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Ask Slashdot: Keeping Your Media Library Safe From Kids?

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the sound-of-eyes-getting-really-big dept.

Data Storage 307

Serenissima writes "I've spent many hours building my Media Library in XBMC and scraping all the DVD Covers and Fanart. And I love it, I can pull up movies on any computer or device in the house. I played a movie for my son the other day so I could get some cleaning done without him being underfoot. I noticed shortly after that the sound coming from the other room was from a different movie than I played for him. I snuck up and watched for a few minutes and saw him use a trackpad to navigate to the stop and play buttons of different movies in his folder. I know it's only a matter of time before he realizes he can see all of the movies. I don't want him to have nightmares because he saw the T-1000 stab someone in the face. The quickest solution I can think is a screen saver with a password. It's mildly inconvenient to me, but would stop him from accessing anything. However, I remember how much more I knew about computers than my parents when I was a kid, and I have a feeling he's going to surprise me one day. There's a lot of ways out there to stop it, the way we do it now is to not let him watch anything unless we're there (but there are only so many times I can watch the same kid's movie). How do YOU guys find yourself dealing with the convenience of running your own server while keeping your media safe from prying eyes?"

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two choices (0)

epyT-R (613989) | about 2 years ago | (#42482553)

1. Make copies of the discs for them to use.
2. Put them on a media server.

Re:two choices (5, Interesting)

epyT-R (613989) | about 2 years ago | (#42482603)

In trad slashdot style, I didn't read. Best way to do this is to keep R-rated stuff off the family tv's media playback device. Share them on a different share etc.

Re:two choices (2)

aNonnyMouseCowered (2693969) | about 2 years ago | (#42483043)

"In trad slashdot style, I didn't read."

Typically with stories tagged askslashdot you need only read the submission itself. Or do you mean you have that esoteric abillity to answer questions you don't know?

I prefer a hardware solution. Different devices for different users, preferably with some sort of hardware locking mechanism for the NC stuff. I'm rather suspicious of software-only solutions since they're either a joke or too expensive or complex for the task at hand unless you're a bum willing to tweak all day.

Re:two choices (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482639)

Did you even read the question?

Re:two choices (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482707)

OP is asking how to secure media on a media server...and one of the solutions is to put them on a media server?

Re:two choices (1)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#42483183)

OP is asking how to secure media on a media server...and one of the solutions is to put them on a media server?

Well, yes, that;s not such a bad idea. Have two media servers - one open and one locked down.
Perhaps a third one too ;)

Permissions (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482607)

How about just using Linux file permissions? Keep daddy's movies in his home folder, and have the XBMC under an unprivileged user.

hidden folder (1)

Xicor (2738029) | about 2 years ago | (#42482615)

you can put videos you dont want him to navigate to in hidden/password protected folders

Re:hidden folder (1)

Xicor (2738029) | about 2 years ago | (#42482675)

another thing you could do would be to disable the mouse and keyboard while hes watching... sure eventually he will figure out a way to get past it... but how old is this kid? i doubt he would try.

Knowing more than parents... (5, Insightful)

gnasher719 (869701) | about 2 years ago | (#42482619)

Don't worry. You knew more about computers than your parents. You'll also know more about computers than your children.

Re:Knowing more than parents... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482653)

rolf lol omg

Re:Knowing more than parents... (5, Funny)

rolfwind (528248) | about 2 years ago | (#42482777)

You called?

Re:Knowing more than parents... (1)

johnsnails (1715452) | about 2 years ago | (#42483167)

that had to be a setup...

Re:Knowing more than parents... (1)

SlappyMcgee (1364419) | about 2 years ago | (#42483191)

If I had mod points and I could give you all of them, this comment is worth it (just about spit wine out my nose - once I figured out why it was funny - sorry long week).

Re:Knowing more than parents... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482941)

Some will disagree with you but I'm not one of them. So I want to expand on what you're saying. There is a certain age range that had to understand how a computer worked to run anything. Older generations were past the age of quick learning when this happened with only a few exceptions. On the other end, younger generations have no need to know any of that stuff. The file system is more and more hidden. Younger generations know how something works by clicking and touching on different things, but beyond that not much. That middle generation however can figure out any UI and fix problems as they arise because they understand what's going on underneath. There are exceptions to all of these generalities, but in general they're true :)

Re:Knowing more than parents... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483375)

I'd agree with you on the premise that today's youth is dumber and less capable period, lack critical thinking, never been in a fight, etc...

But that's where it ends: assembly programmers probably know more about how a computer works than either one of us, in fact I always raise an eyebrow when I hear older techs talking about motherboard processes in the form of IO & voltage rather than clock speeds & bridges. I know voltages only for the purpose of OC (and fixing buggy asus motherboards), but that's not my #1 thought process when it comes to analyzing mobos. The point being we do our stuff just find without knowing assembly, a select few still have to know it to write translation / engine tools for frameworks, but a time ago that was everybody.

It goes something like this: jscript > jquery > ajax / jquery, and remember how hard ajax was at first? Ya most of that has been automated, no reason this pattern won't continue.

Re:Knowing more than parents... (4, Insightful)

Andrewkov (140579) | about 2 years ago | (#42483385)

So true.. Kids today are very well versed in the Internet (Facebook, Twitter, email, etc), but have no idea of anything technical like setting up a network or troubleshooting hardware. There are exceptions, of course, the nerds who have the interest and might go into IT. But generally, kids are strictly users like most of our parents were.

Re:Knowing more than parents... (2)

Garridan (597129) | about 2 years ago | (#42482943)

It's (mostly) true! The current generation of kids are consumers, not tinkerers. Chances are, you're a consumer too, and your skills are a result of a childhood well spent. Unless you keep tinkering and raise your kids to do the same, you're safe.

Re:Knowing more than parents... (5, Interesting)

shakezula (842399) | about 2 years ago | (#42483047)

I agree, my kids know a lot about computers because I work on them for a living. They are NOT typical of their friends. Most of their friends know their way about an iDevice or how to check their Gmail or Facebook, but that's the extent of it. My 10 year old could help you mount a heatsink to your Core2Duo and re-install Windows, but that's because he's helped dad do just that on countless computers in his short existence.

This disposable computing age we're entering has its ups and downs...

Re:Knowing more than parents... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483265)

People weren't tinkering with their C= 64s anywhere near as much nostalgic geeks like to think, and during the great golden age of PCs that never was of the early to mid 90s, the average person - hell, even your average person who used the Internets - couldn't write hello world in BASIC let alone upgrade their own RAM.

Meanwhile, kids these days are spewing everything from pure genius to pure unadulterated crap all over YouTube, Facebook, various imageboards, and countless social media sites.

The only difference between then and now is kids have a potentially global audience for their creativity.

Also, their taste in music sucks and they should get off my lawn.

Re:Knowing more than parents... (2)

jedidiah (1196) | about 2 years ago | (#42483381)

It was a C64.

Just to run a game you had to do far more "tinkering" then a modern kid may ever do. It just came with the territory becuase the user interfaces were embryonic.

You had to understand the machine just to use it.

Re:Knowing more than parents... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483413)

if Apple has its way...

RTFM (5, Informative)

OverlordQ (264228) | about 2 years ago | (#42482621)

RTFM [xbmc.org]

XBMC supports multiple user profiles, much the same as setting up individual users on your home computer. These individual profiles allow you to customize the environment for multiple users, allowing for such functionality as:

  • Customized view settings such as skins for each user
  • The ability to lock folders, such as network shares on a per-user basis
  • Separate Media Libraries for each user

Did you even attempt to find something yourself?

Re:RTFM (4, Insightful)

WilliamGeorge (816305) | about 2 years ago | (#42482691)

I have mod points, but where is the option for 'Informative - but a jerk'? Granted, it can be annoying to help someone when the answer to their question is a short Google search away... but the question there at the end seems unkind (at best). Lets keep things civil :)

Re:RTFM (5, Funny)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about 2 years ago | (#42482769)

It could have been worse. He could have linked to this http://lmgtfy.com/?q=XMBC+lock [lmgtfy.com]

Re:RTFM (2, Insightful)

wer32r (2556798) | about 2 years ago | (#42483567)

I really hate this one. Few things are as annoying as searching for some difficult-to-search topic, find a forum link on the top search result with a relevant topic, and then find that Imgtfy link to just another Google search. Typically when this happens, the result of the next search is as little informative as the link itself. The really annoying part is that you know that whoever posted the link is likely to know the answer and could have stated it in a few words or have provided a relevant link instead of being a douche.

Re:RTFM (4, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 years ago | (#42482855)

No. people need to know they are being lazy, and being nice hasn't been working.

Re:RTFM (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#42483067)

No. people need to know they are being lazy, and being nice hasn't been working.

Working for what (i.e. what purpose do you target)? 'Cause not all the nerds share the same purposes, moral or ethical values (and it's is still OK... less boring, you see?)

E.g. if it is the opportunity of jerks to show themselves informative (which I can accept as a passable purpose), it seems it's working quite well.

Re:RTFM (4, Insightful)

cgimusic (2788705) | about 2 years ago | (#42483379)

My ideal target is for Ask Slashdots to be interesting and informative with the pros and cons of various solutions to a complex problem being discussed. With a really basic problem such as this I really would have thought a simple Google would have given the best solution. In fact I had this very problem several months ago and all I did was search the internet and the manual for XBMC came up top.

Re:RTFM (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483519)

No. people need to know they are being lazy, and being nice hasn't been working.

Working for what (i.e. what purpose do you target)? 'Cause not all the nerds share the same purposes, moral or ethical values (and it's is still OK... less boring, you see?)

E.g. if it is the opportunity of jerks to show themselves informative (which I can accept as a passable purpose), it seems it's working quite well.

Yes, you're right. Not all nerds share the same purposes or values.

That being said, do you know what all lazy people have in common? Being fucking lazy.

Bottom line is when it takes longer to type the question on Slashdot than it does to find the answer in Google, you're not only doing it wrong, but you have no right calling yourself a nerd.

Re:RTFM (1)

johnsnails (1715452) | about 2 years ago | (#42483347)

Isin't the story getting published a sign of the /. community?...

that instead of checking /. once a day and spending ~45min going over 4 good stories we would rather habitually read junk like this (in the sense that the answer was one quick seach away) 3-4 times a day. I know I am guilty of this.

What we need is an rss feed of 2600 type stories(articles), so not just popular news stories but 'news' as in new intersting hacking to learn type stories(articles).

Re:RTFM (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482983)

And what about people like me who have no desire for a media server but used this answer to solve a similar problem in an area totally unrelated to this one.

I use search engines all the time. Multiple solutions are foun;, often contradictory. I then ask on a knowledgable forum. After filtering out the chaff you can get a concencious of what works in the real world.

You often get multiple positive comments on a solution, often the leading solution the search engine came up with, only to have a single comment advise that it will not work in "this" situation. Which, of course, is my exact situation.

Re:RTFM (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483317)

I'd agree if this was the XBMC forums but it isn't. This is about an exchange of ideas, not how to change a setting. Would you have felt the same if the submitter had asked how to set a default printer in WinXP?

Re:RTFM (1, Troll)

Nyder (754090) | about 2 years ago | (#42483367)

I have mod points, but where is the option for 'Informative - but a jerk'? Granted, it can be annoying to help someone when the answer to their question is a short Google search away... but the question there at the end seems unkind (at best). Lets keep things civil :)

No, I don't agree. If you are too fucking stupid to read up on the program you are using, then you get what you deserve. It's not like that info is hidden. Not to mention it's a fucking computer, why don't you make user accounts, and keep the porn and adult movies in an account he can NOT access? And don't put it in your regular account, I suggest you make one that you log in when you want to watch those movies/shows. Give the kid his own account, and then just give him access to the kids shows & movies. You can also lock the internet down on that account so he doesn't discover porn.

But honestly, it seems your knowledge of computers is meh, and the kid will probably be smarter then you on computers in 3 years. Enjoy it while it lasts.

Re:RTFM (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483351)

He should also stop pretending he's trying to hide Terminator movies. We all know who is stabbing who in the face and with what in his collection.

Re:RTFM (1)

fermion (181285) | about 2 years ago | (#42483405)

I would say permissions are the way to go. Keep it simple, because kids have nothing by time. That is why you knew more than your parents. Hiding, obfuscating, putting it on a different server, is just going to provide a vector of attack.

What I might do is set up an account that only holds appropriate videos. Log into this account during unattended viewing. Long term this will allow the child to feel more in control and less under your thumb.

As an aside, many of my friends just left the tv on PBS. At some point the child realized there were other channels. and would surf. This provided an opportunity for a conversation about rules of the TV, and appropriate consequences.

Re:RTFM (1)

aliquis (678370) | about 2 years ago | (#42483559)

So. What's next mr first post?

What should we do with the rest of the thread?

Separate media server (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482623)

Create their own media server with only the content you want them to view.

Permissions, Groups, and ACLs (2, Informative)

bmo (77928) | about 2 years ago | (#42482655)

One set of movies has "kids only" group permissions
The other set of movies has "Adults and kids" permissions.

Your son doesn't belong to the "adults and kids" group.

????????

Profit.

--
BMO

Re:Permissions, Groups, and ACLs (1)

bmo (77928) | about 2 years ago | (#42482727)

I kinda didn't express what I set out to express.

You are an adult.

You would have access to both sets of movies "kids" and "adults"
He would have only access to the "Kids" group.

--
BMO

Re:Permissions, Groups, and ACLs (1)

KiloByte (825081) | about 2 years ago | (#42482841)

The only profit here is for your ISP, as the porn will get downloaded twice. What do you think, that a kid today doesn't know how to avoid blocks and get to stuff he wants? Unless you go with a nazi whitelist, there's no way to stop the kid from getting to something as ubiquitous as porn. And a forbidden fruit is all the sweeter.

Re:Permissions, Groups, and ACLs (1)

countach74 (2484150) | about 2 years ago | (#42483123)

There's a rather big difference between attempting to block porn and attempting to block a portion of a movie collection. Most likely the OP just doesn't want his kid stumbling across something that he wouldn't have seen, if it weren't for the XBMC library. If that's the case, the child is probably too young to be interested in seeking out porn.

Re:Permissions, Groups, and ACLs (1)

KiloByte (825081) | about 2 years ago | (#42483205)

TFA used violence as an example, this is something that interests boys from the age of, say. 4-5. And nearly as widespread as porn on teh interwebs.

Re:Permissions, Groups, and ACLs (1)

cgimusic (2788705) | about 2 years ago | (#42483431)

Yes but it is much harder to accidentally stumble across on the internet than it is in a collection of movies that can be freely browsed through.

Coming of age (4, Insightful)

White Flame (1074973) | about 2 years ago | (#42482657)

If they're smart enough to figure out how to pry through complex systems and look at daddy's files, exposure to what they see will have a self-determining effect on them. Either they'll be scared of what they saw in the "grown-up movies" and will leave it alone (and you can talk it out with him), or the kid will find something he likes and expand his horizons a bit.

You don't say how old he is, but I generally believe that you've got to let curiosity run its course for everyday sorts of things like this.

Re:Coming of age (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 years ago | (#42482837)

XBMC is a complex system now?
yeesh.

"but I generally believe that you've got to let curiosity run its course for everyday sorts of things like this."
and you are wrong.

Re:Coming of age (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483131)

XBMC is a complex system now?

Not for me... however having a kid still baffles me (grin)
Maybe you can't have both of "good XBMC" and "how to have kids" knowledge in the same time?

Priviledges/Accounts (1)

p0p0 (1841106) | about 2 years ago | (#42482661)

Make a user for yourself and one for your child. A folder specifically for kids movies. Your child's account is limited and cannot access your users movies.

You can setup a macro to log out/switch user, and quickly log onto the kids account for movies. Keep password on your account.
Simple enough?

Re:Priviledges/Accounts (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 2 years ago | (#42483145)

Make a user for yourself and one for your child. A folder specifically for kids movies. Your child's account is limited and cannot access your users movies.

You can setup a macro to log out/switch user, and quickly log onto the kids account for movies. Keep password on your account.

Simple enough?

I did this, and have since stopped using the "kids" account. I figure if my kid is as intelligent as me, he'll eventually figure out how to get past the password if he really wants to. Now, I just have the screensaver with a password lock for making access to the system less trivial (my kids can't just "accidentally" browse the files) and have trained them in the proper way to treat a computer and account privileges. Setting up a VM and showing them what can happen to it when violating house policies helped.

Now they generally only want to view the stuff that's been whitelisted for them. This will, of course, change as they get older, but they're pretty happy with using their parents as intentional content filters right now.

My first dash of reality came back when I left my 1 year old near the computer with a web browser open to Google in the foreground, and came back to find porn splashed across the screen. All from mashing the keyboard and hitting the mouse in Google (with safebrowsing on). That's when I shortened my password lock timeout and set the screen to turn off after a minute of disuse (or when mouse moved to a hot corner).

I figure my next hurdle with this stuff will come when puberty kicks in, at which point I hope that early training in openness, honesty and respect for others will be enough to save them from being permanently scarred from exposure to things like slashdot at -1.

Use software with parental controls (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482667)

http://www.xbmchub.com/blog/2012/08/13/parental-control-for-xbmc-addons/
http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/Video_Library#Parental_Controls

Seems simple enough to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482677)

Load all child-safe movies into one folder, all other folders should be accessed via password protection. If you are as diligent as you seem, you can organize them based on their MPAA rating into folders, putting password locks on the others.

Try being a parent. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482681)

Instead of looking for a technical solution to do your job for you.

Yeah, i know. mindblowing for sure.

Kids require 24-7 supervision for about 16 years or they WILL get into something you don't like. 100% guaranteed. The only fix is doing the job you signed up for when you had a child.

Re:Try being a parent. (1)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 2 years ago | (#42482947)

Kid cracks password protection by his 5th birthday.

Re:Try being a parent. (2)

Nutria (679911) | about 2 years ago | (#42483189)

It's patently obvious that you have no clue about how parenthood actually works.

(Don't feel too stupid, though: I spouted the same drivel before I had kids, too.)

Re:Try being a parent. (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about 2 years ago | (#42483251)

All my kids' movies are in the folder called @kid-safe.

They know where it is, and they know not to go elsewhere. The other content won't be that interesting to them anyway.

NSFW movies are on the black thumbdrive.

Re:Try being a parent. (4, Funny)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | about 2 years ago | (#42483423)

Anyone that disagrees with me doesn't have a child. All children are the same, too, and that's why everyone's opinion about how to raise a child will be the exact same.

Re:Try being a parent. (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 2 years ago | (#42483239)

Instead of looking for a technical solution to do your job for you.

Yeah, i know. mindblowing for sure.

Kids require 24-7 supervision for about 16 years or they WILL get into something you don't like. 100% guaranteed. The only fix is doing the job you signed up for when you had a child.

I believe that should read "Kids require 24-7 supervision for about 16 years AND they WILL get into something you don't like." The trick is to ensure they've had the training before they get into it so that they know how to handle it at least somewhat maturely.

Giving kids access to things is just like giving everyone else access to things -- information wants to be free; too much information is sometimes a bad thing (in retrospect). Technical solutions for kids are a useful loose set of guidelines to help protect them from wandering off accidentally, but as you state, only a history of good parenting will help them once they (not if they) intentionally step off the beaten track.

Why back in my day... (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 2 years ago | (#42482697)

"...nightmares because he saw the T-1000 stab someone in the face."

It builds character.

Alternative parenting phrases: Walk it off, and ask your mother.

File server + ACLs + ldap (2)

boule75 (649166) | about 2 years ago | (#42482699)

Currently running under Zentyal [zentyal.org] over Ubuntu 10.04.

Each family member has an account, parents have RW access everywhere, kids are generally RO or have no access at all depending on the folder.

database 'views' (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 2 years ago | (#42482701)

use that concept. your player should only have visibility into the 'exposed' parts of your filesystem.

there are FUSE plugins, iirc, that can present partial views of your full/real filesystem.

the tv system would never see the full FS but your personal system (in a diff room that he should not have access to) would have full r/w view privs.

in a nutshell, that's what I would do.

along with that, the view concept can 'mount' the FS read-only.

Re:database 'views' (1)

blueg3 (192743) | about 2 years ago | (#42483033)

Views for filesystems are called users, groups, and file permissions. (Or, if you want to get fancy, ACLs.)

Forgot your own media library (3, Insightful)

maharg (182366) | about 2 years ago | (#42482725)

the boy has the whole internet to peruse unless you have locked that down also... Seriously.. Are you actually running a walled garden ? If not all bets are off...

Summary of Question: How do I hide my porn! (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482731)

How do I hide my porn!

Protecting a child's innocence is a futile effort (0, Troll)

ickleberry (864871) | about 2 years ago | (#42482743)

Just show them Back Door Sluts 9, show them how it's done. Theyll see it eventually anyway so its better that they'd see it in a controlled environment. I saw the 'bad' stuff when i was just a wee boy as well, never did me any harm did it?

This nonsense of 'not showing the R-rated' stuff is mostly just to console the parents really. They knew they were wrong when they allowed a child to be born into this harsh and cruel world and would rather the child think that things are rosy for another couple of years until it is absolutely impossible to keep up the lie any longer.

Re:Protecting a child's innocence is a futile effo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482931)

Please don't reproduce.

Re:Protecting a child's innocence is a futile effo (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 2 years ago | (#42483349)

Just show them Back Door Sluts 9, show them how it's done. Theyll see it eventually anyway so its better that they'd see it in a controlled environment. I saw the 'bad' stuff when i was just a wee boy as well, never did me any harm did it?

This nonsense of 'not showing the R-rated' stuff is mostly just to console the parents really. They knew they were wrong when they allowed a child to be born into this harsh and cruel world and would rather the child think that things are rosy for another couple of years until it is absolutely impossible to keep up the lie any longer.

It's a typical US viewpoint that considers R-rated to be about how much skin is shown.

You really REALLY don't want to show violent movies to a 3-year-old. They aren't wired to process it in a healthy way. Even movies with intense emotional content (but non-violent) can cause months of nightmares. By the time puberty hits, such stuff can be handled somewhat; but a 3-year-old has trouble separating fact from fiction; to them, everything they experience is real in the same way.

If you're not concerned with a 3-year-old stumbling on the somewhat tepid live action version of Back Door Sluts 9 in your bedroom, you don't have to worry about it if they stumble on the film. But don't let them watch anything on film you wouldn't be comfortable with them seeing in real life, because for them there's not much difference (they can "tell" you when something's pretend or real with training, but it's still being processed in the same way inside their heads; separate neural pathways for the two sets of stimuli doesn't develop until later).

Re:Protecting a child's innocence is a futile effo (1)

jamesh (87723) | about 2 years ago | (#42483535)

Just show them Back Door Sluts 9, show them how it's done. Theyll see it eventually anyway so its better that they'd see it in a controlled environment. I saw the 'bad' stuff when i was just a wee boy as well, never did me any harm did it?

This nonsense of 'not showing the R-rated' stuff is mostly just to console the parents really. They knew they were wrong when they allowed a child to be born into this harsh and cruel world and would rather the child think that things are rosy for another couple of years until it is absolutely impossible to keep up the lie any longer.

Little kids have enough to learn about the world without worrying about the finer points of sex. They'll see it eventually, and eventually is when they should see it.

And if a movie called "Back Door Sluts 9" is your idea of "how it's done", then I'm guessing harm has been done and you're probably doing it wrong. Porn is done for the benefit of the audience, sex is done for the benefit of the participants. Kids shouldn't be learning about sex from porn, and should only be seeing porn once they are old enough to understand the difference between the two.

To illustrate the point to an older child, maybe sit them down in front of their favorite computer game (do people still play WoW?) and film them. Constantly tell them that they are in the way of the screen. Tell them to change their armor or other aspects of their character because it doesn't look right. Get them to fight battles that are visually pleasing, not necessarily fun.

I too XBMC my media... (5, Informative)

shakezula (842399) | about 2 years ago | (#42482759)

...from a NAS device. Like you, I've spent HOURS getting all the TV cataloged, named correctly, and with images. Like you, I have kids I don't want watching certain things and I solve it thusly:

1:Create a share on your NAS which has the items you DON'T want them to watch and make it so that it needs a password or whatever credentials you need to connect to it.

2:Add the share to XBMC, but put it under a Master Profile.

3: Create another Profile for your younglings that can't access the shared files. Double bonus, since you password protected the share, if they do go scanning the network, they'll have to have to know the (hopefully) different password to mount the share with your non-kid content.

4:??? Profit?

Check this out: http://forum.xbmc.org/showthread.php?tid=108232 [xbmc.org] I think it will help you sort your media out with haste.

meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482773)

Keep the child friendly stuff on one drive and the rest on another and unmount the other drive when you aren't in direct control of the box.

wrong angle... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482801)

Teach your Son HOW to watch...what's good and what's bad and the reasons why. All you're setting yourself for with security is an arms race that you'll probably lose...

parenting, not technology (5, Insightful)

plaut (42347) | about 2 years ago | (#42482805)

Set and communicate the rules and the consequences for breaking them, monitor compliance, and enforce the consequences if the rules are broken. If you force compliance with technology, your son won't learn what is and isn't appropriate behavior and you won't have the opportunity to build trust. And, believe me, you'll need that trust when he's older.

Re:parenting, not technology (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482935)

This should have been moderated to 5:insightful by now. Parenting is a social feat, not merely a technical or biological one.

This parent could have simply said "hey, there are a lot of grownup movies on here that WILL give you nightmares. You are not allowed to watch the grown-up movies, ask me first before you change what's playing." You don't even need to threaten with punishment. Just state that this is how it will be, and if they start testing boundaries when they get older, THEN you can step in and start revoking privilege as punishment.

Re:parenting, not technology (4, Insightful)

jedidiah (1196) | about 2 years ago | (#42483461)

Some things are adult by nature simply because of unavoidable social convention. Those really should be locked away using some mechanism that is expected to pose some sort of minimal barrier.

It doesn't have to be unhackable. It just has to create a clear boundary.

It doesn't matter if it's a "parents" fileshare or a lock on a gun cabinet.

Re:parenting, not technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483303)

Dude, that didn't work for Tommy! He ended up going blind!

Re:parenting, not technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483425)

Despite not having commented or logged in for years, I felt I had to point out how ridiculously stupid this post is. Clearly, you don't have kids.

First off, the OP didn't want a parenting lecture. This is a tech site for technical information.

Secondly, like everything in the US, it deals with the consequences not the problem. I guarantee if you tell a child not to do something, they will. The OP doesn't want this issue to come up at all. Some adult stuff (especially for special kids), could be too harsh. Not to mention, the OP still needs to know how to lock down the media after the parent "enforces" the behavior.

So please get off your high horse if you can only contribute a glib lecture on how you think the world should be.

Good Luck (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482809)

I keep my kids media in a different shared folder on a NAS with different file permissions. They have to login to my account to get access. Altho, now I'm going to have to also modify my netflix account to as I caught my pre-schooler typing the letters ironman into the Netflix search box as he read them from his comic book title, matching them up to what's on the keyboard. Hadn't needed any controls until recently, but get used to it, they're gonna watch you and learn, ALOT faster than you're gonna like.

Different user rights for the kids (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482847)

While WHS has been discontinued (and may not be at all popular with the /. crowd) it is still what we use, on a small 5 TB Tranquil server. Parents have access to more folders than kids and guests.

I am sure other NAS-type products has similar user settings.

User profiles on our living room devices (PS3, Xbox, etc.) makes it easy to keep the restrictions in place.

Only problem is the tablets. They are not multi-user friendly so they have only been provided with the network credentials for the kids account. But it is seldom a problem - we rarely need to access the restricted folders from those devices anyway.

Get a network/storage system with user control. I am surprised you didn't come to that conclusion yourself. :-)

Original poster here. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482933)

Hi guys, the original poster here. Of course I knew about the parental controls in XMBC: After all, it's only one Google away! However, what I was really after, is the geek way to go about this. I was thinking of retina-scanning myself, though also some sort of Rube Goldberg device ultimately leading to the proper identification of the person watching would suffice. Anyway, thanks!

Re:Original poster here. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483173)

KILL YOURSELF FAGGOT.

Require "Adult Presence" for Restricted Movies (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482953)

Here's what I do: To keep it simple, I tag all the "bad" movies as restricted. Then on the server in each room where a movie could possibly be played, I require that the server has an "adult present" token. At first this token was just a USB stick I carried around with just a certain named file on it (no crypto). A few years ago I switched to detecting the presence of a bluetooth device - my cell phone or a few other authorized devices. The server scans for the MAC address every 30 seconds, if it can't find it 3x in a row it disables playback of restricted movies. But you can use any convenient token.

I don't use this at home but at a non-profit I run (a haunted attraction). It's got a mix of adults and teen volunteers, and we have PG-13 and R stuff in our horror video library. The system has worked rather well, but I admit the security of it is based on obscurity - that the teens don't know what enables the restricted content! If they ever figured it out, I'd switch to a secure token.

VHS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482993)

Use VHS, he won't have a clue...

ERM (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42482999)

I'm pretty positive xbmc has parental controls built in, does it not?
I know my version does.

Read only Samba share and symlinks (1)

SoCalChris (573049) | about 2 years ago | (#42483017)

I've got a samba server with a share containing all of our media that's for my wife & I to watch. I've got a second, read-only share set up for the kids. The kid's directory has a bunch of symlinks to content that's suitable for them. It allows them to freely browse the media on their own, and I know exactly what they're accessing.

Try something different (3, Interesting)

MrKaos (858439) | about 2 years ago | (#42483069)

Treat your kid like an intelligent human being and implement the security measures the code has but no more. Explain to you child why but in a way that lets them weigh their own value system against their curiosity. We don't need more kids in the world that are mindless accepters of whatever is put in front of them. Allow them to make their own decisions and own the consequences for them, including nightmares.

If they break through the security, get them to show you how they did it, congratulate them, fix it and challenge them to find the next one. Turn that part into a game and you maybe able to give you child an advantage over 99% of the sheeple out there.

OMG they'll see nudity (1)

gelfling (6534) | about 2 years ago | (#42483149)

Next thing you know it's a gunfight in the kindergarten class.

Re:OMG they'll see nudity (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 2 years ago | (#42483417)

Next thing you know it's a gunfight in the kindergarten class.

And it will get blamed on video games!

Parental Controls (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483217)

Parental Controls, v-chip, etc.

The entertainment industry has been trying to do this for quite a while.

Limit playback to movies rated G or under - I'm sure that XBMC can do that... if not, it's open source, right?

Safe from kids? No problem! (1)

erroneus (253617) | about 2 years ago | (#42483255)

Mark it read-only!! They won't be able to delete it then.

Can we be clear on this? Does "adult video" harm children? Have there been any studies on this? Really?

Let's see: Children who grow up around guns most often learn to respect and handle them properly. Children who learn early on about knives and fire early on are no longer curious about them either. And yes, "sex education courses!" Yeah, that watered-down class of PC speak is going to address all of their natural curiosities and natural insticts right?

Let's ask the question more properly shall we?

"How can I keep myself from being tossed in jail for violating some law based on presumed morality which has little basis in fact?"

P.S. When I was a kid, I saw porn. It didn't "harm me." I'm a normal guy.

Re:Safe from kids? No problem! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483441)

Can we be clear on this? Does "adult video" harm children?

Yes, it does.

I grew up with computers, and early on pressed my parents into getting me access to the Internets. I saw plenty of pixelated, low-resolution boobies and at the ripe age of thirteen, was having sexy IRC times with what appeared to be hawt nerdy college chicks.

I went on to become a systems administrator.

Parents, don't let this happen to your children. Teach them to be developers; they get paid more and don't have to wake up at 3 AM because some drunk C-level forgot his password.

Re:Safe from kids? No problem! (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 2 years ago | (#42483487)

...

P.S. When I was a kid, I saw porn. It didn't "harm me." I'm a normal guy.

When I was a kid, I didn't see porn, and it harmed me. I didn't know much about sex, didn't understand how to please women, shit, I didn't even realize how women masturbated till I was much older. Porn at least would of gave me insight on the art of sex and how to help switch it from a self act, to a pleasing act for the other.

Of course, practice makes perfect, but who wants to have sex with a guy who only knows how to please himself? Besides hookers.

Well, now you decided if I'm being funny or insightful.

Re:Safe from kids? No problem! (1)

erroneus (253617) | about 2 years ago | (#42483593)

I'm going to go with obvious. Sex is part of who we all are at so many levels. Disney has been making billions exploiting kids and sexuality. And doesn't everyone know that keeping something away from children only makes them want it more?

Security by Obfuscation to the rescue! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483259)

My parents just used to label the naughty HBO show VHS tapes as football or soap operas =P

Actual question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483377)

How do I keep the kids from finding my multi-TB pr0n library?

Different directories / levels of security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483421)

I would use different directories with different levels of security. One for movies you have cleared for his consumption (G, PG-13, etc) this would have unrestricted access. Another directory for R (bad language, nudity, violence, etc) could be password protected, and (if needed) a third level for X or things that you REALLY don't want him seeing. These would be physically off-line (removable HD) locked in a closet/drawer etc AND password protected.

The most affective way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483489)

The most affective way that I have found is to not have kids in the first place.

The Simple Way (1)

TechnoLuddite (854235) | about 2 years ago | (#42483547)

Somewhat surprised to find this hasn't been suggested already: remove all non-G-rated material.

If it's appropriate for adults ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42483571)

If it's appropriate for adults it's appropriate for children.

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