Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Bloomberg: Steve Jobs Behind NYC Crime Wave

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the well-of-course-he-was-duh dept.

Cellphones 311

theodp writes "Rudy Giuliani had John Gotti to worry about; Mike Bloomberg has Steve Jobs. Despite all-time lows for the city in homicides and shootings, NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg said overall crime in New York City was up 3.3% in 2012 due to iPhone, iPad and other Apple device thefts, which have increased by 3,890 this year. 'If you just took away the jump in Apple, we'd be down for the year,' explained Marc La Vorgna, the mayor's press secretary. 'The proliferation of people carrying expensive devices around is so great,' La Vorgna added. 'It's something that's never had to be dealt with before.' Bloomberg also took to the radio, urging New Yorkers who didn't want to become a crime statistic to keep their iDevices in an interior, hard-to-reach pocket: 'Put it in a pocket in sort of a more body-fitting, tighter clothes, that you can feel if it was — if somebody put their hand in your pocket, not just an outside coat pocket.' But it seems the best way to fight the iCrime Wave might be to slash the $699 price of an iPhone (unactivated), which costs an estimated $207 to make. The U.S. phone subsidy model reportedly adds $400+ to the price of an iPhone. So, is offering unlocked alternatives at much more reasonable prices than an iPhone — like the $299 Nexus 4, for starters — the real key to taking a bite out of cellphone crime? After all, didn't dramatic price cuts pretty much kill car stereo theft?"

cancel ×

311 comments

The real issue (5, Insightful)

cunniff (264218) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422759)

It's not the *cost* of the iPhone. It's the *black market resale value* that drives theft.

It's uncomfortable allowing a third party to be able to permanently brick your phone or other device, but if that were a commonly-used option, the resale value would quickly drop down close to zero.

As always - back up your data, and don't store important personal information on your easily-stolen device...

Re:The real issue (5, Informative)

BradleyUffner (103496) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422847)

It's not the *cost* of the iPhone. It's the *black market resale value* that drives theft.

It's uncomfortable allowing a third party to be able to permanently brick your phone or other device, but if that were a commonly-used option, the resale value would quickly drop down close to zero.

As always - back up your data, and don't store important personal information on your easily-stolen device...

The cost of the iPhone is what drives the black market price up to begin with. If the price from a retailer wasn't so high the amount of money paid for stolen phones wouldn't be nearly as high either (except during shortages) and the incentive to steal them would go down as well.

Re:The real issue (1)

Macrat (638047) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422927)

The cost of the iPhone is what drives the black market price up to begin with. If the price from a retailer wasn't so high the amount of money paid for stolen phones wouldn't be nearly as high either (except during shortages) and the incentive to steal them would go down as well.

Does that imply the $699 unlocked price of the Samsung SIII isn't a high amount since thieves mostly target the iPhone?

Re:The real issue (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423067)

Does that imply the $699 unlocked price of the Samsung SIII isn't a high amount since thieves mostly target the iPhone?

I hope not. The variable being ignored is brand recognition. You're going to have an easier time and probably ultimately make more money off of selling Toyota Corollas on the black market than you are PT Cruisers, simply because more people in the area tend to buy Corollas than PT Cruisers. In the US, it's fairly safe to assume that the iPhone has the brand recognition over the SIII, so it's a safer bet to sell iPhones on the black market than SIIIs. That seems to be a shrinking gap between the two, but it is still there in the US.

BradleyUffner is partially right, though, in that there's not going to be as much demand to pay $400 on the black market what you can buy for similar or less legally. There'll still be some black market present probably, no matter the cost you lower it to, but the lower the price, the less attractive the black market alternative is going to be. Also, at a certain point, when its easier to get it legally and price is no longer an issue, there's probably going to be less people interested in the alternative deal that the black market will present to them.

Re:The real issue (2, Interesting)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423233)

Although one has to wonder how big the market for iPhones really is. It's not the like the vast majority of consumers aren't stuck paying one of the big carriers for a monthly sub anyway, and for them how much cheaper is a stolen iPhone than the carrier price anyway?

But then with phones it's a little easier. The EU has been working on this, stolen phones should be blacklisted from carriers. If you can't resell them, what is the point of stealing them? There is still the overseas market but it eliminates a lot of the casual disorganized piracy, and the EU and US databases should be able to talk to each other.

Re:The real issue (2)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423237)

Followup

http://www.rcrwireless.com/article/20120412/devices/att-verizon-sprint-and-t-mobile-usa-agree-to-block-stolen-phones/

Re:The real issue (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423097)

The cost of the iPhone is what drives the black market price up to begin with. If the price from a retailer wasn't so high the amount of money paid for stolen phones wouldn't be nearly as high either (except during shortages) and the incentive to steal them would go down as well.

Does that imply the $699 unlocked price of the Samsung SIII isn't a high amount since thieves mostly target the iPhone?

Browsing this thread I see that the fandroids are already having the devil of a time trying to figure out what position to take on this one. I mean if you want to be politically correct then you are glad that the crime rate is not up because of Android devices, which brings the added bonus that you can ride this to death trying to demonstrate why anything Apple is pure evil. It must still sting like a sonuvabitch that Android devices appear to be so undesirable that hardly anybody seems to want to steal them.

Re:The real issue (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423275)

Leave it to the mindless Apple fanbois to stop sucking dead Steve's dick long enough to try to twist things around in what was otherwise an actual discussion.

Re:The real issue (4, Insightful)

Ironhandx (1762146) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423101)

The thing protecting the S3 is obscurity. Its harder to identify amongst a host of other cheaper products, On the other hand if they steal an apple phone they know the price is high and that theres a resale market for it and its ridiculously easy to identify.

Re:The real issue (4, Insightful)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423199)

Plus the majority of smartphones in America are iPhones and the majority of tablets are iPads. Even if thieves were blind, and stealing randomly, they'd steal more iDevices than all the other brands added together.

Re:The real issue (1)

Jartan (219704) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422857)

The black market value is heavily influenced by the actual retail price.

Re:The real issue (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422947)

The black market value is heavily influenced by the actual retail price.

Well you have the "black" part right.

But it seems the best way to fight the iCrime Wave might be to slash the $699 price of an iPhone (unactivated), which costs an estimated $207 to make.

No the best way to end all crime in New York is to round up all the gangsta blacks and send them back to Africa. Course nobody wants to talk about this and you will all hate me for saying it. But nobody who hates me for saying that, is so dumb that they will walk their pale white liberal asses down the heavily black inner city areas like Harlem because they KNOW what would happen. They know the gangbangers will not care how not-racist and inclusive you are. They will show no mercy for that. You know that, I know that. Mod me down now, you hypocritical bastards, for not spewing the "correct" party line, yes that's a nice little robot, protect that political correctness like a good programmed little PC-tard. You know I am right so you cannot do it with facts - ah-hah! - mod points will substitute for your lack of facts, yes!

Re:The real issue (5, Funny)

DarkTempes (822722) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422977)

I hope you step on a lego.

Re:The real issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422871)

I wonder if the bigger issue is that people are getting to be bigger and bigger jerks. I wonder if this a statistical study of every type of theft, ethics, and other rude behavior would show the population is just getting more cold hearted in general - the poor are just more obvious about it through direct theft because it is more accepted in their peer group. Other society groups are just more subtle in their bad behavior, or at least less news-worthy.

Re:The real issue (1)

garaged (579941) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422957)

Imtend to think that this is more related to poorness, which leads to less education, more frustation.....

Re:The real issue (1)

tnk1 (899206) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423205)

I'm not so sure that the lack of material wealth necessarily makes you unhappy. What makes people unhappy is either not being able to actually take care of yourself or your family, or it is a belief that you won't be happy without what someone else has.

To be honest, I have two iPhones. One I bought for myself, and one that actually belongs to my work place. They're nice and all, but I could totally see my life without one. In fact, I could have cared less if I even owned a cellphone before my work place in the past insisted that I get one. So now, if I have to have one, I'm going to have a good one, but at the same time, I don't think that the lack of an iPhone would make me unhappy on it's own.

Most times, I think the problem with poverty comes from either your worth being derived from material belongings, or the fact that you are not allowed to support yourself in a way that makes you feel like you have value. I've met janitors who are not unhappy, and I have met more than one upper middle class IT worker who hates their life while having just about every gadget you can think of, as well as a nice house, and a pretty nice car. Of course, being poor is more than just a state of mind, but I am not certain that it actually deprives you of any opportunity for happiness unless you are truly starving.

Re:The real issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422883)

Its "living in a shithole" that drives theft. The people of NYC would want to get their act together.

Re:The real issue (2, Insightful)

icebike (68054) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422891)

Agreed.
Now that the major carriers have all agreed to kill phones that are reported stolen [pcmag.com] (like most European carriers) , the in-country black market value should drop to zero.
There is still the export option for stolen phones.

But to a certain extent the price of the phone sets the black market value as well. And that price is just too high.

And further, I have my doubts about the claim at the bottom of the summary:
  The U.S. phone subsidy model reportedly adds $400+ to the price of an iPhone.

According to Apple's own web page [apple.com] the cost of an unlocked an contract free iphone5 (cheapest model) is $649. ($849 for the one with the big GBs).

So how does the subsidy enter into that equation?

It shouldn't unless Apple is propping up the price to support Carrier subsidy plans.

But why would Apple do that? The carriers make every cent of that subsidy back and never reduce the price of your monthly bill. Apple could sell at 100% markup and still beat carrier pricing. Instead Apple sells at well over 200% markup even when you buy direct with cash up front. No other manufacturer rakes in that much cash.

T-Mobile is ending subsidization of phones. (You can still buy it on time, but its a separate contract that has an end date).

Re:The real issue (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423171)

Where do you get this "Apple sells at well over 200%" markup idea from?

Re:The real issue (0)

icebike (68054) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423235)

The purported manufacture price is estimated at $207. See link in summary.
Apple sells from their website with zero subsidy for &649.

100% markup over cost would be $414.
200% markup over cost would be $621.

Re:The real issue (5, Insightful)

tnk1 (899206) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423257)

I think that Apple charges that price not to support subsidies, but rather, because they know they can charge what they want and subsidies will make it affordable for end users. It's like health care or education. If the government makes it so you can get grants or low interest loans, then that means you can make your undergrad programs 25-30K a year, and most people will still be able to pay it. Apple counts on the cell phone companies for spreading the very high cost out so that it doesn't look like it is as much as it is.

Of course, there is certainly a level of symbiosis involved, but I think Apple looked at existing situations with subsidies and saw a pricing scheme that would allow them to break into a market with their high markup items and have it not sting as much for the end user. Apple can not, and to their credit, will not compete in situations where there they will be unable to secure a high unit price for their product. The wireless market was a slam dunk for them, in that regard.

Re:The real issue (2)

sribe (304414) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423279)

Instead Apple sells at well over 200% markup even when you buy direct with cash up front.

Which of course explains why they "only" get 45% margins on iPhones. Oh, wait, no it doesn't ;-)

Re:The real issue (2)

Roblimo (357) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422903)

Whatever. Somehow I doubt that the black market resale value of the HTC Android phone I bought from Virgin for $149 is anywhere near the black market resale value of an iPhone.

Re:The real issue (5, Funny)

Roblimo (357) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422943)

In fact, for the cost of an unlocked iPhone I could buy an HTC Android phone and a .22 pistol and get a Florida CCW and still have enough money for a whole lot of whiskey to drink at home so I don't have to go out and expose my precious smarty phone to criminals in the first place.

Yeah!

Re:The real issue (5, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422911)

The cause of theft: people carry items worth stealing!
The cause of rape: ?

Please follow the same logic and see how idiotic it is.

Re:The real issue (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422967)

Its not idiotic, its just that one case is obvious, and the other case is politically incorrect.

Flaunting wealth without a deterrent would get you robbed in every civilization since the dawn of mankind.

Re:The real issue (1)

icebike (68054) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422995)

Lets blame the victim, eh Mr Mayor?

Re:The real issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423013)

Makes sense to me. There are things you can do to minimize the risk of any activity, whether it's `using an expensive phone` or `going outside`. It's like no-one is saying `there are no go areas for black (or white, for that matter) people - you just shouldn't go there` but it's common sense to avoid badly policed areas populated with a lot of people with differing skin colour where there's history of crimes predominantly against people of differing skin colour.

Re:The real issue (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423157)

Wrong. Rape is not caused by economic forces. But theft is (so are drug murders, auto theft, bank robberies, etc.). The black market is still a market and the laws of economics apply. At some point the benefit for stealing an iPhone is greater than the risk of going to jail. But the benefit for stealing X-crapphone is not. The only way to prevent the iPhone/iPad/iWhatever from getting to the black market is to make the cost to get it there (the risk of stealing it and/or having it be bricked) be higher than the price on the open market. Several things can elevate this risk, such as educating people about theft (like Bloomberg has done), increased enforcement, remote bricking, and increased penalties.

Re:The real issue (3, Insightful)

Half-pint HAL (718102) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423267)

The cause of theft: people carry items worth stealing! The cause of rape: ?

Please follow the same logic and see how idiotic it is.

Let's take your logic the other way:

The cause of being kidnapped and executed in drug-lord-controlled areas of foreign countries: visiting drug-lord-controlled areas of foreign countries

Well you're right: it's not the cause, but a contributory factor. I would appreciate being told where these drug-lord-controlled (or guerilla-rebel-held) areas are so that I can avoid them. And if I have to pass through them, I would appreciate advice about how not to get kidnapped for ransom.

Re:The real issue (1)

antdude (79039) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423065)

And add security and encryption!

Re:The real issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423071)

It's uncomfortable allowing a third party to be able to permanently brick your phone or other device, but if that were a commonly-used option, the resale value would quickly drop down close to zero.

There is a list of phone IDs which phone companies should reject. It works for all mobile phones (not just smartphones). The idea is that phones shouldn't be interesting to steal if they can't connect to make phonecalls.

Something is flawed in this plan though as we can see phones are still being stolen. Don't ask me what is wrong with it though. The few (3?) countries allowing usage of stolen phones are just part of the explanation.

Worst headline ever (4, Insightful)

kthreadd (1558445) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422767)

Interesting statistics, but seriously Steve Jobs died in 2011. And even if he was still alive he personally would not be responsible or connected to any form of crime wave in New York.

Re:Worst headline ever (5, Insightful)

doku_hebi_ryu (864351) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422785)

It's not just the headline. The whole thing is google fanboy trash.

Re:Worst headline ever (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422971)

How dare you call the Google defenders 'fanboy'. Thats their word for insulting people who chose a certain brand they don't!

Re:Worst headline ever (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423137)

There isn't even an article here. It's just a troll summary with a bunch of unrelated links pimping Android devices. At least if they would have compared the SIII to the iPhone, it would be so blatant. The Nexus 4 has no storage or even LTE... It's right inline with the free phones.

How the hell does he equate "Crime Is Up and Bloomberg Blames iPhone Thieves" to "Bloomberg: Steve Jobs Behind NYC Crime Wave"? That is libelous, since using the "Bloomberg:" prefix implies that it is a Bloomberg quote, which it isn't.

Re:Worst headline ever (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423259)

mod this up.

I've seen better headlines in the national enquirer...

So by the logic of this article... (4, Insightful)

CajunArson (465943) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422777)

So they are saying that it is "unfair" that iWhatevers cost a bunch so making them cheap means nobody will steal them.

So using this jumping-the-tracks train of logic, we should make guns free so no criminal will ever want to steal one. BINGO!

Re:So by the logic of this article... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422901)

You dimwit, crimes connected to guns are not gun thefts. If gunshot people could be revived for cheap, gun thefts would be low :D

Re:So by the logic of this article... (1)

gutnor (872759) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422959)

Does not work for gun, since there are other benefit of stealing one (no link to you). However, that works quite well with about everything else. Car, jewellery, tv, ... all of those things that are stolen because they are expensive (and the company selling them is making a profit, which somehow in the article logic make it worse)

Re:So by the logic of this article... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423133)

That is the dumbest and least-helpful analogy I've ever read. The correct rebuttal to the summary is that $200 in your pocket is still a juicy pickpocket target, i.e. you can't drop the price enough to make smartphone theft unworthwhile. At best the thieves would switch to the next-most-expensive brand, but more likely the iPhone would remain a prime target due to trendiness.

Breaking News! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422781)

Criminals steal overpriced items to pawn them off for a decent sum of money

This is borderline ridiculous (5, Insightful)

itsphilip (934602) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422787)

The way this is written is so absurdly biased; if you want to promote Android devices, just come out and say it. Don't use some arbitrary statistic to promote your agenda. That's like blaming the former CEO of Lexus for making a desirable vehicle that is prone to theft as a result of its desirability or popularity.

Re:This is borderline ridiculous (2)

statusbar (314703) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422917)

No, really, it is Steve Job's fault - personally - that since the devices are loved so much by users, the re-sale black market price is high allowing big profits for people who steal them. If ONLY Steve Job made the products lousy, no one would pay for them! and no one would steal them!

Uh.... I wonder if the criminals DON'T steal the Android phones?

Criminal: "Give me your iPhone!"

Geek: "I have an Android phone!"

Criminal: "Darn, ok you can keep your Android."

???

Re:This is borderline ridiculous (4, Informative)

Krishnoid (984597) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423039)

a desirable vehicle that is prone to theft as a result of its desirability or popularity.

Offtopic, but Lexus doesn't even figure in the top ten [jalopnik.com] . I think the Honda Accord and Civic have topped that list for years -- earlier-model ones, for that matter.

Re:This is borderline ridiculous (1)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423125)

The way this is written is so absurdly biased; if you want to promote Android devices, just come out and say it.

I don't think they're trying to. I'd infer one a few possibilities, possibly more than one:

*Apple has, through a marketing blitz, become synonymous with personal electronic gadget. So a crime wave of electronic gadget theft makes people think Apple.

*Apple devices have a high market share, so their devices probably constitute a high fraction of gadget thefts

*Apple devices may have a better black market value due to ubiquity and appeal.

The quotes come from city officials - I don't think they have any sort of anti-Apple bias

The way the slashdot summary is written is clearly joking, sonic boom *whoosh* sound impending

Re:This is borderline ridiculous (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423187)

People buy Lexus who don't actually like cars. They just want a sofa on wheels with a prestige brand. It's not the same. Take the IS-F. A sports car with a torque converter? Very enjoyable.

Victim blaming (2, Insightful)

enabran (1451761) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422803)

If you don't want to have your iPhone stolen stop using it in public.

Great.

Re:Victim blaming (3, Funny)

BradleyUffner (103496) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422885)

If you don't want to have your iPhone stolen stop using it in public.

Great.

Or stop advertising that you have one on you by wearing it like a fashion accessory. Ahh, wait, that would defeat the entire point of owning one. What a dilemma.

Re:Victim blaming (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422935)

Or stop advertising that you have one on you by wearing it like a fashion accessory. Ahh, wait, that would defeat the entire point of owning one. What a dilemma.

If you dress that way, you deserve to be raped.

"Wearing"? (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422999)

Or stop advertising that you have one on you by wearing it like a fashion accessory.

Who "wears" an iPhone or iPad? Usually they are kept in pockets or jackets or backpacks.

The problem is that the whole point of having any kind of phone, much less a smartphone, is that you can receive calls, make calls, or look up things as you wish. If you lock your device away out of fear until you are in a private space then what is the point of having something portable?

Re:"Wearing"? (3, Insightful)

Rockoon (1252108) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423123)

Who "wears" an iPhone or iPad? Usually they are kept in pockets or jackets or backpacks.

In my experience they are usually kept about chest height in front of the owner, in their left hand, and the owner is paying almost no attention to anything other than their iDevice.

Ban IPhones (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422815)

If banning guns will cut down on crime, this is absolute proof that banning I-Phones and I-Pads will also reduce crime. At the very least I-product owners need to have background checks and get registed and licenced to carry them. Also I-Pad 2s should be outright banned. Who in their right mind actually needs and I-Pad 2? The retina display isn't that much better and all it is doing is fuleing a crime wave.

Challenge: Tell me why my post is wrong, but banning gus is right.
LOL

Re:Ban IPhones (-1, Troll)

Tapewolf (1639955) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422919)

Challenge: Tell me why my post is wrong, but banning gus is right.

Guns are designed for no other purpose than to kill or maim. Easy availability allows for more and deadlier crimes, so their use should be restricted. However, Apple devices are the targets of crime owing to their desirability.

There were robberies before iPhones and iPods and there will be robberies still when they are long forgotten. But reducing the availability of deadly weapons makes them harder to pull off.

Re:Ban IPhones (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423003)

Challenge: Tell me why my post is wrong, but banning gus is right.

Guns are designed for no other purpose than to kill or maim. Easy availability allows for more and deadlier crimes, so their use should be restricted. However, Apple devices are the targets of crime owing to their desirability.

There were robberies before iPhones and iPods and there will be robberies still when they are long forgotten. But reducing the availability of deadly weapons makes them harder to pull off.

I am so very glad that banning drugs has stopped anyone from doing them. Oh, wait...

Re:Ban IPhones (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423143)

My guns must be defective. They've never killed or maimed anyone despite being fired tens of thousands of times.
 
Understand, Tapefuck, I will never... EVER... disarm. So get that shit out of your mouth right now.
 
Don't blame the law abiding citizen for what a criminal does. Guns are not only designed to maim and kill. So go fuck yourself in the ass. Your memes are lies and they're tired lies at that.

Re:Ban IPhones (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423161)

If banning guns will cut down on crime, this is absolute proof that banning I-Phones and I-Pads will also reduce crime. At the very least I-product owners need to have background checks and get registed and licenced to carry them. Also I-Pad 2s should be outright banned. Who in their right mind actually needs and I-Pad 2? The retina display isn't that much better and all it is doing is fuleing a crime wave.

Challenge: Tell me why my post is wrong, but banning gus is right.
LOL

Because no one can walk into a crowded public place and kill a dozen people with an iPhone or iPad? Though I suppose you might be able to take down one or two slow moving people with a strike to the head with an iPad.

Furthermore, your iPod can save your live by stopping a bullet: http://www.gadgetcrunch.net/2007/04/06/ipod-stops-bullet-saves-soldiers-life-in-iraq/ [gadgetcrunch.net]

High Quality Gear (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422819)

Whatever geek.com's writing, I'm sure little has changed in the theft of high-end car-gear from the likes of Pioneer & co.

maybe rolex should reduce their prices too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422823)

since nobody will mug you for a cheap ass timex, lel.

Warrant for his arrest (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422825)

Have they issued a warrant for Steve's arrest? Quick, before he flees the country.

Bloomberg is a douche (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422831)

Always has been and always will be.

Link-bait headline. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422835)

Really? Are headlines like this what Slashdot has become?

I've been reading this site for over 10 years, and posts like this are just sad link-bait.

Re:Link-bait headline. (0)

Roblimo (357) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422949)

It's irony, dudelet. RTFM. See? It's dumb, and it's on Slashdot so smart people can laugh at it.

10 years and you haven't figured out that Slashdot jumped the snark long ago?

Snark has been a Slashdot feature since day one.

Heh.

Bloomberg is too busy... (4, Insightful)

dfenstrate (202098) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422853)

...Being a lecturing nanny to actually see that the normal functions of a city government are performed.
Note his wars on large sodas and restuarant menus, while bedbugs run rampant.
He wags his finger at Apple because crooks are loose in his city. And he has his PIs make straw purchases of firearms in far-away states, violating federal law for masterbatory political posturing.
Why do New Yorkers elect this clown?

Lock up the entire underclass, problem solved. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422859)

Or you could bend over and let them fuck you up the ass, if you
were a Slashdot editor.

Is Apple responsible for stolen devices? (3, Informative)

ark1 (873448) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422863)

At least one lawyer successfully sued Apple and got compensated [iphoneincanada.ca] when his previous toy got stolen. Why take responsibility for your actions when you can blame someone else?

hahahha... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422865)

Even for Slashdot this summary is so absurdly written as to bury whatever interesting point it tried to make. I laughed out loud.

If you want to be clever, by all means, be clever, but don't expect the rest of us to take you, your ideas, or anything you'll have to offer from here on out, seriously.

Got my iphone stolen in nyc (0)

bradrum (1639141) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422867)

It was interesting to watch its location go directly to Flushing Queens ( biggest chinatown in the city for those not in the know). Called up the local precinct and they told me I had to file the report in the precinct that it had been stolen in. Then I had to track it down myself and contact the precinct where the phone ended up in.

Kojack is a fictional character so I said "screw that" and just wiped the thing out. Getting my irish ass karate chopped ( much higher odds on their end ) and my organs sold on the black market in some Flushing back ally were the last way I needed to die over an iPhone. While it would have made a cool premise for a low budget action pict, I can think of more dignified things to die over.

Re:Got my iphone stolen in nyc (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422963)

I can think of more dignified things to die over.

You're not man enough to live in NYC.

Re:Got my iphone stolen in nyc (1)

bradrum (1639141) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423029)

Who said I was one?

History repeating (1)

bickerdyke (670000) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422887)

It was exactly the same when cellphones themselves were expensive gadgets. Their price dropped over the years and now they're pretty commonplace.

Article Failure... (1)

Delarth799 (1839672) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422893)

Thieves will steal whatever they can to make some money, especially easy money since people don't keep their phones/tablets locked to themselves. They don't care if its an iPhone or not and I bet if all android type phones were lumped into a single category they would be just as high in theft rate as iDevices and maybe even higher. Sure some criminals might see the iDevice and know exactly how much they can pawn it for and maybe make a bit more compared the numerous devices by other manufacturers but that's about it.

Zombie attack (3, Funny)

Tough Love (215404) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422897)

Unbeknownst to Steve, his new liver was infected with zombie juice. He didn't stay buried long. Hordes of zombies wielding iPhones now attacking New York subways, lead by Steve or what remains of him.

Blame Visa Debit Cards and Electronic Payments (5, Interesting)

l0ungeb0y (442022) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422905)

I imagine that most people (such as myself) don't carry any significant quantity of cash on them anymore since most every Retailer and Restaurant will take a Visa Debit card issued from your bank.

So it only makes sense to go after iPhones and iPads since going after someone's wallet will typically net you $60 or less, while you can offload that shiny iGadget for a couple hundred.

If it weren't iDevices, it'd be something else.
The real culprit here is a profound culture shift from cash based shopping to electronic payments.

Re:Blame Visa Debit Cards and Electronic Payments (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423273)

I would think the reverse is true. People who use money, carry more money on them at a time because of ATM fees. Before ATM fees, you could take out 20$ here, 20$ there and be able to cover expenses. With 2$ ATM fees, you want to take out 200$ at your home ATM, thus saving you 20$ in fees. So people carry more money around with them than before... Those of the people who use money.

Problem already largely solved... (1)

Shoten (260439) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422923)

I'm from the DC area, and we had the same problem. Chief Lanier (our chief of police) along with other counterparts from other major urban centers with a lot of iPhones, have had the same problem...and they pushed the cellular carriers to make it possible (as it already has been in Europe for a long time) to essentially blacklist stolen devices. As we speak, the system is going into use, and soon stolen iPhones will be basically worthless. iPads are a little different, since you can do most of what you want with one using only wifi, but these are also less prevalent and less often stolen.

Re:Problem already largely solved... (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423017)

and soon stolen iPhones will be basically worthless

Except, in New York City, apparently, where they still seem to have some worth.

Bloomberg was on the cutting edge on the soda size issue, though . . .

Re:Problem already largely solved... (1)

guruevi (827432) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423111)

All iDevices (and most upscale Android devices) can be remotely bricked if set up properly. The problem is 90% of the owners have no clue this is a free service that would immediately drop the want for expensive bricks.

The REAL issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422931)

Mass immigration and multiculturalism. It never has worked and never will. It always causes horrible problems.

Other markets (1)

jbolden (176878) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422951)

This post is nonsense. The iPhone is expensive in unsubsidized markets. A $400 subsidy doesn't add $400 to the price rather it is a subsidy what consumers pay. As for American phone subsidies. Phone subsidies have been a crucial component of building America's cellular infrastructure. It may be completely irrational but that irrationality doesn't change the fact:

a) The quality of one's total cellular experience is highly dependent on the quality of the handset.
b) The better the cellular experience the more one is willing to pay.
c) Adding the price of the phone to the monthly reoccurring services doesn't change the total amount much (i.e $400/20 = $20 / mo).

So it makes sense to subsidize the handset and add the cost to the monthly bill.

Let's blame inanimate objects (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422961)

Just another case of Bloomberg blaming inanimate objects instead of the actual people making the decisions.

The Actual Real Issue (1, Interesting)

TwineLogic (1679802) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422989)

Is tracking software -- the kind users install named "Find My iPhone" or "Find My Android." In anticipation of the day when their device may be stolen or lost.

Here in Seattle, WA, the police are also responding to a great surge in these theft calls. The reason is simple: if they do not respond, the owner might take the law into his or her own hands (or the hands of their posse, in some cases). The police would rather intervene and not have people get into such risky situations.

Otherwise, the usual response to property crime of such a low value would be to take a report and move on. A detective would not be assigned to a lost $600 item. A recovery would not occur. The stolen item would be gone.

With owner-installed Find My [Property] using GPS + Cloud applications, law enforcement is being moved into a citizen-responsive mode. The "dispatching detectives" are the citizen running a web app, reporting the location of the stolen item. The radio transmission relays some information along the lines of, "victim has tracked the item to a particular building and believes he can hear it ringing upon his command." And the police units are on the way post haste to intervene on that potential scenario.

The same is happening with Android, but to a reduced extent. Some cheap-o Android devices are no doubt not tracked. Possibly the user experience for person who lose their smart phone is discrepant between platforms.

At least one moving "stolen" phone I heard a report of turned out to be in the back seat of a taxi. That is where it had been lost the night before. There were multiple police chasing the location reports around while the citizen in the GPS-web loop called the moves... Eventually the taxi they were following became apparent and the case was solved.

Meanwhile, if I lost a Fluke Scopemeter (hypothetical possession; please send me one), I would be out a $2400 portable meter. It does not have a Find My Flukemeter that I could otherwise use to pursue asset using dynamics.

If the robbery was an armed robbery and the victim can identify the suspect later, the police are proactive in using the same tracking software to collar the perpetrator for the major crime.

Just trollin... but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42422991)

If gun crime is at an all time low and iThing crime at an all time high.

Maybe they should ban all apple products and tar and feather anyone who disagree's.

price cuts didn't kill car stereo theft (1)

slew (2918) | about a year and a half ago | (#42422997)

After all, didn't dramatic price cuts pretty much kill car stereo theft?

The general consensus of criminologist is that two factors killed car stero thefts...
First, car manfacturers started putting in better stereos into most cars reducing the market for stolen car stereos.
Second, it was much easier to fence GPS navigation devices in glove boxes than spend the time to rip out the car stereo.

So with this logic, we should force carriers to only give out smart phones for free (you could still get a feature phone for $40) and have people carry easy to fence sunglasses and gold jewelry.

Re:price cuts didn't kill car stereo theft (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423083)

The other thing of course is that now so many manufacturers have strange custom bezels for the stereo, so if you rip a stereo out of a car it will only fit the same make and model. Furthermore, these days the stereo display is integrated into the dashboard, and the controls are integrated into the steering wheel. So, even if you remove the stereo and fit it to an identical car, the serial numbers don't match up and it won't work properly.

Re:price cuts didn't kill car stereo theft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423155)

Not to mention being barely able to remove them without tearing them to pieces.

Terrible submission (2)

Mr_Silver (213637) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423005)

But it seems the best way to fight the iCrime Wave might be to slash the $699 price of an iPhone (unactivated), which costs an estimated $207 to make.

Only if you ignore such pesky things like R&D, salaries, buildings, administrative staff, operating costs, tooling costs, distribution, packaging, marketing and so on.

Apple make a good profit from their handsets, but not the three times that the submission implies. It's also worth noting that whilst the Nexus is impressively priced, the only Android OEM that is really making any money is Samsung - everyone else isn't doing quite so well.

No. (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423007)

It's uncomfortable allowing a third party to be able to permanently brick your phone or other device, but if that were a commonly-used option, the resale value would quickly drop down close to zero.

And the Slashdot crowd would be screaming EVEN LOUDER about proprietary "walled gardens".

Price isn't the issue (1)

richardtallent (309050) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423031)

An Samsung Galaxy S3 is almost $600 unlocked as well.

Instead, Apple should SQUASH the black market by making it easy for customers to report a device stolen. Once reported stolen, Apple should brick the phone remotely and contact the service provider to have the IMEI blacklisted.

AT&T and TMobile just started blocking blacklisted IMEIs last month. As other carriers follow suit and companies like Apple make it easier for the average consumer to make the report, thieves will eventually learn that the devices are worthless.

Awfully bad summary (1)

Kyusaku Natsume (1098) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423043)

This is an awfully bad summary. There is no need to try to be snarky from the beginning. Also, what Bloomberg's press secretary said is so stupid that is fitting for the Innocent's day, the spanish and latin american version of April's fools that was yesterday.

Of course thieves and muggers will try to steal expensive gadgets. People don't wear expensive jewelry like in past years because it is out of fashion and, unlike jewelry, gadgets can perform an useful function so they are a more common and convenient target than wallets full of credit cards and no cash, jewelry or expensive watches.

Instead of saying stupid stuff to the press the mayor should blame the thieves themselves, the growing income gap that makes easier to rationalize crime for people that don't have anything to lose, or the bad economy for the increase in crime instead of Apple o any other consumer electronics company.

Use a Cheap Basic Phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423061)

Iphones and Android stuff are "smart phones" in that only dumb people use them (save medical and other professionals who need web/apps to look up things like medications on the go). Data costs are terrible, its cheaper if less convenient to look things up on a wifi network; just like cooking rather than takeout/restaurant food is cheaper (and better for you).

Carry a disposable basic phone costing less than $50 at Wal-mart, no contract, don't keep that much money on it, you're out at most $70 or so. The thug will get less than $5 for it, street value. That basic phone will make calls, get voicemail, get and send texts just as well as a smartphone. You can get a new one whenver you want.

Electronics have gotten to the point where investing any real money in them is a waste. They're all cheaply made in China. Outmoded within a year.

The real problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423093)

is a nasty city of animals.

The Modern American Way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423099)

It's always someone else's fault for the failings of others. We've removed a lot of personal responsibility in the past 3 decades. Welcome to modern society, where personal responsibility is always someone else's job.

Michael Jordan behind NYC Crime Wave (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423131)

Mayor from 1990 says "don't wear expensive basketball shoes like the Air Jordan".

If you outlaw iDevices (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423135)

only outlaws will have iDevices.

It's not Jobs (1, Flamebait)

kawabago (551139) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423139)

It's the American public rushing out to buy 'luxury' 'designer' goods at prices far beyond their worth. Lose the label envy and you'll solve the problem.

Re:It's not Jobs (2)

DaMattster (977781) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423263)

Ah if only it were that simple. Americans consume excess out of status envy, depression, inferiority-complex ... you name it. They don't call it retail therapy for nothing. The subliminal messages in the ads try to make you feel inferior or backward if you don't buy the latest and greatest gadget. Ignore the ads, work on your self-esteem in positive ways, and gain a sense of independence.

By that logic... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423203)

If you take out all of the murders from the crime report, NYC's murder rate was essentially zero. Well done, New York.

What needs to be done to stop these crimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42423215)

There are many items which need to be done to stop these crimes and ensure public safety.

1) All cell phones, smart phones, iPhones and other electronic devices need to be registered with the government and local police

2) Owners of these devices must submit finger prints, self-photos, home address, work address, to be confirmed and approved valid before these items can be bought, brought home, used, or transported.

3) Owners must submit to training for these devices as well as medical background checks. This will ensure no dangerous or unauthorized usage of these devices occurs.

4) Devices need to be installed in the cars of the owners of these devices, which will automatically turn off the engine of the car, when these devices are used. This will save lives, as it is proven driving and text or using these devices in anyway causes deaths almost at the same level as firearms.

5) When the devices are no longer required by the owner, it will be surrendered to the government or local police.

6) Police and government will be allowed to search the homes, cars, places of work and any other place the owner of these devices might be or have gone. This is to ensure public safety.

7) Wait periods of 45 days is required for all new or used devices after they are bought.

8) strict guild lines are required to ensure the safe storage of these devices. With these guide lines, public safety is at risk.

9) Names, addresses, place of work and other information will be placed on line to ensure the public knows who has these devices, and where these devices are located at all times.

10) All voice and data transmissions will be recorded, stored, and listed to by the Government and Police. This will ensure there are no miss use of these devices.

Only by creating new laws and removing all privacy and other rights, include the right to protect one self from others including the Government, will the public be safe.

Perhaps there should be an UN resolution to bring these changes to all self-governed countries like the US, Canada and Iran.

Meh (1)

DaMattster (977781) | about a year and a half ago | (#42423241)

This is a nationwide problem and thus not unique to NYC. I live in the DC area and device theft is so much of a problem that DC Metro Transit Police have warnings posted everywhere as well as pretty good prevention tips.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...