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Ouya Dev Consoles Ship, SDK Released

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the progress-as-promised dept.

Android 169

An anonymous reader writes "Earlier this year, the Android-based Ouya game console project raised over nine times as much funding as they initially asked for in their Kickstarter campaign. Now, Ouya developer consoles are starting to ship, and folks on the Ouya team released a video showing what the developers should expect. As explained in the video, the console currently being shipped is by no means the final hardware, but promises to give developers everything they need to start developing apps and games for Ouya. The only surprise is that they decided to add a micro-USB port to the hardware, making it easy to hook up to a PC. The Ouya team has also released an SDK for the device (which they call the ODK — Ouya Development Kit), and have provided most of the source under the Apache 2.0 license. They wrote, 'We think we’ve got a great team of developers here at OUYA, but there’s strength in numbers and a wealth of passionate, talented people out there. We want you, the developers of the world, to work alongside us to continually improve our platform. It’s our hope that releasing a more open ODK will help foster such innovation.'"

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Very well done to them! (3, Informative)

Xugumad (39311) | about 2 years ago | (#42411093)

Well, I said it couldn't be done, I was wrong. Very well done to them!

Re:Very well done to them! (4, Insightful)

CodeheadUK (2717911) | about 2 years ago | (#42411121)

Seconded. It always looked like it would happen, but there were many naysayers.

Well done Ouya team!

Re:Very well done to them! (2, Insightful)

ikaruga (2725453) | about 2 years ago | (#42411749)

Out of curiosity, why you said that?
Delivering a hardware is not a hard thing to do, specially if you have 7 million dollars in the bank and are using common commercial components(you can easily buy a Tegra 3 board).
I believe now they're probably customizing the Android OS for their proprietary needs and set upping their own appstore. Neither which really is that hard either.
In my opinion the real challenge hasn't even started yet: marketing the final product. If they can't convince developers to create exclusive content as well as convince the average consumer to buy the device they probably go down soon after the release. If sony is failing to successfully move the Vita out of the shelves even though it has the playstation brand, is homebrew friendly(PS Mobile SDK), has hardware comparable to the latest flagship smartphones and over 100 real games(almost a 1000 if you also count PSP and PS1 downloadable titles) due (mostly) to the insufficient marketing that they have right now, then the OUYA better be prepared.
Personally they still haven't convinced me to buy it instead of just plug in my Android phone to the TV. My japanese Xperia acro hd came with a charging dock. I can just put my phone on it and then connect it to the TV using a HDMI cable. For the controller a PS3, Wii pro controller, Wiimote or any of the dozens of bluetooth controllers for PC/Android work, Plus I can just use Google Play to buy the game which will work on any android device I own, instead of having yet another third party store to keep track and that will only be usable on one device.
Finally, on a completely different subject, how the hell is your post modded Informative? What new information did Xugumad add to the discussion?

Re:Very well done to them! (1)

vovick (1397387) | about 2 years ago | (#42412023)

Let us now hope that no ponzi scheme was involved and they've got enough funds to make and ship normal consoles as well by the schedule.

Commies (0, Flamebait)

Gocho (16619) | about 2 years ago | (#42411101)

The logo looks like a commie piece of propaganda straight out of Moscow circa 1925

Re:Commies (0)

Stormwatch (703920) | about 2 years ago | (#42411131)

Wooosh.

Re:Commies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411239)

The logo looks like a commie piece of propaganda straight out of Moscow circa 1925

Man, whoever modded you flamebait needs to go back to school and look up some Soviet Union posters...

Either that or /. has some Soviet Communist sympathizers modding comments.

Re:Commies (1)

Golddess (1361003) | about 2 years ago | (#42411361)

I haven't looked at the logo, but you seem to be implying that something cannot be both true and flamebait.

Inconvenient truth (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411585)

you seem to be implying that something cannot be both true and flamebait.

I seem to remember that if the truth is flamebait, it's what called an "inconvenient truth". What's the polite way to express something like this?

so it's true (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411751)

So it's true. AGW is flamebait ;^P

Re:Commies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42412055)

The intelligence level of the average slashdot reader has declined. Many of the old people that made this site what it was have moved on since the addition of the flags and departure of Taco. Now we have an overflow of idiotic reddit readers that don't understand inside jokes, don't understand humor (unless it's a caption on a redundant photograph), and think they know everything.

I posted below that I sure would like a beowulf cluster of these consoles, but I got downmodded as offtopic.

Cheers, slashdot. Bunch of fucking faggots now.

Creative Commies (2)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411249)

Sure, there's fan art [devs.ouya.tv] reminiscent of Soviet marketing materials. Creative Commons has the same thing [boingboing.net] .

Ouch. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411149)

- Giant fan in a sealed box. Why?
- I know the xbox dev box comes in clear plastic, but doesn't make it look any less cheap.
- D-Pad from hell (another x-box transfer)
- Have they done any software to support their games? Didn't even see Jelly Bean load up.
- Awkward video full of awkward comments. Ouch.

I have high hopes for the console, but holy shit, it needs work.

Re:Ouch. (3, Insightful)

Omestes (471991) | about 2 years ago | (#42411627)

- Giant fan in a sealed box. Why?

I'm guessing there is a vent opposite the fan, but being clear plastic its hard to tell the details. I'm not sure, it could be a completely boneheaded design decision, but I'll give them the benefit of the doubt (no one who could actually produce a functioning bit of hardware could be that stupid, right?)

- I know the xbox dev box comes in clear plastic, but doesn't make it look any less cheap.

I rather like it. I miss the clear plastic trend of the mid-80's. I would love to see the guts of my gadgets, just to be reminded that they aren't "magic boxes". I doubt I'm cool, or my sense of style is accepted (I'm a nerd, so the latter is probably an oxymoron), but I like it. This also isn't release hardware, so I'm guessing the final consumer version will look like it does on the marketing materials.

- D-Pad from hell (another x-box transfer)

They pretty much said that the controller isn't the final version in the video. I admit, though, that so far it looks sort of like a crappy "Mad Catz" cheapo controller. If it has bluetooth, nothing will stop you from using a 360 controller, or anything else.

- Have they done any software to support their games? Didn't even see Jelly Bean load up.

This is a bit hazy. Looking at another video on their channel, it looks like they might be using a modified version of Android, as their game browser is rather "unique" looking. I'm not sure if you can actually use Android normally, and if you can how, since using a controller is very different than the standard touch. But it does look like they did make it more "game friendly", since it has an actual game browser. Everything else is a mystery, which is sad, since my decision to purchase one would be somewhat based on its functionality beyond games.

I can play games on pretty much everything these days. So having another gaming device isn't terribly attractive (3 computers (one hooked up to the living room TV), a phone, 2 tablets, 2 consoles, 5 retro consoles, a DS, etc...), but having a very small, low power, computer allowing basic functions to replace my aging, loud and hot, HTPC would be nice. Even as a gaming device, I'm somewhat skeptical, since 90% of Android/iOS games don't really excite me, they are generally shallow, gimmicky, crap; good for playing on the bus, but horrible for holding your attention for over 15 minutes. If it had "real" games I might bite, but is the hardware capable enough to handle anything beyond the typical iOS/Android fare?

- Awkward video full of awkward comments. Ouch.

I wish I knew what it was about Youtube that brought out the largest possible selection of absolute morons of any other form of media.

Since when are 360 controllers Bluetooth? (2)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411739)

If it has bluetooth, nothing will stop you from using a 360 controller

Since when are Xbox 360 wireless controllers Bluetooth? I thought they used a proprietary RF layer, and using them with a PC required buying at least one of the controllers in a bundle with a USB receiver. And even then, PlayStation 3 and Wii controllers don't completely follow the Bluetooth HID standard, and underlying changes in an operating system's Bluetooth stack can break and have broken [ccpcreations.com] driver applications designed to map these slightly nonstandard devices.

Re:Since when are 360 controllers Bluetooth? (1)

Omestes (471991) | about 2 years ago | (#42411795)

Good catch. I meant PS3 controller.

I'm still a bit boggled by this world where PCs no longer really use their own controllers and resort to pre-existing console pads.

Traditional genre divide (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411869)

I'm still a bit boggled by this world where PCs no longer really use their own controllers and resort to pre-existing console pads.

PC games and console games have traditionally been in different genres. Genres popular among PC gamers (FPS/RTS/MMO) tend to use a mouse and keyboard rather than a gamepad. See CronoCloud's explanation of the traditions resulting in the current state of the market [slashdot.org] .

Game library (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411801)

having a very small, low power, computer allowing basic functions to replace my aging, loud and hot, HTPC would be nice.

Having a device that actually has games for it would be nice. Should Ouya not pan out, what games do you recommend that fully take advantage of what makes an HTPC different, such as a big screen and multiple gamepads?

is the hardware capable enough to handle anything beyond the typical iOS/Android fare?

That depends on how you define "capable". Do you consider retro consoles incapable? In one sense, any game that assumes the player has gamepad as opposed to just a touch screen is "beyond the typical iOS/Android fare" because only one Android phone (Xperia Play) has ever shipped with a gamepad.

Re:Ouch. (1)

acedotcom (998378) | about 2 years ago | (#42411735)

i dont get the "box of fan" either. All your other points are a bit trolly, but the fan in a sealed box is one of the strangest things i have ever seen.

Re:Ouch. (1)

beelsebob (529313) | about 2 years ago | (#42412129)

I have to agree, there's just so much wrong here, it really doesn't to me bode well for them actually producing something good.

Chrome flagged ODK (1)

medv4380 (1604309) | about 2 years ago | (#42411185)

Something about them not having a lot of downloads from their site flagged it as possible phishing or malware.

Re:Chrome flagged ODK (2)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411217)

Something about them not having a lot of downloads from their site flagged it as possible phishing or malware.

If this is anything like the "SmartScreen" reputation system that IE uses, then how is a new site supposed to gain reputation other than by buying it from a CA?

Ouya Dev Consoles Ship (5, Funny)

Brian Kendig (1959) | about 2 years ago | (#42411213)

"There there, ship." *pats the hull*

Re:Ouya Dev Consoles Ship (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 2 years ago | (#42411289)

Is that what they spent the extra 7x money on? Their own cruise ship for developers? lol.

Re:Ouya Dev Consoles Ship (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42412153)

If so, I guess it's just a front for these guys [sea-code.com] .

This product is a game changer. (1, Interesting)

elucido (870205) | about 2 years ago | (#42411231)

Traditional game consoles will not be able to keep up with the pace of innovation now that a Kickstarter project can come along and do this.

Sony and Microsoft are going to have their work cut out for them. If their console is not significantly more powerful than the average PC then Google or any third party company can come along and take their asses to the bank. The linux, steam and android combination really is a game changer and with truly state of the art hardware they could get the hardcore gamers this way.

If a console were released for $1000 but it had massive graphics and computer power I would seriously consider buying it over the traditional $300 console. I think the reason people would be willing to pay is people now want gaming super computers and not just consoles. The first company to offer a true gaming supercomputer will get my money. They say graphics don't matter but obviously they do if people are always trying to buy the latest PC and latest graphics card.

What someone needs to do is create a console which somehow links up multiple graphics cards for under $1000. Call it a gaming supercomputer, and target hardcore gamers via Kickstarter. See how much funds can be raised. See if a custom chip can be designed for the project if enough funds can be raised to be used along side the Nvidia GeForce GTX 590. Allow for upgrading the card or cards and you have it.

Brick and mortar stores (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411265)

Traditional game consoles will not be able to keep up with the pace of innovation

Of course they will. Microsoft, Nintendo, and Sony have Best Buy, GameStop, Target, and Walmart sewn up.

If a console were released for $1000 but it had massive graphics and computer power I would seriously consider buying it over the traditional $300 console.

That's been available since 2007, when PC inputs (VGA and HDMI) became standard features on television monitors. But Best Buy and friends are doing their dangedest to keep this idea from popping into home users' minds. A couple years ago, I asked a Best Buy sales associate about what TV would be best for a home theater PC, and he led me to the PS3 section.

What someone needs to do is create a console which somehow links up multiple graphics cards for under $1000.

How much do SLI-capable video cards for standard PCs currently cost?

Re:Brick and mortar stores (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411543)

Why would you ask a bestbuy sales person anything?They cannot answer questions, nor can they help you. They might be able to run a register, but not even that will be done in a competent manner odds are.

There are SLI capable cards in the $100 range.

Median customer != geek (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411709)

Why would you ask a bestbuy sales person anything?

To simulate the experience of the average home user. This is because the people who buy video games, who provide the revenue with which developers feed their families, are average home users more often than developers.

Re:Median customer != geek (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411747)

You could have asked the wall, it would have simulated it just as well.

Re:Median customer != geek (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411833)

So if the brick-and-mortar stores aren't helping, how should home users become aware of Ouya, PC + TV + gamepads, or Android + HDMI + gamepads?

Re:Median customer != geek (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411897)

I honestly doubt they will. So long as there is enough market to keep it alive that is all that really matters.

Typical home users are pretty far behind the curve on almost all new technology.

Re:Median customer != geek (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411957)

So long as there is enough market to keep [Ouya and HTPC] alive that is all that really matters.

CronoCloud and other HTPC haters believe that there is not in fact "enough market to keep it alive". Please convince me that this is the case.

Re:Median customer != geek (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42412035)

They can believe whatever they like. I see no need to convince anyone of something they can see for themselves.

We shall see if the Ouya survives and I have an HTPC so I know they exist.

Re:Median customer != geek (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42412109)

Commercials during prime time television, dumbfuck.

So out of touch with reality. See my previous post on intelligence: http://games.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3345695&cid=42412055

Re:This product is a game changer. (2)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 2 years ago | (#42411283)

That and if they simply don't add ads to the main interface, they'd already have Microsoft's Xbox Live service beat.

Re:This product is a game changer. (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411559)

Only if they also let you use outside services without tithing to them unlike MS.

The first time I was at a friends house and wanted to watch netflix using my account I almost died laughing when he told we could not since he did not pay for the gold version of the service. Talk about extortion "Pay us to use a totally unrelated service that costs us nothing".

Re:This product is a game changer. (1, Troll)

dadelbunts (1727498) | about 2 years ago | (#42411295)

Graphics really dont matter tho. Look at the massive success that is the Wii. People also dont want to really pay above $500, as shown by the massive flop that was the PS3 release, which is the most powerful of the 3 consoles out. I sadly cant see this going too well for them. The ease of pirating android apps will push many big name developers away. And without big budget games they will never appeal to a "hardcore" crowd. When i see a forza clone for it ill believe the hype.

Re:This product is a game changer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411529)

The Wii sold for a while, mainly due to the hype of limited supply (not really, stocks were replenished within days), parents getting them for young kids, and a new massive market: women and old folk. It soon died after blasting into a massive units sold lead, two years ago Nintendo had their financial reports showing they were living off their cash mountain with a poor out look in the next few years. The PS3 and 360 will still be selling in two years time, even when their next incarnation hits the shelves, and unlike the Wii, they'll still be selling massive amounts of games.

Re:This product is a game changer. (1)

Patch86 (1465427) | about 2 years ago | (#42411531)

The ease of pirating android apps will push many big name developers away.

That sounds like FUD of a tall order. How are Android programmes any easier to pirate than Windows programmes? Are you going to claim that the PC pushes big developers away?

Re:This product is a game changer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411563)

The PC does push them away. It has been explicitly stated by many large studios. And when it doesn't push them away, they jam ridiculous DRM down your throat. Steam is practically the last bastion of sanity for gamers to play games from big developers on PC.

Re:This product is a game changer. (0)

dadelbunts (1727498) | about 2 years ago | (#42411623)

Totally. How many recent big triple A titles are PC exclusive? How many big PC titles arent just console ports of console games. Everyone wants to deny it but gaming piracy does hurt the developers.

Re:This product is a game changer. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411767)

Then why do they keep releasing them for 360?
Or why did it not kill the original xbox?

Piracy can hurt developers, but only so much and other factors are a far bigger influence on the modern make a console game and port it to PC procedure.

Re:This product is a game changer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411305)

Not just anybody can do this shit. You need very good engineers (hardware & software). Any "kick-start-up" needs plenty of cash for marketing because to compete with the big boys you need lots of cash to burn. Just because this type of console is exciting for the /. crowd it doesn't mean the general population is going to embrace it without some convincing.

Re:This product is a game changer. (2)

Nyder (754090) | about 2 years ago | (#42411313)

... The first company to offer a true gaming supercomputer will get my money. They say graphics don't matter but obviously they do if people are always trying to buy the latest PC and latest graphics card.

What someone needs to do is create a console which somehow links up multiple graphics cards for under $1000. Call it a gaming supercomputer, and target hardcore gamers via Kickstarter. See how much funds can be raised. See if a custom chip can be designed for the project if enough funds can be raised to be used along side the Nvidia GeForce GTX 590. Allow for upgrading the card or cards and you have it.

They do offer it, it's called a PC. A custom chip? Then you get into programming problems, and high costs for manufacturing a custom chip.

Okay, i started typing up a great example and realized I didn't need to do that. Your example this time is Real Life. We are looking at the latest generation from MS and Sony. Video Consoles that are over 5 years old. PC's on the other hand, keep getting new video cards, etc. Yet the quality of the games that come out match the lowest common machine, which is either the 360 or PS3, since by 2012 standards, they suck dog shit.

In other words, just because you have a machine with the latest graphics, it doesn't matter. The devs develop for the lowest common denominator.

 

Very few people are willing to buy an HTPC (2)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411381)

They do offer it, it's called a PC.

Very few people are willing to buy a second PC and connect it to a television. See, for example, these comments [slashdot.org] . Part of the difference is that devices marketed as PCs are traditionally associated with a different kind of game, the FPS, RTS, and MMORPG that can be played with a keyboard and mouse, not the platformers, racing games, fighting games, and party games that work with one to four gamepads.

Re:This product is a game changer. (1)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | about 2 years ago | (#42411333)

I really don't know about how many people want to spend $1000 for a "gaming supercomputer" as you call it. A significant portion of game players are teenagers and younger and it is simply not realistic to expect parents to willing cough up that much money. It's one thing to be an adult and be willing to spend this kind of money and it's something else to expect average parents to do it.

Re:This product is a game changer. (1)

dinfinity (2300094) | about 2 years ago | (#42411743)

To be fair, if you assume 4% of annual inflation, the original Xbox launch price ($300) is equivalent to ~$460 today.
The SNES ($199 in 1991) would be about the same.
The Neo Geo ($649 in 1990) would be ~$1500.

Of course purchasing power has also increased, so although I do believe that $1000 is a bit out of range, consoles do not have to be sub $500 to sell to avid gamers. Add in a 'year free Xbox Live with access to all your favorite music/sports/VoD!' and they might stand a chance.

Re:This product is a game changer. (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#42411969)

To be fair, if you assume 4% of annual inflation, the original Xbox launch price ($300) is equivalent to ~$460 today.
The SNES ($199 in 1991) would be about the same.
The Neo Geo ($649 in 1990) would be ~$1500.

Of course purchasing power has also increased, so although I do believe that $1000 is a bit out of range, consoles do not have to be sub $500 to sell to avid gamers. Add in a 'year free Xbox Live with access to all your favorite music/sports/VoD!' and they might stand a chance.

Hopefully your point was that anything over about $500 in today's dollars is a non-starter; the Neo Geo was a complete flop sales-wise.

Re:This product is a game changer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411365)

Traditional game consoles will not be able to keep up with the pace of innovation now that a Kickstarter project can come along and do this.

Maybe we should wait until they release this to the publc before making such grand claims? I'm pretty sure this will never sell more than a tiny fraction of the hundred million plus units that Sony, MS and Nintendo will.

Re:This product is a game changer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411379)

Traditional game consoles will not be able to keep up with the pace of innovation now that a Kickstarter project can come along and do this.

Sony and Microsoft are going to have their work cut out for them. If their console is not significantly more powerful than the average PC then Google or any third party company can come along and take their asses to the bank. The linux, steam and android combination really is a game changer and with truly state of the art hardware they could get the hardcore gamers this way.

If a console were released for $1000 but it had massive graphics and computer power I would seriously consider buying it over the traditional $300 console. I think the reason people would be willing to pay is people now want gaming super computers and not just consoles. The first company to offer a true gaming supercomputer will get my money. They say graphics don't matter but obviously they do if people are always trying to buy the latest PC and latest graphics card.

What someone needs to do is create a console which somehow links up multiple graphics cards for under $1000. Call it a gaming supercomputer, and target hardcore gamers via Kickstarter. See how much funds can be raised. See if a custom chip can be designed for the project if enough funds can be raised to be used along side the Nvidia GeForce GTX 590. Allow for upgrading the card or cards and you have it.

You just described the home PC.

Re:This product is a game changer. (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#42411901)

Traditional game consoles will not be able to keep up with the pace of innovation now that a Kickstarter project can come along and do this.

Sony and Microsoft are going to have their work cut out for them. If their console is not significantly more powerful than the average PC then Google or any third party company can come along and take their asses to the bank. The linux, steam and android combination really is a game changer and with truly state of the art hardware they could get the hardcore gamers this way.

If a console were released for $1000 but it had massive graphics and computer power I would seriously consider buying it over the traditional $300 console. I think the reason people would be willing to pay is people now want gaming super computers and not just consoles. The first company to offer a true gaming supercomputer will get my money. They say graphics don't matter but obviously they do if people are always trying to buy the latest PC and latest graphics card.

What someone needs to do is create a console which somehow links up multiple graphics cards for under $1000. Call it a gaming supercomputer, and target hardcore gamers via Kickstarter. See how much funds can be raised. See if a custom chip can be designed for the project if enough funds can be raised to be used along side the Nvidia GeForce GTX 590. Allow for upgrading the card or cards and you have it.

Today, you can get a very cheap (around $50 US) bluetooth ready, 3d accelerated HD Android device in a tiny package, add a controller of your choice ($30-50), and plug it in to your TV to play anything that will run on Android (which as of now is either touch-screen oriented titles, or emulators of very old systems, hence the lack of appeal).

It has never been about innovation per se, but about getting enough software developers on the same page (similar to the dev ecosystem Apple grew around the iPhone) so that the games were plentiful enough to appeal to a huge market. The sea change will be a demand for games with more sophisticated controls, and enough devs all working on the same platform (screen size, controller type, accelerators, etc).

Re:This product is a game changer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411973)

If a console were released for $1000 but it had massive graphics and computer power I would seriously consider buying it over the traditional $300 console.

There are certainly gamer enthusiasts with that kind of money to spend (see reddit /r/buildapc), but you're really in the minority. I doubt the market for a $1000 console is even 5% of the market for a $300 console. With that kind of arithmetic a $1000 console is a non-starter: it would never sell enough units to profit either the hardware manufacturer or the game devs targeting it.

Re:This product is a game changer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42412029)

It "may" be a game changer. The console market is mostly determined by contract agreements for exclusive games, not by hardware or openness. If big name devs can't put their AAA titles on it and Wal-Mart won't stock the shelves, it may also just be an enthusiast device (which gaming PCs already are) or a TV-bound smartphone.

why? (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 2 years ago | (#42411275)

Isn't the point of Android that any app runs on any device? Why would they then need a developer console (I assume for game developers). That implies they'd make games that only run on the console. Even if they set up their own separate app store, the other 99% of android users would probably find it and get all pissed off that their $600 smartphone can't run basically anything in it. That really defeats the intention of the Android OS. They should have just made it a Linux box in that case.

Re:why? (4, Informative)

codewarren (927270) | about 2 years ago | (#42411311)

This is not a "dev" box in the sense that if you are a developer, you need one of these boxes. These are boxes that were specifically awarded to backers that wanted to do development. The only difference between these and the retail boxes is that these are early versions and therefore available earlier than the retail boxes. Also these are in "special edition" cases as a thank you to the devs for their support.

Re:why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411331)

Isn't the point of Android that any app runs on any device?

No, Android is fragmented, so each app has to be rewritten for every device that it wants to run on. I know this because the HypnoSteve told me.

Input devices (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411341)

Isn't the point of Android that any app runs on any device?

How many current games can run on a first-generation HTC Dream (T-Mobile G1)? And how can a game that expects a gamepad run if no gamepad is available? True, the workaround of putting a virtual gamepad at the lower corners of the screen works for one button (Sonic). But extending it to two (Bubble Bobble, Mega Man, Contra, Metroidvania, etc.) runs into problems with players blindly reaching for on-screen buttons and missing them, which only become worse with four or six (Mortal Kombat, Street Fighter).

Why would they then need a developer console (I assume for game developers).

To make sure that their designs adapt well to the Ouya controller and that their graphics engines don't turn into a slide show on the Ouya console's GPU.

That really defeats the intention of the Android OS. They should have just made it a Linux box in that case.

An Android device is a Linux box. Why don't people say GNU/Linux when they mean GNU/Linux?

Re:Input devices (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42412031)

An Android device is a Linux box. Why don't people say GNU/Linux when they mean GNU/Linux?

Because he most likely didn't mean GNU/Linux. In "embedded" devices where you don't need/want to rebuild all tools on the target machine GNU/Linux has been largely replaced by one of the many size optimized alternatives like BusyBox/Linux.

Re:Input devices (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42412269)

Why don't people say GNU/Linux when they mean GNU/Linux?

Because GNU/Linux is a retarded term only meant to stroke rms' ego. Also, Android does not use GNU anything beyond GCC. It specificially kicks out anything GPLed from userspace.

"the Linux stack that is not Android" (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42412425)

Also, Android does not use GNU anything beyond GCC. It specificially kicks out anything GPLed from userspace.

That's exactly my point. Every Android machine is a Linux machine, and every GNU/Linux machine is a Linux machine. Saying "GNU/Linux" is less of a mouthful than saying "the Linux stack that is not Android".

Re:why? (1)

codewarren (927270) | about 2 years ago | (#42411457)

Isn't the point of Android that any app runs on any device?

No.

Why would they then need a developer console

This uses controllers and not a touchscreen.

Re:why? (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 2 years ago | (#42411765)

Well then it DEFINITELY should have been a Linux box just to avoid confusion.

No heat sink (2)

kbg (241421) | about 2 years ago | (#42411299)

What the hell? A fan inside the box? Please tell me this won't be in the final version. Have these guys never heard about heat sinks? The way I would do this would be to have the case be made out of aluminum and the heats sink would be connected to the case utilizing the case itself to dissipate heat

Re:No heat sink (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411433)

What the hell? A fan inside the box? Please tell me this won't be in the final version. Have these guys never heard about heat sinks? The way I would do this would be to have the case be made out of aluminum and the heats sink would be connected to the case utilizing the case itself to dissipate heat

As I understand it, the final version will be aluminium for exactly that reason. You would know the plastic model is just for the devs if you had watched the video. BOOM headshot.

Re:No heat sink (1)

thejynxed (831517) | about 2 years ago | (#42411507)

Microsoft tried that with the first gen 360s. The damned things overheated and killed the chipsets (infamous RROD). Rev 2 and later all included fans inside of the case.

Heat sinks on anything more powerful than a "passive" machine won't cut it.

Re:No heat sink (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411589)

MS stuck the unit inside a plastic case. A case they designed before the actual motherboard.

Heat sinks can deal with pretty much as much power as you want, provided you are willing to use a big enough heat sink. Bolt even an i7 to a 500lb copper lump and I bet it does fine.

Re:No heat sink (1)

kbg (241421) | about 2 years ago | (#42411625)

The Xbox 360 problems can be blamed mainly on bad design and cheap components. It should be no problem to design a computer that can dissipate heat efficiently when you can design it from scratch. The Ouya shares many of the components used in tablets and somehow powerful tables can be built without a fan.

No photo? (4, Insightful)

Gordonjcp (186804) | about 2 years ago | (#42411315)

Surely it wouldn't have killed them to put a photo of the production verson *somewhere* in the post...?

Re:No photo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411363)

That's assuming it actually physically exists.

USB? Excellent! (2)

Short Circuit (52384) | about 2 years ago | (#42411391)

When their Kickstarter began, I sent them a message (along with many other folks, I'm sure) that it needed _some_ means of getting a wired internet connection and/or access to by-wire accessories. USB was one of the possibilities I offered.

Now devs for Ouya can turn around and leverage that USB port to allow the Ouya device to latch on to a PC's network connection. Excellent.

(Page doesn't seem to show if it's USB2 or 3. At this point, I sure hope it's USB 3...)

Re:USB? Excellent! (2)

Narishma (822073) | about 2 years ago | (#42412415)

It has an ethernet port as well as USB.

Re:USB? Excellent! (1)

HideyoshiJP (1392619) | about 2 years ago | (#42412421)

It looks to me like the console has an ethernet port. If for some reason, you need it to connect to a PC, couldn't you use a crossover cable?

"Closed" (2)

markdavis (642305) | about 2 years ago | (#42411395)

I am still not sure I understand the purpose of the OUYA. If it doesn't run existing Android games, then it is just another locked-down device/market from someone else. What's the big whoop? Just the fact that is runs Android?? Wouldn't a device that runs standard Android and has access to all the existing games in Google Play be far more desirable?

The hardware will be near zero-profit and they will just rake in the money from sales of apps on their proprietary "store". Why would developers want to lock themselves into another, different store with different rules, and target only the Ouya?

Wasn't the excitement to have a cheap set-top box that could play inexpensive Android games? If it is a separate, proprietary marketplace, then the selection will be dismal, the prices much higher, and you won't be able to use those apps on any other non-Ouya device.

Plus, if you already paid for Android games on the Google Play or Amazon App Store, they won't run on the Ouya either. I don't see how this is a good thing. Despite it running an Android fork, it is just another semi-proprietary platform.

I would rather pay more for a really "open" set-top box with decent hardware, joysticks, and have it just use Google Play and link to my existing account. They can make money off the box.

Re:"Closed" (0)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 2 years ago | (#42411607)

Android games can be played with a darn joystick is why. For $100! I love that there is now a viable alternative to overpriced, locked in video game systems. Devs have an even playing table now. Gamers will have a multitude of low cost, free or upgrade after you try games. Competition is good, games don't need to have 60+fps, they just have to be engaging and fun to play.

Look out Sony, MS and Nintendo...Ouya's gonna' getcha'!! (p.s. Ouya is pronounced "Wee-Ya")

Re:"Closed" (2)

Bohnanza (523456) | about 2 years ago | (#42411715)

(p.s. Ouya is pronounced "Wee-Ya")

That just ruined it for me.

Re:"Closed" (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42412027)

don't worry, because that's not correct. as the system's startup chime confirms (youtube it), it's oo as in loop. oo-ya.

Re:"Closed" (1)

brunes69 (86786) | about 2 years ago | (#42411781)

You can already play Android games with any PS3 controller. Why would you want to buy ANOTHER piece of kit with a crappier CPU and GPU than your phone, when you can just buy a PS3 controller and use your phone you already own?

Re:"Closed" (1)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 2 years ago | (#42412057)

Not everyone in the world has an Android phone/tablet. Parents would be more inclined to get their kids a video game that doesn't cost $300 - $600 plus after buying a couple of $50+ games/memory card. Games cheaply and conveinently downloaded from an internet connection. This won't be a hardcore gamers console. It'll be an alternative for the masses, IF they don't screw up somehow in the mass production and distribution phase. If it's even somewhat a success, then the company will be in a good position to market a more powerful sequel to this console.

Re:"Closed" (1)

brunes69 (86786) | about 2 years ago | (#42412089)

You are living in the past... by the time this thing gets to mass production in 6-12 months, bargain-basement phones people get for free with their plan will have CPU specs equivalent to this device. It is only running a Tegra 3, it is nothing revolutionary or state of the art... it was the state of the art chip a year ago.

This is exactly why standalone consoles don't have future.

Gamepad genres != touch screen genres (2)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411651)

Wouldn't a device that runs standard Android and has access to all the existing games in Google Play be far more desirable?

Some genres work better with a capacitive multitouch screen. Games in these genres belong in the Google Play Store first and Amazon Appstore once they're successful on Google Play Store. (Amazon charges an annual fee.) Other genres work better with a gamepad. Games in these genres belong in the Ouya store. They could be published in the Google Play Store, but as I understand it, it's not easy to get solid sales figures for external gamepads such as iCade and iControlPad products.

Why would developers want to lock themselves into another, different store with different rules, and target only the Ouya?

Because not all developers already have enough "financial stability" and "relevant experience" to lock themselves into the Microsoft, Nintendo, or Sony platform. And because not all game designs translate well to a flat multitouch screen.

Wasn't the excitement to have a cheap set-top box that could play inexpensive Android games?

The excitement is to have a cheap set-top box that plays inexpensive gamepad games developed by people who happen not to have been born near Austin, Boston, or Seattle.

Plus, if you already paid for Android games on the Google Play or Amazon App Store, they won't run on the Ouya either. I don't see how this is a good thing.

If you paid for a game on a store that carries games designed for a touch screen, you paid for it because you thought the experience with a touch screen was worth the money.

Re:Gamepad genres != touch screen genres (1)

markdavis (642305) | about 2 years ago | (#42411731)

+1 Informative

Thanks for the excellent response.

Re:"Closed" (1)

ikaruga (2725453) | about 2 years ago | (#42411937)

The big whoop is that it's a game console from kickstarter. That is it. It's trendy, people that don't know how to use money will buy it.

Re:"Closed" (1)

fredan (54788) | about 2 years ago | (#42412151)

I am still not sure I understand the purpose of the OUYA. If it doesn't run existing Android games, then it is just another locked-down device/market from someone else.

You are right and this is why the Ouya will fail bigtimes.

This _IS THE_ streaming device for TV/FILM content connected to your TV of century!

Get it? A device that you can play games with and when you tried of the games, watch some movies instead! Or tried of the movies, play some games!

Why is Ouya not in bed with Netflix on thisone? Easy answer; they would f*cking own the world as we know it, stupid motherfuckers!!

Will it take standard controllers? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411515)

Will this take bluetooth standard controllers?
From the video it looks like they are shipping without real directional buttons and instead have the same braindead Xbox design.

Also put the fucking sticks in the middle where they belong, just clone a PS3 controller or thrustmaster and be done with it.

Piece of crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411519)

The only thing this console has going for it is the OnLive service and XBMC. The Tegra 3 was obsolete when they announced it. Perhaps that's why it's so cheap, they're buying up old stock?

I still don't get the Ooya, and I expect itll fail (2, Insightful)

brunes69 (86786) | about 2 years ago | (#42411579)

I already have a phone in my hands that has more CPU power than the Ooya, it has an HDMI port, and I play games on it all the time using my PS3 controller. Why would I buy this device? It seems like it would be LESS convenient than what I already have, which is a powerful game console that follows me everywhere and can be plugged into ANY TV in about 3 seconds.... this is a less-powerful console tethered to my house that would mean something else I have to carry around?

I don't understand who the target market for this thing is or who is going to buy it. I am a geek, a gamer, and an Android fanatic. You would think I would be the ideal target market for this device. But if I don't see any use for it, then I don't think there is much hope in the broader marketplace. To me it is a solution looking for a problem.

They got two things right... that mobile is the future of gaming, and that Android is going to rule the market. But what they got wrong is the assumption that standalone consoles are going to stay around. Who need a standalone console when your phone is more powerful? All you need is a CONTROLLER. They should have put their project into making a seamless bluetooth controller experience that worked for any phone (the PS3 controller solution is great when you have it working but is a bit convoluted for a newbie to set up).

Re:I still don't get the Ooya, and I expect itll f (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411659)

Have you found a good solution for HMDI plugs?

All the ones on my devices are on the back and a bitch to get too. What I want is a way to plug my phone in to the front of the TV area and hook it up to wall power while doing so. A docking device would be best probably.

Re:I still don't get the Ooya, and I expect itll f (1)

brunes69 (86786) | about 2 years ago | (#42411687)

Mine is MHL, so it's just part of the USB jack.

But to be honest, in 6-12 months HDMI out will be obsolete. Miracast mirroing is going to mean no one will bother with wires anymore. My phone supports it, waiting for my TV firmware to be updated. Supported by default in JellyBean 4.1.2

Re:I still don't get the Ooya, and I expect itll f (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411817)

I meant on the other end, or are you leaving this cable in all the time?

I would rather not play games over such a slow link.

Re:I still don't get the Ooya, and I expect itll f (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42411879)

By slow I mean the latency not the throughput.

Re:I still don't get the Ooya, and I expect itll f (1)

kwerle (39371) | about 2 years ago | (#42411673)

I don't have that.

What sales figures for Android controllers? (3, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411683)

I already have a phone in my hands that has more CPU power than the Ooya, it has an HDMI port, and I play games on it all the time using my PS3 controller. Why would I buy this device?

The fact that not enough other people connect PS3 controllers to their phones is enough to discourage game developers from targeting Android phones with PS3 controllers. If I were to develop a game targeting Android phones with PS3 controllers, how big could I expect my market to be? Are there even published sales figures for the iCade or iControlPad to reassure developers that the market for gamepad games on Android isn't entirely unprofitable?

All you need is a CONTROLLER.

And only one Android phone has ever been bundled with one: the Xperia Play by Sony.

the PS3 controller solution is great when you have it working but is a bit convoluted for a newbie to set up

And Android 4.2 broke the Wii controller solution.

Re:What sales figures for Android controllers? (1)

brunes69 (86786) | about 2 years ago | (#42411725)

The fact that not enough other people connect PS3 controllers to their phones is enough to discourage game developers from targeting Android phones with PS3 controllers. If I were to develop a game targeting Android phones with PS3 controllers...

You don't need to "target" people with controllers... a controller in Android is just another input device. You can use a controller in Android with ANY game that supports keyboard input.

And only one Android phone has ever been bundled with one: the Xperia Play by Sony.

Which is what I am saying. All that is needed is a seamless foolproof controller solution, and good marketing, and partnering with publishers. You don't need to make a ground-up console with crappy CPU and GPU specs. Consoles are yesterday's news. They went about this totally wrong.

Analog; gaming keyboard install base; marketing (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42411931)

a controller in Android is just another input device. You can use a controller in Android with ANY game that supports keyboard input.

For one thing, how does an analog joystick translate into keyboard input? For another, the game has to be developed with keyboard input in mind. If there aren't enough people who already carry what the application sees as a gaming keyboard, then developers aren't likely to target Android devices with gaming keyboards, instead targeting other platforms whose users are more likely to already own gaming keyboards.

All that is needed is a seamless foolproof controller solution, and good marketing, and partnering with publishers.

Good luck getting this sort of marketing and partnering in a market already dominated by Microsoft, Nintendo, and Sony, and by devices that aren't widely sold to the public apart from a bundle with 24-month cellular voice and data plan. Perhaps Ouya might be the key to getting this marketing and partnering done.

Re:What sales figures for Android controllers? (1)

am 2k (217885) | about 2 years ago | (#42412017)

You don't need to "target" people with controllers... a controller in Android is just another input device. You can use a controller in Android with ANY game that supports keyboard input.

Anything that's more complicated than "plug it into the power socket and the TV and turn it on" doesn't work in the consumer space, and that includes buying two distinct pieces of electronics you have to combine yourself. Even that people have to set up WiFi is a huge problem at the moment. Don't forget that being an Android fanatic also means that you have a lot more knowledge than the target market.

Touch screen and keyboard/controller input are totally different from a game developer point of view, and need different approaches very early in development. If you would just publish for Google Play or on Amazon, you'd have to support both (since you can't assume that they have more than the standard device), which means a lot of additional work.

Re:What sales figures for Android controllers? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42412071)

This.

The average consumer can't even deal with a receiver and a couple devices.

Who cares? It's all about the software... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42411911)

The expensive part of PS3, Xbox, Wii is not the hardware or hardware development. (Excluding the Cell processor development, which was a big mistake.) The cost is in the software development. If they can't get good game companies on-board it will all be a waste. And if the big game companies do get on-board, they'll port to whoever's hardware has the most viewers. Doesn't look good for an open hardware company any way you spin it.

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