Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Game On War In Syria Explores Ongoing Conflict

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the no-extra-lives dept.

The Media 62

arclightfire writes "So while games have come under spotlight via the debate about the causes of the tragic school shootings in the U.S., it is worth remembering that games are now a broad medium and far from all games are FPS games. Even those about war are not now just about shooting, as Endgame:Syria shows by covering an ongoing war; 'The subject matter for Endgame: Syria should not however be looked on from a trivialized angle; people and civilian casualties are dying every day over in Syria.'" The game is part of a series from Auroch Digital.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Rob Malda's thoughts on Syria speak for themselves (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374395)

Rob responded to my ad to be interviewed for an article I was writing concerning Slashdot editors and, in particular, one Michael Simms. What follows are the transcribed notes of that interview.

Questioner: I hope you won't be offended if I ask you to prove to me that you're really CmdTaco of Slashdot fame so that our readers will know that this isn't a fake.

Rob: Sure, no problem. (stands and unbuckles pants and drops them to his ankles, revealing a smooth, shaven crotch with only a thin scar to show where his genitals once were).

Q: Thank you. That's a remarkable sight. You sure are a true Linux aficionado.

(laughs and pulls pants back up). Most people think so.

Q: What made you decide to become a nullified website owner?

(pauses). Well, it really wasn't entirely my decision.

Q: Excuse me?

The idea wasn't mine. It was my lover's idea.

Q: Please explain what you mean.

Okay, it's a long story. You have to understand my relationship with Michael before you'll know what happened.

Q: We have plenty of time. Please go on.

Both of us were into the leather Linux lifestyle when we met through a personal ad. Michael's ad was very specific: he was looking for someone to completely dominate and modify to his pleasure like a one-off Linux distro. In other word, a slave.

The ad intrigued me. I had been in a number of B&D scenes and also some S&M, but I found them unsatisfying because they were all temporary. After the fun was over, everybody went on with life as usual. I was looking for a complete life change. I wanted to meet someone who would be part of my life forever. Someone who would control me and change me at his whim.

Q: In other words, you're a true masochist.

Oh yes, no doubt about that. After all, I love Linux. My favorite browser is Lynx. Anyway, we met and there was instant chemistry. Michael is a few years older than me and very good looking. Our personalities meshed totally. He's very dominant. I went back to his place after drinks and had the best sex of my life. That's when I knew I was going to be with Michael for a long, long time.

Q: What sort of things did you two do?

It was very heavy right away. He restrained me and whipped me for quite awhile. He put clamps on my nipples and a ball gag in my mouth. And he hung a ball bag on my sack with some very heavy weights. And he made me stare at a Windows ME cd-rom. That was probably the worst.

Q: Ouch.

(laughs) Yeah, no kidding. At first I didn't think I could take the pain, but Michael worked me through it and after awhile I was flying. I was sorry when it was over. Michael enjoyed it as much as I did. Afterwards he talked about what kind of a commitment I'd have to make if I wanted to stay with him.

Q: What did he say exactly?

Well, besides agreeing to be his slave in every way, I'd have to be ready to be modified. To have my body modified.

Q: Did he explain what he meant by that?

Not specifically, but I got the general idea. I guessed that something like castration might be part of it.

Q: How did that make you feel?

(laughs) I think it would make any guy a little hesitant.

Q: But it didn't stop you from agreeing to Michael's terms?

No it didn't. I was totally hooked on this man. I knew that I was willing to pay any price to be with him. Anyway, a few days later I moved in with Michael. He gave me the rules right away: I'd have to be naked at all times while we were indoors, except for a leather dog collar that I could never take off. I had to keep my head shaved. And I had to wear a butt plug except when I needed to take a shit or when we were having sex. I had to sleep on the floor next to his bed. I ate all my food on the floor, too.

The next day he took me to a piercing parlor where he had my nipples done, and a Prince Albert put into the head of my cock.

Q: Heavy stuff.

Yeah, and it got heavier. He used me as a toilet, pissing in my mouth. I had to lick his asshole clean after he took a shit, too. It was all part of a process to break down any sense of individuality I had. After awhile, I wouldn't hesitate to do anything he asked.

Q: Did the sex get rougher?

Oh God, yeah. He started fisting me every time we had sex. But he really started concentrating on my cock and balls, working them over for hours at a time. He put pins into the head of my cock and into my sack. He attached clothespins up and down my cock and around my sack. The pain was pretty bad. He had to gag me to keep me from screaming.

Q: When did the idea of nullification come up?

Well, it wasn't nullification at first. He started talking about how I needed to make a greater commitment to him, to do something to show that I was dedicated to him for life. When I asked him what he meant, he said that he wanted to take my balls.

Q: How did you respond?

Not very well at first. I told him that I liked being a man and didn't want to become a eunuch. But he kept at me, and wore me down. He reminded me that I agreed to be modified according to his wishes, and this is what he wanted for me. Anything less would show that I wasn't really committed to the relationship. And besides, I was the head honcho at Slashdot so I didn't really need my balls. Psychologically they were long gone.

It took about a week before I agreed to be castrated. But I wasn't happy about it, believe me.

Q: How did he castrate you?

Michael had a friend who was into the eunuch scene. One night he came over with his bag of toys, and Michael told me that this was it. I was gonna lose my nuts then and there.

Q: Did you think of resisting?

I did for a minute, but deep down I knew there was no way. I just didn't want to lose Michael. I'd rather lose my balls.

Michael's friend restrained me on the living room floor while Michael videotaped us. He used an elastrator to put a band around my sack.

Q: That must have really hurt.

Hell yeah. It's liked getting kicked in the balls over and over again. I screamed for him to cut the band off, but he just kept on going, putting more bands on me. I had four bands around my sack when he finished.

I was rolling around on the floor screaming, while Michael just videotaped me. Eventually, my sack got numb and the pain subsided. I looked between my legs and could see my sack was a dark purple. I knew my balls were dying inside.

Michael and his friend left the room and turned out the light. I lay there for hours, crying because I was turning into a eunuch and there wasn't anything I could do about it.

Q: What happened then?

Eventually I fell asleep from exhaustion. Then the light switched on and I could see Michael's friend kneeling between my legs, touching my sack. I heard him tell Michael that my balls were dead.

Q: How did Michael react?

Very pleased. He bent down and felt around my sack. He said that it felt cold.

Michael's friend told me that I needed to keep the bands on. He said that eventually my balls and sack would dry up and fall off. I just nodded. What else could I do at that point?

Q: Did it happen just like Michael's friend said?

Yeah, a week or so later my package just fell off. Michael put it in a jar of alcohol to preserve it. It's on the table next to his bed.

Q: How did things go after that?

Michael was really loving to me. He kept saying how proud he was of me, how grateful that I had made the commitment to him. He even let me sleep in his bed.

Q: What about the sex?

We waited awhile after my castration, and then took it easy until I was completely healed. At first I was able to get hard, but as the weeks went by my erections began to disappear.

That pleased Michael. He liked fucking me and feeling my limp cock. It made his dominance over me even greater.

Q: When did he start talking about making you a nullo?

A couple of months after he took my nuts. Our sex had gotten to be just as rough as before the castration. He really got off on torturing my cock. Then he started saying stuff like, "Why do you even need this anymore?"

That freaked me out. I always thought that he might someday take my balls, but I never imagined that he'd go all the way. I told him that I wanted to keep my dick.

Q: How did he react to that?

At first he didn't say much. But he kept pushing. Michael said I would look so nice being smooth between my legs. He said my dick was small and never got hard anymore, so what was the point of having it.

But I still resisted. I wanted to keep my cock. I felt like I wouldn't be a man anymore without it.

Q: So how did he get you to agree?

He didn't. He took it against my will.

Q: How did that happen?

We were having sex in the basement, and I was tied up and bent over this wooden bench as he fucked me. Then I heard the doorbell ring. Michael answered it, and he brought this guy into the room.

At first I couldn't see anything because of the way I was tied. But then I felt these hands lift me up and put me on my back. And I could see it was Michael's friend, the guy who took my nuts.

Q: How did you react?

I started screaming and crying, but the guy just gagged me. The two of them dragged me to the other side of the room where they tied me spread eagled on the floor.

Michael's friend snaked a catheter up my dick, and gave me a shot to numb my crotch. I was grateful for that, at least. I remember how bad it hurt to lose my balls.

Q: What was Michael doing at this time?

He was kneeling next to me talking quietly. He said I'd be happy that they were doing this. That it would make our relationship better. That kind of calmed me down. I thought, "Well, maybe it won't be so bad."

Q: How long did the penectomy take?

It took awhile. Some of the penis is inside the body, so he had to dig inside to get all of it. There was a lot of stitching up and stuff. He put my cock in the same jar with my balls. You can even see the Prince Albert sticking out of the head.

Then they made me a new pisshole. It's between my asshole and where my sack used to be. So now I have to squat to piss.

Q: What has life been like since you were nullified?

After I got over the surgery and my anger, things got better. When I healed up, I began to like my smooth look. Michael brought friends over and they all admired it, saying how pretty I looked. It made me feel good that Michael was proud of me.

Q: Do you have any sexual feeling anymore?

Yes, my prostate still responds when Michael fucks me or uses the buttplug. And my nipples are quite sensitive. If Michael plays with them while fucking me, I have a kind of orgasm. It's hard to describe, but it's definitely an orgasm.

Sometimes Michael says he's gonna have my prostate and nipples removed, but he's just kidding around. He's happy with what he's done to me.

Q: So are you glad Michael had you nullified?

Well, I wouldn't say I'm glad. If I could, I'd like to have my cock and balls back. But I know that I'm a nullo forever. So I'm making the best of it.

Michael and I are very happy. I know that he'll take care of me and we'll be together always. I guess losing my manhood was worth it to make that happen for us.

Re:Rob Malda's thoughts on Syria speak for themsel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374423)

Honestly, this is the funniest flamebait / troll I have ever seen. Had you made any attempt at all to tie it in with the story, and had you posted it using an account, I would have modded this up. Seriously. Only for the demonstration of your talent. You have serious potential here my friend. try to find a good use for it.

Meanwhile, I've modded your create down to -1. No direct link to the article at hand and adds no value to the conversation. Perhaps someone will disagree. Meanwhile, feel free to try again.

+1 loved it. Would read this person's next post for sure.

Re:Rob Malda's thoughts on Syria speak for themsel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374451)

Ancient troll is...ancient. That story (even though it's based on fact, Malda really is a eunuch) goes back more than 10 years during the golden age of /. trolling...

Not an FPS, a card game (2, Informative)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 years ago | (#42374575)

Replying off-topic but the summary doesn't mention this very relevant bit of information: The game is not an FPS, it's a card strategy game. Like Magic or something.

Which is disappointing, I was hoping it was an FPS and that some Russians and Iranians could play from the rebels' point of view.

Re:Not an FPS, a card game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374617)

Replying off-topic but the summary doesn't mention this very relevant bit of information: The game is not an FPS, it's a card strategy game. Like Magic or something.

Which is disappointing, I was hoping it was an FPS and that some Russians and Iranians could play from the rebels' point of view.

Disappointed? Really? If you want to "enjoy" or "experience" a FPS take on this conflict just watch the news, or better yet, buy a plane ticket to Syria.

Re:Not an FPS, a card game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42376927)

Like Magic or something.

This is what I think of in terms of "or something": Illuminati card game. [wikipedia.org]

Might not be that boring to play, depending on the context of scenarios and various trump or modifier cards that could be used.

Idea for a new game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374399)

Basically it's a FPS based on Q3 engine or similar where you you are a janitor in a school armed only with a single pistol and you have a limited timeframe to find and neutralise a hostile shooter who enters the school with a random kit of weapons and starts killing kids or taking hostages.

Too soon?

Re:Idea for a new game (0)

siddesu (698447) | about 2 years ago | (#42374711)

Too soon?

Too easy. It is a well-known fact that only a good guy with a gun can stop a bad guy with a gun. For a challenging game, the janitor should be armed with a broomstick, a toothpick, a nail file and harsh language.

Re:Idea for a new game (4, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#42374751)

It is a well-known fact that only a good guy with a gun can stop a bad guy with a gun.

Actually, a falling boulder can stop a bad guy with a gun. A poison dart can stop a bad guy with a gun. An electric fence can stop a bad guy with a gun. A femme fatale can stop a bad guy with a gun. Psychotropic drugs can stop a bad guy with a gun. Early intervention via counseling can stop a bad guy with a gun.

And not having a gun can stop a bad guy with a gun.

But let's face it, the fantasy of being the "good guy with the gun" is very appealing to the frustrated and insecure and sociopaths who could easily become the "bad guy with the gun".

Re:Idea for a new game (1)

siddesu (698447) | about 2 years ago | (#42374765)

Actually, a falling boulder can stop a bad guy with a gun. A poison dart can stop a bad guy with a gun. An electric fence can stop a bad guy with a gun. A femme fatale can stop a bad guy with a gun. Psychotropic drugs can stop a bad guy with a gun. Early intervention via counseling can stop a bad guy with a gun.

Quite possibly so, but in a REAL, MANLY and TOTALLY UNGAY FPS, all of the above would be part of the environment, not part of the gameplay.

Re:Idea for a new game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42376883)

So basically, your argument distills to: "a one in a million accident, or a person with a weapon that may or may not be a firearm, can also stop a bad person with a weapon".

Not a brilliant point, really.

Re:Idea for a new game (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#42377343)

So basically, your argument distills to: "a one in a million accident, or a person with a weapon that may or may not be a firearm, can also stop a bad person with a weapon".

Not a brilliant point, really.

You missed:

"Psychotropic drugs can stop a bad guy with a gun. Early intervention via counseling can stop a bad guy with a gun.

And not having a gun can stop a bad guy with a gun.

Those are not, "one in a million accidents" OR "a person with a weapon that may or may not be a firearm".

Why did you overlook those?

Re:Idea for a new game (1)

johnny cashed (590023) | about 2 years ago | (#42377537)

I'm waiting for the real life mass shooting involving multiple armed citizen "good guys" that, once the mass shooting starts, they mistake each other for the mass shooter and add to the body count. So far, we've had a few mass shootings with armed citizen "good guys" engaging or attempting to engage the shooter. I don't believe there have been more than one "good guy" shooter involved (aside from law enforcement).

As a personal aside, I do not concealed carry. Even if I were too, if I were to encounter a mass shooting in which I'm not directly being targeted, I'm pretty damn sure I'd do my best to get the hell out of the mass shooting scene to safety. If that makes me a coward, well, I guess I'm a coward. If a mass shooter is engaging the public at large, he'll often have a superior arrangement of firepower due to his advanced planning. I don't want to engage that type of shooter with a mere concealed carry type pistol (I don't ever want to engage and armed assailant, if I can avoid it).

Re:Idea for a new game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42377907)

not good to face insanity at close range, i hear you. carry a rifle. retreat, then pop.

Re:Idea for a new game (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#42377991)

I don't want to engage that type of shooter with a mere concealed carry type pistol (I don't ever want to engage and armed assailant, if I can avoid it).

How chilling that we even have to have this discussion.

What is it about us that causes so many mass shootings? Even adjusted for population, it happens in the US about 30 times more often than elsewhere.

Re:Idea for a new game (1)

Mooney Driver (2800903) | about 2 years ago | (#42379943)

You spend this much time worrying about mass shootings? I can't imagine what would happen if you looked at traffic accidents. Ban the cars! Deaths due to medical practitioner negligence/fatigue. Ban the medicine! Ad nauseam.

Re:Idea for a new game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42380673)

callus-idiot-troll.

Re:Idea for a new game (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#42384537)

Cars and medicine have a use besides killing people.

But you already knew that.

Game the News? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374403)

I think if someone is so detached that they need a game to understand the news, then perhaps I would rather they just stayed playing traditional games and let the adults in the room discuss the news of the world.

Re:Game the News? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42375853)

The only news I am interested in is news that directly affects me. Life is short, I have too many things I want to do and I don't have time to catch up on all of the latest gossip like you do.

lame piece of propaganda (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374427)

Yes, thats exactly what it is. Todays world has new tools for propaganda apart from newsspin.
This game portrays the Syrian fight against terror in simplistic black and white just like most mainstream media likes to show it.
However, nothing in this world is as simple as that.
What you will not see in that game is:
* leading Syrian terrorist group Jabhat al-Nusra (categorised so by none other than US of A)
* daily beheadings done by islamist rebels (aka al-Qaeda)
* teaching beheadings to their children (will not post link as anyone can find it if (s)he so wishes)
* daily kidnappings for ransom by islamist rebels (aka al-Qaeda)
* killing of christians en masse by islamist rebels (aka al-Qaeda)
* destruction of churches by islamist rebels (aka al-Qaeda)
* all war crimes imaginable, mostly by islamist rebels

Just some links:
Fate of Christians in Syria [youtube.com]
US designates Syria's Jabhat al-Nusra front a 'terrorist' group at lightning speed [csmonitor.com]
#OpSyria v.2.0 [youtube.com]

Re:lame piece of propaganda (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 years ago | (#42374521)

So you guys are posting on Slashdot now:

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/12/assadosphere/ [wired.com]

I hope you and Assad die slow, painful deaths.

Re:lame piece of propaganda (1)

gerddie (173963) | about 2 years ago | (#42374661)

Unfortunately, all the things AC wrote are indeed happening.

Not only that. (2)

boorack (1345877) | about 2 years ago | (#42374733)

US and other western governments are actively supporting, sponsoring, arming and training those rebels. Should they not do that, Assad would propably crush them quickly in some cruel way BUT thousands upon thousands of civilians would still be alive. It's sad to see our politicians being ultimately responsible for most of killed civilians and sponsoring those killings with mouths full of crap about "bringing democracy". If Norymberg precedents would be honored in today's world, most of our leaders would be already sentenced and jailed (or hanged).

Re:lame piece of propaganda (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42375145)

Unfortunately, all the things AC wrote are indeed happening.

Indeed! What is being painted by the Western media as the Syrian edition of the Arab Spring uprisings that have installed Islamic regimes in Tunisia, Libya and Egypt is actually a thinly disguised civil war between the majority Sunnis of Syria vs the rest of the population, which form the backbone of the Baath Party and are under that umbrella. The situation in Syria is more (conversely) similar to Iraq or Bahrein, than to Egypt or Libya.

Honestly, there is little to choose between the 2 sides. The Assad regime backs, and is backed by Hizbullah, as well as the mullahs of Iran. The whole philosophy of Baathists is to gather Arab national socialists who don't fall within the majority Islamic sect in a given Arab country, and maintain power by force in order to prevent them from getting eviscerated. In Iraq, Saddam did that by uniting Sunnis, Christians and Turks behind him, and suppressing the majority Shias. In Syria, Hafez al Assad and after him, Bashar al Assad did that by uniting Alawites, Shias, Druze, Christians and Kurds behind him, and suppressing the majority Sunnis. Reason for both was simple - if these countries got Islamic regimes, then they would have assumed the majority sect as their official religions - Shia in Iraq (as is the de facto case now) and Sunni in Syria, and all other groups would have been persecuted and marginalized. In Iraq, that's already happening - almost all the Christians in Iraq have fled to Syria, and now they, along with Syria's Christians, will flee to Lebanon, if and when they see this regime collapsing. So neither could Saddam nor the Assads be faulted - Muslims ain't the 'Live and let live' type at all. If they are not oppressed, they'll be the oppressors. As they're showing in Iraq (towards Assyrians and Sunnis), Egypt (towards Copts), Tunisia (towards Jews), Lebanon (towards Maronites and Sunnis) and Libya.

This is not to glorify or exonerate the Baathists, who were and are just as vile anti-Semites. Saddam was a major supporter of Hamas during his regime, and it was in Baghdad that Abu Nidal was killed shortly before the US invasion of Iraq. Assads were previously a sponsor of the Lebanese Shia group Amal, which later merged into Hizbullah, and on top of their support to Hizbullah, they also hosted Pali Islamic Jihad as well as PFLP in Damascus. So it's not like any of the parties are opposed to Jihadi terror.

So the ideal solution really is the civil war, which thankfully is showing no signs of ending. Iran and Hizbullah have thrown in what they have in support of the regime, and on top of that, Russia and China, which stand to lose their last customer of military hardware, are offsetting Western attempts to topple this regime. This is a good thing - honestly, it's inane of the West to support groups that are backed by the Muslim Brotherhood and al Qaeda. If the Assad regime falls, then instead of the Shi'ite crescent that runs from Teheran, Baghdad, Damascus and Beirut, there would be an Ikhwan crescent that would run from Damascus to Cairo, probably swallowing Amman and Beirut as well. It would be a rerun of 1967 if that happened. So the best thing is for all Jihadi factions to converge in Syria and fight out the civil war there and destroy each other, so that they can't destroy anyone else. Non Muslim powers, such as the US, Russia, China, EU et al should simply stay out of it, or just maximize their profits by arming both sides to the teeth.

Re:lame piece of propaganda (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42379829)

So neither could Saddam nor the Assads be faulted - Muslims ain't the 'Live and let live' type at all. If they are not oppressed, they'll be the oppressors. As they're showing in Iraq (towards Assyrians and Sunnis), Egypt (towards Copts), Tunisia (towards Jews), Lebanon (towards Maronites and Sunnis) and Libya.

You missed oppressing Amercians in America and Australians in Australia.

No, seriously.

In Australia they are forcing their way in by boat and then demanding that Australian change its laws to suite their culture. They recently demanded that their kids be allowed to carry 'ceremonial knives' to school.

There was a series shown on TV called "Go back to where you came from" which had a heavy slant on showing what boat people go through to get to Australia. Two things went wrong there. Firstly, it didn't explain why people leave the relative safety of Indonesia to try to cross into Australia and it did not explain why so many of these people are young male and muslim.

o the best thing is for all Jihadi factions to converge in Syria and fight out the civil war there and destroy each other, so that they can't destroy anyone else. Non Muslim powers, such as the US, Russia, China, EU et al should simply stay out of it, or just maximize their profits by arming both sides to the teeth.

Absolutely. Do you want these people fighting it out in your back yard? No? Then don't move to Sydney or Melbourne because it is already happening there.

Re:lame piece of propaganda (1)

Mooney Driver (2800903) | about 2 years ago | (#42379959)

Geopolitics. You don't understand it.

Re:lame piece of propaganda (2)

mauri (168049) | about 2 years ago | (#42375423)

Yes, thats exactly what it is. Todays world has new tools for propaganda apart from newsspin.
This game portrays the Syrian fight against terror in simplistic black and white just like most mainstream media likes to show it.
However, nothing in this world is as simple as that.
What you will not see in that game is:
* leading Syrian terrorist group Jabhat al-Nusra (categorised so by none other than US of A)
* daily beheadings done by islamist rebels (aka al-Qaeda)
* teaching beheadings to their children (will not post link as anyone can find it if (s)he so wishes)
* daily kidnappings for ransom by islamist rebels (aka al-Qaeda)
* killing of christians en masse by islamist rebels (aka al-Qaeda)
* destruction of churches by islamist rebels (aka al-Qaeda)
* all war crimes imaginable, mostly by islamist rebels

Just some links:
Fate of Christians in Syria [youtube.com]
US designates Syria's Jabhat al-Nusra front a 'terrorist' group at lightning speed [csmonitor.com]
#OpSyria v.2.0 [youtube.com]

I wholeheartedly agree. If the corporate media starts brainwashing people, be it for commercial gain or under political pressure, they usually succeed.
Why should simple people question mass-media? They have neither the information nor mental abilities to confront such power.

Also take a look at Alex Thomson at Channel 4 and Robert Fisk at the Independent.
Both are veteran British journos and both are actually raportinf FROM Syria. Not sitting in some comfortable chair 4000 km away.

Re:lame piece of propaganda (1)

Jiro (131519) | about 2 years ago | (#42375601)

The problem with political games is that... they're still political.

Imagine that instead of making a game about the conflict, the same group had simply put out an editorial saying "Here is what we think about the war in Syria, and exactly what is happening there."

If they did that, and it was promoted as much as a game was, and it was typical media quality, everyone here would jump on it in a minute, pointing out that the editorial oversimplifies the war, and that most editorials are made by people with strong opinions on the subject who may be biased. Or the writer of the editorial may have based it on news reports but been a bit too trusting of them. Perhaps the editorial, while supposedly summarizing the war, leaves out important events. (And that's assuming all the facts in it are literally true.)

But package your editorial as a game, and everyone eats it up, as a "unique gamification approach" which "reports the news in the most entertaining fashion possible". As if a contentious subject suddenly turns into a completely objective analysis just because it was put in something that has cards and a score. Please.

How many games include post-WWII Israel? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374439)

How many games include post-WWII Israel?

Probably none. Why?

Re:How many games include post-WWII Israel? (0, Flamebait)

SplashMyBandit (1543257) | about 2 years ago | (#42375789)

Hmm, the Falcon series of flight sims featured Israel as a combat theatre. There are very many paper wargames (ya know, old style) that feature conflicts in the Middle East. So it appears you are pretty ignorant - and what appears to be your attempt at anti-Zionism has failed.

Since you are ignorant here's a capsule history in 5 minutes that explains the situation in the Middle East, from Purdue University. The situation is very simple and clear. It is the resolution that is complex. How do you defuse intrinsic hatred of Islam for all non-Mulims? solve that and you will solve all the Islam created problems in the Middle East; eg. Islam vs unbelievers like Europe; Iranian Shia Islam vs Arabian Shia Islam; Islam vs Christians in Iraq, Syria and Egypt; Islam vs animists on Sudan; Islam vs Israel; Islam vs the US; etc etc:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63hTOaRu7h4 [youtube.com]

Unfortunately the United Nations can't be relied on to sort it out, for the following reason:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7Mupoo1At8 [youtube.com]
Furthermore, the UN is attempting to outlaw Free Speech by disabling our ability to cricitise the flaws in any religion (but specifically, the barbarism of Islam):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uadgk2kveRU [youtube.com]

The political Left are usually helpful watchdogs, but they are no help either (they are so anti-American as a vestige of Cold War reasoning, that they excuse the totalitarian imperialism of the Islamists who seek to impose a new global Caliphate):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TA3OzSCdCUk [youtube.com]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqSY285BqQg [youtube.com]

So, your statement is a bit of a fail. It simply shows you know nothing about gaming/wargaming (the Middle East is covered extensively) and probably have a poor grasp of the situation in the region (and it turns out, the World, since the goal of the jihadis is to conquer the World once they've crushed Israel).

LET THEM DINE ON HONEYDEW !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374441)

And drink the milk of paradise !! That'll turn them all to sissies, and the war will be over !!

What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "game"? (1)

fantomas (94850) | about 2 years ago | (#42374449)

Of course this raises the moral question of "what's off limits for a game" - but also - "what's a game?".

Does something have to be "fun" to be a game? Is this the definition of a game (as opposed to say a "simulation"). Or is a game a "simulated environment where there is a win condition"?

Interested to hear slashdotters thoughts.

Re:What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "gam (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#42374477)

There doesn't even need to be a win condition. Some of the classic games go on forever - pacman, tetris. The objective is to either maximise a score or keep the game going as long as possible.

Re:What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "gam (3, Insightful)

Johann Lau (1040920) | about 2 years ago | (#42374551)

I can't define what a game is, but I know that chess works even when stripped down to the bare mechanics... and if you stripped these games down to their bare mechanics, they might still be games, but most of them would be more or less identical (at least if you consider the maps as input to the game just like players are, not as not part of it's rules). Because of that I'd say they are definately nowhere near as much the games they're perceived as.

What is called "game" these days often enough is just a vehicle for story-telling, super idiotic story telling at that. You know, you wouldn't be able to sit through most of these stories as movie, unless there was a lot of action or hot people in it. And you wouldn't be able to take it as a slideshow on the computer/console, either! So you get to mash a few buttons; that way you feel involved and stay on the petri dish.

That wouldn't be a problem if the people who told stories and their stories amounted to shit -- I am sure you could make a "pseudo-game" about (the effects of) war that has something to say... those games probably exist, they're just rarely hyped, are they.

But you cannot make an actual war game, not really, since war isn't so much about the pong/galaga/pacman mechanics that are used to portray them, as they are about propaganda and using the masses -- and not in an RTS way either, that just simulates the "general grunt" instead of the "infantry grunt". War is waged by planning in super comfy rooms with huge desks -- it's about profit and numbers, not about individual actions. Knowing that it's pretty much clear than 99.9999% of all war games obfuscate war, not explore or simulate it. They are just extensions of power, they are part of those wars. They keep even the people who are not currently out there being hired killers safely embedded in the fabric of war.

Re:What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "gam (1)

Johann Lau (1040920) | about 2 years ago | (#42374763)

I don't wanna leech karma off Ian Bogost and Jonathan Blow, who for me are the Noam Chomskies of gaming haha, so if you found this post interesting, you will LOVE these two lectures, and maybe more you can find under related videos, exploring indie games, and what games are or could be:

Ian Bogost on Serious Games [youtube.com]

"[,,] there's some line that divides games that are beneficial from games that are harmful. It's not really my business to draw that line today, I don't wanna try and convince you exactly what's beneficial and what's harmful, because again, that is up to the opinion of every designer and in fact the opinion of every player. But what I would like is for people to have an opinion about it. When people design a game to think about what that game is doing, and when people play a game to think about what that game is doing. And people don't, right now. They think about how it has cool graphics and a lot of levels and, like, they love the story about killing the bad guy. Which is not a very self-aware place to be standing when you're consuming something that affects your life for so many hours and therefore affects your mind for so many hours. And that bothers me. That makes me feel bad about being a game designer." (Jonathan Blow: Video Games and the Human Condition [youtube.com] (the bit I transcribed is here [youtube.com]

Re:What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "gam (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374589)

There are about as many definitions of what a game is as there a re people who've given it serious thought. Personally, I'm a fan of raph koster's:

Playing a game is the act of solving statistically varied challenge situations presented by an opponent who may or may not be algorithmic within a framework that is a defined systemic model.

Re:What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "gam (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374633)

Does something have to be "fun" to be a game? Is this the definition of a game (as opposed to say a "simulation").

Why ask us when you can ask WOPR [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "gam (1)

BertieBaggio (944287) | about 2 years ago | (#42374697)

"What's in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet." (Juliet)

So what's in a game? The subject has been discussed by folks far more eloquent and persuasive than I; but hey, this is Slashdot so what the hell. In some ways trying to define what 'game' means is akin to defining art; grasping at the wind. I think you're pretty close to the mark with your latter definition, although as sibling posters suggest the win condition is not necessary, and the concept of winning itself has been toyed with as a mechanism (see UnwinnableByDesign [tvtropes.org] ). "Fun" is hardly a necessity either, witness RPG grinds, for example. And how 'fun' would Contra be without UUDDLRLRBA?

That leaves "simulated environment", which I think approaches the heart fo the matter. Games (not just video games here) are a simulacrum, an approximation of a scenario. Some are more complex than others - Snakes and Ladders versus Dwarf Fortress or MilSim-du-jour - but all distill a scenario/environment into a set of rules. Fun and winning are usually part of the arrangement, but not by necessity.

Sibling post hit the mark too in saying that a significant proportion of gaming is there as a vehicle for storytelling. It's easy to be cynical as there are some bad stories out there. But there is good storytelling too, if that's your thing. Planescape: Torment* has a particular focus on story; and there are times where the line between 'game' and 'interactive story' are pretty heavily blurred. Dear Esther is an example which PA Report recommends quite highly [penny-arcade.com] :

Dear Esther is a $10 PC [note: currently on sale on Steam for £1.74 for the next two hours at time of writing] experience that toys with the concepts that make, or don’t make, a game. You are a man exploring a deserted island, and every so often you’ll trigger a voice over that helps to explain what you’re doing there and describes other characters you never see. It’s a desolate, lonely game that funnels you into one specific ending that’s impossible to escape. It takes around 90 minutes to finish, depending on how much of the island you choose to explore.

At the end of a day if someone creates something that is a representation of something with at least some semblance of interaction, and calls it a game I'm quite happy to believe them until proven otherwise.

*Planescape was recently discussed [slashdot.org] on /. and it was mentioned that GOG had it for ten bucks, which was nifty. Now they've discounted it to five bucks [gog.com] , which is at least twice as nifty by my calculations.

Re:What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "gam (1)

Hentes (2461350) | about 2 years ago | (#42374799)

Theoretically, there could be other forms of interactive art that's not a game. I just haven't seen one, maybe we got too fixed on the gamer mindset to think about anything else.

Re:What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "gam (1)

khallow (566160) | about 2 years ago | (#42375319)

Of course this raises the moral question of "what's off limits for a game"

What's "raising" this question?

Re:What's off limits for a game? definitn. of "gam (1)

ultranova (717540) | about 2 years ago | (#42375993)

Does something have to be "fun" to be a game?

A game has to be fun to be relevant. If it isn't fun, it might still be a game, but it doesn't matter since no one's going to play it unless forced to, and if they are, they'll just go through the motions while daydreaming.

But of course the straightforward answer to your question is: it depends entirely on how you define a game, and thus varies depending on the context. Which, in this case, is "convenient scapegoat".

Eventually... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374605)

The world is going to have to do something serious about islamists. Either bitchslap them all hard. Real hard. Or join them.

They are not compatable with the rest of the people on the planet.
The longer you wait the harder it will be to fix...

I don't wanna join them...

Re:Eventually... (2)

cpghost (719344) | about 2 years ago | (#42374703)

he world is going to have to do something serious about islamists. Either bitchslap them all hard. Real hard. Or join them.

C'mon, the US official policy has been pro-islamist since, at least, 2006 or so. Just look at the Cablegate cables emanating from allied countries, e.g. from Morocco, but not only from there. There, US diplomats are reporting how they cultivated ties to the various islamist groups that were illegal at the time. They also invited them for talks in US universities and think tanks at the same time. In Libya, they militarily (!) removed a dictator that despite all his weirdness, kept the islamists in check (and promptly got "rewarded" for their help by the attack in Benghazi from the very same elements they worked so hard to get to power). In Egypt, the US were quick to abandon the secular opposition and supported Morsi and his new constitution. And, of course, in Syria, the US is teaming with Al Qaeda and other jihadists against one of the last secular regimes in the region. How much closer can you get by joining them? The US Government is in bed with them for quite some time... and that's a tragedy for people there who hoped for human rights, equal treatment of women and men, etc., and who will have to wait a couple of generations or more to undo the current damage.

Re:Eventually... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374805)

Or let them die out, just like the insane variety of christianity we had in europe during the middle ages.

Re:Eventually... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42375099)

Here's an idea, sport:

You leave them alone, and they'll leave you alone.

If someone from across town set up a tent in your yard, stuck his nose into your affairs and tried to tell you how to run your life, killed your dog and "collaterally damaged" your child into a hospital or grave, they'd have to eventually have to do something serious about your rotten attitude.

See how that works?

Re:Eventually... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42375253)

and they'll leave you alone

Yeah, I guess that's why they're bombing each other's weddings, they just keep putting up the wedding tents in each other's yards.

In Syria the problem is that the Alawites would (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42376549)

rather run the world's most oppressive and brutal totalitarian state than risk submitting to the whims of a Muslim population. And given a choice, they'd rather fight to the last Muslim...

In the Middle east the main problem is sectarian supremicism/violence/oppression/hatred. Muslims may be at the root of that, but it's not just them. EVERYONE uses the Jews as their safe scapegoat. And you might say Alawites are Muslims... but they're probably not, but because of the violence it's better for them to pretend to be and for their allies to pretend they are too.

I could give you examples, but basically things in the Middle east aren't worse than you imagine, they're worse than you CAN imagine.

If games were the cause of the school shootings .. (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 2 years ago | (#42374615)

. . . half the schools in the world would be empty by now. Just think of how many people in the world play these games.

Recently, the Connecticut killer has been labeled "a basement dweller." Maybe basements are the cause, and should be outlawed . . . ?

Ancient cultures have always played some sort of war games in tribal ceremonies. It prepares the young for the real thing.

Too soon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42374967)

No Risk

Take the reigns of a banking giant, too big to fail and certainly way too big to held accountable for laundering money from terrorists and drug lords. Whatever happens, you can't lose!

CatholicCraft

As the vicar of Christ, you'll remain true to Christ's teachings by amassing incredible amounts of money and hushing up years to inaction against known pedophiles. When caught, blame secularism for years of Church sanctioned abuses.

World of Youtube Debate

Take control of a typical YouTube master debater as he enriches the Internet with his sideways take on life. Buy the Game of The Year edition to receive a free game controller with pre-defined comments, including "lol", "gay" and "fuk u".

GTA - Riyadh

Play the role of a Saudi woman, rebelling against society by carefully driving her husband's car unescorted by a male keeper. How long can you drive responsibly before being hauled out of the car by the Mutaween, and beaten by your son.

Ooooooh (1)

kiriath (2670145) | about 2 years ago | (#42375015)

I despise the 'Witch Hunt" style analysis of the affect(or is it effect?) of video games on children. That's like the 'church' in medieval times saying things were bad just to say they were bad. I'm sure they said 'Studies find that....' right before they sentenced someone to death too...

The point here is, video games are n o t t h e p r o b l e m. The problem is the lack of familial support for the nations troubled children / adults. Families are far more detached now than they have ever been... I think this perpetuates crime and violence through lack of guidance.

That's my two cents.

I know this is slightly off topic for the post but it needed to be said. That is all.

People _and_ civilian casualties? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42375207)

Something about this sentence unsettles me. I don't quite know what.

American's are Being Manipulated in Syrian War (1)

BrendaEM (871664) | about 2 years ago | (#42375639)

Look at the network-related news. That's all you see is articles about Syria, just like we saw about Iraq and Afghanistan, as if any of they needed our help shooting them. This big issue about Syria is: they fed soldiers and materiel into Afghanistan and Iraq. We're still reading from Paul Wolfiwitz's big book of war. Stop it!

Re:American's are Being Manipulated in Syrian War (1)

SplashMyBandit (1543257) | about 2 years ago | (#42375897)

You are wrong. What is happening in Syria is this. The totalitarian but secular Baath Party has overreached and the citizens got fed up. The citizens started out with peaceful protests but eventually turned to weapons. This is the Revolution. It has evolved from this situation and the Revolution has been co-opted by a jihahist movement (incited, funded and supported by the Saudis and Qatar). They seek to turn Syria into a member of the global Caliphate.

So if you think that the news about Syria is some plot by the US to control the Middle East then you couldn't be more wrong. The situation in Syria was secular Syrians wanted more freedoms (grea!) but has now been perverted into Sunni Muslim militants taking over another country (since they've already captured Egypt).

If you want to useful and oppose imperialism then get out of your Cold War mindset where the US is always at fault. It is not in the case of Syria. The Imperialism is due to the global totalitarian aspirations of jihadis that wish to re-impose the Caliphate (and an internal struggle where the Caliphate is either Shia and led by Iran, or Sunni and led by the Saudis). It is easy to see that this is the case, just listen to the pronouncements of the Syrian rebels themselves (and stop listening to the ignorant media in the West, who are shitty journalists).

Note that the US is not intervening. This is good and bad. It is good because the US doesn't need to waste more money. It is bad because the secular Syrian forces that started the revolution are not being supported and the brutal Islamist forces are taking over. Egypt is already on the way to becoming another Saudi Arabia and Syria is now on the same path. Anyone who cares about democracy and human rights should be urging for the US to intervene and impose a secular democracy in Syria because without that we're just going to see an Islamist takeover (where you have no human rights). Do you want this to happen? I don't. So get real and stop using the outdated paradigms of the past.

Re:American's are Being Manipulated in Syrian War (1)

BrendaEM (871664) | about 2 years ago | (#42379583)

Well, we didn't seem to mind when this happened:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rwandan_Genocide [wikipedia.org]
Because there was nothing in it for us?

The bottom line is: We have a lot of problems to attend to right here without becoming involved in the internal politics of a sovereign nation.

Re:American's are Being Manipulated in Syrian War (1)

SplashMyBandit (1543257) | about 2 years ago | (#42379827)

Here is the fundamental difference between Rwanda and Syria. The Rwandan Genocide was horrific but it was a national tragedy. It was not as if the Tutsi and Hutus were going to export their fight elsewhere. The fight in Syria has regional and global ramifications - that's a huge difference.

The fight in Syria is of interest to the West because the jihadis fighting there are working to establish a *global* Caliphate (according to their own words) that is coming to an area near you as soon as they can do it. They are against Free Thought, Free Speech, Women's Rights, Homosexual Rights, the equality of all religions and ethnicities. In short, the battle for Syria is not an isolated situation - it is part of the ongoing upheavals in the region that are going to spread elsewhere as soon as the jihadis finish their current round of fighting. Interestingly enough, they appear to be trying to follow a plan revealed in 2005 by the respected Der Spiegel - http://www.spiegel.de/international/the-future-of-terrorism-what-al-qaida-really-wants-a-369448.html [spiegel.de] and according to this timeline it appears things are proceeding to their plan (according to the plan we're between Stages 4 and 5, as far as I can see).

So my suggestion about Syria is to not listen to what poorly informed pundits in the West are saying (since they appear to be in willful denial). Instead, listen to what the jihadis are saying. They are not hiding their agenda at all. Their plan is to bring Sharia to the globe and restore the Caliphate. Don't believe what I say, just do a simple YouTube search of their speeches in Arabic (with English subtitles) - since the principle of 'taqiyya' means whatever they say in English doesn't count. Also, it appears the Russians have a greater awareness than the US does about this (although part of the problem is that the Russians supported Assad when the protests were still peaceful yet the will of the people was clearly against his regime).

It is the difference between a regional genocide and the intent of global genocide/domination that makes Syria worthwhile of more attention than Rwanda. Ideally we'd give attention to both, but if we have to prioritize then it is simple which conflict is more significant for *global* human rights and Enlightenment values than the other. Yes?

A few games taught me the map of the middle east (1)

Mooney Driver (2800903) | about 2 years ago | (#42375909)

I will never forgot the map of the eastern Mediterranean after playing the old game Conflict: Middle East Political Simulator http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conflict:_Middle_East_Political_Simulator [wikipedia.org] . It runs beautifully in dosbox and is available at abandonia http://www.abandonia.com/en/games/24764/Conflict+-+Middle+East+Political+Simulator.html [abandonia.com] Air Force Commander burned the map of the middle east into my brain at a very young age. It also runs in dosbox and I found it at the home of the underdogs if anybody is interested http://www.hotud.org/home/44-war/21074?lang=en%2Findex.php%3Foption%3Dcom_realtyna%2F%2Findex.php%3Foption%3Dcom_realtyna [hotud.org]

Re:A few games taught me the map of the middle eas (1)

tylernt (581794) | about 2 years ago | (#42377601)

after playing the old game Conflict: Middle East Political Simulator

Thank you for mentioning the old DOS Conflict. I spent many an enjoyable hour playing that game. Only now in hindsight do I realize how nice it was to have a fun yet challenging game that wasn't a cliche side-scroller, RPG, or FPS.

It's kind of funny... often when I played Conflict, I'd try to nuke somebody and still win the game... never succeeded. Perhaps that was the game designer's subtle way of saying the nuclear option is a no-win scenario?

Anyway, this new Endgame Syria bears a striking resemblance to Conflict, almost to the point of being a rip-off -- Conflict had newspaper headlines too, influenced directly by your political and military in-game decisions. But if Endgame Syria raises awareness of the Middle East's issues, I guess I can forgive the author.

The problem isn't games. (1)

Nexion (1064) | about 2 years ago | (#42376431)

As a child I was an introverted little nerd kid. My father was a police officer who retired from the department when I was four or so. We had a snub nose 38 police special in my parent's closet, loaded and unlocked, and I always knew where it was. I was taught what it was, how dangerous it was and that I wasn't to handle it without my father present.

As I grew older I of course played games. I was given a modem at one point, and on a BBS I found the anarchist's cookbook. It told me how to make all sorts of dangerous things. My father gave me gifts like pocket knives, and I was even known to play with matches!!! My uncle taught me things like mixing iodine and ammonia. My older brother taught me the value of lighter fluid and a tube of tennis balls. What you may not realize is how much interaction I had with my family on these dangerous subjects, and ultimately how I was allowed to explore things with proper supervision. Playing with fire all the while confined to the fireplace.

I once set a fire outside the home. I was caught and sent to my room. When my father came in to the room I figured I was going to get it. Instead he tossed a box of matches at my feet and asked that if I was going to burn the house down to at least let him know so he could get my mother and sister out safely. Today I own MANY guns and know how to make MANY dangerous things.

I have NEVER had a thought of hurting a bunch of people I don't know, nor anyone I do know. My favorite game is GTA and I also play some Saints Row.

I don't know why anyone ever does, and it saddens me that this keeps happening. Some firearms legislation is quite positive. Never fear a guy who has a dozen weapons, fear the person who has never had one but needs one right NOW. Putting a delay on new ownership is a VERY good idea and I support it even if it seems counter to at least the spirit of the constitution of the United States.

I think the problem stems from at least two things. First, that those who do these things feel isolated from a world of people they believe are indifferent to them or perhaps even hostile. We didn't have that feeling so long ago as communities associated with each other more closely. Technologies that keep us entertained in our home do far more damage then collaborative multi player games like Call of Duty ever will. The violence upon the imaginary has less of a negative impact then the violence in movies and seen on TV that are set upon real live actual people. These murderers are most often known as loners even when in small groups.

Second, I've come to believe that our news media takes the lion's share of blame in these acts of mayhem against the populace. They fall short of glorification, but in the end everyone knows the names of these perpetrators. They spend months rehashing this news. Nancy Grace goes on and on spewing her dramatic bile. So... wanna be famous? Well, at least infamous. Just kill a bunch of innocents... the more terrible the better! Everyone in the world will know your name! Then we'll throw a friggin pity party for your corpse going on and on about how hard your life was, poor poor you. We always seem to get copy cats after these tragedies, and I am disgusted that the media's profits increase from this coverage. They collect their blood money from the misery of the victims.

So, I ask everyone, what new gun law can we pass that would have prevented the loss of all these children? The guns were owned by the mother, legally, and for quite some time. What new restrictions on games could keep them away from someone in their 20s with an internet connection, hmmm? What legislation could we introduce that would have actually stopped this murderer? So far the only suggestion that may have has some impact was given by the NRA and mocked by the media.

I wonder how those in the media can look at themselves in the mirror in the morning. I could never be a part of that... but I guess I was just raised better..

Interactive war porn? Questions about obscenity (1)

johnny cashed (590023) | about 2 years ago | (#42377457)

Can this not be framed into a category of obscene material? This and violent video games? I know this raises touchy First Amendment issues here in the US.

Obscene material alone is considered a touchy subject, child porn is generally universally accepted as obscene and not protected by the First Amendment. The act of producing it in the US and most of the world is criminal.

With regards to this particular circumstance, I feel that a violent videogame about a current violent actual real life tragic event is no worse than the actual real life events unfolding in front of us right now in real time. The fact that some people are using this event to cash in is crass.

Re:Interactive war porn? Questions about obscenity (1)

johnny cashed (590023) | about 2 years ago | (#42377585)

Ok, going over the article a second time, this game appears to be a more intellectual venture into interactive commentary on war? An interactive performance art piece?

My previous comment above still stands, but isn't directed towards this particular game in question.

Re:Interactive war porn? Questions about obscenity (1)

Mooney Driver (2800903) | about 2 years ago | (#42379981)

You use question marks? Too often?
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?