasonably be said about News for Nerds is that anyone who says "News for Nerds doesn't mean...."

Is always wrong.

Re:Nice hobby project (5, Funny)

robthebloke (1308483) | about 2 years ago | (#42372185)

I'm just here for the ladies.

Re:Nice hobby project (2)

Revotron (1115029) | about 2 years ago | (#42372687)

I'm just here for the "ladies".

FTFY.

Re:Nice hobby project (4, Insightful)

phizi0n (1237812) | about 2 years ago | (#42372127)

Rasberry Pi has its uses but what this guy did is make an oversized underpowered portable computer when you could buy a good android phone (no contract) with better specs for half the cost.

Re:Nice hobby project (4, Insightful)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 2 years ago | (#42372263)

He built it himself for fun. This isn't for sale. It's not supposed to be better than what you can buy. It was a fun project, an experiment, an exercise, a lesson. Haven't you ever made anything yourself, if only for the sole purpose of the satisfaction you feel?

Re:Nice hobby project (2)

phizi0n (1237812) | about 2 years ago | (#42372415)

Pretty much the only thing he did was the 3d printed case, the rest was a bunch of shopping. Raspberry Pi is a $35 computer and he turned it into a $400 computer. I'm all for hobby projects but this one is far from interesting or impressive.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372549)

Raspberry Pi has never been a $35 computer. You always need the peripherals and those will cost more than a bit. This guy choose expensive peripherals. Probably intent on writing the article at the same time.

Re:Nice hobby project (1)

samkass (174571) | about 2 years ago | (#42373083)

Raspberry Pi has never been a $35 computer. You always need the peripherals and those will cost more than a bit. This guy choose expensive peripherals. Probably intent on writing the article at the same time.

The Raspberry Pi is a $35 computer. Yes, you need peripherals, but if you're not the type that have the appropriate peripherals lying around you're probably not the target audience.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372717)

All I had to do was find the onboard voltage regulator and solder on leads across the 5v capacitor and solder those to the 5v input on the powered USB hub. Easy as Pi.

I got a nano USB WiFi dongle and a nano USB bluetooth dongle ... These are also soldered directly to the built-in powered USB hub.

Yep, didn't do a damn thing.

Re:Nice hobby project (1)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | about 2 years ago | (#42375657)

And yet he did more than you.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372467)

There's such a thing as reinventing the wheel. I'll make something myself if I I can do it cheaper or better than what I can get elsewhere. The thing he built is neither of those.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372491)

I'll make something myself if I I can do it cheaper or better than what I can get elsewhere.

Bullshit, you just lied your ass off.

You are reading slashdot, which is not something that saves you money OR is anything you can't get elsewhere better. So you clearly DO have hobbies that are for nothing at all but fun. You literally claim you don't, while in the act of doing so.

Your entire opinion is null and void, liar.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372843)

You literally claim you don't, while in the act of doing so. Your entire opinion is null and void, liar.

And you, my anonymous compatriot, need to understand that words composed of different letters mean different things.
I specifically said:

I'll make something...

not

I'll only do something...

Unless you're implying that I'm a brain in a vat living in my own private matrix, and that /. is a figment of my imagination which I create on the fly whenever I'm bored. Although if that's the case it means I have the worst case of multiple personality disorder ever, and desperately need to get laid. Maybe I can use bitcoins to buy a copy of Lady in the Red Dress from my squidly overlords.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374173)

He built it himself for fun. This isn't for sale. It's not supposed to be better than what you can buy. It was a fun project, an experiment, an exercise, a lesson. Haven't you ever made anything yourself, if only for the sole purpose of the satisfaction you feel?

Except he just happens to sell all of the stuff you need using his plans, at a premium. As mentioned he charges 80$for the battery you need, and the charger is 75$!! You could buy a battery from elsewhere with better power ratings and cheaper chargers. Yes it is interesting,but you could do it yourself with a better screen and battery and still end u 100$ less than his plans, which signals to me this is not some altruistic gesture, but a sales pitch.

Re:Nice hobby project (4, Insightful)

MightyYar (622222) | about 2 years ago | (#42372327)

Jesus, I'm old but not THAT old... I remember when you could buy a stereo kit and assemble it yourself. Sure, you could just go out and buy an assembled stereo - but what fun was that? How would you learn how a stereo works by buying one from a shelf? What is more interesting to other people: an off-the-shelf stereo, or something you assembled yourself? One thing makes you more interesting and less ignorant. The other just makes you a regular consumer.

This seems to be in the same vein, only he actually designed parts of his own kit so it's actually cooler.

Re:Nice hobby project (1)

Artifakt (700173) | about 2 years ago | (#42373073)

You're right, a Pi has its uses, but let's get more specific. A low powered device smaller than a typical deck of cards - aren't most uses either going to be monitorless/headless or involve very small, low powered displays? If the design has a component big enough to hold the whole Pi inside some spare, empty space - if you can shoehorn the Pi itself into the big, honking gaming keyboard or the monitor, then that's where it should go, not connected by cables to a 23 inch desktop monitor and other input and output devices that together mass 100 or 500 times the Raspberry Pi. Who really has plenty of space and power for a 3D printer but can't find the additional space or power for at least a laptop sized controller and pattern storage device? I keep expecting to see Pi's used to do things such as overlay a GPS coordinate, date and time stamp on an in-vehicle camera and display system, or put into an Estes model rocket to record a G-sensor's output. So far, there's not much of that sort of use out there, but many people building something that still weighs 80-90% of a laptop or even desktop sytem. Just because a Pi can technically run Quake 2, doesn't mean it's ideal use is a gaming PC.

Re:Nice hobby project (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#42374953)

I keep expecting to see Pi's used to do things such as overlay a GPS coordinate, date and time stamp on an in-vehicle camera and display system, or put into an Estes model rocket to record a G-sensor's output.

All of those are things better done with an Arduino, which has plenty of power for the purpose and which is smaller, lighter, and draws less power. Even the old ones do, and they have been used to do all of those things. Raspberry Pi isn't useful for putting a video overlay on the video from your quadcopter back to you, it's useful for implementing machine vision directly on your quadcopter so that you don't have to watch the video output.

Just because a Pi can technically run Quake 2, doesn't mean it's ideal use is a gaming PC.

If you couple it with a smallish OLED display you get a very low-power system, which is ideal for people running off of a battery or something. So it's an ideal PC for some people whose particular needs run in that direction. But actually I lied, they should probably just get a tablet and a keyboard. Something with 1GB RAM, for example, and maybe more cores. Because the R-Pi is pretty pathetic as a primary platform.

Re:Nice hobby project (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372145)

It's because you're the hapless product of a feminised consumer culture... and you've forgotten the proud past full of men who built stuff themselves to learn and just for the hell of it.

Fucking worthless pussy.

Not Just The Men - (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372439)

Consumer culture is poisonous to both genders. I'm glad to have lived in a family that still embraces concepts like independence and creativity - I knew my great grandparents, if briefly, and learned more about them over time. I learned about the habits they picked up from surviving the Great Depression in particular, about thriftiness and resourcefulness. (Unfortunately I think this is also where my family acquired its hoarding gene.) Women used to take pride in crafts and creating their own clothing in the same way men took pride in trades like woodworking or machining. The demise of the trades made these skills unprofitable to obtain, and the rise of mass production made them unnecessary. The subsequent loss of interest just seems natural in the course of things, but the casual acceptance of mediocrity, homogeneity, and quiet dissatisfaction with everything attacks our nature. We have everything but we feel as though we have nothing, that we lose more every day. I see it all around me, constantly.

It isn't that we're becoming feminized or that we're losing our collective testosterone, but something bigger than that. We're losing our independence, our free will, even our desire to survive: basic underpinnings of sapience. You know, our humanity.

At least there's an upside to all this automation: Robots are becoming so cheap and easy to use that almost any poor idiot with a rainy day fund can eventually get his hands on a CNC table, and eventually, a 3D printer. It's no substitute for real creativity or real skill, but tools are tools - they exist to expedite the creative process. I don't worry about those. What I worry about is the rise of the kind of people who have no want or use for them.

Re:Not Just The Men - (1)

lobiusmoop (305328) | about 2 years ago | (#42372543)

And I'm just out of mod points, damn. Anyway, thanks for the interesting post AC.

Re:Not Just The Men - (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42377557)

Shame he's wrong. Our consumer culture is designed for women... it's not PC... but it's true. The entire economy is structured around women's biological impulses to consume, not construct or create.

Quilts and cooking aside... with very very few exceptions women have never built a fucking thing.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372195)

Its cool to build something, he is not gong to sell it anyway, and you can build your own version cheaper than that, maybe some lcd, batteries and some case for less than 100.

Re:Nice hobby project (2)

node 3 (115640) | about 2 years ago | (#42372447)

Instead of spending $391 to make a kludge of shit, you could spend half that and get a netbook.

Setting aside for the moment that netbooks themselves are kludges of shit...

I've tried to understand why people want a Raspberry Pi, but I just still don't get it, I guess.

For fun, why else?

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372179)

Who pays $2/GB for an SSD? Not me. And the battery was either surplus or obtained at wholesale. In any case, the point is not the cost of buying all new components, but ingenuity in using parts at hand. And he doesn't say that this is intended for every wannabe to put together...

You go, guy, and ignore the noise from know-it-alls living in their parents basement.

The Devil's In The Details - (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372363)

The most expensive component in the entire device, by far, is the SSD. This isn't a necessary part. Hell, the Pi accepts SD cards as primary storage media, and for everything else there's a thumbdrive. Cool, interesting way to show off, but totally wasteful. Excluding the SSD drops the price to $261.35. That's a bundle.

The next most expensive parts are the battery and charger. A ten hour battery life is nothing to scoff at, but also pretty excessive for a low-end hobby mobile. If one naively assumes you can lop the battery in half and thereby halve the price, which may or may not be true, you wind up with a five hour battery life and $44.25 knocked off the price, bringing us to $217.10. However, whether a laptop battery (and its accompanying big bulky charger) is even the best choice for this is very debatable. I'm inclined to think there are probably cheaper and less bulky ways to do this.

Hobby projects and prototypes are usually expensive and have plenty of rough edges. This is a great example, unfortunately. One could easily improve on this design by aiming for economy over extravagance. It's over-engineered considering the Pi's modest credentials and low power consumption.

Re:The Devil's In The Details - (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | about 2 years ago | (#42372771)

If you want a low power ARM portable, you could get something like this: http://www.genesi-tech.com/products/smartbook [genesi-tech.com] ... they're not selling it any more, but when they were selling it, it's less than the low end price you quote, and it's got a much more usable screen.

It's cool what this guy did, but it's not something I would try doing. It seems like a colossal waste of money, especially for something that stands as a nettop on its own.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372431)

Nice hobby project if you have money to burn.

This is a terrible hobby project.

A "nice" hobby project would be sticking a RasPi in a stuffed animal and making your own custom AIBO, making a dashboard HUD for your car, or even putting one in the shell of an old Nintendo. The whole point of a RasPi is that it's cheap and small. This guy spent over ten times the cost of the original computer creating the most awkward monster ever conceived by man, completely and utterly negating both of these merits. It attempts to fill the role of a 'standard user computer' but does not compete with a cellphone/tablet/netbook/laptop/desktop on ANY metric.

No Arguments There - (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372643)

Even if you wanted to build your own mobile computer or something even more bold, the approach this guy took is just downright comical. That whopper of a battery pack and the SSD are both totally unnecessary, and add a considerable sum to the unit's size and final cost. This is the kind of shit that gets Pi enthusiasts laughed at.

Even if you wanted to go full COTS, which this guy pretty much did (he claims he had this stuff lying around from his work) you could do better and much cheaper with cellphone batteries (many prefabricated battery packs have built in chargers and 5v USB out, which is one way the Pi can accept power) and a smaller USB hub, and also by completely ditching the totally unneeded SSD. Plus the 3D printed case looks ugly as sin, the lazy bastard didn't even smooth it out. Some plascard, sandpaper, and a hobby knife could have done the job better. The mini-keyboard really takes the cake though, what a piece of crap.

I'm all for people building their own mobiles, tearing down the walled gardens and stitching together the fragments of the mobile landscape, and all that jazz; but constructing an overpriced, over-engineered, unwieldy, and underpowered device from leftover junk and actually having the nerve to show it off is just laughable. Keep this garbage to yourself, folks.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372667)

$163.50 for charger and battery is just stupid, he should have shopped around more.

$129.95 for 64GB storage, could have been under $40 for a usb flash stick.

He's doing it wrong cost-wise.... except he didn't pay those prices because he is the CEO of parts-people.com and wants other people to buy these expensive things at silly mark-ups, slashvert in disguise.

Re:Nice hobby project (1)

fufufang (2603203) | about 2 years ago | (#42372731)

LCD Screen – $17.95
Raspberry Pi – $35
Mini Keyboard/Mouse – $29.95
Standalone Battery Charger- $75.00
Powered 7 Port USB Hub – $14.95
64GB SSD Hard Drive – $129.95
Dell D600 Battery – $88.50

$391.30 (not including 3d printer and other tools).

Nice hobby project if you have money to burn.

With this amount of money, personally I would use it on something else. Printrbot jr is only $399.
http://printrbot.com/shop/printrbot-jr/ [printrbot.com]

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372989)

...and more than I paid for a close-out Toshiba Libretto in 1997, which was roughly the same size and specs (except hard drive was only 6GB and battery life was only two hours). It ran 13 years as my local firewall. Cheaper now to buy a clearance thinkpad which would be more useful as well.

Still, cool that one guy can succeed with such a project.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42373265)

Are /.ers that stupid that they'd think an old D600 battery is $88?

Try $22 or 25% of AC's ridiculously high quote...
http://origin-www.buy.com/prod/dell-latitude-d600-laptop-battery-compatible/211831448.html

And, how about $60 less for the SSD....
http://www.buy.com/prod/sandisk-64gb-2-5-sata-iii-solid-state-drive-ssd/230793472.html

I hardly have to leave buy.com to get the parts for nearly half of AC's quote.... LOL

That quote by AC makes it look like you could buy a cheap ultrabook for less moolah than a kludge mobile Pi.

And the charger? LOL.... way overpriced... and we see no URL's to prove the prices are real world from the first AC...

My AC quotes show you could probably make the portable Pi for closer to $200 REAL WORLD DOLLARS..

Sometimes NewEgg or Pricewatch.com has lower prices on the SSD's, and sometimes larger ones sell for less than the 64GB models...YMMV

I can't believe I am the first to CALL AC out for making the setup look absurdly expensive when it really is not...

There are also better battery and charger combinations that would yield the same or longer run times for EVEN LESS cash out of pocket.

If I could remember my login I'd post as BDProductions, like I do everywhere else....
BDP

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374331)

If you had actually read TFA then you'd know the prices were the ones given in TFA.

Re:Nice hobby project (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | about 2 years ago | (#42373833)

In what delusional world are you paying $130 for a 64GB SSD? I just bought one for around $55.

And i live in fucking AUSTRALIA where we get price gouged for everything.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374345)

Was it a good quality (i.e. not made by OCZ) 1.8" model? If it was could you tell me which one it was since I'd like a small SSD to try and cram in my netbook.

Re:Nice hobby project (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42380295)

Let's not forget the $1500 thrown in for the 3D printer to make the case.

Is this a joke? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372035)

This thing is literally the size of a brick (and likely the weight too).

Re:Is this a joke? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 2 years ago | (#42372107)

This thing is literally the size of a brick (and likely the weight too).

But at least it won't be bricked if you tamper with it. :-)

Holy WTF Batman (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372089)

All said and done, this is:
- 5x the size and weight of a smartphone/iPod touch
- half the screen resolution
- 1/4 the battery life
- twice the price (not even counting the printer you'd need to make it)

If this is the kind of thinking exemplified by people who work at Dell, no wonder they're dying....

Re:Holy WTF Batman (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372335)

He doesn't work at Dell, idiot. He runs his own shop repairing and refurbishing Dell laptops. It's also a hobbyist project. What the fuck are you doing here anyways? Didn't your Mom call down into the basement that dinner was ready like ten minutes ago? Oh, sorry. You were still wanking to mock up photos of the next iPhone. Gotcha.

Half-baked, like the Pi itself (0)

rephlex (96882) | about 2 years ago | (#42372347)

This is rather pointless, for all the reasons others have previously stated. But this is really laughable, Eben Upton of the Raspberry Pi Foundation thinks they can wait until 2015 to produce a successor to the Raspberry Pi. Even more amusingly he intends to still be selling the Raspberry Pi Model B in 2020, seven years from now: http://www.itpro.co.uk/644701/raspberry-pi-founder-has-plans-for-a-sequel-in-2015 [itpro.co.uk]

Slashvertisements? (3, Insightful)

Yonder Way (603108) | about 2 years ago | (#42372369)

With the frequency of RPi "articles" on /. one might wonder if there is some payola behind the positive press.

But not a word is spoken about the ongoing supply chain issues, and resellers making candid statements about it not being worthwhile to try to carry them. Can we have a moratorium on articles that drive up RPi demand until the Foundation can get its supply caught up more with the demand you've already created?

Re:Slashvertisements? (5, Informative)

isorox (205688) | about 2 years ago | (#42372623)

With the frequency of RPi "articles" on /. one might wonder if there is some payola behind the positive press.

But not a word is spoken about the ongoing supply chain issues, and resellers making candid statements about it not being worthwhile to try to carry them. Can we have a moratorium on articles that drive up RPi demand until the Foundation can get its supply caught up more with the demand you've already created?

I just bought 6, delivered next day. What supply problems?

Re:Slashvertisements? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372699)

Newark often lists it as out of stock although they can fulfill orders quickly. I ordered one on Thursday and got notification of shipment yesterday.

Re:Slashvertisements? (1)

ctid (449118) | about 2 years ago | (#42373483)

The Raspberry Pi Foundation is non-profit. I suspect the glut of stories is to do with the number sold and the perceived gap between price and capability. Certainly where I live (UK) supply is not a problem. Even RS, who couldn't fulfil my order in reasonable time, have now cleared their backlog (or so they claim). I cancelled my RS order and got one overnight from another supplier. You can buy them in store now here (eg at Maplin).

Re:Slashvertisements? (1)

rephlex (96882) | about 2 years ago | (#42374321)

The Raspberry Pi Foundation is non-profit.

Apparently they do have one employee though. I wonder who it is and how much they're getting paid...

Re:Slashvertisements? (1)

ctid (449118) | about 2 years ago | (#42374591)

Lots of non-profit organisations have employees. What point are you trying to make?

Re:Slashvertisements? (1)

rephlex (96882) | about 2 years ago | (#42379125)

I'm just curious.

Re:Slashvertisements? (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | about 2 years ago | (#42373851)

With the frequency of RPi "articles" on /. one might wonder if there is some payola behind the positive press.

Payola? You have lost touch with how Slashdot works haven't you? Just submit any story (preferably one with a link to your blog to drive up hits rather than to an actual article) and some overpaid idiot of an editor will submit it, change your headline to be sensationalist, add some typos, and ... profit.

But not a word is spoken about the ongoing supply chain issues

That's because there are none. There were initial supply issues when they came out. After the initial run of boards the supply issues were mostly solved. If you have issues now they are exclusively reseller issues, go buy it elsewhere. They are in stock all over the world.

Re:Slashvertisements? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374165)

Right, because a fun geek device causing threads on geek site is way too unlikely as an explanation.

Flatter form factor, please (2)

aNonnyMouseCowered (2693969) | about 2 years ago | (#42372469)

The bulkiness of the PDA-like hackware makes me wonder why the RasPeople didn't design a sleeker board. I mean something as slim as an iPod touch or a Palm Pilot.

It's not as if there are significant design issues with a flatter board. "Only" the I/O connectors appear to be needlessly sticking out. How much more would it cost to substitute tinier versions of the USB and HDMI ports in the unit? Since feature/smartphones are already outselling PCS, I can only assume that the micro/mini versions of these standard ports have already achieved economies of scale.

If some Indian company can produce an el cheapo $50 tablet complete with LCD, rechargeable battery, and case, and there are full-featured phones that are cheaper than that, why can't there be a RasPi that one can hack into a homebrew eReader?

Re:Flatter form factor, please (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42373991)

The bulkiness of the PDA-like hackware makes me wonder why the RasPeople didn't design a sleeker board. I mean something as slim as an iPod touch or a Palm Pilot.

It's not as if there are significant design issues with a flatter board. "Only" the I/O connectors appear to be needlessly sticking out. How much more would it cost to substitute tinier versions of the USB and HDMI ports in the unit? Since feature/smartphones are already outselling PCS, I can only assume that the micro/mini versions of these standard ports have already achieved economies of scale.

If some Indian company can produce an el cheapo $50 tablet complete with LCD, rechargeable battery, and case, and there are full-featured phones that are cheaper than that, why can't there be a RasPi that one can hack into a homebrew eReader?

The costs of putting in slimmer connectors are significantly more expensive than the taller connectors. Significant in this context is tens of pennies rather pounds/dollars/euros. This adds up to higher costs at the end.

Also most people don't have the smaller connectors easily to hand to reduce costs. I have around 2 cubic metres of cables from various projects over the last twenty years and I still struggle to find some stupid connector some twat specified who thought he or she was being clever as it would save 1mm in thickness.

Clearly you have zero knowledge of manufacturing, zero knowledge of what the Raspberry Pi is all about and would suggest a) reading up on what the Raspberry Pi website says b) spend a small amount of time in manufacturing to enable you to speak with authority. Based on what you've written to date around 15 mins would easily double your knowledge.

Re:Flatter form factor, please (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#42374097)

I'm examining my pi now. The tallest things on the board, at roughly equal height, are the ethernet and USB ports. As the enclosure size is determined by the tallest component, it'd be pointless replacing anything else with (probably more expensive) lower-profile parts unless these can also be shortened. The USB could, with some rearranging, possibly be replaced by two side-by-side rather than stacked - but the ethernet port is an inherently tall connector. It's not getting any slimmer without losing the ethernet, which would be a serious loss of functionality.

If you want a really low-profile pi, go warm up the soldering iron. Aside from the HDMI, the connectors all look like they wouldn't be too difficult to remove so you can solder cables directly to the board.

Re:Flatter form factor, please (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374469)

> It's not getting any slimmer without losing the ethernet, which would be a serious loss of functionality.
You mean like the Model A?

Re:Flatter form factor, please (1)

Svartalf (2997) | about 2 years ago | (#42375317)

Wired Ethernet causes a problem. The cheap connector's tall. A pop-up/pop-out connector that would satisfy your "slimmer" requirement would make the boards nearly half again to double the cost.

Re:Flatter form factor, please (1)

aNonnyMouseCowered (2693969) | about 2 years ago | (#42379001)

But the cheaper version of the board doesn't have an Ethernet connector. So your choice for an Ethernet or whatever net connection for those boards will still be a USB dongle.

*Funny but I just noticed that my Android cheapad which has no Ethernet connector, has an Ethernet option in addition to the usual BT and Wifi.

FRIST STOP.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42372509)

it5el7. You can't

A fun project to try (1)

mapuche (41699) | about 2 years ago | (#42373037)

While the machine is ugly, expensive and underpowered, it's an interesting hack. The guy had to figure how to connect all the parts that came from differents sources, not aa a DIY computer kit. He even had to deal with some basic electronics to use one energy imput (laptop battery) to feed several parts with different voltage requirements. He even call this a protoype. And that's what this frankentop is, a fun prototype to do. Thanks for sharing it!

I miss the times when one visited a radio shack store and buy some parts to create an interesting hack. Now everything is about pre-designed arduino kits.

Only one comment (1)

multicoregeneral (2618207) | about 2 years ago | (#42373519)

That's an awful lot of money to spend on 6 high drain 18650 batteries wired in series. You can pick up individual batteries like this on ebay for about $5 each, if you order them from china. These are the same batteries my e-cigarette takes.

Popups! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42373527)

Beware! This "mobile PRI" site has "Recommended for you.." popups in the bottom right of the browser when you scroll down to near the bottom!

Why such a big SSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42373817)

I mean, there's no real reason to have an SSD in there. Maybe if they omitted that and just put an SD card slot in there, it would be worth it.

rpi and fedora (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374927)

I bought the raspberry pi for $35 and added a wireless keyboard from gear head for about $40.
I found the usb charger at frys for 10 and the micro usb cable about the same. The hdmi cable
was probably another 20. I am looking for a small 12 volt lcd monitor to go in the car and
I also have a usb charger that works in the cigarette lighter.

I was rather surprised how well the fedora image worked on the rpi. I was able to browse
the internet using midori and lynx (firefox had issues with yahoo mail ) I was able to
use yum to add applications or run update. Another benefit is that the rpi has a
toolchain so you can compile source on the rpi. If you have ever worked with embedded
systems you know that you have to cross compile on another system and then load the
image on the embedded system.

So as modest as the rpi appears it is a rather capable system.

Enough With The $35 - Please! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42375089)

Enough with the $35 Raspberry Pi. Please! The base board may(MAY) be found for $35, but you can't make it work, not even boot, without spending more money. You need a power supply an SD card with the OS on it, an optional case...

Then there is this particular project. Nearly $400 without counting the 3D printing gear or 3D outsourcing. He ends up with the equivalent of a Nintendo GameBoy! He could have bought a MUCH more powerful and much more useable Atom based Netbook or a 7-10 inch Android tablet for half that much. Seriously Slashdot, we don't give a crap about the poor decisions and rickety implementations of high school level projects such as this. Seriously!

Space Station (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42378983)

I'm waiting for a Raspberry to make it to the space station, we would then have scientifically provable pi is the sky.

reallity disfunction (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42379161)

Could this be a secret ARM sponsered effort at "getting them while young"? Here's another: Could they, by insult to programmer pride by showing adolecent school children capable of doing what took years of training for most in in the profession, be instigating a "Oh please I can do that"-go-out-and-buy-one-to-prove-it-to-myself market reaction. I must admit when I first read up on the pi "summer coding contest" I certainly was pissed to hear of an 18 year old code a fully functioning php web server called "pancake" on the a pi. Presumably that must have been done in ARM assembly too.

testing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42379199)

testing

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