Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Ask Slashdot: Android Apps For Kids Under 12 Months?

timothy posted about a year ago | from the what-about-a-flight-simulator dept.

Android 311

An anonymous reader writes "My kid seems incredibly interested in my Android tablet, but I'm not too comfortable with letting her play with my browser. I've been hunting the app store for apps that I could let my kid play around with, but haven't found much. It seems like most apps are targeted for slightly older kids and are trying to teach them words, math or whatnot. Has anyone found any cool apps for approximately 6-month-old children? I'm mostly looking for something that makes funny noises or where you just have to e.g. track moving objects on the screen."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

6 months? (4, Insightful)

cashman73 (855518) | about a year ago | (#42387791)

I wouldn't worry about finding specific apps that are "safe" for a 6-month old. At that age, no parent should even consider letting their child use an Internet-connected device unsupervised. So, if yo show the child something on the web browser, or another app, you should know specifically what you're looking at and should be 100% comfortable with the material.

Re:6 months? (5, Insightful)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about a year ago | (#42387961)

Insane.

Put the phone away. Talk to the child. You know: teach human interaction? This is a child, not your personal experiment.

A review of the evidence in the Archives Of Disease in Childhood says children's obsession with TV, computers and screen games is causing developmental damage as well as long-term physical harm. Doctors at the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, which co-owns the journal with the British Medical Journal group, say they are concerned. Guidelines in the US, Canada and Australia already urge limits on children's screen time, but there are none yet in Britain.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/oct/09/ban-under-threes-watching-television [guardian.co.uk]

Why would you substitute the acquisition of developmental language skills and the attendant ability to relate and empathise - with a fixation on shiny lights and noises?

I understand that this is Slashdot - but value of the concept cannot be completely alien...

Re:6 months? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388095)

This is a child, not your personal experiment.

Isn't every kid a (personal) experiment of the parents? You screw some up so you try again, until you just say "screw it, all of them are messed up, I think I'll just quit now"

Captcha is very apt: condom

Re:6 months? (2)

Rhalin (791665) | about a year ago | (#42388283)

Insane.

Put the phone away. Talk to the child. You know: teach human interaction? This is a child, not your personal experiment.

A review of the evidence in the Archives Of Disease in Childhood says children's obsession with TV, computers and screen games is causing developmental damage as well as long-term physical harm. Doctors at the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, which co-owns the journal with the British Medical Journal group, say they are concerned. Guidelines in the US, Canada and Australia already urge limits on children's screen time, but there are none yet in Britain.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/oct/09/ban-under-threes-watching-television [guardian.co.uk]

Why would you substitute the acquisition of developmental language skills and the attendant ability to relate and empathise - with a fixation on shiny lights and noises?

I understand that this is Slashdot - but value of the concept cannot be completely alien...

This. A thousand times this. It doesn't matter that they like it, it is still a bad idea to encourage it at that age. Too lazy to cite other sources, but they exist.

Re:6 months? (4, Insightful)

icebraining (1313345) | about a year ago | (#42388299)

As soon as I ready the title, I knew that some condescending prick would post something like this.

Who the fuck said anything about substituting normal communication with this? Are you somehow incapable of doing more than one thing per day, let alone per week?

Your study proposes imposing limits on screen time, not banning them as if a couple of hours of TV per week is going to mush the kids brains. Stop assuming everyone but you is incapable of having common sense.

Re:6 months? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388541)

Who the fuck said anything about substituting normal communication with this?

There's a huge precedent with parenting and TV from the 20th century that clearly shows that yes, these devices WILL be used to substitute normal communication for a really big number of people.

Re:6 months? (2)

icebraining (1313345) | about a year ago | (#42388575)

And I'm sure that if people here act like condescending pricks, all those lazy parents will see the errors of their ways and turn off the TVs.

Re:6 months? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388699)

And I'm sure that if people here act like condescending pricks, all those lazy parents will see the errors of their ways and turn off the TVs.

People like us TRIED civil discourse in the past to get them to see the errors of their ways. It failed. Plus, we were accused of being condescending elitist pricks because we dared to tell stupid people with massive entitlement issues that they were wrong. Imagine! Being accused of that without even get to have fun actually BEING condescending pricks!

So now, we're just directly going to be condescending pricks. We know it won't work, but at the very least we can have SOME sort of fun with it.

Re:6 months? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388607)

How about that? A condescending prick complaining about condescending prick.

Re:6 months? (5, Insightful)

hb253 (764272) | about a year ago | (#42388879)

It may sound condescending, but really - 6-months old and you're asking about apps? All the kid wants to do at this age is pound things on the floor and slobber on them.

How about just giving the kid a colorful cardboard square and be done with it.

Re:6 months? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388341)

Totally agree. If you give this baby a tablet, you'll be growing a moron. Talk to your child, let it run upon grass, give him a bike... anything but a hideous tablet.

Re:6 months? (-1, Troll)

sycodon (149926) | about a year ago | (#42388649)

This is how Lanza's are made.

Re:6 months? (5, Insightful)

kheldan (1460303) | about a year ago | (#42388495)

This. This, times 1,000,000.
The world doesn't need children who connect better with machines than they do other human beings.

Re:6 months? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388669)

And my 2 year old has been playing Angry Birds for over a year. Its not a game I would have taught her, but she learned it from my older kids and now my wife uses it to entertain her (like when we are at Cub Scout banquets or during the weekly basketball awards). She's plenty socialized; she's extroverted and typically loves watching and talking to people; she's very caring of others. She can also count to 14; since my wife and I have been concentrating on letters and sounds she must have learned the from TV or a game somewhere. Of course the WII U they got this morning is still sitting unopened (I think my wife and I want to play it more than the kids) the Kindles have only been played with for about an hour (they wanted them initially, but quickly moved on to playing with dolls or building). Long term, I'm sure the Kindles will get plenty of use; my four year old really enjoys having it read to him and the unlimited kids books includes Curious George, one of his favorites. Doesn't replace real books and sitting them in your lap to play, but I'm always amazed at what they can learn on their own and how much they enjoy showing me what they learned that day when I get home.

Re:6 months? (3, Insightful)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about a year ago | (#42388739)

Talk to the child.

Is there an app for that . . . ?

Re:6 months? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387967)

Actually, if you live in the US, you should have already had your child immersed in first-person-shooter games, and he should have handled a real ak47 by now.

It's a dangerous world out there, and as the NRA so proudly espouses, "If everyone had guns, no one would need guns."

Arm up, everyone.

Re:6 months? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388687)

You are fucking liar.

Re:6 months? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387981)

A child that young (let's face it, under 12 months isn't even a child, it's a baby) should not be doing anything with a tablet or any electronics for that matter. I know the article submitter is proud that they have a child and thinks that their special little baby is the smartest and cutest thing in the world, but objectively speaking, that child is no different than any other. Getting him/her started on a tablet at this time isn't going to do anything but harm them.

Basically stop worrying about getting your infant baby on a tablet and spend time with them. Take them out to the park or something. The tablet can wait until they are 6 years or older.

Re:6 months? (0)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about a year ago | (#42388015)

Training America's future drone operators, in infancy.

Re:6 months? (0)

maeglin (23145) | about a year ago | (#42388239)

I know the article submitter is proud that they have a child and thinks that their special little baby is the smartest and cutest thing in the world, but objectively speaking, that child is no different than any other. Getting him/her started on a tablet at this time isn't going to do anything but harm them.

Just like every other poster on /. thinks that they are better parents than everyone else.

Basically stop worrying about getting your infant baby on a tablet and spend time with them. Take them out to the park or something. The tablet can wait until they are 6 years or older.

See, the thing is, you can't just power off a baby when the park closes or it's raining or snowing outside. Yes, you shouldn't have your child fixate on blinky things for hours on end. You know what else you don't do? Plop a six month old child in snow bank for 8 hours.

You allow them to explore, see what they want to see, play with what they want to play with (with the exception of knives and guns) and stick with them to make sure they're safe and have someone to turn to when *they* want social time. After a little time with activity X you encourage them to move on to something else.

Of course, you would be aware of all this if you were an actual parent instead of a self-appointed child development expert.

As to the original post: It doesn't matter. Leave it on the lock screen and let her play with the unlock widget.. and make sure it's clean because it'll end up in her mouth anyway (and tablets are pretty nasty). Take it away after a few minutes and don't give it back until the next day. There'll be crying involved but it's okay: you're the boss.

Re:6 months? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388373)

See, the thing is, you can't just power off a baby when the park closes or it's raining or snowing outside. Yes, you shouldn't have your child fixate on blinky things for hours on end. You know what else you don't do? Plop a six month old child in snow bank for 8 hours.

Use your imagination. Taking your child to the park is an example of ONE thing out of many that you could be doing that is better than handing them a tablet and forgetting about them. Read with them, do arts and crafts with them or any of dozens of other things that promotes health and well-being.

You allow them to explore, see what they want to see, play with what they want to play with

The definition of a bad parent is one who does this. The child does not decide what they want to do when they are that young, that is for the parents to decide.

Of course, you would be aware of all this if you were an actual parent instead of a self-appointed child development expert.

And you're another irresponsible moron who should never have had children because you obviously cannot or will not care for them.

Re:6 months? (1)

maeglin (23145) | about a year ago | (#42388631)

See, the thing is, you can't just power off a baby when the park closes or it's raining or snowing outside. Yes, you shouldn't have your child fixate on blinky things for hours on end. You know what else you don't do? Plop a six month old child in snow bank for 8 hours.

Use your imagination. Taking your child to the park is an example of ONE thing out of many that you could be doing that is better than handing them a tablet and forgetting about them. Read with them, do arts and crafts with them or any of dozens of other things that promotes health and well-being.

At what point did I advocate forgetting about them for hours on end?

Was it here:

stick with them to make sure they're safe and have someone to turn to when *they* want social time. After a little time with activity X you encourage them to move on to something else.

Holy crap! It looks like I said the exact opposite.

You allow them to explore, see what they want to see, play with what they want to play with

The definition of a bad parent is one who does this. The child does not decide what they want to do when they are that young, that is for the parents to decide.

Of course, you would be aware of all this if you were an actual parent instead of a self-appointed child development expert.

And you're another irresponsible moron who should never have had children because you obviously cannot or will not care for them.

Again with the context:

You allow them to explore, see what they want to see, play with what they want to play with (with the exception of knives and guns) and stick with them to make sure they're safe and have someone to turn to when *they* want social time. After a little time with activity X you encourage them to move on to something else.

Strange, it's almost as if you keep taking things out of context on purpose. Either that or you're saying only a bad parent stays with their child, keeps them safe and encourages them to try many activities? Hmm... Strange either way.

Some day I hope you become aware of the fact that children are, at all ages, actually human beings who need to learn both through exploration as well as guidance and not be placed in a cage with "approved content." But, hey, worst case, you'll only be messing up your own kids so it's not really a problem for me if you don't.

Re:6 months? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388241)

Your child should learn how to understand and manipulate people before doing the same on devices. It's a much more important skill. ;)

Parents of course are typically more easily susceptible - sleep deprivation is part of common brain washing techniques.

want funny noises? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387805)

pull my finger! Especially after I eat at taco bell!!!!

Couting Robot (3, Informative)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about a year ago | (#42387821)

Counting Robot [google.com]

Basically it is a sort of whack-a-mole with different numbers of moles each time.

Zoodles (2)

detain (687995) | about a year ago | (#42387825)

http://www.zoodles.com/home/marketing/android [zoodles.com] Pretty good kid-mode for android. Disables most apps / buttons and provides its own kid interface to just what you enable.

Give the best app (5, Insightful)

Computer_kid (996105) | about a year ago | (#42387827)

Love and affection. At that age it is nothing more then a glowing rectangle that makes noise. Go outside and show your children the world around them.

Re:Give the best app (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387959)

I agree with this 100%. Plus, very soon, your kid is going to start putting everything in his/her mouth, like my 9 month old. Electronic devices with small plastic parts that might break off aren't the best thing to give them. Better to get some colorful squishy blocks or the ubiquitous donut stacker toy. These toys you can give without much worry, and they still have some educational value.

Re:Give the best app (1)

icebraining (1313345) | about a year ago | (#42388317)

Yes, doing various activities? Unpossible! If the parent wants to let the kid play with something, that obviously means that's all the kid will do all day!

Re:Give the best app (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388625)

How do you think children learn.. through PLAY.

Re:Give the best app (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388717)

"Go outside and show your children the world around them"

I tried that yesterday. Then she fell off the sled. We lasted 10 minutes.

No TV or Electronics for the 1st Two years. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387833)

No TV or Electronics for the 1st Two years.

Toddler Lock (5, Informative)

throup (325558) | about a year ago | (#42387837)

Toddler Lock works nicely. Cool colours and sounds as they touch the screen. It temporarily replaces the home screen so it locks out phone/internet/other app access until an adult follows the onscreen unlock instructions.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=marcone.toddlerlock [google.com]

Re:Toddler Lock (2)

j-cloth (862412) | about a year ago | (#42388013)

Seconded. Both kids have loved this. It's perfect when you need a few seconds of distraction (like changing the diaper of a mad kid) Similarly, I use bam bam on my laptop. Same idea-puts all keys in a safe mode.

Re:Toddler Lock (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388253)

Highly recommend.

Not really my place but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387851)

The current research is indicating that children under 2 years old should not have any screen time (tv included). And after 2 years they are saying that it should be limited to under 2 hours. I know it is a popular thing to do to have your kids zone out in front of a screen but it may significantly hinder their development. That said it is ultimately your call.

Real play and physical interaction are better (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387855)

My understanding is that physical play with 3D objects (e.g. blocks) for motor skills and physical interaction with a parent for language skills are much more important to young children than learning apps. Anecdotally, I've heard that kids learn language much better from real interaction with an adult than from language aps.

Although this might be heresy for a tech web site, put away the screens, big and small, for the very young!

Re:Real play and physical interaction are better (1, Insightful)

icebraining (1313345) | about a year ago | (#42388335)

And sleeping is more important than reading Slashdot, therefore we should be always sleeping and never read slashdot, not even for 5mins.

Simple answer (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387859)

This idiotic question is easy to answer. Any app calling shutdown() right at the beginning will do just fine.

Really, just stop fucking up your kids.

Parenting (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387863)

Parenting is the best app. It involves spending time with your children. Don't let them play too much with your tablet (or any screen/computer), as at that age staying at a screen that is a fixed distance away will highly impair their ocular development. Seriously, save games like that until they are older, get then some squeaky toys, rattles and building blocks.

Cat app (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387867)

There is some app where cats can hunt mices.. Not saying your kid has 20 claws.. But it is movement and precision. Look for it

You (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387869)

Just because a 12 month old likes to play with the tablet, doesn't mean she/he wouldn't be better spending one to one face time with you, developing their language skills, monitoring your face, and tracking basic.

Plastic bricks, lots of talking, lots of 3d spacial things, as opposed to 2d pictures of 3d things you get on a tablet.

Bubbles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387877)

My kids really enjoy a bubble game. You touch the screen to make and pop bubbles its one of the first results on a search.

vi and cc (4, Funny)

kthreadd (1558445) | about a year ago | (#42387881)

If you want to make them into responsible open source contributors you better start as early as possible.

Re:vi and cc (2)

rst123 (2440064) | about a year ago | (#42387905)

suggesting vi without giving equal time to emacs? you trying to start a flame war?

Re:vi and cc (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388277)

suggesting vi without giving equal time to emacs? you trying to start a flame war?

Keep in mind that little hands have trouble pressing Escape Meta Alt Control Shift all at once.

Re:vi and cc (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388401)

Children should wait until they are at least 2 years old before trying (and failing) to use emacs, everyone knows that!

All tablets are for babies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387899)

Any tablet will do. Today's tablet designated for maximum age of 5 years.

Fresh air from the real world? (0)

LABarr (14341) | about a year ago | (#42387917)

You could also consider that the child will likely have an entire lifetime of interaction with electronic devices. Instead of fostering an early development for something that will likely be inevitable anyway, why not take the kid outdoors out into the real world and foster a love at an early age for the non-cyber world as well?

You're a lazy excuse for a parent (1, Insightful)

stemarcoh (2110284) | about a year ago | (#42387919)

You've GOT to be kidding me! Are you serious? What the hell is wrong with you? Children that young need to experience THE WORLD not steer wide-eyed, slack jawed at a screen. You might as well put the poor thing up for adoption because you've already proven yourself to be a completely incompetent parent. This is so sad, so very very sad. I'll pray for your poor little child. (And I'm a devout atheist.) Let them play with blocks, with stuffed animals. Or, hey, has a novel concept - how about you, you lazy disinterested excuse for a real parent. Read them a freakin book. Bring them outside. Get a g*d d*mn puppy or kitten. The REAL WORLD people. The REAL WORLD is just on the other side of that plastic light emitting panel that your eyeballs are so hopelessly stuck to! GET A LIFE!! 6 months old. Oh my g*d!

Re:You're a lazy excuse for a parent (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388027)

You've GOT to be kidding me! Are you serious? What the hell is wrong with you? Children that young need to experience THE WORLD not steer wide-eyed, slack jawed at a screen. You might as well put the poor thing up for adoption because you've already proven yourself to be a completely incompetent parent. This is so sad, so very very sad. I'll pray for your poor little child. (And I'm a devout atheist.) Let them play with blocks, with stuffed animals. Or, hey, has a novel concept - how about you, you lazy disinterested excuse for a real parent. Read them a freakin book. Bring them outside. Get a g*d d*mn puppy or kitten. The REAL WORLD people. The REAL WORLD is just on the other side of that plastic light emitting panel that your eyeballs are so hopelessly stuck to! GET A LIFE!! 6 months old. Oh my g*d!

This. Tots don't need a tablet a stick or a rock is just as much fun. Also.. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12806594/ns/health-childrens_health/t/good-news-bad-news-tube-watching-tots/#.UNnX4qzIuSo

Re:You're a lazy excuse for a parent (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388171)

Come on now, TV and computers are going to destroy his attention span and ability to think clearly eventually. Might as well get it out of the way early so he won't miss them.

Re:You're a lazy excuse for a parent (2)

l-ascorbic (200822) | about a year ago | (#42388247)

Self-righteous enough? You're obviously never had a screaming toddler on your lap while you're on the phone, when a minute of Talking Ginger on the Nexus is the difference between screaming and giggling contentedly. This isn't mutually exclusive with playing with blocks or stuffed toys.

Re:You're a lazy excuse for a parent (2)

houghi (78078) | about a year ago | (#42388539)

So giving in to a toddler is the answer?
If you do not neglected your kid, it will sometimes cry to try out boundaries. If you give in at the young age, you will give in later as well.
You are not the kids best friend. They do not have to think you are great because you give in and do what they want.

You are the parent. You are there for the kid. Giving in is for yourself. This is not about you. This is not about the kid crying. This is about you giving the kid what it needs to grow up and know boundaries.

If you are lucky, your kids will get kids of their own and only then will they understand what you were trying to do. Till then, they probably hate you at some level.

And yes, I have had a crying toddler on the phone, craving attention that it wasn't getting. Tough shit. I will hang up, because I do not want the other person to be deaf. I then will call back as soon as the toddler s safe and out of noise range (probably still crying).

Obviously I do not take calls all of the day. However the kid has got to learn that sometimes I am not around, so it should learn that I take my 10 minute phone call or a 5 minute toilet break.

Pocket God (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387935)

Pocket God.

No, seriously. I pull that out whenever there are young kids, as young as 11 months to as old as 4-5. Have had multiple ones around 1 year of age who, after you drag a few people and show them fairly quickly what to do, the next thing you know they are owning the world. Makes noises, flashy sounds, etc. Probably not so good for the 6-9 month old age (in which case I'd suggest putting a copy of "Baby Einstein" on there and letting them watch) but the interactivity is pretty good, and if they have even halfway decent motor skills they will be flinging villagers to and fro in no time. Plus, can help develop said motor skills. I've had an 18 month old show ME how to do stuff in that game after leaving her alone for 10 minutes.

what about a system where free apps don't need a p (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#42387949)

what about a system where free apps don't need a pin / CC card to buy / install but one where you need a pin to buy / install a paid app / buy stuff in app?

heres one you can have (1)

LodCrappo (705968) | about a year ago | (#42387953)

http://aaronwolfe.com/a [aaronwolfe.com]

its pretty much as dumb as they get, just hit the ufo cats and they make noise and fly around. done as a learning experiment.
kids do seem to love it though.

Idiot parent (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387957)

Your daughter simply reacts to stimuli, e.g. you frequently fiddling with a tablet.
A typical case of : "Chiiiiiild worship". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6wOt2iXdc4

Let her play in the dirt, moron.

In totally unrelated news, media wonders where sociopathic children come from.

Related question (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387969)

My toddler is very interested in my car keys, but I'm reluctant to let him drive my BMW. The iDrive system is somewhat complicated, and I think a RWD performance car might not be appropriate for a first-time driver - especially since here's snow on the ground and he can't reach the pedals. Can anyone recommend a FWD or AWD car with a simpler interface and adjustble pedals which would be appropriate for a sub-2 year old child?

Peekaboo barn (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42387971)

Very simple app, hit screen, animal appears, makes noise, says what it is. Hit screen again, new animal
Time. We used it when my son was less than a year old. He operated it on his own now for awhile. As always, be a parent and limit screen time.

Just stop (4, Insightful)

p0p0 (1841106) | about a year ago | (#42387979)

A child shouldn't be handling technology until about 3 years old, as many Slashdot stories have reported. It's also just common sense that so much stimulation so early on is bad for a developing brain.

You mistake interest for curiosity. It is in the child's nature to explore and learn about their environment, but introducing them to your tablet is just going to impede their progress as all their attention is consumed by the device.

Homebrew (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about a year ago | (#42387991)

If you are not an Android developer yet and would be interested in trying it out, here could be your chance to develop something simple to the platform and possibly even share your work to fill the gap in the app store.

Our son is 9 months old (3, Insightful)

ctrl-alt-canc (977108) | about a year ago | (#42388001)

and we decided he will not look at a TV/PC/phone screen before he is two years old as a minimum. We instead try to spend as much as time possible with him doing activities appropriate for a 9 months old baby. Maybe this is the reason why he is so active and curious about what happens around him.... And no, I am not a tech luddite (I am a physicist).

Re:Our son is 9 months old (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about a year ago | (#42388103)

"and no, I am not a tech luddite (I am a physicist)". hmm, for my physics degree I mostly used a pencil and paper, while other majors got to use the University mainframe and micros. then at Fermilab we had to take designs in that same pencil and paper format and put them into FEA for the requests for funding, because "they" wanted to see calculations that came out of a computer....

Re:Our son is 9 months old (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388143)

Well my son is 6 and he didn't have a tablet at 6 months, but he sure as hell was looking at televisions and computers. He wasn't just confined to the "real world". Since televisions and computers are a part of this world we chose to include them into his world so he could use them to learn. We filled those televisions and computers with letters and numbers and weather or not he was even sitting down watching we had those shows playing in the back ground so he would at least have them running through his mind. DVD's like preschool prep. He might not be smarter, cuter, or any better than any other child, but he started to learn to read at the age of 4 because he wanted to, and he had the tools and the knowledge to do so. Its technology and its important. Whats the difference of listening to animal sounds on a tablet or on one of those old The Farmer Says toys (where you pull a lever and it lands on a sound to make)?

Re:Our son is 9 months old (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388219)

You have no idea what you're doing. Overstimulation of the mind is a bad thing. I know it sounds all cool and shit to think that you're going to pump stuff at the kid and something will stick but that's really not how it works and you're undermining whatever development you supposedly think he's gaining. Maybe your kid will be different but it's a known fact that most kids who are overstimulated also have problems later in life with paying attention, concentrating and socially interacting.

Re:Our son is 9 months old (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388233)

I hear that constantly reading to a children is a good thing. I'm not sure technology is a good replacement for human interaction. I'm glad someone else thinks so too. (I am neither married nor have children.)

Re:Our son is 9 months old (1)

PNutts (199112) | about a year ago | (#42388483)

(I am neither married nor have children.)

This is /. That's assumed.

6 Month Old? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388009)

What! Dude spend time time with your child instead of given them a tablet. Hold them, cradle them, play games with them, be a parent. We don't need another kid whose parent ignored them. The child is 6 months old. My kid doesn't touch a tablet for years. Did you name the kid using a number?

Android app ?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388019)

Android tablets are boring.

            dr. Gregory House

wheres mommy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388025)

My kids love this app, jou can add jour own voice and pictures.

Tablets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388029)

all tablets are designed for 5 year olds. You'll be fine

Go buy them real toys (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388041)

There's a slew of research that suggests that TV is nothing but bad for kids under 2 years. It will lead to attention and behaviour problems and offer no actual benefit to development. This is why Disney recalled those Baby Einstein videos that were supposed to make your kid a genius, and why there are laws in several countries about making programing targeting kids under 2. Smart phones and tablets are new enough that not much research has been done yet, but I think it's safe to assume that anything involving a screen and/or constantly changing pictures or sounds will carry a lot of the pitfalls for young kids, if not even more.

Just keep them away from it as long as possible. Kids will be fascinated by a lot of things, give them real physical objects and physical interactions for now. At least wait til they're a couple years old before encouraging them to become technojunkies with tiny attention spans like the rest of us.

No Tech to Kids (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388047)

Hello,
concerning not only this article, but other situations we should debate the use of technologie by small children.
As other comments say, and I agree, you should show the real world to the kids, play with them, give care and attention.

And look into monitors hurts the eyes. When you were young, how many kids in your class used glasses ? One or two !
And now ? More than five ! This is due to the use of computers in the class room or at home!
Teach them how to write and draw ! Offer them a notebook and color pencils, not a laptop !

In the weekends take your kids to visit some diferent places, nature or museums.
And buy some books! Have a mini library at home!

As Benjamin Franklin said: "The investment in education pays the best interest".

find a case first (1)

acroyear (5882) | about a year ago | (#42388065)

Little ones tend to toss phones aside when they get them, so be sure that you can fit the phone in some kind of protective case. The better ones out there, at least for iPad and iPhone (and iPod Touch) even have a blocker to prevent pressing the home button. However, they are all standardized for ipods, so be sure to try one on your android device first to be sure it fits and is secured and stable.

I can't speak for pre-toddler apps on android, as for my little one we opted for an iPod touch instead, since we knew it would 1) fit in those kinds of cases, and 2) be easier to secure vis-a-vie the home button, shopping sites, the settings panel. Fisher Price's apps have been good for our little one in the IOS. Some of those might have been ported.

The other important thing to watch for is the free preview apps - those are *entirely* for adults to try. When they reach their time or step limit, they may take you to the app store to purchase the full version. Make sure it doesn't do that before you hand it over to the kid to try.

Let me tell you how to raise your kid! (1)

HycoWhit (833923) | about a year ago | (#42388073)

Don't tell me how to raise my kid--I won't tell you how to raise yours. Hate to break it to the fucktards wanting to tell others how to raise your kid--electronics are a large portion of the world for many. Kids will get outside, but why can't they learn and get a fascination with everything?
Anyone actually read the AAP article? The study found children can't cognitively comprehend anything before two--basically there is no educational TV before two. something along the lines that watching SpongeBob makes your kid dumber... Shocker!! My own theory-stimulate that young brain any way you can. The notion kids don't comprehend before two is hogwash--give them the right stimulus and they will do amazing things. Some kids can count, know their letters and shapes by two--others can eat.... A lot depends on the parents.

Simple games do wonders: Here is a simple ABC game as well as one that helps with counting and has the advantage of doing it in several languages.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=russh.toddler.game [google.com]

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=kidgames.connect.dot.dinosaur [google.com]

Owlieboo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388079)

http://www.owlieboo.com/

My daughter (3) went from that to wandering around the tablet better than her mother in a couple days.

More specifically... (3, Insightful)

NEDHead (1651195) | about a year ago | (#42388091)

"My 3 week old is fascinated by certain shapes. Is there an app that looks like big tits dripping milk that would be something he could play with?"

Dumb ass posting; never should have seen the light of day.

Re:More specifically... (2)

pla (258480) | about a year ago | (#42388453)

My 3 week old is fascinated by certain shapes. Is there an app that looks like big tits dripping milk that would be something he could play with?

Oh, you have come to the right place for that, my friend! Welcome to the Internet! You can find breasts doing just about anything you can imagine here, including quite a few things you can't imagine, and some you can't even comprehend.

Enjoy your stay! ;)

I have several... (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year ago | (#42388151)

Look for the following....

A rattle, a ball, and any of the other toys that work on dexterity and focus. Apps? really?

Backlights may disturb melatonin production (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388201)

The research is still early on this. I would be very careful, and I'd limit exposure to flat screen TVs as well.

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/aug/28/news/la-jc-sleep-book-backlit-melatonin-20120828

“Our study shows that a two-hour exposure to light from self-luminous electronic displays can suppress melatonin by about 22 percent," said Mariana Figueiro, the lead researcher. “Stimulating the human circadian system to this level may affect sleep in those using the devices prior to bedtime.”

Re:Backlights may disturb melatonin production (1)

PNutts (199112) | about a year ago | (#42388593)

The research is still early on this. I would be very careful, and I'd limit exposure to flat screen TVs as well.

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/aug/28/news/la-jc-sleep-book-backlit-melatonin-20120828

“Our study shows that a two-hour exposure to light from self-luminous electronic displays can suppress melatonin by about 22 percent," said Mariana Figueiro, the lead researcher. “Stimulating the human circadian system to this level may affect sleep in those using the devices prior to bedtime.”

Interesting you bring that up. I've started looking at the effects of light on mood and there is some hard science behind it, e.g., light therapy for Seasonal Affected Disorder (SAD). I didn't read the linked article, but I assume it discusses certain light wavelengths that stimulate (or repress) responses in the body.

6 months? Give it a rest. (1)

cvtan (752695) | about a year ago | (#42388339)

Buy blocks or big Lego bricks. Puzzles with big pieces are good. Is the app-for-the-kid really for her or for you? Things with glass are not for small children (unless it's the Bag O' Glass from Saturday Night Live: http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/irwin-mainway/1185611/ [nbc.com] ).

Learning (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about a year ago | (#42388353)

Change the question for "What a baby should be learning at that age?". A learning device with no texture, fake 3d, no smell, taste, heat, or any other input for senses other than sight and hearing maybe could be harmful for his development. Human and nature contact, toys that estimulate his senses (if possible, several, something with more texture than just plastic), a pet, music. A tablet (i.e. very simple games like ant smasher) could be a complement, but not a substitute.

Boob Tube App for Kids under 12 months (1)

pubwvj (1045960) | about a year ago | (#42388365)

It just so happens there is exactly the application you need. It's called the original all natural boob tube. Round, soft to the touch, a simple circular universal interface with a single button that also dispenses nutritious drink. They come in matching pairs with virtually every mother.

W00T fp !? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388369)

Can you afford real toys? (0)

wer32r (2556798) | about a year ago | (#42388423)

Can you afford real toys? Do you have time for your child? If the answer to any of those questions is 'yes', then ditch that Android, and do something real with your child.

Slow down there... (0)

jdharm (1667825) | about a year ago | (#42388451)

Plenty of time for exposure to tech. At 6 months that kid's brain has only just now figured out the difference between sounds and colors. She's so interested in that tablet because every time that a notification dings and causes a popup she hears butterfly pudding and tastes blue sandpaper. She's been in a perpetual state of synesthesia while her brain tries to figure out what the heck is going on and that tablet is a source of all kinds of weirdness. She's not "interested" in tablets, she's trippin' balls.

And she still needs to figure out how the world works. Experiments show that children that young can have an intuitive grasp of physical laws, like how gravity works. That kid needs training in the real, 3D world, not the fantastic, inconsistent, 2D world in a tablet. Not to mention the emotional training that can only come from other ugly bags of mostly water.

my 7mo old son loves this app (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388465)

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.mobileaddicts.rattle&hl=en&referrer=utm_source%3Dgoogle%26utm_medium%3Dorganic%26utm_term%3Dbaby+rattle+app

Kid Mode and Baby Toy (1)

Nuitari The Wiz (1123889) | about a year ago | (#42388485)

Baby Toy is a small app that just has some pictures of animals, musical instruments or robots and it makes sound / vibrates when one of them is touched. It has an option to lock into the app until some specific combination is pushed so it's very hard to get out of it.

Kid Mode is a shell that provides some apps that are age appropriate. We got a cheap white label tablet (7") and put it on it. It's pretty good and can wrap around other kid apps so that they can't get out of the kid mode / app easily.

We've mainly used both on planes and places where it gets hard to bring lots of toys. I do agree with the comments about sleep and melatonin production, whenever she used our phones / tablets near her sleep time it was harder to get her to sleep. We're now more careful about that.

Virtual Cat Toys (1, Informative)

BenJeremy (181303) | about a year ago | (#42388493)

Heh.... I just released this for Android tablets.... now I get to flog it here on Slashdot, LOL.

Seriously, though, it was designed for cats, but the reviews for the webOS version have stated that small children loved it, too. This was more or less confirmed when my 2 year old niece played the new enhanced Android version at a family Christmas party and she was delighted.. there's even an Easter egg in the game to put up a "Scary dog" which jut made her giggle (not my cats, though). She was also much better at it than the adults that tried it.

At any rate, here is the link [google.com] .

Really? (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about a year ago | (#42388525)

If this isn't a troll then I would say tablets aren't really made for babies so why not stick with human interactions rather sitting her in the corner with a tablet?

Developmentally inappropriate (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388591)

Infants and toddlers should not be watching TV before 2, and should definitely not be on phones before then as well. They need to be looking around, trying to make sense of the world, and not be preoccupied with "entertainment". Every moment they spend teaches a lesson about this world. Having a constant distraction in front of them is not a wise thing, as focus and concentration will come harder in life.

Akin to our grown up habits: Nowadays, we have enough distractions. Every time we get a spare second, we are looking at our phones, playing a game, checking our status... We don't get nearly as much time to ponder and imagine. A child is the same: whenever they get the chance to see something new, they will try to feel it, weigh it, taste it, smell it, and basically, in their way, to understand it. Providing an infant or toddler distractions which, through their senses, does not teach them about how the natural world works, is inappropriate. i.e. staring at a screen will mean slower eye coordination (focusing on near/far objects). Having a lack of texture, or taste, or smell... things that infants/toddlers need.

And please don't plop your child on your lap while you play COD or HALO IV. Play with THEM. Children without these social interactions are, not accounting for genetic inheritances/mutations, more likely to become psychopaths.

Got Radiation? (1)

assertation (1255714) | about a year ago | (#42388673)

We all pretend not to see the occasional article about cell phone radiation. That is us. Do you really want an infant having one of those devices close to their head all of the time?

is there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388707)

an android or ifone app to help teach you how to control your anal sphincter muscle?

Spend time with your kid, bonehead! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388765)

Sheesh....

Munch-o-tron (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388833)

I know a good one.
It's free. It's called "Munch-o-tron". It's this game where you give the tabled to your kid. And he munches on it.
Are you serious with this stuff?

baby app (2)

icknay (96963) | about a year ago | (#42388863)

Try "baby picture fun" ... Super simple, free, no ads. Will entertain for a couple minutes.

zoodles is boss (1)

AlephNaut (120505) | about a year ago | (#42388871)

Zoodles is excellent. You can even lock the kid in zoodles "kid mode". I got it when my son turned 2 and still use it. Liked it so much I pay for it but it's fully functional for free.

They have hundreds of apps arranged by age. And you can add links to other apps (e.g. angry birds). They send you a weekly report card with more graphs and stats than anyone needs.

  Zoodles is awesome.

Internet Experts (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42388881)

I like how a bunch of misanthropes who have never had sex are giving condescending parenting advice like they are Doctor fucking Spock.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?