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Foursquare Will Display Users' Full Names By Default

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the that-will-have-no-problems dept.

Privacy 101

Location services can be useful and fun, but, depending on how paranoid ("cautious") you are, you might already dislike the idea of a social-network dashboard keeping track of where you are at a given moment. After all, bad guys can use computers, too. Now, Foursquare may up your level of caution just a bit: CNET reports that "Beginning January 28, 2013, users' 'full names' will be displayed across the check-in service and venue owners will have increased access to users' check-in data, the company announced in an e-mail sent to users late last night." Users, though, "will still have control of the name displayed by altering their 'full name' in their settings," and can opt out of the increased flow of data to business owners. For users' sake, I hope Foursquare doesn't go in for the "real names" fetish to the extent that both Google and Facebook have.

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History repeating itself (2)

kintamanimatt (2674243) | about a year and a half ago | (#42427813)

Pitchforks in 3 ... 2 ...

Not sure what they're trying to achieve by doing this.

Re:History repeating itself (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42427875)

Publicity. And it seems to work, there are at least two articles in the interweb, and there will be at least two more when they "graciously reverse direction"...

Re:History repeating itself (3, Insightful)

iamhassi (659463) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428323)

Agreed. Foursquare is dying. Facebook allows check-ins, so no one is using foursquare. So if your website is dying how do you get some press coverage? Make an outrageous claim that you're going to publish the full names and locations of all of your customers! Instant news coverage! 3 days later, claim due to "public outcry" you're changing your mind! Instant hero and more press! Thousands of new users sign up to the website! Marketing Basics 101 right there

Re:History repeating itself (1)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428593)

Foursquare, dying?

Do you have anything to back this up?

Re:History repeating itself (3, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year and a half ago | (#42429031)

Foursquare, dying?

Do you have anything to back this up?

The enduring tendency of the human mind to hope for a good outcome.

Re:History repeating itself (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42435323)

Likely nothing at all. It's actually growing as a platform. I don't know about you but I'd be very afraid to use Facebook's check-in service, who knows who gets to use that data, same with G+. Foursquare is not linked to all kinds of other data about you, unlike Facebook and Google, you can consider it a bit of a data-silo.

If you look into what Foursquare is doing, it's a very viable platform, and going in good directions. If you're concerned about privacy, its settings are simple. They aren't sprawling into all kinds of nonsensical apps or anything like that, just building in logical directions, like tips becoming like reviews, photos to see what a venue is like, ratings determined by frequencies of checkins and likes/dislikes, and lists for creating your own curated list of venues.

Personally the best use of Foursquare is for adding things other services wouldn't consider as true places, IE, non-business venues like landmarks, hiking trails, and parks -- for geocoding the whole world, not just your frequented shops and restaurants. Yelp will never do that, nor will Google Places or Facebook places. It also seems to have better data about remote and rural areas. As someone who's a bit of an explorer-type personality, it beats other platforms hands-down.

Re:History repeating itself (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42430031)

Let's review Google Groups: Posts using a user's real name can be searched, by real name. Any posts that are flaming or ridiculing the user will like have an algorithmic bias towards being at the top of the search results--even moreso if they were flamed or ridiculed in the post subject line. And, of course, employers who opt to use such an archive to disqualify job applicants will do so quietly, without informing the applicant that Google heresay based on search results was the criteria used to disqualify the applicant. (HP San Diego site, however, found out that even if an employee brings Usenet posts to a manager's attention, that running to HR with those posts gets them in trouble, it doesn't get another employee or ETW contractor fired.)

So Google created a monster when they not only bought DejaNews to supplement their own smaller Usenet archive but also bought Usenet posts from private archive sources to create a reasonably complete 20 year Usenet archive.

Now, I don't use Foursquare, but with them now opting for a real names policy, do you feel lucky Foursquare won't be bought by Google and put into its own searchable archive? I wouldn't bet my privacy or my employment future on it--since Google gleefully burned an entire Usenet community without so much as a disclaimer that the Usenet posts were not to be used as a background check nor any ad revenue compensation for monetizing their posts.

Ut oh (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42427817)

Know they'll know my last name is Coward!!!

-- Anonymous

They are mentally ill. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42427837)

It's bad enough with fully, easily traceable public nicknames. The Internet has become something that I no longer want to have anything to do with. And yet there is no way to escape all this madness short of moving out to some cabin in the woods and living like a survivalist, which I really don't want.

You really try to reach out to people, but it's always in through one ear and out the other. They don't get it. They think you are crazy. It's maddening.

Even this site where I post this on, Slashdot, calls me an "Anonymous Coward" in an attempt to guilt-trip me into registering and logging in for anyone to track all my posts and violate my privacy.

Re:They are mentally ill. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42427861)

I haven't logged in for several years. Never will again. Somebody stole my username: Anonymous Coward

Re:They are mentally ill. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428015)

I've had a userid on Slashdot for 10 years. You can still post as AC by checking a box. I do that sometimes because I don't feel like spell checking, I think I might be displaying some ignorance, or because I just don't want people to think I waste too much time online.

Re:They are mentally ill. (4, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428049)

The Internet has become something that I no longer want to have anything to do with.

Do you want the Intertubes all locked up? Or do you want them "open"?

Because with "open" comes responsibility. YOU put stuff about YOU on a public network, YOU give private data to companies and "agree" to their "privacy" policy.

In other words YOU are in the driver's seat about how much people on the Intertubes know about YOU.

So take some responsibility. Your name and consumer purchasing data didn't "just show up" in some huge database for sale to the highest bidder, in fact at some point YOU checked a box or scrolled through a EULA, and clicked "continue".

This is a side effect of being a "consumer" in a "consumer society".

Re:They are mentally ill. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428173)

I think you and the poster you're quoting are saying the same thing: If you don't want your name in a database, you can't use a big chunk of the web.
You're just tetching him for things he hasn't even posted - possibly because he's posting as Anonymous Coward, and therefore a target?

Interesting who is the registered poster and who's the AC here.

- Intentionally posted as AC.

Re:They are mentally ill. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428321)

This is a side effect of being a "consumer" in a "consumer society".

Don't defend it with your nonsensical notion of "responsibility." EULAs and privacy policies are, for the most part, trash.

Re:They are mentally ill. (0)

bmo (77928) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428333)

So take some responsibility. Your name and consumer purchasing data didn't "just show up" in some huge database for sale to the highest bidder, in fact at some point YOU checked a box or scrolled through a EULA, and clicked "continue".

But this is largely wrong, and an EULA in a 5 line by 20 column scrollable window that is in reality 20 typed pages long does not constitute consent. It could be argued successfully that EULAs, as such, are at best not binding and are likely contracts of adhesion due to the fact that they are so one-sided. Only in derpified states like Virginia do so-called "click-wrap licenses," by state law, have any real weight, and they are in the minority.

Because if EULAs were really valid, the fantasy "sending spam to this email account is allowed as long as you pay me $100 per advertisement" back in the 90s would have worked (it was an attempt to stretch the junk fax law to computers with scanners and printers attached). But such fantasy "contracts" never did, because the fallacy behind nearly all EULAs is that there is a meeting of the minds or consideration in terms of contract law when there was no such thing. The junk email fantasy "contracts" were unenforceable contracts of adhesion.

An EULA can declare anything, and there is no "give and take" that makes a true contract like contract law has done for centuries. EULAs go against such established contract law in nearly every possible way.

An EULA is worth less than toilet paper, because at least toilet paper is physical and you can wipe your arse with it and EULAs are just bits on a screen.

--
BMO

Re:They are mentally ill. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42434197)

You are making an EXCUSE for being an IGNORENT surfer.

Re:They are mentally ill. (1)

bmo (77928) | about a year and a half ago | (#42435139)

No, it's not an excuse.

It's time people started fighting back against these things instead of just aquiescing to them.

Of course you're an AC, so you're not going to read this, but I'm saying this simply to go on record that EULAs aren't fucking contracts and shouldn't be treated as if they are.

Wow, I seem to have angered some people. Maybe they depend on the fiction that EULAs are enforceable.

--
BMO

Re:They are mentally ill. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42429817)

When they write a contract that they can change at will and I have no choice how is that a contract? Eula's are not legit put me on a jury and watch the lawyers wiggle like they need to pee.

Re:They are mentally ill. (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about a year and a half ago | (#42430153)

Exactly. Sheep follow the herd. Thinking people take charge of their own security.

The internet knows a lot about me. It knows what I have let it know. But, none of the trackers track me everywhere. There were plenty of tools to prevent that even before the browsers came up with that "Anonymous Browsing" gimmick. About the only way anyone is going to track me, is to do a MIM attack. Even then, they better have a full suite of surveillance software with which to intercept TOR and other privacy software.

Re:They are mentally ill. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42430245)

[quote]YOU give private data to companies and "agree" to their "privacy" policy[/quote]

Bullshit. When I posted to Usenet, I wasn't initially aware I was posting worldwide distributed and instead thought I was participating in a central worldwide discussion area. Later when I realized I was posting worldwide distributed I didn't realize someone would make a commercial archive of it. Well, DejaNews (later Deja.com) made a commercial archive of Usenet, fully searchable, but not as good of a search as Google. Later, as Deja.com was going out of business, Google not only bought Deja but incorporated the Usenet archive into their search engine (as Google Groups). Not only that, they went out and got private archive sources and backfilled that archive.

MANY users of Usenet at workplaces and universities had their real name in their post--if not as part of their username, then as part of their signature.

As another user posted, I also don't use Foursquare but do think of the repercussions if Google were to ever buy Foursquare and incorporate an archive into their search engine. To reiterate part of what could happen: Google Groups tends to favor posts that flame or ridicule the poster (in the subject line or in the body of the post) by their username (which could be their real name) at the top of the search results. That bias alone means that other more meaningful posts are hidden away to later pages of search results so Google can cast a negative light on that poster.

Re:They are mentally ill. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42431465)

I don't mind publishing stuff about myself. I mind other people publishing stuff about me.

Re:They are mentally ill. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428583)

"short of moving out to some cabin in the woods and living like a survivalist, which I really don't want."

But _we_ want you to go!

Protecting your PUBLIC privacy?? (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42431071)

You really try to reach out to people, but it's always in through one ear and out the other.

Why they should listen to you? Continuity in the foundation of trust.

an attempt to guilt-trip me into registering and logging in for anyone to track all my posts and violate my privacy.

I have nothing but the most UTTER contempt for people who want to shout things to the world, but get all upset when we can tell what sort of things you shouted previously.

Anonymity? I am so done with the concept, or trying to protect it in any way. What you can see is the entire world proving out the "Greater Internet Fuckwad Theory" in fullest glory. In order to bring any form of civility back to the internet, we probably sadly have to kill anonymity in the process because as with all the best toys, humanity has proven itself not responsible enough to manage that gift.

Google realized this recently with Google+. Other companies are simply following suit, and more will as the people who value only the ability to shove racial slurs or hate speech down others throats move to the shrinking cesspool they term "freedom".

What you never considered to most people true freedom is freedom from assholes. And that is why they do not listen to you and are giving up anonymity in droves, because a world of real people is at least marginally more pleasant.

Re:Protecting your PUBLIC privacy?? (1)

subreality (157447) | about a year and a half ago | (#42431467)

people who want to shout things to the world, but get all upset when we can tell what sort of things you shouted previously

I'd rather not shout it to the whole world. I frequently talk on mailing lists and forums where I expect there to only be a dozen or a hundred people reading it. Unfortunately the internet never forgets, and if I sign my real name to it, it becomes my legacy. I prefer to not have to think whether every random comment is well-considered and sensible. I just want to share an idea, not make a statement for all posterity.

As for Internet Fuckwards... Well, maybe people will say dumb shit because they're anonymous, but posting anonymously also protects YOU from being harassed by those fuckwads too. Let's say one day you post "Hey, Hitler wasn't entirely bad. He did a good thing with the autobahn!". Without anonymity, you now have some asshole - who may not mind posting under their real name since he's just protecting the world from you - following you for a few years in every forum calling you a nazi sympathizer and linking that quote. Posting anonymously you just make your little point and move on, internet fuckwads averted.

And I'm just some random geek talking about vaguely controversial things. There are far more critical cases like bullying victims who need a place to talk without attracting MORE bullying, or rape victims, or people who just need to talk about their dark fantasies or fucked up dreams. Anonymity protects you - it limits the damage to whatever nasty words someone can send back to your anonymous account. I would rather deal with those assholes than be physically hurt, stalked, and harassed.

Anonymity? I am so done with the concept, or trying to protect it in any way.

Then would you mind telling us your full name?

Never understood the appeal of that app (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42427839)

The whole idea of "checking in" was ridiculous to me in the first place. It immediately reminded me of the cartoon where the clever mice give the cat a bell as a gift. Why should anybody be surprised if they want to amp up the level of stupidity an extra notch?

Re:Never understood the appeal of that app (4, Funny)

alen (225700) | about a year and a half ago | (#42427895)

but if you are 22 or so years old how else are you going to show the world how cool you are?

i mean everyone cares about everything you do every day?

Re:Never understood the appeal of that app (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42427971)

but if you are 22 or so years old how else are you going to show the world how cool you are?

i mean everyone cares about everything you do every day?

By getting published as a writer or having an art opening?

Oh wait, those require time and serous effort. Never mind.

Re:Never understood the appeal of that app (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428037)

Back in my day, if you wanted to impress others, you just needed an IROC-Z and a good stereo.

Re:Never understood the appeal of that app (2)

davester666 (731373) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428325)

It was also an earlier form of indicating your location to your friends. They could hear you coming in your car via the stereo and the screeching tires.

I don't think for many people it was about "cool" (1)

Moraelin (679338) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428063)

I don't think for many people it was about "cool". I've never used Foursquare myself, but I would assume I'd treat it more or less like a game.

In fact like any other game. Just because, say, Star Trek Online gives out achievements, it doesn't mean I'd define my self-worth based on those, or on anyone knowing I have those.

If I were to define anything "cool" about myself based on a game, it would be more like helping decrypt the binary .esm format in the early Fallout 3 days, before there even was a construction kit for it. Or stuff like making the first lightsabers for Fallout 3. (Yeah, I'm the same Moraelin as on the Nexus.) Or helping a buttload of newbies get started on modding.

Or my tens of thousands of hours sunk into studying history. Which, for game purposes, does give me enough knowledge to recreate an exact replica of a high-medieval European arming sword, or exactly an Edo period lady's naginata.

Not that even those would be my first choices to base self-worth on, but, you know, it's still actually involving more skills than visiting the same Starbucks every day. Stuff that if I were to brag about, it would still show, basically, "look at the skills I have! Look at the things I can DO!" Or something like that.

You know, stuff that takes some RL knowledge and skill.

Now I don't doubt that some people do base their self-worth on a game score, but not everyone, and in Foursquare's case I don't suspect there were that many who actually thought that their "cool" factor is based on how often they visited the same Starbucks. Even hipsters tend to think they're hip, you know, for doing other stuff than the rest of the population, not by some random thing that everyone else is doing.

What I'm getting at is that I don't think many people now deserve having their privacy violated and their personal data sold to the highest bidder, just for using a silly automated GPS game. Chances are a lot of those didn't even think they're "cool" for it, nor really used it for more than some silly lulz,

Re:I don't think for many people it was about "coo (3, Insightful)

Brandybuck (704397) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428159)

If they don't want their privacy violated they shouldn't be telling the whole world what they're doing on a minute by minute basis.

Re:I don't think for many people it was about "coo (1)

xaxa (988988) | about a year and a half ago | (#42431691)

If they don't want their privacy violated they shouldn't be telling the whole world what they're doing on a minute by minute basis.

The point wasn't to tell the whole world, it was to tell a selected group of friends.

I signed up to Foursquare after seeing two things in one day: I'd met a friend in central London. His phone "pinged" a little later, saying another friend had "checked in" to a nearby bookshop. We called him, and met up. The coffee shop we went to had an offer of a free larger drink for checking in.

Since then, I've never crossed paths with one of the few people I've added on Foursquare, and never received a special offer from a business. It's been about a year, and it's probably time I lost interest in it.

I've just received an email from Foursquare:

Hello Foursquare community!

2012 has been a pretty huge year. We’ve released over fifty new features, welcomed nearly 15,000,000 new people to Foursquare, and had our 3,000,000,000th check-in. It’s a bit clichéd to say this, but your support really is what keeps us going day after day.

As our product evolves, one of the things we do is update our policies to match it. And a big aspect of that is privacy (something we think about a lot). This email lays out a couple changes that we’ll be making to our privacy policy in the coming month, and explains how they affect you and what you can do about it.

We know that privacy policies can be dense, so we put together a high-level document that we think of as our “Privacy 101.” It describes, in an easy-to-read way, how we build privacy into our product. While it doesn't replace the legal need for the complete description of our privacy practices (which you can read here), we hope it helps you better understand how we think about privacy. We’ve also added new explanations of how privacy works throughout the app in our FAQs, including our default privacy settings and how they can be adjusted.

In addition to creating and refining those documents, we want to point out two specific changes to our policy, both of which will go into effect on January 28, 2013.

1. We will now display your full name. Currently, Foursquare sometimes shows your full name and sometimes shows your first name and last initial (“John Smith” vs. “John S.”). For instance, if you search for a friend in Foursquare, we show their full name in the results, but when you click through to their profile page you don’t see their last name. In the original versions of Foursquare, these distinctions made sense. But we get emails every day saying that it's now confusing. So, with this change, full names are going to be public. As always, you can alter your ‘full name’ on Foursquare at https://foursquare.com/settings [foursquare.com] .

2. A business on Foursquare will be able to see more of their recent customers. Currently, a business using Foursquare (like your corner coffee shop) can see the customers who have checked in in the last three hours (in addition to the most recent and their most loyal visitors). This is great for helping store owners identify their customers and give them more personal service or offers. But a lot of businesses only have time to log in at the end of the day to look at it. So, with this change, we're going to be showing them more of those recent check-ins, instead of just three hours worth. As always, if you'd prefer not to permit businesses to see when you check into their locations going forward, you can uncheck the box under ‘Location Information’ at https://foursquare.com/settings/privacy [foursquare.com] .

The Foursquare of today is so different than the first version that launched in 2009, and we appreciate that you let us continue to evolve and build our vision. This occasionally means altering our privacy policy. When we do, we make it a priority to come up with clear ways to help you understand your privacy choices, and to communicate them clearly. If you have any questions or want more details, head over to our updated privacy policy or support.foursquare.com.

Have a lovely holiday, and thanks for being part of the nearly 30,000,000-strong Foursquare community. We have a lot planned for 2013!

- Team Foursquare

My understanding (the bit I put in bold) is that they no longer respect privacy.

Introvert! (0)

Chemisor (97276) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428317)

You don't understand it because you are an introvert. An introvert defines his self worth in terms of what he can do, as you have illustrated in your comment. An extrovert defines his self worth by what other people think of him. Unless you understand this, you'll never become adequately socialized.

Re:Introvert! (2)

pla (258480) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428783)

An extrovert defines his self worth by what other people think of him. Unless you understand this, you'll never become adequately socialized.

An introvert also doesn't give a shit about being "adequately socialized", or about what extroverts think of them. Which, interestingly enough, makes that a somewhat asymmetrical relationship - Because extroverts do care what introverts think about them.

So... leave me alone to read my damned book in the park, and I'll give you a +5 likeable or whatever the hell you "cool" kids use to measure your ePeens these days.


More seriously - I honestly don't "get" what FourSquare even does. Check in? I get the idea of signing a "guest book", but seriously, you can get a billion self-hosted third-party guestbooks, you don't need to sell your soul to Big Data just to see that you had a visitor.

"But but but," I can hear you say, "what about the people who don't sign the guest book? How will you track them?"

Hey, guess who will never ever sign up for FourSquare, either? :)

Re:Introvert! (3, Interesting)

retchdog (1319261) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428827)

speaking as an introvert, this is a false dichotomy. there's some truth to what you're saying, but overall it's just something introverts comfort themselves with, to feel like they have some kind of integrity, and to put off overcoming their limitations. of course, before i go on, i must say that extraverts have limitations as well.

i've known several extremely successful people who define their self worth in terms of what they can do, but challenge themselves by living and exhibiting it with their peers. they actively mentor those who are (at the moment) less accomplished, and they seek mentorship from those who are moreso. their extraversion leads to more utility and challenge of their own abilities.

this is not to say that extraversion is a superior strategy; there are those who, as you say, begin to define themselves through the shallow. also, extraverts can be annoyingly grating and pompous to their introverted peers who nonetheless ``walk softly and carry a big stick." every person they snub with their antics will be more inclined to vote against them when evaluations come around.

so, the challenge of the extravert is to not be a grating prick, while the challenge of the introvert is to benefit from other people. stereotypes like you present are only good in seeing the challenge; they are not the right way to live.

Re:Introvert! (2)

Kjella (173770) | about a year and a half ago | (#42429411)

People have internal and external motivation but I think it's orthogonal to introvert and extrovert. The most obvious examples are the introverts who wish they could be popular and cool, they define their self worth in terms of what others think of them despite being introverts. And the attention whores that really define themselves only on what others think of them is a small minority of the extroverts, most of them are just social with self worth of their own. Good thing too because the greatest insult you can make to an attention whore is completely ignoring them, only met a few but they act like you just stomped on their puppy.

Re:Never understood the appeal of that app (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42432443)

I love the idea that the government thinks they know where I've been just because I check in on an application that does not require exact GPS coordinates.

Let them get used to the idea that I'm easy to track. If I actually need to hide, this will make it SO much easier!

Re:Never understood the appeal of that app (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42435393)

The check-ins are not the basis of the platform, though it may appear that way at first. Yes, you need to check-in to do certain things but you can automatically make those private. They are rather used as a method of proving to Foursquare itself that you have been there, to give validity to things you say about the place (good, and bad). It prevents things like fake reviews (which plague Yelp) and can be useful (from my experience) for things like people who have allergies looking for a restaurant that won't kill them. My partner needs to eat gluten-free, for example, and it's immensely useful to see a restaurant where tips are left at that restaurant's Foursquare venue profile saying "Hey, they have gluten-free pasta here as an option, and it tastes good!". We then save it to my profile's list of local restaurants with gluten-options and now I have a record somewhere of those places and if we liked it or not, and that helps other people with the same concern.

I also use it to create venues for local hiking trails, with the goal of getting more young people out hiking in the region -- if the trail is added as a venue, and there are plenty of them, it raises awareness and helps out the local conservation authority's goals a bit. There's not any other platforms out there that provide an alternative means to do this, at least, not one as effective or as popular.

Great, so employees can start harassing... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42427845)

Customers like they do now for Yelp. Twice I've been confronted after leaving a bad review on Yelp. The last time the manager at a Jimmy Johns was able to figure out that I worked in the same building as the restaurant and talked to my boss. So now Foursquare is getting into the business of facilitating the harassment and intimidation of customers.

Re:Great, so employees can start harassing... (3, Insightful)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | about a year and a half ago | (#42427951)

As the song goes, you ain't seen nothin' yet [guardian.co.uk] . Welcome to the oppression of legitimate protest and criticism.

Re:Great, so employees can start harassing... (4, Insightful)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428079)

So did you promptly post another review pointing out what the manager did and how you recommend no one visit that store ever?

That would have been about the best thing you could do. I realize that cutting yourself out of an in building place to eat lunch sucks, but a manager like that needs to be shit canned.

Re:Great, so employees can start harassing... (1)

iamhassi (659463) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428347)

I would go to BBB and attorney state general on that, then there's a record and papertrail. Manager of a fast food chain calling my boss because I left a bad review is absurd.

Re:Great, so employees can start harassing... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428125)

You fucked up, boy, and you have nothing but yourself to blame, because your setup enabled that manager to identify you.

Maybe you said something stupid during your bad review, like that you worked in that same building during your bad review. Maybe you Yelp profile used your real name and/or linked to a social networking account like LinkedIn which says where you work. You might as well have posted all of your personal information on 4chan.org's /b/ board and expected nothing to happen. Social networking is a crutch unnecessary for social and professional life.

With jobs scarce, bad reviews related to customer service can threaten peoples' very livelihood with respect to keeping their job, so you're damn right they're gonna track you down and fuck you up given the chance. And you know every time you asked the server to take that dish back into the kitchen to be done right, the cook spit(or worse) on it, because his job sucks and he doesn't need any more aggrivation from some goddamn picky yuppie.

For fuck's sake, if you must trade some of your privacy for attention --

- Use a different pseudonum for each account and use email accounts not linked to your personal e-mail

- If you must use your real name, post a picture of your dog and write nothing.

- Don't use linkedin at all. Telling everybody on the internet where you work is doggonne retarded.

-- Ethanol-fueled

Re:Great, so employees can start harassing... (1)

iamhassi (659463) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428367)

- Don't use linkedin at all. Telling everybody on the internet where you work is doggonne retarded.

-- Ethanol-fueled

AGREED!!!!!!

I do NOT want strangers to know every job I ever worked! The risks of social engineering are HUGE! God forbid they call some dumb boss I had and pretend to be god knows who and get social security number or who knows what info from them. Plus stalking would be *extremely* easy with job info because I'm there more than I'm at home! Tires slashed by some nutty gf or employee from ten yrs ago and I have *no* idea why? No thanks! LinkedIn completely baffles me, people make the same information public on LinkedIn then bitch when Facebook shares it with your friends

Re:Great, so employees can start harassing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42429947)

You sound like one of those irrational AC-haters. Look, the time I got hit by a manager of a micro-brew for leaving a bad review, it wasn't because of social media despite your irrational fear of it. It was because I posted the truth in the review so he knew who to hit.

FS is going to be responsible for creating a lot of violence with this new policy. They're making it even easier for hateful business owners to track down and attack customers.

Re:Great, so employees can start harassing... (1)

SeaFox (739806) | about a year and a half ago | (#42430851)

Why would your boss care what some G.E.D.-wielding sandwich shop manager thinks?

Foursquare seems like the best place for this (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42427847)

I hate not being able to be anonymous on the internet (check out my username). I still don't have a facebook / myspace / friendster / orkut / foursquare / linkedin / twitter / pinterest / instagram / flickr / youtube account, but wouldn't this be one of the "better" sites to show people's real full names? If you care about your privacy so little that you're willing to announce every single place you step into and what your social network is, is your full name really a big deal?

Is there someone out there that uses foursquare that thinks "I want this website to know what my social network relationships are and exactly where I am almost every minute of the day. But showing my real name? That goes too far."

"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (4, Informative)

AbRASiON (589899) | about a year and a half ago | (#42427917)

Google Plus, Facebook, Foursquare - a lot of services are really pushing the boundaries at the moment. I suspect the social media backlash is going to begin pretty damn soon.

On a similar, on topic note: Did anyone who does sign in to youtube recently get 'tricked' by a box popping up, offering them the option to change their first / last name on the service? I got it and thought, "fantastic! I can finally login with a name other than my gmail mail alias" and attempted setting up a different name. BAM - it made me a Google+ profile which I didn't want.
Upon removing the profile, my videos are now tied to my "Google+ youtube account" - so anything I uploaded, any favourites, any comments are not available unless I re-create the account.

Heavy handed indeed and from the musings on the web, I'd say I'm not the only one who got stung by this.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

Nyder (754090) | about a year and a half ago | (#42427927)

Google Plus, Facebook, Foursquare - a lot of services are really pushing the boundaries at the moment. I suspect the social media backlash is going to begin pretty damn soon.

On a similar, on topic note: Did anyone who does sign in to youtube recently get 'tricked' by a box popping up, offering them the option to change their first / last name on the service? I got it and thought, "fantastic! I can finally login with a name other than my gmail mail alias" and attempted setting up a different name. BAM - it made me a Google+ profile which I didn't want.
Upon removing the profile, my videos are now tied to my "Google+ youtube account" - so anything I uploaded, any favourites, any comments are not available unless I re-create the account.

Heavy handed indeed and from the musings on the web, I'd say I'm not the only one who got stung by this.

I bet the government is giving them tax breaks for implementing it.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#42427975)

I bet the government is giving them tax breaks for implementing it.

I bet they're not.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428017)

I bet the government is giving them tax breaks for implementing it.

I bet they're not.

You're right. they are just giving them National Security Letters.

Why give money away or bother with warrants when you can just claim "National Security" and completely bypass that pesky "Bill of Rights" thing.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (4, Interesting)

undeadbill (2490070) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428095)

Dunno why this was modded down. The *ONLY* ISP or hosting service operator in US history to challenge a national security letter was Nick Merrill. Ever.

A single national security letter can dragnet in thousands of user accounts. Simply receiving one means that you are already bound to secrecy by the letter itself with the very real threat of 10 years in jail. Nick had to fight in a secret court hearing just to have the right to have an attorney represent him, and then again to publicly state that he received a letter. He still cannot discuss any of what was requested, or he goes to prison for a very long time.

They are not limited to one letter per user per item- they are not required to be specific at all. That means every major service out there has been handing out your info to the feds. Usually, this is just usernames and other log data. If your full name is included, it makes it that much easier to keep tabs on you. And, yes, people are being investigated and rounded up based on this kind of data.

Look up the Calyx Institute or Nick Merrill on YouTube. Fascinating stuff. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TkvGK60MSOk [youtube.com]

Re: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42431505)

Yes, in the UK, the US, and other shining democracies, you can be imprisoned for telling the truth - even if you don't know any state secrets.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428001)

It will be really interesting once Facebook hits some financial trouble and they begin selling user data by the truckload to whoever wants it. No company lasts forever and a couple companies know basically everything about a large segment of the population. It would be extremely naive to think that they'll hesitate to sell their aggregated data to anybody and everybody once they hit hard times. Zuckerberg himself has even started preparing people for this by stating that privacy is largely an outdated concept.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428069)

Nope, you're just another ones bitching about using a free service and demanding they do it your way.

Perhaps if you're so afraid of people knowing what you post online you should think a little better before you post it.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (2)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428157)

On a similar, on topic note: Did anyone who does sign in to youtube recently get 'tricked' by a box popping up, offering them the option to change their first / last name on the service? I got it and thought, "fantastic! I can finally login with a name other than my gmail mail alias" and attempted setting up a different name. BAM - it made me a Google+ profile which I didn't want.

I've had a (seldom-used) YouTube account for several years - it was created well before Google bought them. The user name on the account has no resemblance to my (or any) real name. Every time I go to YouTube now I get a popup attempting to get me to switch to my real name - and, when I say "no", I'm asked to explain why. I've found it easiest to just pick the "I'll decide later" option, although I'm not sure for how long they'll continue to offer that as a choice.

If forced, I've decided I'm going to put "Puddin' Tane" in the box; but I suspect they've got some sort of filter that'll catch that.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (2)

AbRASiON (589899) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428289)

That's the box - it will make you a Google+ profile if you're not careful (perhaps I'm blind but I didn't find that was clearly stated)

It also won't allow anonymous names. I try to stick with just my initials - but no luck.
Problem is if you make your name "Anonymous Dude" then your google+ profile (and possibly your gmail reply name?) will also be "Anonymous Dude" for example,.........

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428563)

Oh that's a good point - I didn't think about how it might affect my gmail account.

It's too bad I like using gmail so much - in a lot of ways I'm at the point where I'd like to just stop using my Google account at all.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (3, Interesting)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428169)

I suspect the social media backlash is going to begin pretty damn soon.

It wont. People are fucking stupid. They have absolutely no idea what's happening to them. The only thing that will push the public as a whole to care is if holywood makes a movie about it and makes it glaringly obvious what's going on. But this isn't something that makes for good theater, and advertisers are going to squash any attempt to make such a movie just like they killed that Mythbusters episode about RFID.

On the bright side however, those same stupid people that are using these services are also Fickle. I have a niece that's your typical tall blond bombshell, most popular girl in a very large school, won state sports championships, etc... Has something like 3000 facebook friends. According to her, facebooks on its way out. They are mostly annoyed by it and all the drama on it now. One girls opinion but she holds sway over quite a few clueless youth so who knows. I suspect that she's one of those "keystone" members that social networking sites fear losing.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

ciotog (1098035) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428459)

I have a niece that's your typical tall blond bombshell, most popular girl in a very large school, won state sports championships, etc...

Oh really? Can I get her name and phone number?

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428735)

"The only thing that will push the public as a whole to care is if holywood makes a movie about it and makes it glaringly obvious what's going on."

Hollywood already made that movie and it had little effect, probably because it was before it's time and had no real relevance to the general public.

The movie?

"1984"

Maybe it's time for an updated version that includes current technology.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428765)

But please, keep Tom Cruise the fuck away from it...

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

girlinatrainingbra (2738457) | about a year and a half ago | (#42429427)

Sorry, Facebook is for the older generation. srsly. It's been known in school (high school) for a while.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year and a half ago | (#42434563)

Yes, from what my niece has been telling me and what I've read between the lines, Facebook is no more that a way for her to trick her parents and teachers into believing in some double life where she studies all night, is dating some guy that doesn't even live near here and never drinks.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

Sigg3.net (886486) | about a year and a half ago | (#42445827)

We need better and official information that is balanced.

E.g. many who are opposed to Facebook's data gathering are also not users of such tools (like myself).
I understand the opportunities such a tool can have e.g. for old people keeping track of the family tree.

However, the services should be decentralized and not mine the data for nefarious purposes. The main problem with Facebook then, is its recognition and marketing.

I don't see how you get around this beast without democratic regulations.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (2)

pongo000 (97357) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428397)

it made me a Google+ profile which I didn't want.

I noticed a week or two ago that the Google Play store will no longer permit you to submit reviews and ratings for apps if you do not have a Google+ account. No opting out of it either.

I suspect the day is coming where you will have to have a G+ account to even download from the Play store (and what a stupid fucking name that is BTW, Google Play).

It is faintly amusing to me though that I can create an unlimited number of gmail accounts under any nom de plume I choose. Riddle me this: Which has more potential for abuse? (1) The ability to create an unlimited number of fake gmail accounts, or (2) the ability to create an anonymous G+ account?

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42431663)

Why not stop being a pedant douchebag and just say "pen name."

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

ciotog (1098035) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428567)

My daughter, now 10, has had a gmail account for a few years which she uses to correspond to friends and family. About 6 months ago she got locked out of her account because she started creating a Google+ profile (it prompted her to do it), and put in her real birthday. I didn't want her to lose all her correspondence, so went through the painful process of having the account put under my name (and having to verify my birth date). Google's done a lot of things I don't like, but their services tend to be better than the alternatives.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (2)

pla (258480) | about a year and a half ago | (#42429103)

About 6 months ago she got locked out of her account because she started creating a Google+ profile (it prompted her to do it), and put in her real birthday.

Wonderful! And I hope she learned the appropriate lesson - In the online world, Lle lie lie about every personal detail any site asks you.

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42430929)

I hope that wasn't sarcasm; unless it's a business/work related account (and ONLY used for business/work related things), never give a website or person on the internet your personal information. Weren't we telling kids this less than ten or twenty years ago? What the fuck happened to that?

Re:"Full Names" seem to be the in thing (1)

PartyBoy!911 (611650) | about a year and a half ago | (#42429141)

It's called Fascist corporatism. In the US and a lot of the rest of the world it is Google, Facebook, Foursquare doing it for the goverment.

In China they don't need to do it through proxies:

http://politics.slashdot.org/story/12/12/28/1311205/china-tightens-internet-restrictions [slashdot.org]

The NY Times reports China has once again stepped up its efforts to control the internet, passing a new set of rules by which internet users and ISPs must abide. In addition to requiring that users provide their real names to internet providers, the government says those providers are now more responsible for deleting or blocking posts that aren't agreeable to the Chinese authorities.

Same shit, different country

You could complain to the FTC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42429433)

Google had to agree to a FTC consent order after the Buzz social network, and this sounds similar to the stuff that they agreed not to to.
http://ftc.gov/opa/2011/03/google.shtm [ftc.gov]

The final paragraph says how to complain if you want to. For EU citizens, the US FTC is still the regulator to complain to, no idea about the rest of the world.

(The link is to the proposed order, but it became the final order).

Realnames Schmealnames (1)

hack slash (1064002) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428071)

Who exactly is behind the push for real names to be used instead of 'anonymous' screen names throughout the internet? I don't like it.

Every time I login to YouTube I get pestered to change my username to my 'real name', except of course the 'real name' they're trying to push me to select isn't actually my real name.

Re:Realnames Schmealnames (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428097)

Advertisers and data mining companies that make money by building accurate profiles of people.

Re:Realnames Schmealnames (1)

game kid (805301) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428409)

The GIFT gave them a giant excuse as well. Thanks, Penny Arcade! Thanks for fucking up the internet.

Re:Realnames Schmealnames (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428451)

Blaming someone because they spotted and named a trend? Now who's being cuntish.

Am I the only one...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428089)

Who hasn't jumped on the social websites thing? I don't have a facebook, refuse to get one, and constantly complain to google about how they push plus on android and youtube users. Yes, I have a twitter account, but last I checked, they're not chasing me down asking me for a birth certificate to validate my identity.

Unconcern (2)

Brandybuck (704397) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428147)

I get the impression that those who want to tell the whole internet where they are at any given moment aren't too concerned about privacy. Then again, they may just be oblivious to reality. I know many college kids who have absolutely no clue that everything they post on a social site is viewable by the entire world for all of eternity.

Who uses FourSquare anymore? (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428413)

I quit using them over a year ago. Most everyone I know have abandonded them the second that Facebook started doing what they do.

Re:Who uses FourSquare anymore? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42435427)

that's pretty stupid then, considering what Facebook is doing with your data. At least at FS your location data was definitely only going where you want it to go, and not to all kinds of third-party app developers and whereever else FB is sending your data.

I see Fail in their future (1)

PPH (736903) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428495)

Users, though, "will still have control of the name displayed by altering their 'full name' in their settings,"

OK, my full name is Hugh Jardonne.

Re:I see Fail in their future (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42428589)

Nice to meet you, my full name is Mike Hunt.

We should get together sometime...

I already (1)

ruir (2709173) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428617)

cancelled my account...

Re:I already (1)

jeremymiles (725644) | about a year and a half ago | (#42436289)

Just change your "full name". There is no requirement that it's your real name (unlike FB, Google, etc).

self-satisfied (4, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428625)

I am really proud of the fact that I don't know what "Foursquare" is.

I really don't need to know what all of my friends are saying and doing at all times of the day and night. Shit, life is too short.

I wonder how many twenty-somethings are going to hit 40 and realize that they spent more time updating their social networks than actually doing something.

Re:self-satisfied (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42430013)

it's a game, played by kids.

was that b4, still that today. just different. what is the same is.. you and 3 others are the only ones who give a shit what goes on.

Re:self-satisfied (1)

Bieeanda (961632) | about a year and a half ago | (#42430917)

The same question has been asked generation after generation, only with other behaviors like drinking and slacking off.

Re:self-satisfied (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about a year and a half ago | (#42436817)

The same question has been asked generation after generation, only with other behaviors like drinking and slacking off.

At least drinking makes you drunk. What does incessant use of "social networks" make you? Certainly not social.

Re:self-satisfied (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42435517)

I really hate that there is now generations of are priding themselves on their ignorance. Proud that they don't know what something is, as if it makes them superior. Let alone on Slashdot, where intellect is supposed to be a common value. No more, I guess.

Incedentally, if you spend a lot of time on Foursquare, you'd be using it wrong. It's a check-in, make-a-note, and be done experience. You can explore the local area too, and find out more about where you live and what's around you to go to in person, but hey, remain ignorant, you'll be better for not knowing what the world around you is like, I guess.

I'm part of a small group who uses it to geocode lesser-known local conservation/state parks, wildlife viewing spots, and heritage monuments and utilizes its platform for improving what young people know about the area around them. But hey, I must be the devil for giving them knowledge they should be proud not to know, what do I know.

Anonymity activists arn't everyone (1)

Improv (2467) | about a year and a half ago | (#42428727)

There is a very loud and very small group of geeks that really care about anonymity. It's not everyone, and it's not even all the older geeks; there are plenty of us old-timers who don't have these cyberpunk yearnings and prefer networks that use real names (or just don't care). It's unfortunate that this anonymity bunch has come to be thought of as representative of geekdom.

Re:Anonymity activists arn't everyone (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year and a half ago | (#42429463)

That's because you old guys can't even remember your own name half the time, much less any nom de plume.

Re:Anonymity activists arn't everyone (1)

Improv (2467) | about a year and a half ago | (#42429655)

Haha... +1

Re:Anonymity activists arn't everyone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42431105)

"Cyberpunk yearnings" is a strawman, and you know it. Those like myself who value anonymity understand certain principles:
1. Information, particularly personal information, is valuable.
2. Governments and corporations realize the extent of its value.
3. Most regular people, at present, do not realize it - they're operating off of assumptions that are outdated by a decade or more.
4. The combination of #2 and #3 has created a lopsided market, where people freely (or worse, not) give up their valuable information in exchange for services that are far less valuable.
5. This disparity in value makes the exchange unappealing in most cases to those more informed.

Essentially, the onus isn't upon me to explain why I should remain anonymous, it's upon you (obviously not "you" personally, etc) to explain why I should tell you about myself, and the case you've been making thus far mostly only appeals to those who are underinformed.

WWOT?! FP (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42429067)

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WTF is "FourSquare"? (1)

1u3hr (530656) | about a year and a half ago | (#42430165)

I read the summary, I read TFA. Still no idea what "FourSquare" is. A "check in service"? For hotels? Airlines? Hats?

Re:WTF is "FourSquare"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42431965)

Yes.

Deleting your account is quite easy (1)

_Shad0w_ (127912) | about a year and a half ago | (#42432775)

Fortunately it's actually quite easy to delete your Foursquare account: you just go to the Privacy Setting section of your settings. You even get a little tick box where you can indicate that you're doing it because of privacy concerns. Whether they genuinely delete all of your data, like they say they do, is another matter.

google went nuts with real names (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42432783)

As i tried to make a comment on a youtube video, they suggested to post my real name retroactively on All old comments.
Except it was my wife's name. They did not let me choose which. When I clicked 'no' there was a multiple choice 'why not?'. "wrong name" and "privacy" was not among answers.
My feeling is they eventually will stop asking and just do it. They are quite MAD.

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