×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Strong Foundations: FreeBSD, Wikimedia Raise Buckets of Development Money

timothy posted about a year ago | from the more-is-still-welcome dept.

The Almighty Buck 113

mbadolato writes "On December 9, 2012, Slashdot reported that the FreeBSD Foundation was falling short of their 2012 goal of $500,000 by nearly 50%. For all of those that continued to echo about how FreeBSD is dying, it's less than three weeks later and the total is presently nearing $200,000 OVER the goal. Netcraft continues to be wrong." And reader hypnosec adds another crowdfunding success story: "The Wikimedia Foundation has announced at the conclusion of its ninth annual fund-raiser that it has managed to raise a whopping $25 million from 1.2 million donors in just over a week's time. ... As compared to last year's fund-raiser, which got completed in 46 days, this year's was completed in just nine days."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

113 comments

c++ (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419109)

how much do i have to pay to get this freebsd to convert everything to c++?

Re:c++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419115)

Sacrifice 3 kittens and a puppy dog.

Re:c++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419199)

Maybe your best bet would be forking the project, getting some developers and paying them for the conversion.

Re:c++ (0)

nosubmit (2800659) | about a year ago | (#42419427)

how much does it cost to hold family members of the developers hostage? C++ for the most part is a toy language. it lacks orthogonality and for a mature language it is more of a mess than any pother language that i can think of that is widely used. just look at iostream, disgusting! programmers too stupid for regex's should stick to simple things like chewing gum while walking after tying their own shoe laces. /rant

Re:c++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419803)

As a Haskell user, I find the fight between C and C++ users really funny.

It's like seeing a 101 year old anachronistic Nazi grandpa fight his wheelchair-bound drooling retard of a son:
"What's the point of your existence, if you don't even re-invent the wheel every time you build a car?!"
"Hurrka Durr! *drool* Derp Durr Hurka Derp-urr!”

Re:c++ (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42421265)

As a Haskell user, I find the fight between C and C++ users really funny.

But will you still be laughing after you finish your undergraduate degree?

Re:c++ (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42422659)

No, he'll be to busy working on his custom xmonad config while he's watching anime and posting about lolis.

Re:c++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42424097)

An effective if unsubtle anti-Haskell troll.

Re:c++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42420083)

Although I would agree that C++ does many things wrong, we have the benefit of hindsight. I'm also not sure where your rant is directed iostream, regex in general, or using regex as part of iostream. The latter would be incredibly stupid in a core library like iostream.

And as far as regex's being the mark of a good programmer as you imply, I pray I never see any code written by you. A regex can be handy for some simple parsing, matching, whatever, but in many situations they fail in 2 major areas: speed and edge cases. It seems nearly every regex I've ever seen in a critical piece of code is the source of countless bugs. The fixes end up adding to a regex until it becomes a huge unmaintainable gorilla. There's a reason many people refer to them as write-only code. Sorry, but hand-written logic usually can be tweaked to run faster anyway, is more pluggable, testable, and typically suffers from less edge cases. Many languages also offer built-in features or styles that are much better at many of the tasks that people use regex's for in other languages (Lisp and Haskell come to mind as two languages that can parse the hell out of things without such nonsense).

Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419545)

Why convert? UNIX is C, period.

But UNIX isn't forever...

Next-gen OS projects are slowly beginning to start up, and would rethink ye olde POSIX concepts from scratch. Using C++ is rather stupid, however, if you can get the same performance from much more productive and secure languages like Go, Rust, Nimrod, etc.

--libman

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (2)

kthreadd (1558445) | about a year ago | (#42419813)

Why convert? UNIX is C, period.

It's a lot of C, but not all C. According to the FreeBSD mirror on GitHub [github.com] the FreeBSD distribution contains the following types of code:

C 78.2%
C++ 12.9%
Shell 5.1%
Perl 1.2%
Other 2.4%

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42420537)

I think just LLVM / Clang is implemented in C++, which is an externally-developed project.

Can't be any active perl code, fortunately FreeBSD doesn't include perl in base.

--libman

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (1)

synthespian (563437) | about a year ago | (#42420561)

On Mac OS X, Unix is a whole lot of Objective-C.
It has the semantics of the purest of OO languages (Smalltalk), but you can mix and match with C. That allows for speed and fast development without the pain and the bugs. It's probably the number one factor for the success of Mac OS as the number 1 Unix out there for users (power users included). No, actually, number 1 OS, period.
If you ask me, Steve Jobs was wright.

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (2)

Guy Harris (3803) | about a year ago | (#42422003)

On Mac OS X, Unix is a whole lot of Objective-C.

...except for the parts that actually implement Unix behavior, which are mostly C with some amount of C++ and perhaps a small amount of Objective-C.

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (3, Informative)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year ago | (#42425457)

We currently have a few C++ things in the base system:

  • LLVM/Clang, the biggest bit, which is the C/C++ (and Objective-C) compiler.
  • libstdc++, libsupc++, libc++ and libcxxrt, which are the old and new STL and C++ runtime libraries, respectively.
  • devd, which is the utility responsible for performing actions in response to device events (USB device inserted, battery low, and so on).

In a few days, there will also be a BSDL replacement for the GPL'd device tree compiler landing. This is a simple tool that converts between source and flattened device trees, and since it is doing a lot of stuff that involves building maps I decided to use C++ and std::map rather than reinvent the wheel or do something ugly involving macros. Performance isn't an issue, since it's intended to parse input files that are typically under 12KB and produce output that is even smaller, so even without optimisation it uses around 10KB of RAM and under a tenth of a second of CPU time. A higher-level language might have been appropriate, but it's also potentially important to be able to include a statically linked copy for recovery, which rules out most high-level languages.

Note that none of the kernel, and no userland utilities essential for operation are written in C++.

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#42419981)

Next-gen OS projects are slowly beginning to start up

Like Plan 9 and Inferno? These have started up a loooong time ago. ;-)

Using C++ is rather stupid, however, if you can get the same performance from much more productive and secure languages like Go, Rust, Nimrod, etc.

Using C++ is stupid even if you can't. The tools support for C++ is outrageous by definition. By the time you have a parser for C++, you have written half a compiler. Give me a break.

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42420603)

The fact that plan9/etc failed to gain popularity doesn't mean UNIX will be the final idea in operating systems until the heat death of the universe...

I wouldn't call everyone who ever used C++ (which is the majority of major game and app projects) stupid, but it's time for it to die. We have languages that are many times simpler and more elegant that give pretty much the same performance.

--libman

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#42421909)

The fact that plan9/etc failed to gain popularity doesn't mean UNIX will be the final idea in operating systems until the heat death of the universe...

For me, they didn't fail. I think they nicely demonstrated that a lot of cute ideas actually work. That's hardly a failure.

I wouldn't call everyone who ever used C++ (which is the majority of major game and app projects) stupid

Neither would I, it's the fact that people had little choice that is stupid, not the people.

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42422387)

Wut?
Novel gcc versions and clang are written in C++. In consequence new versions of FreeBSD and Linux fundamentally depend on C++. It's time to move on and bite the bullet: Implement the resource management using the RAII techniques of C++ or lose in the long run. The classic goto cascades of UNIX have brought us too many security holes already and do not scale. What a senseless waste of developper time!

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#42426269)

Implement the resource management using the RAII techniques of C++ or lose in the long run.

That's a false dichotomy, if I've ever seen one.

Re:Go / Rust / Nimrod trump C++ (1)

apotheon (577944) | about a year ago | (#42426681)

We probably shouldn't trust anything anyone who says "developper" says about programming, anyway.

Re:c++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419811)

And why would you do that? C is for the most part a subset of C++. Large part of code should compile in C++ compiler flawlessly.

Re:c++ (4, Interesting)

synthespian (563437) | about a year ago | (#42420517)

One of the things I like about FreeBSD is their openess to languages (in contrast to OpenBSD, who think C is the only language around...)
Throughout the years, FreeBSD developers reached out for what they thought were the best languages for the job: Modula-3 (for cvsup, though now deprecated), Forth on the boot loader (ideal, right? Can drop you into a little Forth shell), Ruby for ports infrastructure. In that way, they are not prejudiced about programming languages. Users contribute a great deal too. All the things you get in Debian (lots of languages).

FreeBSD developers also have ported important innovations that are open-sourced but lacking in Linux, because of pure ideology (the GPL doesn't play well with others): Apple's Grand Central Dispatch (a framework that implements concurrency *correctly*), and LLVM (which as a side effect, brings C blocks [wikipedia.org] (effectively, closures for C).

Additionally, many vendors support FreeBSD. I, for instance, run Eiffel on FreeBSD (for the world's best introduction to Object Oriented Programming: A Touch of class [touch.ethz.ch]. Common Lisp has vendors that support FreeBSD (LispWorks, Franz), and so has Smalltalk (Cincom, Smalltalk/X). All these vendors have free products and commercial support.

There's nothing stopping anyone from doing whatever they want with C++ on FreeBSD. But seriously, C++? Shouldn't you be looking at D?

Re:c++ (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year ago | (#42425463)

Ruby for ports infrastructure

The ports infrastructure is written in make, not Ruby. You are probably thinking of portupgrade, which is a (deprecated) third-party tool for managing potrs.

Re:c++ (1)

apotheon (577944) | about a year ago | (#42426717)

Yes, portupgrade is separate from the base system, available through the ports system itself. It's only "deprecated", however, in that it used to essentially be "the standard" for ports system front ends, and has been edged out in that regard by portmaster. There are other front ends as well, though, and they're there to provide choices, as is portmaster.

Re:c++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42421749)

Buy a mac.

Re:c++ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42425799)

I've already got a serviceable parka, thanks.

non-Oracle ZFS FTW (5, Insightful)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#42419111)

Thank you FreeBSD, for having a useful ZFS implementation. Countless devices around the world exist because of you.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419143)

Seconded. My FreeNAS server lifts its monocle to you, FreeBSD.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (4, Interesting)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#42419443)

That's my use case as well. I gave them some cash, lord knows I've used their efforts enough.

My surprise when setting up the ZFS server was in how well everything has worked so far. ZFS has also caught corruption a few times, so I'm going to give it props. It has me wondering if it is possible to get the same kind of data integrity on Mac or Windows. As a stopgap, I sync everything important with Unison so that I can see bitrot on the Mac/PC side. I once caught a really nasty corruption in the middle of my Photos directory that rendered several jpegs useless. More recently I caught another, though this time it was just in the preview image so it wouldn't have been a big deal. It makes me wonder what is going on in the directories that I don't sync!

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

Cato (8296) | about a year ago | (#42420323)

For Mac, try the free Zevo ZFS from Greenbytes: http://www.getgreenbytes.com/ZEVO [getgreenbytes.com]

For Windows, if you are willing to use NTFS on an iSCSI volume hosted on ZFS by a FreeBSD NAS, you could still benefit from the checksumming provided by ZFS. See the comments by 3dinfluence here: http://serverfault.com/a/122408/79266 [serverfault.com]

Or you could run a ZFS NAS in a FreeBSD VM on Windows, of course, and use it via SMB from Windows.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#42421285)

For Windows, there is the promise of ReFS, but for now I just don't keep anything irreplaceable on there.

I'll have to give Zevo a spin. I played with the old MacZFS several years ago and decided it wasn't quite ready for prime-time, but I might give it another go. For now, I just end up backing up certain important things to ZFS, and because I use Unison, I have a very high chance of catching corruption as long as the backups are frequent enough. Unison does a two-way sync, but I use that aspect to detect corruption... the sync should only ever try to go in one direction. I've toyed with making my future Mac and Windows machines run as VMs on top of FreeBSD, but that would mean ugly video performance. Not that I game, but still...

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42421779)

Get an HP microserver, cram it full of RAM and 3tb disks, and one OCZ Geography 9 LOL edition for an L2ARC (reliability is not necessary for L2ARC, so long as it doesn't hang the bus or something). Put it under your desk, connect gigabitgigabit, run FreeNAS or FreeBSD. Hello time machine/media server/big fast files.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#42422563)

How much pr0n do you really need?

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (3, Interesting)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#42426837)

I use mine for a few things:
- Media server. This uses surprisingly little space, though that may change when I switch to high-def.
- Backup. This is where all the space disappears to. The 3 computers in the house all target it.
- CrashPlan. Every time a friend or relative has me touch their computer, they get CrashPlan pointed to my server.
- Services. My photos, music, and some other data get shared via various services.

It also makes a nice machine to throw a VM on when you need to.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

ByTor-2112 (313205) | about a year ago | (#42422729)

Seconded. I bought another 8 drives at black friday prices and doubled my RAIDZ2 to 18TB. There just is no alternative to the functionality provided by ZFS. If you need big storage on an open source platform, you either pay a ton for fancy controllers or use ZFS. I've used FreeBSD for over 12 years now and there was only a brief time when I considered an alternative (Dragonfly), but ZFS has me locked in now. I wish the linux guys had gone for it instead of relying on btrfs.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

apotheon (577944) | about a year ago | (#42426737)

ZFS has me locked in now. I wish the linux guys had gone for it instead of relying on btrfs.

Do you mean you wish Linux used a more broadly compatible license than the GPL so it wouldn't have had problems figuring out how to directly support ZFS without violating either license?

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#42426781)

I have to admit that it is a little bit funny that the GPL conflicts with a license that differs from public domain only by requiring attribution.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

apotheon (577944) | about a year ago | (#42428269)

What license do you mean? That does not describe CDDL. There are licenses with "advertising clauses" and so on with which the GPL conflicts, but that's not the reason for CDDL incompatibility.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

Raenex (947668) | about a year ago | (#42426765)

ZFS has me locked in now. I wish the linux guys had gone for it instead of relying on btrfs.

ZFS was patented by Sun and the license they released it under was incompatible with the GPL.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (2)

rdnetto (955205) | about a year ago | (#42420901)

ZFS does work under Linux - my understanding is that the only reason you don't find it in the main repositories (Ubuntu has it in a PPA) is a licensing issue. Or is there some technical issue I'm missing?

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

apotheon (577944) | about a year ago | (#42426777)

The licensing issue is that both CDDL (the license for ZFS) and GPL (the license for the Linux kernel) are copyleft licenses -- and they're not the same copyleft license -- so they are legally incompatible with each other. It's a common problem when copyleft licenses meet. Unless you're playing tricks with shims and wrappers, such as by running ZFS in userspace somehow, or forcing end users to do all the work of setting up ZFS rather than making it quick and easy to set up, you're probably violating the CDDL and GPL by distributing ZFS with a Linux distribution.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

rdnetto (955205) | about a year ago | (#42428103)

Unless you're playing tricks with shims and wrappers, such as by running ZFS in userspace somehow, or forcing end users to do all the work of setting up ZFS rather than making it quick and easy to set up, you're probably violating the CDDL and GPL by distributing ZFS with a Linux distribution.

The official position [zfsonlinux.org] is that the license conflict just means you can't compile it into the kernel, not that you can't publish it as a kernel module.

I acknowledge that there is some controversy over whether kernel modules are considered derivative works, but the fact that proprietary drivers do exist and are often available in the non-free sections of repositories contradicts the idea that the licensing issue alone is enough to stop it. Furthermore, Linus' opinion on the matter seems to be that modules developed for other OSes which are then ported to Linux should not be considered derivative works.

But one gray area in particular is something like a driver that was originally written for another operating system (ie clearly not a derived work of Linux in origin). At exactly what point does it become a derived work of the kernel (and thus fall under the GPL)?
THAT is a gray area, and _that_ is the area where I personally believe that some modules may be considered to not be derived works simply because they weren't designed for Linux and don't depend on any special Linux behaviour.
Basically: - anything that was written with Linux in mind (whether it then _also_ works on other operating systems or not) is clearly partially a derived work. - anything that has knowledge of and plays with fundamental internal Linux behaviour is clearly a derived work. If you need to muck around with core code, you're derived, no question about it.
Historically, there's been things like the original Andrew filesystem module: a standard filesystem that really wasn't written for Linux in the first place, and just implements a UNIX filesystem. Is that derived just because it got ported to Linux that had a reasonably similar VFS interface to what other UNIXes did? Personally, I didn't feel that I could make that judgment call. Maybe it was, maybe it wasn't, but it clearly is a gray area.
Personally, I think that case wasn't a derived work, and I was willing to tell the AFS guys so.
Does that mean that any kernel module is automatically not a derived work? HELL NO! It has nothing to do with modules per se, except that non-modules clearly are derived works (if they are so central to the kenrel that you can't load them as a module, they are clearly derived works just by virtue of being very intimate - and because the GPL expressly mentions linking).
So being a module is not a sign of not being a derived work. It's just one sign that _maybe_ it might have other arguments for why it isn't derived.
Linus
---http://kerneltrap.org/node/1735

So legally, there aren't any issues with running ZFS under Linux, or even distributing binary kernel modules for it. Legally there's no distinction based on the relative difficulty of installation, it's merely a question of whether it's compiled into the kernel or not.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

RobbieCrash (834439) | about a year ago | (#42425433)

Is ZFS on OpenIndiana not feature comparable? I thought OI was a few versions of ZFS ahead of FreeBSD?

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

RobbieCrash (834439) | about a year ago | (#42425435)

Nevermind, as of April FreeBSD caught up and now they're both on ZFS28.

Re:non-Oracle ZFS FTW (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year ago | (#42425467)

A number of ZFS developers work on both platforms, so features flow pretty freely between the two. There's also a Linux ZFS implementation maintained in Gentoo, and they're also pretty good at pushing changes in the FreeBSD direction.

All This Proves Is ... (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419151)

All this proves is that some people are willing to put their money where their mouth is when it comes to things that are important. If only we/they would do the same with some political contributions to those who are trying to change things for the better (human rights, privacy rights, less spying, copyright/patent reform, tort reform, etc, etc, etc).

You can't change the system from the outside. Getting players on the inside requires playing the current incarnation of the game. That requires money.

Re:All This Proves Is ... (5, Insightful)

MysteriousPreacher (702266) | about a year ago | (#42419385)

All this proves is that some people are willing to put their money where their mouth is when it comes to things that are important. If only we/they would do the same with some political contributions to those who are trying to change things for the better (human rights, privacy rights, less spying, copyright/patent reform, tort reform, etc, etc, etc).

You must be an absolute blast to hang out with, if on hearing good news, you feel compelled to whine about lack of involvement in unrelated areas.

Happy Man: I got tickets to go see
Whiner: All that proves is that some people are willing to pay to hear live music. If only we/they would do the same for theatre!

Happy Man: I had to study three evenings a week for years, and now I finally got my degree!
Whiner: All that proves is that people will put in time for things important to them. If only we/they would do the same in cleaning up litter in the neighbourhood.

Happy Man: I had to speak up on this one. It's shameful that women are being denied access to birth control.
Whiner: All that proves is that people will speak up on things that matter to them. If only we/they would do the same for Internet whiners who find themselves derided in posts such as this one.

This is very good news for FreeBSD and BSD in general. Go somewhere and do something to help your pet causes.

Re:All This Proves Is ... (2, Interesting)

nosubmit (2800659) | about a year ago | (#42419469)

"This is very good news for FreeBSD and BSD in general. Go somewhere and do something to help your pet causes." the poster is pointing out that if this is considered newsworthy in the sense that it is surprising and it should make people happy, we are in a sad state. we should really be complaining that freebsd had to suffer on the path to meeting it's goals, and it took an uprising of good hearted doners to compensate for neglect. this is why the OP is upset, and that comes across. so to talk to you in your own language: you're not being helpful. this is very bad news for consumers and humanity in general. go somewhere and do something intelligent. if youwan't to live in your happy world with happy people go look at some lolcats.

Re:All This Proves Is ... (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about a year ago | (#42419597)

Crowdfunding really is gathering some serious momentum though, I'm seeing a lot more projects rapidly exceeding their goals now than a few years back. The word is spreading. Maybe the end of the VC era?

Re:All This Proves Is ... (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#42421711)

No, not the end of the VC era. Crowdfunding as it stands now via the popular implementations such as kickstarter is not investing, its just donations and its not even new. Its only new because some silly projects get massive amounts of money when any VC person would know better than to invest. Ouya as an example. Ridiculous amounts of donations for a project that offers no reason what so ever that it will be anymore than just another Android device, and not even a particularly impressive one at that.

VC is crowd-investment. A bunch of people get together, make a fund and invest in a bunch of businesses knowing 9 out of 10 will go belly up but that 10th one is going to make far more than enough to cover the loss of the others.

The only thing different is because you're doing it on a website from your livingroom with very little effort, you think its new and doing something different.

Re:All This Proves Is ... (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about a year ago | (#42421855)

It is doing something different, you pointed out the differences yourself.

VCs earned the nickname "vulture capitalists" because they have a tendency to pump up companies as quickly as possible and then reap the benefits - the dot com bubble was largely a VC creation. Anytime I see a company with a staff of fifty doing a job that could be done by five, sure enough there's a VC trying to float/seeking rounds of investment from bigger fish behind it. The latest buzzword is "nano", the sexier it sounds the more interested they are. Also to the contrary, crowdfunding isn't just donations, its more like preordering, and is used for this purpose by many companies.

Bottom line is a lot of companies are getting started without having to depend on loans or VCs, which can only be a good thing. The next stage in the evolution will be to allow microinvestment, where instead of donations people can actually buy shares in new ideas, true public investment, and I believe legislation is currently being cleared to allow that.

Re:All This Proves Is ... (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#42421681)

This isn't 'good news', its more of a 'look you stupid BSD is Dying morons, once again you dont' fucking get it' as to refute the last retarded article claiming that BSD had fallen utterly short of its goal.

This is more of a finger to Linux fanboys on slashdot than anything else.

Re:All This Proves Is ... (1)

MysteriousPreacher (702266) | about a year ago | (#42423149)

"This is very good news for FreeBSD and BSD in general. Go somewhere and do something to help your pet causes." the poster is pointing out that if this is considered newsworthy in the sense that it is surprising and it should make people happy, we are in a sad state. we should really be complaining that freebsd had to suffer on the path to meeting it's goals, and it took an uprising of good hearted doners to compensate for neglect. this is why the OP is upset, and that comes across. so to talk to you in your own language: you're not being helpful. this is very bad news for consumers and humanity in general. go somewhere and do something intelligent. if youwan't to live in your happy world with happy people go look at some lolcats.

In their own words, it's normal that 50% of their fundraising comes during their end of year campaigns. Where does the suffering come in to this? Fortunately they're looking to change this.

It is good news in the sense that a group run on donations can't assume those donations will magically come, and in this instance they exceeded their target by a pretty decent margin. I've no idea where you arrived at that interpretation of the ACs post. By my reading it's about people generally being unwilling to put money in to important causes, and I agree that it's difficult to get people to pony up time or cash to causes that are indeed important. However that should detract from cases where it does happen.

In an ideal world a majority, or even a large minority, of users would be donating code, cash or other resources to projects. We'd be calling our elected representatives to keep them in line, and we'd be sickened by the injustices that afflict our societies. In reality, that doesn't happen nearly as often as it should. We seem to struggle to really care about people distant to ourselves, at least in any kind of sustainable way. When crowds are involved, we're individually inclined to assume that someone else will take action, so we don't have to. That's why I think it particularly impressive when people do step away from the herd to take a stand. In the case of fund raising, it's going to be about knowing the right strings to pull - not just assuming that people will pay their "fair share".

It's good news when a project can get people to donate in any kind of serious way. I call that a healthy mixture of optimism and pragmatism - not living in some imaginary lolcat soothed happy world.

Seriously sorry NY weekend if this is news... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419253)

Netcraft has nothing to do with this.

"Nearly $200,000 over" is actually "$180,000" over. I guess 90% is "nearly 100%".

Whatever. FreeBSD will continue to be developed regardless of whether the Foundation
can send people to conferences at no cost to them.

This was never news for geeks and it's still not news for geeks.

Re:Seriously sorry NY weekend if this is news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419287)

you jelly?

Re:Seriously sorry NY weekend if this is news... (2)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year ago | (#42419345)

"Nearly $200,000 over" is actually "$180,000" over. I guess 90% is "nearly 100%".

It's currently $184,905K over, and was before TFA was posted. If you're going to be pedantic about rounding, then you probably shouldn't round in your own comment. There are also a few large pledges (e.g. from Netflix), which may or may not arrive in time to be counted towards the 2012 total. If they don't, then the 2013 total will get an early boost. If they do, then they'll easily push it over the $200K-over mark.

You got it all wrong. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419305)

All those moneyz are for funeral!

Then, don't forget NetBSD (2)

northar (2801909) | about a year ago | (#42419321)

Good, also don't forget to help NetBSD if you can, they haven't reached anywhere near expectations.http://www.netbsd.org/donations/

Re:Then, don't forget NetBSD (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419871)

I did check that page and investigated a bit and found out that the page hasn't really been updated in a while since NetBSD 6.0 has been out for a few months already, and if we check the money gauge image, we get:

    Last-Modified: Wed, 30 Dec 2009 21:30:05 GMT

They probably have gone above the ~$13k the image shows. It just hasn't been updated in three years, for whatever reason.

Linux Foundation and graphics/wifi drivers? (4, Funny)

LourensV (856614) | about a year ago | (#42419331)

Maybe the Linux Foundation (or someone else, they're the first that come to mind) could do a similar thing to raise money for improving the Linux graphics and wireless stacks? How much improvement could we get for a million USD? Or perhaps there are individual developers out there who would do what Poul-Henning Kamp [freebsd.org] did? I'd be happy to contribute to such an initiative. Kickstart it?

Re:Linux Foundation and graphics/wifi drivers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42420085)

Why not Kickstart it yourself? Sounds like a cool idea.

Re:Linux Foundation and graphics/wifi drivers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42420439)

Wireless has been sorted. The broadcom 'mare has gone with new stuff. The company eventually realised it's better to work with, rather than against people. Plus wanting a huge slice of the pie for the billion Android devices that may use their chipsets.

Re:Linux Foundation and graphics/wifi drivers? (1)

synthespian (563437) | about a year ago | (#42420595)

Linux is backed by corporations that sell per-seat licenses.
Linux was just a pawn to drive Sun Microsystems out of business.
Ask Red Hat to do it.

Donate what you can. I give 20 bucks, maybe 40. (1, Interesting)

notdotcom.com (1021409) | about a year ago | (#42419347)

I donate (small amounts) to FreeBSD almost every year, and I don't even use their software currently. They have an important place in the history of Unix-like operating systems, and I have used their software for some great projects in the past.

Wikipedia is so obnoxious with their fundraising, I've stopped donating. The local news recently reported that the most visited page on Wikipedia was "Facebook", and I rarely use it. I did get a kick out of their previous campaign where the staffers photos were above the article - deceptively close to the subject. Searches returned some pretty funny results.

Re:Donate what you can. I give 20 bucks, maybe 40. (1)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | about a year ago | (#42419389)

Wikimedia is different -- a huge directory of public domain images and other media. I use it for just about every school paper I write. There's no inherent bias in "This is a picture of milk thistle"

Wikimedia is doing FSM's work and is well deserving of your support.

Re:Donate what you can. I give 20 bucks, maybe 40. (1)

JustNiz (692889) | about a year ago | (#42419441)

>> There's no inherent bias in "This is a picture of milk thistle"

Sorry but there is. What format is the image stored in?

Any format you want (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42420195)

If you can see it in your browser you can convert it to any format you wish. And the license even lets you do that, if you care about that sort of thing.

So if you feel like having your images in dual-interleaved alpha-channeled bitplany goodness, you can! Personally, I'll stick to jpeg for photos and png for illustrations. Unless it's vectors, then I'll take PostScript please. (warning, bias: SVG implementations suck donkey balls)

Re:Donate what you can. I give 20 bucks, maybe 40. (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#42421721)

Wow, just wow ...

Your statement pretty much proves why wikipedia shouldn't even be allowed anywhere near school research. No bias? Are you 8?

Re:Donate what you can. I give 20 bucks, maybe 40. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42421837)

The picture of the milk thistle inherently encapsulates many of the social dynamics inherent in plant propagation. Clearly the fact that it has etiolated somewhat is also indicative of the effects of global warming on cloud cover. These two spheres of influence create a disparity between the public world of global climatography and the private world of Milk thistle propagation. The author proposes that to properly asses the relationship of these spheres, more funding is needed, as well as the examination of other spheres, both similar and dissimilar.

Re:Donate what you can. I give 20 bucks, maybe 40. (1)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | about a year ago | (#42423231)

Read it again, I said wikimedia not wikipedia. Wikimedia is a great place to get public domain media.

Re:Donate what you can. I give 20 bucks, maybe 40. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419823)

There are many more pieces of software that has an important place in the history of Unix-like OSes. Why donate to this specific one?

This article is misleading (4, Insightful)

nosubmit (2800659) | about a year ago | (#42419397)

this article is misleading and upside down.

if an entity has the following charactoristics:
1- good product (quality)
2- product is appreciated (demand)
3- costs are reasonable (feasibility)
4- has a consumer base with spending power (viability)

then it will NECESSARILY meet it's goals. this is basic economics of supply and demand. didn't we all learn this in highschool?

let me fix this article:

"corporations with crap products who raise money with psychological tactics are increasingly finding it difficult to get funding because of the internet."

i would also add: "projects such as netbsd and openbsd that add enormous value to the lives of every human being are underappreciated because the consumer is ignorant of them, and so they fall short of funding goals some times, and it befalls us as responsible technologists to make sure that they continue to protect our interests with the same selfless, joyful, gracious generosity that we have been able to enjoy for so long without giving much in return"

typing this message just left a bad taste in my mouth. to realize that somehow everyone doesn't get this stuff is sad.

Re:This article is misleading (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42421451)

I see you labor under the myth that capitalism is a simple deterministic system where no outside factors matter. You apparently learned wrong in high school.

46 days with Creepy Jimmy. 9 days without him. (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419433)

That's the difference.

Told ya FreeBSD would make it. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42419509)

Told ya so! [slashdot.org]

But this doesn't mean you shouldn't still donate! ;-)

--libman

Good (1)

gtomorrow (996670) | about a year ago | (#42419779)

Good on both counts. Congratulations.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42420649)

No, the Wikimedia foundation does not need any money. They are just empire building and adding paid positions where none were needed before. It's ridiculous. This was not for servers or continuing costs, this was for adding people to the payroll. In fact, now that most of the articles have been filled out they have less need for a central committee. They should be working on decentralizing the entire system to make it more robust, but noooo....

Fundraisers vs Time (5, Informative)

Alcoholic Synonymous (990318) | about a year ago | (#42419879)

Should I point out that at the point that the FreeBSD fundraiser was on Slashdot as being a failure, it had only been running for 4 days and had reached nearly half of it's goal...?

Re:Fundraisers vs Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42420709)

Damn right, unfortunatelly it was burtied way down in the comments.. Ways bellow the trolls claiming FreeBSD was dead..
12years I use FreeBSD, and I will never switch back to ant penguin-flavor..
BSD4Life.

Re:Fundraisers vs Time (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year ago | (#42425501)

It's a bit more complex than that. The goal is an annual goal and is set at the start of the year. In the past, most of the donations have come towards the end of the year, as they did this year, but they've been quietly raising money all year. It's not like the first $400K came in those first four days: most of it came months earlier. One of the priorities for the Foundation in 2013 is encouraging companies to donate earlier (individuals tend to donate at random times anyway, companies when they realise they want a tax write-off at the end of the financial year). It's not finalised yet, but the goal for 2013 is probably going to be $1m.

INTEL GRAPHICS SUPPORT NOW PLEASE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42420441)

Now maybe there will be some decent intel graphics support so I can run it on my laptops :/ FBSD10, I'm watching you.

Re:INTEL GRAPHICS SUPPORT NOW PLEASE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42421339)

Wasn't that added in 9.1-REL?

Re:INTEL GRAPHICS SUPPORT NOW PLEASE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42421877)

Yes, OP is a troll.

Gemified TTM is currently the only major block in the graphics subsystems.

Re:INTEL GRAPHICS SUPPORT NOW PLEASE (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#42421733)

OSX is the FreeBSD for your laptop. Yes, I know its not FreeBSD per say, but FreeBSD isn't trying to be everything, and its certainly not putting much effort into being an awesome desktop.

If you want a fast server with an awesome filesystem or the fastest TCP/IP stack on the planet, then you want FreeBSD. If you want a desktop GUI OS, you want something else.

Re:INTEL GRAPHICS SUPPORT NOW PLEASE (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42421893)

Desktop or laptop? Try PC-BSD - "PC-BSD® is a user friendly desktop Operating System based on FreeBSD." http://www.pcbsd.org/

Re:INTEL GRAPHICS SUPPORT NOW PLEASE (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year ago | (#42425371)

Sure, PC-bsd is desktop focused, may do it well. May do fine on a laptop as well, I stopped tying to have a bsd desktop years ago and a lot has changed.

I really just meant fbsd isn't so much workstation centric as server centric.

I love Fbsd, haven't had a day without it in my home and office since I switched from Linux and started using 2.2.x back in the day :)

Re:INTEL GRAPHICS SUPPORT NOW PLEASE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42422455)

Disagree strongly. If you can't make it into an awesome desktop, you're not a UNIX nerd.

Half the coolness of FreeBSD is that it's a bit like LFS-lite...you have to understand the system to construct it, it doesn't come canned.

It's quite easy to run the full KDE stack, or GNOME, or XFCE, or XFCE+Compiz, or whatever.

PC-BSD is the canned version, if you prefer.

OS X is only vaguely reminiscent of the reanimated corpse of an old FreeBSD version, with a ton of bolt-on mods, all the way down to device drivers and the kernel.

Re:INTEL GRAPHICS SUPPORT NOW PLEASE (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year ago | (#42425505)

Intel GPU support is in 9.1 and -CURRENT (10.0). nVidia support is available from their blob. The Nouveau stuff is apparently not much effort to port, but no one has done it. The big omission is AMD, because it depends on TTM, which is not yet implemented in FreeBSD.

Wayland (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about a year ago | (#42425963)

In fact, I wish that PC-BSD, if not FBSD, adds support for Wayland, and allows DEs that implement their Window managers in Wayland to run on top of it. While FBSD may want X11 for legacy reasons, I doubt that the same is as true about PC-BSD.

Re:Wayland (1)

apotheon (577944) | about a year ago | (#42428255)

I think you mean you wish that Wayland would grow some support for FreeBSD. It was designed in the first place with the Linux kernel assumed in its target platform, which means some changes need to be made in Wayland for smooth porting to FreeBSD. That, at least, is my understanding (I haven't actually looked at the sources for Wayland).

IPv6 contributions by FBSD (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about a year ago | (#42425959)

Thank you, FBSD, for being a pioneer not only in implementing IPv6, but also producing possibly the first IPv6-only implementation of an OS. I hope that Monowall and pFsense develop advanced IPv6 specific security and routing features that makes them fully usable for that purpose.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...