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Google Docs Vs. Microsoft Word: an Even Matchup?

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the duke-it-out dept.

Google 346

Nerval's Lobster writes "Software developer Jeff Cogswell writes: 'About a year ago, I decided to migrate my documents to Google Docs and start using it for all my professional writing. I quickly hit some problems; frankly, Google Docs wasn't as good an option as I'd initially hoped. Now I use LibreOffice on my desktop, and it works well, but I had to go through long odysseys with Google Docs and Zoho Docs to reach this point. Is Microsoft Word actually better than Google Docs and Zoho Docs? For my work, the answer is "yes," but this doesn't make me particularly happy. In the following essay, I present my problems with Google Docs and Zoho Docs (as well as some possible solutions) from my perspective as both a professional writer and a software developer.'"

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346 comments

Wat? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401211)

Jeff Cockswell? What kind of site is this anyway?

Re:Wat? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401421)

APK is a 45-year old white male with a stocky build and a beard. His head is shaved. He responded to my ad to be interviewed for this article wearing only leather pants, leather boots and a leather vest. I could see that both of his nipples were pierced with large-gauge silver rings.

Questioner: I hope you won't be offended if I ask you to prove to me that you're a nullo. Just so that our readers will know that this isn't a fake.

APK: Sure, no problem. (stands and unbuckles pants and drops them to his ankles, revealing a smooth, shaven crotch with only a thin scar to show where his genitals once were).

Q: Thank you. That's a remarkable sight.

(laughs and pulls pants back up). Most people think so.

Q: What made you decide to become a nullo?

(pauses). Well, it really wasn't entirely my decision.

Q: Excuse me?

The idea wasn't mine. It was my lover's idea.

Q: Please explain what you mean.

Okay, it's a long story. You have to understand my relationship with Crutchy before you'll know what happened.

Q: We have plenty of time. Please go on.

Both of us were into the leather lifestyle when we met through slashdot. Crutchy's comment was very specific: he was looking for someone to completely dominate and modify to his pleasure. In other word, a slave.

The ad intrigued me. I had been in a number of B&D scenes and also some S&M, but I found them unsatisfying because they were all temporary. After the fun was over, everybody went on with life as usual.

I was looking for a complete life change. I wanted to meet someone who would be part of my life forever. Someone who would control me and change me at his whim.

Q: In other words, you're a true masochist.

Oh yes, no doubt about that. I've always been totally passive in my sexual relationships.

Anyway, we met and there was instant chemistry. Crutchy is a few years older than me and very good looking. Our personalities meshed totally. He's very dominant.

I went back to his place after drinks and had the best sex of my life. That's when I knew I was going to be with Crutchy for a long, long time.

Q: What sort of things did you two do?

It was very heavy right away. He restrained me and whipped me for quite awhile. He put clamps on my nipples and a ball gag in my mouth. And he hung a ball bag on my sack with some very heavy weights. That bag really bounced around when Crutchy fucked me from behind.

Q: Ouch.

(laughs) Yeah, no kidding. At first I didn't think I could take the pain, but Crutchy worked me through it and after awhile I was flying. I was sorry when it was over.

Crutchy enjoyed it as much as I did. Afterwards he talked about what kind of a commitment I'd have to make if I wanted to stay with him.

Q: What did he say exactly?

Well, besides agreeing to be his slave in every way, I'd have to be ready to be modified. To have my body modified.

Q: Did he explain what he meant by that?

Not specifically, but I got the general idea. I guessed that something like castration might be part of it.

Q: How did that make you feel?

(laughs) I think it would make any guy a little hesitant.

Q: But it didn't stop you from agreeing to Crutchy's terms?

No it didn't. I was totally hooked on this man. I knew that I was willing to pay any price to be with him.

Anyway, a few days later I moved in with Crutchy. He gave me the rules right away: I'd have to be naked at all times while we were indoors, except for a leather dog collar that I could never take off. I had to keep my head shaved. And I had to wear a butt plug except when I needed to take a shit or when we were having sex.

I had to sleep on the floor next to his bed. I ate all my food on the floor, too.

The next day he took me to a piercing parlor where he had my nipples done, and a Prince Albert put into the head of my cock.

Q: Heavy stuff.

Yeah, and it got heavier. He used me as a toilet, pissing in my mouth. I had to lick his asshole clean after he took a shit, too. It was all part of a process to break down any sense of individuality I had. After awhile, I wouldn't hesitate to do anything he asked.

Q: Did the sex get rougher?

Oh God, yeah. He started fisting me every time we had sex. But he really started concentrating on my cock and balls, working them over for hours at a time.

He put pins into the head of my cock and into my sack. He attached clothespins up and down my cock and around my sack. The pain was pretty bad. He had to gag me to keep me from screaming.

Q: When did the idea of nullification come up?

Well, it wasn't nullification at first. He started talking about how I needed to make a greater commitment to him, to do something to show that I was dedicated to him for life.

When I asked him what he meant, he said that he wanted to take my balls.

Q: How did you respond?

Not very well at first. I told him that I liked being a man and didn't want to become a eunuch. But he kept at me, and wore me down. He reminded me that I agreed to be modified according to his wishes, and this is what he wanted for me. Anything less would show that I wasn't really committed to the relationship. And besides, I was a total bottom and didn't really need my balls.

It took about a week before I agreed to be castrated. But I wasn't happy about it, believe me.

Q: How did he castrate you?

Crutchy had a friend who was into the eunuch scene. One night he came over with his bag of toys, and Crutchy told me that this was it. I was gonna lose my nuts then and there.

Q: Did you think of resisting?

I did for a minute, but deep down I knew there was no way. I just didn't want to lose Crutchy. I'd rather lose my balls.

gmhowell restrained me on the living room floor while Crutchy videotaped us. He used an elastrator to put a band around my sack.

Q: That must have really hurt.

Hell yeah. It's liked getting kicked in the balls over and over again. I screamed for him to cut the band off, but he just kept on going, putting more bands on me. I had four bands around my sack when he finished.

I was rolling around on the floor screaming, while Crutchy just videotaped me. Eventually, my sack got numb and the pain subsided. I looked between my legs and could see my sack was a dark purple. I knew my balls were dying inside.

Crutchy and his friend left the room and turned out the light. I lay there for hours, crying because I was turning into a eunuch and there wasn't anything I could do about it.

Q: What happened then?

Eventually I fell asleep from exhaustion. Then the light switched on and I could see gmhowell kneeling between my legs, touching my sack. I heard him tell Crutchy that my balls were dead.

Q: How did Crutchy react?

Very pleased. He bent down and felt around my sack. He said that it felt cold.

gmhowell told me that I needed to keep the bands on. He said that eventually my balls and sack would dry up and fall off. I just nodded. What else could I do at that point?

Q: Did it happen just like gmhowell said?

Yeah, a week or so later my package just fell off. Crutchy put it in a jar of alcohol to preserve it. It's on the table next to his bed.

Q: How did things go after that?

Crutchy was really loving to me. He kept saying how proud he was of me, how grateful that I had made the commitment to him. He even let me sleep in his bed.

Q: What about the sex?

We waited awhile after my castration, and then took it easy until I was completely healed. At first I was able to get hard, but as the weeks went by my erections began to disappear.

That pleased Crutchy. He liked fucking me and feeling my limp cock. It made his dominance over me even greater.

Q: When did he start talking about making you a nullo?

A couple of months after he took my nuts. Our sex had gotten to be just as rough as before the castration. He really got off on torturing my cock. Then he started saying stuff like, âoeWhy do you even need this anymore?â

That freaked me out. I always thought that he might someday take my balls, but I never imagined that he'd go all the way. I told him that I wanted to keep my dick.

Q: How did he react to that?

At first he didn't say much. But he kept pushing. Crutchy said I would look so nice being smooth between my legs. He said my dick was small and never got hard anymore, so what was the point of having it.

But I still resisted. I wanted to keep my cock. I felt like I wouldn't be a man anymore without it.

Q: So how did he get you to agree?

He didn't. He took it against my will.

Q: How did that happen?

We were having sex in the basement, and I was tied up and bent over this wooden bench as he fucked me. Then I heard the doorbell ring. Crutchy answered it, and he brought this guy into the room.

At first I couldn't see anything because of the way I was tied. But then I felt these hands lift me up and put me on my back. And I could see it was gmhowell, the guy who took my nuts.

Q: How did you react?

I started screaming and crying, but the guy just gagged me. The two of them dragged me to the other side of the room where they tied me spread eagled on the floor.

gmhowell snaked a catheter up my dick, and gave me a shot to numb my crotch. I was grateful for that, at least. I remember how bad it hurt to lose my balls.

Q: What was Crutchy doing at this time?

He was kneeling next to me talking quietly. He said I'd be happy that they were doing this. That it would make our relationship better. That kind of calmed me down. I thought, âoeWell, maybe it won't be so bad.â

Q: How long did the penectomy take?

It took awhile. Some of the penis is inside the body, so he had to dig inside to get all of it. There was a lot of stitching up and stuff. He put my cock in the same jar with my balls. You can even see the Prince Albert sticking out of the head.

Then they made me a new pisshole. It's between my asshole and where my sack used to be. So now I have to squat to piss.

Q: What has life been like since you were nullified?

After I got over the surgery and my anger, things got better. When I healed up, I began to like my smooth look. Crutchy brought friends over and they all admired it, saying how pretty I looked. It made me feel good that Crutchy was proud of me.

Q: Do you have any sexual feeling anymore?

Yes, my prostate still responds when Crutchy fucks me or uses the buttplug. And my nipples are quite sensitive. If Crutchy plays with them while fucking me, I have a kind of orgasm. It's hard to describe, but it's definitely an orgasm.

Sometimes Crutchy says he's gonna have my prostate and nipples removed, but he's just kidding around. He's happy with what he's done to me.

Q: So are you glad Crutchy had you nullified?

Well, I wouldn't say I'm glad. If I could, I'd like to have my cock and balls back. But I know that I'm a nullo forever. So I'm making the best of it.

Crutchy and I are very happy. I know that he'll take care of me and we'll be together always. I guess losing my manhood was worth it to make that happen for us.

This scares the crap out of me.

Re:Wat? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401491)

I read this whole thing, I have mod points but I didn't have the heart to rate it off topic. What a strange story.

It's APK (4, Funny)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#42401943)

We love APK but now and then he goes off his meds and has to post this stuff. He's a local character.

APK, take your meds please. You're scaring the tourists.

Re:Wat? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401783)

Yeah, that's a real valid point that adds to the discussion. Nothing like kids who don't need to be in school over the holiday break to make comment boards more witty and colorful.

Gay niggers.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401219)

use niggerOS document reader professional corporate home office lab clusterfuck editon.. I HIGHLY recommend this software.

Re:Gay niggers.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401275)

hey you said nigger!

A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Cloud (4, Insightful)

Hardhead_7 (987030) | about a year ago | (#42401235)

I love Google Docs. But, in the end, Word has been around forever, it's very mature, and it has features that fit any conceivable needs. It also has the advantages (and disadvantages) that come with being local to your machine instead of living in the cloud. Google docs is great for a quick and dirty word processing or a collaborative project, but you shouldn't try to write a novel with it.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401263)

Well said. And it's easier to tack online storage on to word processing than word processing on to online storage. So who's surprised, really?

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (5, Interesting)

BrokenHalo (565198) | about a year ago | (#42401909)

In a way, the choice of word processor is more or less irrelevant by comparison with the level of trust involved in putting my files in the hands of someone I don't personally know. If anything should happen to files on my own hard drives, I at least only have myself to blame for not having secured or backed them up. But there is always the risk that Google might be compromised, either from the outside or by some rogue sysadmin, and I don't want to even think about trying to claim any redress against Google if they fuck up.

Further, since I live a long way away from urban amenities, I can't count on the availability of a constant internet connection, which could easily put me in a bind if I had my files stored in the so-called "cloud".

So, FWIW, my choice is simple: LibreOffice, since I don't run Windows. There will always be someone who will bitch that the free software suite doesn't have this or that all-important niche feature, but it has pretty much covered everything I need since it was StarOffice - only, of course, infinitely better now.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (5, Insightful)

tftp (111690) | about a year ago | (#42401317)

I deal with documents on professional basis. This, in my industry, means that none of my documents may ever hit the cloud. (Encryption is a possibility, but it creates more problems than it solves.)

I tried OpenOffice of several versions, over the years, and all of them were buggy. The latest one, for example, corrupted the watermark in the document. This is unacceptable. I have MS Office now. It may have bugs (not that any bit me recently) but the overall quality of the software is certainly acceptable. OpenOffice does not pass that test - it is unusable in an environment where the wordprocessor will have to correctly handle all kinds of inputs, written by me or written by others.

MS Office costs about $100 per license. This is a very acceptable cost of doing business. Perhaps this would be too steep if you are a grandmother with limited resources who only wants to create a single page note about a missing cat and print it for her nearest neighbors. As a business, you want to be as sure as it ever gets that the important proposal that you are writing will be correctly opened by the soliciting party. (In many cases editable Word documents are requested, not a PDF.)

A good wordprocessor is not a good target for an F/OSS project. It's a lot of boring, thankless work. Nobody has an itch that has to be scratched in such a masochistic way. That's why F/OSS wordprocessors are all not very good. Same goes for accounting systems, CAD systems, and many more. Often a F/OSS project just can't muster enough resources to complete the project. A for-profit company has no such problem; they just pay money, and developers show up for work.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (5, Insightful)

TWX (665546) | about a year ago | (#42401583)

Honestly, Wordpad is good enough for so many users' individual needs that it's almost foolish for the vast majority of users to purchase extra word processing software in Microsoft environments. Hell, even the netbook I'm using to type this with Windows 7 Starter Edition has Wordpad built in.

Throw in free word processors that are more feature-rich than Wordpad or are meant for other platforms and the actual number of users that needs Microsoft Office is very, very small. It's dumb for school districts to buy Office for most of their computers. It's dumb for home users to buy it. I would argue that it's even possibly dumb for many professionals to buy it. They simply do not need it unless there's some true need to protect proprietary content.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401631)

"Honestly, Wordpad is good enough for so many users' individual needs that it's almost foolish for the vast majority of users to purchase extra word processing software in Microsoft environments. Hell, even the netbook I'm using to type this with Windows 7 Starter Edition has Wordpad built in."

We are talking about word processors, not text editors. Programmers are probably the only profession where they would tell you to use Wordpad and claim it covered 99% of your needs.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (5, Insightful)

pwizard2 (920421) | about a year ago | (#42401685)

Wordpad is a very stripped-down word processor, not a text editor (as unix/linux veterans understand the term). Have you ever opened a source file in Wordpad? It treats code like a regular document and the results are absolutely dreadful. Meanwhile, Notepad is god-awful as far as plain text editors go--it doesn't even understand Unix-style line breaks. If you want a decent text editor for Windows, I recommend Notepad++.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (0)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about a year ago | (#42401695)

But the handful of people who don't fit in that category set the standards, and they need features like tracking changes, comments, and stylesheets. The Unix philosophy doesn't sell to non-technically-minded people, especially not when it conflicts with a superior workflow.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (4, Informative)

pwizard2 (920421) | about a year ago | (#42401593)

Perhaps this would be too steep if you are a grandmother with limited resources who only wants to create a single page note about a missing cat and print it for her nearest neighbors. As a business, you want to be as sure as it ever gets that the important proposal that you are writing will be correctly opened by the soliciting party. (In many cases editable Word documents are requested, not a PDF.)

This. Google docs and OpenOffice/Libreoffice are low-to-midrange tools. They are WAY better than *nothing* and much better than that stripped-down Wordpad tool that Windows gives you out of the box. I got through college just fine using OpenOffice and I still recommend it to people (if it's appropriate for their needs), but when something just has to work without problems I get the big tools out. MSOffice is professional grade and is what you use when nothing else will do.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401733)

This.

No, that. Not this, that. This. This. That. That.
That. That. This. This.

But is it fair to recommend they learn OpenOffice? (2, Interesting)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#42401777)

I got through college just fine using OpenOffice and I still recommend it to people

It's perfectly usable for college, sure.

But I think it's doing the average college student a real disservice to recommend to everyone they use OpenOffice and not Word. Think of the poor history major; unless they go on to some kind of advanced degree a proficient skill in Word may be the only marketable skill they have!

If a college student has never used word you have introduced a real hurdle to them performing well in any company job right out of the gate.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (5, Insightful)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#42401615)

To be fair, it's not that the OpenOffice and LibreOffice are crap, it's just that the format you're feeding them is. Get us an actual free and open source document standard, and have folks follow it, and things will be much better. Here's an interesting anecdote: My moderately computer literate mother now uses Linux at home and Win7 at work, and prefers Linux. She takes her Linux laptop with LibreOffice on it to work because there are MS Word documents that MS Word won't open that LibreOffice does. There. That should counter your "it's buggy" anecdote.

Have you had many corruption problems with the FLOSS office tools saving and loading their own format? Or is it just them failing to comply with MS's flawed published document standards that not even MS complies with? How can a FLOSS word processor work with MS Office if they publish one thing and do another? Oooooh, so now you see do you? Perhaps your fingers have been pointing in the wrong direction all along. Look, I know you don't give a damn why the competing free alternatives are buggy, but let's not go pretending they can't do the work. There is a deficit of CAD, but then again, look at CAD users as a percentage of market share vs total users... Then again, I actually prefer Blender and YafaRay for 3D modeling and animation and even just adding special effects to videos.

(Un)Fortunately this doesn't work both ways. Here, I'll show you: MS has no Emacs or Vim replacement at all! Who can even write code for their system? VS doesn't even work with my Emacs macros or have block select! Ah, but you see? Emacs and Vim, and essentially every FLOSS program can run on Windows as well as any other OS -- They're not hindered by vendor lock-in strategies...

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (1)

wmac1 (2478314) | about a year ago | (#42401739)

She takes her Linux laptop with LibreOffice on it to work because there are MS Word documents that MS Word won't open that LibreOffice does. There. That should counter your "it's buggy" anecdote.

Aren't those documents created or edited by LibreOffice by any chance?

Because in a few cases this has happened to me (with OpenOffice of course) but I don't remember a case that a document I created using word could not be opened with word. I edit very large documents (several hundred pages most of the time).

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (5, Informative)

martin-boundary (547041) | about a year ago | (#42401941)

It's quite trivial for this to happen. Suppose someone writes a Word document (with the latest version of Word), then sends it to another person who has Word 97, who maybe opens and edits it, then passes it along to someone with another version of Word again. Somewhere along the line the document will get corrupted, as the classic Word format is just a memory dump of the objects that happen to be alive during editing.

This is the reason why it's difficult for other word processors to read and write Word, they just don't have the exact same COM object hierarchy in memory. So they can only support a subset of the full "format", but on the other hand they can often read a broken document much better than Word itself because they literally only extract the bits they need.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (1)

pwizard2 (920421) | about a year ago | (#42401751)

Off the top of my head I know there's at least one Vim port for Windows (I forget what it's called but I had it installed years ago). If you're complaining that Windows doesn't give you anything comparable out of the box then you have a point.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (5, Interesting)

narcc (412956) | about a year ago | (#42401813)

Or is it just them failing to comply with MS's flawed published document standards that not even MS complies with?

How could they? The OpenXML standard is more than 6500 pages long!

Part 4, the Markup Language Reference, weighs in at 5756 pages -- 5756 pages -- to define "every element and attribute, the hierarchy of parent/child relationships for elements, and additional semantics as appropriate"

It's madness. Pure madness. No one in their right mind could claim that such a ridiculous, impossible-to-follow, standard couldn't (or shouldn't) be dramatically simplified!

It should surprise no one that Microsoft fails to comply with their own standard -- and why it's virtually impossible to produce an implementation that is completely compatible with Microsoft Office.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401899)

Yeah, every standard should be like ODF - the standard is short, but so badly written that it's possible to save an ODF document that fits the standard perfectly but renders incorrectly in every ODF compatible word processor.

The main problem with MS Office... (1)

Chordonblue (585047) | about a year ago | (#42401969)

...is that there is no version for Android, IOS, or Linux. They've certainly had long enough to port, so I can only assume the problem is related to some sort of business politics. IMHO, MS are idiots for not taking advantage of the mobile mobile - MILLIONS of dollars on the table and yet here we are - NO mobile versions.

It might be time for Steve B to go. He's still thinking it's the 80's where you just ignore the competition or buy them out. Well, here they are now, Windows 8 and Surface are failures in the market - so much wiping out the existing order. Google Docs and LibreOffice finally giving Word a run for it's money - well, they MIGHT, if Word could be found on Android/IOS...

MS needs to shift course quickly before they aren't the only option anymore, although I think that ship has sailed now.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (4, Interesting)

jkrise (535370) | about a year ago | (#42401351)

it has features that fit any conceivable needs

Speak for yourself. I use Google Docs for lots of things, where Word simply does not fit. For ex:

1. Daily time-sheets of my team members with details of work done, and time spent, with status.

2. Project progress of my department; which plugs into the that of the entire division.

etc.

3. A taxi dispatch system uses Google docs to find out current location, availability, status etc using Google docs. Word is totally unusable in such scenarios.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401435)

I am curious too know which of those 3 you think can't be done in MS Office?

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401509)

Word on office 365 does all of that.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (4, Insightful)

supersat (639745) | about a year ago | (#42401579)

If you're using Google Docs to dispatch taxis, you're doing something very wrong.

Google Docs is a great band-aid to quickly hack something together, but it's no substitute for real tools.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401589)

Comparing Google Docs to MS Word is like comparing every sport played in the USA against just Cricket in the UK. Atleast compare like for like.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (3, Insightful)

DFurno2003 (739807) | about a year ago | (#42401667)

Why the hell would you use Google Docs for Taxi Dispatch?

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (5, Informative)

Daltorak (122403) | about a year ago | (#42401719)

it has features that fit any conceivable needs

Speak for yourself. I use Google Docs for lots of things, where Word simply does not fit. For ex:

1. Daily time-sheets of my team members with details of work done, and time spent, with status.

2. Project progress of my department; which plugs into the that of the entire division.

etc.

3. A taxi dispatch system uses Google docs to find out current location, availability, status etc using Google docs. Word is totally unusable in such scenarios.

Wait, what? Are you talking about the ability to do real-time collaborative editing of Word documents here?

Word (and Excel, and Onenote) has this already, and has for a few years now. It's part of the Skydrive integration [microsoft.com]. Documents are stored "in the cloud" but you get a local copy, too, for disconnected editing. Any machine (or phone, yes even iPhones and Androids) connected to Skydrive gets the synced up copies too). Version history (up to 25 versions anyway) are stored. Hell, even the OS X versions of Word and Excel support real-time collaborative editing. You don't even need Office installed.... the web app versions of Office 2013 are free.

In short -- Microsoft has real-time editing of an Excel document by someone using a native app on Windows, a native app on OS X, and someone using Chrome on a Linux system. Your uses cases are supported just fine.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (2)

tooyoung (853621) | about a year ago | (#42401357)

Agreed. Do everyone a favor - list everything you hate about Google Docs. Hopefully someone from Google will read the list and actually cause change. You know a list of Office painpoints would go unheard.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401513)

http://connect.microsoft.com/directory/

Though it looks like Office is currently empty.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (1)

tooyoung (853621) | about a year ago | (#42401571)

What does a post of that website have to do with the parent's comment?

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401637)

Why would I help Google (a big evil corp) compete with Microsoft (a big evil corp), when Microsoft is playing nicer with my cloud data?

Google scans all my cloud docs for content, potentially makes some of it available to G+, and generally abuses my privacy. At least my private cloud data is private on the SkyDrive.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401829)

If you really think that then you're pretty stupid. Perhaps you didn't see the privacy changes Microshit tried to slip in on a friday evening before a long weekend. Yeah, that's how these assholes operate.

Re:A Mature Local Machine Product vs Immature Clou (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401687)

In the end, it's Microshaft fuckware. You have to be a dumb fucking cunt to use it. Fuck off, cunt.

hey you racist /. poster... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401251)

you are a shitstain on the face of the earth
go away

Re:hey you racist /. poster... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401345)

"you are a shitstain on the face of the earth go away"

Well, that was apropos of nothing, but continue . . .

I don't understand the version control complaint (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401253)

You can see a detailed revision history of a document, including every saved version ever, in Google Docs.

It can show you the differences from the current/previous versions.

So if you deleted text, just pull up the revision history, grab the text you want, and paste it back into the current version.
It's not any different from a "real" version control workflow.
 

Re:I don't understand the version control complain (1)

cheater512 (783349) | about a year ago | (#42401279)

No need to copy and paste. You can just restore the revision (unless you've made changes since that you want to keep).

Re:I don't understand the version control complain (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#42401335)

Yeah, he's way off... Word also has version control. So does Excel. I'd wager PowerPoint does, too.

Re:I don't understand the version control complain (3, Informative)

jfengel (409917) | about a year ago | (#42401475)

Word's version control is a lot more sophisticated. It can show you the document clean, or with strikeouts and inserts, or with annotations in the margins. You can accept and reject changes by pointing to them.

I don't know how widely useful such a thing is, but I personally find it very useful. It's one of the few things I break out Word for. (LibreOffice has a similar feature, but its implementation is slow, and it's unusable on the dozens-of-pages documents I use it for.)

Re:I don't understand the version control complain (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about a year ago | (#42401709)

It's extremely popular in business and academia when people are collaborating on documents, and it's used just how the article's author uses it. This is so critical in The Real World that it's the number one complaint people wield against Open/LibreOffice.

Re:I don't understand the version control complain (1)

timeOday (582209) | about a year ago | (#42401865)

For me it's that and Outline View. (Not OpenOffice Navigator).

Word had more features (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about a year ago | (#42401257)

Word has more features, but Google Docs is good enough for most people. Depending on what you use, Docs is good enough.

Re:Word had more features (5, Insightful)

nbauman (624611) | about a year ago | (#42401517)

Notepad is good enough for most people. (I'm using it right now.) But some people need certain features in their work, and if a program doesn't have those features, they can't use it.

He's a professional writer who writes books, and he's talking about whether Google Docs and Zoho Docs can do that. They can't.

A big book needs a style sheet. Otherwise you're taping lists of codes to the monitor, like we used to do in 1985.

A writer who works with an editor needs Track Changes. Otherwise, the writer doesn't know what changes the editor made. They'd be better off faxing hand-written corrections to each other, like we used to do in 1985.

When Microsoft started marketing Word, they were competing with WordPerfect, which dominated the word processing market and did a pretty good job. So Word had to do an even better job. MS worked with people who used Word in every major industry, like law firms, to find out how they wrote and what they needed in their word processor. They worked with an American Bar Association word processing committee to write free manuals. Lawyers sometimes write documents with line numbers. You got it. Law firms use all kinds of strikeouts and underlinings. You got it. Law firms use elaborate outlines. You got it. If you're a lawyer, and the judge wants a submission a certain way, there's no excuses.

When I have a problem with Office, I do a Google search and I find people who have left the answers. Microsoft's web site, much as I hate to admit it, is an excellent manual in every version of Office. They paid a lot of very good technical writers what they were worth to explain it. (In fairness, they haven't been up to the same quality lately.) When I have a problem with Google, I do a Google search and sometimes find a bunch of guys trying to give helpful suggestions. I wonder what Google's paid tech support is like. If my job depended on it, it would certainly be worth $50 a year.

I too would love to use OpenOffice/LibreOffice etc., just for the principle of open software, but I've tried them and they had little incompatibilities. If you're working on a big project with other people, you can't take a chance on an incompatibility that will take an hour or two to figure out, or that you just have to work around.

Some day they'll get there. Not yet.

Word is just better... (0)

mschaffer (97223) | about a year ago | (#42401911)

That's why it has always been so popular---even on the Mac platform.
Give MS some credit for doing something better.

Dear Google, go buy this book (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401259)

There's a definitive book for anyone wanting to write a wordpressor. It's called 'Harts Rules', and it goes into micro detail of, for example, how to layout footnotes that are bigger than the page they refer to. The real micro detail of every extreme case of layout and composting anyone might face writing a wordprocessor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hart%27s_Rules

Google Docs developers should read it, as should Microsoft Word developers quite frankly.

Docs is suitable for simple tasks associated with everyday writing, memos faxes, instructions, meeting notes etc, but to write books, particularly technical ones requires a bit more processing.

Re:Dear Google, go buy this book (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401821)

But that's heading into DTP which is more suited to InDesign, Quark, or Scribus. That kind of work is a tad bit different than just word processing.

Microsoft Word Sure Sounds Fantastic (2, Funny)

NonUniqueNickname (1459477) | about a year ago | (#42401287)

Word sounds so great I'm gonna get 10! One for each person on the team. Heading over to microsoft.com now... looking at the price now... sticking with Google Docs now.

Re:Microsoft Word Sure Sounds Fantastic (2)

geek (5680) | about a year ago | (#42401309)

Or you could head over to Skydrive.com and have all ten use it for free just like google docs. Just sayin.

Re:Microsoft Word Sure Sounds Fantastic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401341)

SHHHH.

As far as the internet pundits are concerned, Microsoft doesn't have a free, web-based office suite.

Re:Microsoft Word Sure Sounds Fantastic (4, Informative)

lokedhs (672255) | about a year ago | (#42401501)

Well, if you actually tried it you will see that the Web version is so feature-limited that it might just as well not even exist. I think the original release of Google Docs was more feature-complete than Skydrive Word, and that's saying a lot.

Re:Microsoft Word Sure Sounds Fantastic (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#42401393)

Or you could head over to Skydrive.com

Goodness, I'd forgotten all about that. It was not very easy to find, but it does seem nice.

How To Make Sure Everyone Knows You're A Retard (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401427)

"Just sayin."

Re:Microsoft Word Sure Sounds Fantastic (1, Interesting)

lilfields (961485) | about a year ago | (#42401373)

Microsoft has a free suite, and if you compared paid suites, Microsoft is only marginally more expensive on the cloud, but if you compare client-side to server side and use SkyDrive, then Microsoft is cheaper...because you can get a small business suite with 5 seats for very cheap. Office 2013 is amazing, the collaboration isn't as good as Google's...yet, but Google is so far behind on everything else, that it really don't matter at this point.

Re:Microsoft Word Sure Sounds Fantastic (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401541)

Well if you worked for me, I'd fire you.
I would expect anyone competent to look at total cost of ownership.
How productive would staff be with MS vs Google, any App specific plugins, Endnote, Chemdraw,etc
What happens if the net / cloud goes down
What about confidentiality of documents: local vs Google (who DOES snoop)
Who do you share documents with, compatibility with customers is important
Compatibility with previous documents, yes there is a cost when they are converted and yes MS is a pain in the ass here too
Compatibility with "templates", ie legal templates from courts, files formats for journals, etc etc etc

There is a whole lot more to consider beyond purchase price

Re:Microsoft Word Sure Sounds Fantastic (2)

fredprado (2569351) | about a year ago | (#42401769)

And if you worked for me I would fire you. I would expect anyone that manages a team to understand that locking down your team in ever changing proprietary broken file formats that are made incompatible between versions on purpose is more costly at long term than any short term hurdles you could get for lacking a few features you won't likely need anyway.

Re:Microsoft Word Sure Sounds Fantastic (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401889)

You obviously did not read what was written, or failed to comprehend.

There are time where MS is the right tool for the job, just as there are times when LATEX is.

I have a Mixture of Linux, OSX, Windows machines with a mixture of OSS and propriety software at a University, we are forever assessing options and how they integrate within our working environment, the people we collaborate with, etc.

Simplistic politicised views are not part of my job, nor should they be.

Is it just me? (5, Insightful)

geek (5680) | about a year ago | (#42401295)

Or is Google software getting worse instead of better? I tried so hard to like Google Docs and Drive but it's been so buggy for me (in their browser no less) that I simply can not stand to use it. Worse still is the unfinished nature of EVERYTHING Google puts out these days. There is absolutely no polish to anything they have besides gmail. Gmail is fantastic but everything else from them is just terrible. The nail int he coffin for me on the Google side was the Google Drive sync client on OS X, it crashed constantly, failed to sync files all the time and used a crap ton of CPU time draining the battery of my MacBook Air. Not to mention the lack of a Linux client (still!)

Add to the above the fact Google likes to just close shit down whenever they feel like it and I can never let myself get too deep into their ecosystem without worrying whether they'll just cut it off one day (Wave, iGoogle etc.) Google just can't seem to follow through on anything to completion.

I'm neither a Google fan or an Apple fan, I own products from both (Nexus 7 and an MBA) so I don't think I'm biased. I have to say, the two companies have the opposite failings. Apple lacks features but has polish while Google lacks polish while has features. In the end I find myself more inclined to use Apple these days just because I have real work to do and can't dick around with all of Googles BS.

That said, I don't see why anyone would use Google Docs. I guess for simple text files its ok and I hear the collaboration is good so maybe it has uses for a small subset of folks out there but I just don't find it useful. I combine Scrivener, LaTeX and Word for my writing and find my needs met quite well.

Google is run by engineers, which is cool, I actually like that, but as a result, suffers from a lack of real world usability, polish and commitment. Google lacks focus in the right areas (they can sure focus on selling you to advertisers though). I just don't see Google as anything but a search + email provider. Everything else I've tried of theirs has been lackluster and easily met by other options out there at a decent price without the privacy issues.

Re:Is it just me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401429)

Gmail is fantastic but everything else from them is just terrible.

I occasionally lose the cursor while in Gmail both in Chrome and Firefox. No other program causes this.

Re:Is it just me? (1)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year ago | (#42401457)

Or is Google software getting worse instead of better? ... Google is run by engineers, which is cool

Maybe the wind started to blow in the other direction?

I cannot say much for quality of software, but it seems like all services have gone up in price A LOT (gmail storage, google apps). Maybe engineers are no longer calling the shots? Nothing wrong with charging for services or increasing the price, but when the price goes up a lot (or when the free "small business" options just disappear completely instead of diminishing) that seems a little far.

Re:Is it just me? (3, Interesting)

Zadaz (950521) | about a year ago | (#42401461)

My experience says differently. I had given Google Docs a chance years ago, but it outright stank. I couldn't image why someone would want to use it.

Then a few months ago I started writing for a major tech publisher. When I asked what file format they wanted they responded "Word if you must but we love Google Docs". So Google Docs it was. And I was very pleasantly surprised. It worked slickly, speedily and no unexpected surprises. (This is with Chrome on OS X.) Compared to the OS X version of Word, which reminds me that the The Spinning Beach Ball of Death is still a real thing, I almost overwhelmingly preferred Goog.

There are a few things it won't let me do that I'm used to. Captioning images is one. Which doesn't work well in Word either, but is apparently not possible in Docs. I also use tables a lot and the table formatting options stink. But otherwise I found it met all my needs and worked better and faster than Word.

Re:Is it just me? (3, Insightful)

Lord Maud'Dib (611577) | about a year ago | (#42401833)

I've been using OpenOffice (and then LibreOffice, since around when it forked) for writing scientific papers for a few years now. For referencing I use Zotero which works really well ( I can't stand Endnote!!!). Recently I had to switch to Word for a collaborative project and I absolutely hated the way it tried to take control of everything. The way LibreOffice handles captioning and just everything in general is much better than MS Word. The formula input and formatting is much more like Tex than MS Word too, which is really handy for all sorts of scientific and math input. Anyway, I've been considering switching to Google Docs on an Asus Transformer for writing on-the-go (commuting) and will give it another go soon, but for now LibreOffice is the best I've come across. For basic writing needs on a tablet I think I can make Goog work.

Re:Is it just me? (1)

hendridm (302246) | about a year ago | (#42401839)

The nail int he coffin for me on the Google side was the Google Drive sync client on OS X, it crashed constantly, failed to sync files all the time and used a crap ton of CPU time draining the battery of my MacBook Air

I used to have a lot of issue with Google Drive on my Mac when it first came out (the sync issues were certainly frustrating), but it's been running very smoothly for quite awhile now. I can't comment on the CPU/power consumption, though.

Re:Is it just me? (2)

hcs_$reboot (1536101) | about a year ago | (#42401923)

My rant-of-the-day goes to Google (docs). I also thought that after all these years Google must have built a robust and intuitive product able to compete with MS office in terms of feature and compatibility. And decided to give it a try (using the latest Chrome). Conclusion is disappointment. Small docs lightly decorated (bold, italics, colors...) are usually ok either from MSO to GD or straight from/to GD. When it comes to create numerated chapters, margins, headers footers etc... you must count on your best of luck. It may or may not work the way you think it would. Talking bugs, missing features, compatibility issues / different rendering depending on where you view the doc etc... It sounds like Google Docs is an abandonned project.

To a larger extend I'm under the impression the problem covers many Google products. And this is where the rant takes place. There are many brilliant people at Google. And Google is expanding a lot. Good technicians become managers, new people fill the teams. Brilliant people move to the new or strategic projects. All of this, happening at a fast pace, results in very good ideas being implemented by brillant people, who move to management / something else to fill the new juicy positions created by an uncontrolled expansion. While those brilliant people enjoy the satisfaction of having given birth to spectacular novelties, the - initially good - products are then maintained by lower profile / new staff, not having the same level of motivation (creators vs maintainers, basically). Thus many products are left with obvious and annoying bugs for months or even years ( just to name a few, Maps (website) while in a foreign country ignoring language options and display names in local language ; Search now ignoring domains that are supposed to be filtered out based on settings etc... Just visit Google forums - bugs last for a long time, and replies from Google teams, when present, do not usually answer positively the initial question. All products have bugs - ok - but it seems the staff doesn't care much. It reminds me [not that bad yet, but gets closer] the Microsoft forums of the early 2000 where the MS staff only answered with arrogance ).

Deriving happiness from tools... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401297)

Fortunately for me tools are merely "things" that allow me to "do". I derive happiness from "doing". Particularly in doing that which benefits myself, my family, and my neighbors.

What a shallow existence it must be: to discover a tool, learn its use, discover it is the best tool for its intended use, and then be displeased by the revelation. Would you care for some wine with your essay?

Perhaps the energy spent putting your whining in print would be better spent inventing a better word processor? Surely as a self proclaimed "software developer" you can do better than the reigning champion?

Re:Deriving happiness from tools... (2)

kestasjk (933987) | about a year ago | (#42401715)

Yeah.. wanting something better citing specific examples, what a nerve. If you ask me people should quit bitching and move on from this whole "improvement" nonsense.

Absurd (1)

onyxruby (118189) | about a year ago | (#42401329)

I know it's popular to bash Microsoft on Slashdot, but this is as absurd as asking if Windows Phone 8 is as even matchup to Android or IOS. The story and article are flame-bait and should be treated accordingly.

Re:Absurd (2)

lilfields (961485) | about a year ago | (#42401383)

Windows Phone is a LOT closer to those two platforms than Google is to Microsoft in Office suites...it isn't even close in this comparison, at least with mobile platforms some comparisons can be argued reasonably.

Re:Absurd (4, Interesting)

Belial6 (794905) | about a year ago | (#42401543)

I'm going to have to agree. Google docs is in the ~1993 stage of office suites. Windows Phone is in the ~2009 stage. The nice part for Google is that word processing is a largely solved problem. Google is chasing a largely static target. Unfortunately for MS, they are chasing two competitors that are anything but a static target.

Re:Absurd (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401635)

I know it's popular to bash Microsoft on Slashdot, but making that comment is clearly flame-bait and should be treated accordingly.

Depends on the use (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401337)

Google docs is great for anything involving collaborators. It's really easy to send out the link to other students I have been grouped with for projects, and explain how it works.

However, for the final copy, we have one of the team members copy it into word and do the prettying up there.

reveal codes FTW (2, Informative)

aepurniet (995777) | about a year ago | (#42401377)

i still use word perfect. being completely OCD about formatting, i cannot stand anything but that old standby. using word is just frustrating. how come my table just got deleted? why is it typing in italics now? everytime i use it, these questions just take more of my time than actually typing the document. with word perfect, there is a legitimate explanation every time this happens, and since you can see all the markup codes, it most likely wont happen.

Re:reveal codes FTW (2)

beep54 (1844432) | about a year ago | (#42401537)

Word Perfect was what I first used, back in DOS days. The 'reveal all codes' feature was nifty. You can get some of that in LibreOffice, but not ALL codes. But, actually, usually enough to be very useful.

Re:reveal codes FTW (2)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about a year ago | (#42401849)

Out of curiosity, if you're that obsessed with formatting, why don't you use LaTeX?

Granted, it provides many formatting rules behind the scenes. But they're generally really good formatting rules.

Wrong tool for the job? (4, Insightful)

Kwyj1b0 (2757125) | about a year ago | (#42401391)

I think he is using the wrong tool for the job, and then blaming the tool. I don't know about the collaboration features, having never used them. But Google docs was never (IMO) intended to be a replacement for a professional editing tool.

He talks about style sheet feature in the professional writers world. I don't know what that is, because I use Google docs for simple things. Sharing a to-do list with colleagues. Sharing a grocery list with my family. Short story writing in my spare time. Yes, a lot of professional writers need particular features - but MOST people don't. If you try to include features that everyone and their dog would want, you'd get a mess that is unusable, especially in a browser (I can configure MS Word to some extent. Change the layout, add shortcuts to the ribbon, etc).

The closest I have come to a specialized writing software is Scrivener - and I love it. It has features MS Word doesn't have. And I don't expect Word to have them. But that isn't Word's fault - not everyone wants a pinboard and notes section while writing technical papers. They want to send a letter to Grandma thanking her for the check.

And while Word might have some of the features he wants, that comes at a cost - I think MS realized it when they made Microsoft Works. A simple Word editor, a simple spreadsheet etc. It was much easier to use. But it tanked for reasons I don't know. Maybe (pure guesswork) because the mentality while buying software is - "I don't know what this feature is. But hey, I might want it some day!".

Do you expect Paint to have all the features of Photoshop? Frankly, I couldn't use photoshop because I found it too complex, and I use Paintshop Pro. But that isn't Paint/Paintshop's flaw - if I need the features, I'll find the tool that fits the job.

Re:Wrong tool for the job? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401717)

I think the main difference is that Google markets Docs as a full-on replacement for Office, not just as "good enough for a lot of things" (source: I'm a Google engineer, but that claim means a helluva lot here). Microsoft never made any claim that Paint was any more than it is.

Developers Must Know Their Target Audience (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401399)

Lost me a this since he seemed fairly oblivious to the fact this worked both ways.

About time (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401515)

Last year or so I was modded down for pointing out that simple functionality just doesn't work in Libre Office. Google docs doesn't even have the functionality of GEOS on my Commodore 64. MS Office just works, and even if Word is crap, the other options are ten times worse. Deal with it.

Re:About time (2)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about a year ago | (#42401855)

Well, one thing going for Google Docs is that it doesn't have the ribbon bar.

Man, I still can't get the hang of that thing.

Google Drive with LibreOffice, Scribus (2)

digitalhermit (113459) | about a year ago | (#42401529)

I recently used Google Drive with directory sync to "collaborate" with two others on a presentation. It's not true collaboration in the sense of how multiple developers could use something like CVS and merge, but it was useful enough. LibreOffice will create a lockfile that is also synched, so at least can tell you if someone else has the document open.

The process was:
1) Create a shared directory in Google Drive.
2) All team members installed Google Drive and synched that folder.
3) One member uploaded images to a subdirectory, another generated a layout in Scribus, another created copy.
4) Finally everyone uploaded PDFs to another subdir so everyone could view.

Normally we'd do this over a local fileserver but even though we were all sitting around the same table, it was just easier to do it via Drive because everyone was using their own laptops.

I'm not a professional writer so LibreOffice is good enough for me. This is why feature creep happens in Word. Without all those "pro" features, there would be no reason for most folks to pay a premium for Word when LibreOffice suffices.

The real story is that LibreOffice wins (1, Informative)

feranick (858651) | about a year ago | (#42401591)

Really, the story here is the following: 1. Google Docs sucks 2. There is nothing in Word that makes it peculiar compared to other traditional offline editors 3. The guy uses Libreoffice. So: How's Word really winning here?

Everyone is different (1)

Stirling Newberry (848268) | about a year ago | (#42401629)

I use Google Docs for collaboration, and LibreOffice for my own work. Clients sometimes have MS specific Visio needs, and so I pull out that and integrate with Word.

ms superior = doesn't make me happy (1)

chentiangemalc (1710624) | about a year ago | (#42401675)

so what MS is good at office. Office 2013 easily beats competitors such as LibreOffice, and alternatives on Mac for many usage scenarios. what's with the "MS is better" = "doesn't make me happy" So they sometimes make good software. oops did i say that aloud on slashdot??? *waits for crucifiction* when will the apple/linux/google/ms world learn to live together in peace & harmony...like they do in my house.

Re:ms superior = doesn't make me happy (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year ago | (#42401745)

"So they sometimes make good software."

LIES! (jk of course they sometimes hit the statistical anomaly)

Last time I used google docs (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year ago | (#42401711)

The wordprocessor had about as many features as wordpad on windows 2000, the spreadsheet was compariable to gnumeric, and the whole cloud interface made things feel shakey at best ... in late 2011

MS Office vs GDocs, heh yea dont even bother. Libre / Open office vs MS Office, very comparable (if your looking at MS office 2000 or 2003, but that does quite a freaking bit)

The author is either ignorant or an idiot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401735)

Google docs has version control and can show you every change you've made. Unfortunately, the author was either ignorant or an idiot, but he did suggest installing SVN, exiting Word each time you wanted to version the document and checking it in manually as an alternative to the seamless version control used by Google docs . He then goes on to criticize real time collaboration as useless in his workflow because it doesn't track changes. Perhaps if Google Docs had some sort of version control to indicate to him what has changed...hmmm

Google Doc is unacceptable for scientific writing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401749)

I have tried out Google Doc a couple times. It didn't take me long to conclude that it is unsuitable for scientific writing:
1) Inadequate review function. Only allow you to see history;cannot accept/deny changes.
2) No reference. This alone is a deal breaker because auto numbering of figure, equations, and table are life-savers for long technical articles and reports.
3) No bibliography. Another deal breaker.
4) No spelling checker. Yet another. Believe it or not, even professors and scientists make typos, lots of them.
5) No custom style. First thing I do when starting an article is to define styles and sometime cascade numbering (e.g. 1, 1.1, 1.1.1). ......

Re:Google Doc is unacceptable for scientific writi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401781)

Spell checking is automatic in Google Docs.

Tell us something we don't know. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401811)

Thank you for stating the obvious, Microsoft Office has more features than Google Docs and free Office suites. If I have enough money to buy a software license from Microsoft and don't care about cloud storage, obviously I will not be wasting my time with a combination of other free software solutions. Yes companies are moving to cloud storage and using free software in a shitty economy. But others bite the bullet and continue to purchase volume licensing for Microsoft for a reason, because they have a need. This isn't news by any stretch of the imagination. Why is /. wasting bandwidth on it?

Yo, Jeff buddy.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42401905)

fuck google. fuck microsoft. fuck 'em all.

LaTeX, FTW

captcha: adaptive

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