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John McAfee Explains How He Milked Information From Belize's Elite

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the ok-but-who-will-play-john-mcafee? dept.

Security 275

paysonwelch points out John McAfee's latest blog post, which "details the complex spy network that he used to tap information from the highest echelons of the Belizean government. He might consider a new career as a movie producer — this blog post is enthralling. Here is an excerpt: 'I purchased 75 cheap laptop computers and, with trusted help, intalled invisible keystroke logging software on all of them — the kind that calls home (to me) and disgorges the text files. I began giving these away as presents to select people — government employees, police officers, Cabinet Minister's assistants, girlfriends of powerful men, boyfriends of powerful women.'"

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Two words: (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487457)

Nut Job

Re:Two words: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487649)

From the article (really):

I arranged with 23 women and 6 men to be my operatives. Eight of the women were so accomplished that they ended up living with me. It was amazingly more efficient and they were easily convinced to check up on each other. One was so accomplished (Marcia) that she became a double agent and nearly got me killed.

Re:Two words: (5, Insightful)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | about 2 years ago | (#42487783)

This is one of the places where the story rings false. Given any 30 people involved in full-time spying on dozens of other people, it is _inevitable_ that at least one of them would notify the police of this operation. Not only because the activity is illegal, but because very few people can keep quiet about what their wage paying job is for an extended period, and they would inevitably inform lovers, family, or friends. That then multiplies the number of people who might inform on the operation in a plea bargain.

For anyone who's been involved in handling security of any kind, such as a shared administrative password or simply keeping a corporate merger private before the public announcement, it's simply not feasible: it _will_ leak out with many participants.

Re:Two words: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487887)

he didn't deny that they formed lovers, although he sounded too shocked that that they would (it's normal in even professional workplaces?). but the question is, is he just narrating a movie story to the tune of counterterrorism?

instead of making a movie based on a true event (Argo and the Iranian hostage Crisis in 1979), he's narrating factual information as they're happening (belizeans entering the U.S. and growing castor oil in Nicaragua for force-feeding Tom and Jerry or other use in the comments). And only one man can stop them. Well, I added that last part for humor, but the previous statement holds...

Re:Two words: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487825)

I hope someone he screwed over delivers him some "permanent" justice

Re:Two words: (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487897)

I hope someone he screwed over delivers him some "permanent" justice

That's how he got found out, the boyfriend of a powerful man ratted McAfee out because it pissed him off that only the straight people got a laptop.

Re:Two words: (1, Insightful)

xyourfacekillerx (939258) | about 2 years ago | (#42487917)

Absolutely. This guy's mind is mangled beyond repair from all the MDPV and other cathinones he's been doing for years. He's worse off than a meth addict on a binge, because what he's done to his brain is likely permanent.

Re:Two words: (1)

Freddybear (1805256) | about 2 years ago | (#42488105)

Megalomania. Is that in the DSM? Ah, wiki says no, it's a type of narcissistic personality disorder.

If he wasn't in trouble before (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487465)

He certainly is now.

If I were in charge, I would send him to Belize as a show of good faith.

deport? (1)

globaljustin (574257) | about 2 years ago | (#42487585)

He probably has been in trouble for a long time...or at least running with a bad crowd.

It will catch up to him, but I don't know if there is any reason to deport him.

As far as his blog ("TFA") goes, it could be anything. Maybe he thinks he's been working for a gov't...maybe he thinks he's above international law...

Slashbloat (5, Insightful)

OffTheLip (636691) | about 2 years ago | (#42487473)

The amount of coverage McAfee has received on Slashdot and other "news" sources rivals the bloat his software adds to a system. Nothing to see here, move along.

Re:Slashbloat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487519)

We need some kind of heuristics, or some other method of inoculating us against bad antivirus jokes.

Re:Slashbloat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487751)

Not reading slashdot is an important first step...

Re:Slashbloat (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about 2 years ago | (#42487947)

We need some kind of heuristics, or some other method of inoculating us against bad antivirus jokes.

How about some good innocuous ... oh, never mind.

Re:Slashbloat (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487521)

He sold McAfee the software company over 20 years ago. Just saying.

Re:Slashbloat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487965)

So, given that he has no involvement in the IT business any more, why are we still reading about him here?

Re:Slashbloat (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487587)

You just wish Peter Norton was this awesome. Fucking superspy.

Re:Slashbloat (5, Funny)

charlesbakerharris (623282) | about 2 years ago | (#42487901)

You mean the Peter Norton who hasn't been caught yet?

Re:Slashbloat (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487653)

Just wait until he blogs about bribing his way out of Belize with BitCoin.

Re:Slashbloat (1)

SomePgmr (2021234) | about 2 years ago | (#42487721)

Just wait until he blogs about bribing his way out of Belize with BitCoin.

Or if some of those computer gifts were Raspberry Pi's. :)

Not possible. (2)

iceworks (2766695) | about 2 years ago | (#42487475)

I have to call BS, I live along the border of Belize and nowhere, and I mean NOWHERE can you find electronics that cheap. Electronics are gold in these countries.

Re:Not possible. (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#42487497)

I have to call BS, I live along the border of Belize and nowhere, and I mean NOWHERE can you find electronics that cheap. Electronics are gold in these countries.

Custom forms are bullshitted every day.

Re:Not possible. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487503)

Chetumal, Mexico? Plus, it doesn't have to be that cheap.... he's frikin loaded!

Re:Not possible. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487513)

I generally live in Belize 1/4 of the year now, and its certainly possible to get Chinese generic laptops very cheap here. Much cheaper than in America.

Re:Not possible. (5, Funny)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | about 2 years ago | (#42487547)

>> Chinese generic laptops very cheap here

Plus they come preloaded with spyware.

Re:Not possible. (4, Interesting)

CdBee (742846) | about 2 years ago | (#42487541)

I'm inclined to agree, also because I suspect the kind of mindset who would actually DO this isn't the sort of person who would ever admit it - not least because he's forever besmirched his chance of ever doing it again. I suspect McAfee's suffering the after effects of various experimental chemicals, or delusions brought on by withdrawal symptoms

Re:Not possible. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487641)

I countercall BS. He never mentioned a price in his article.

Possible alternative explanation (3, Informative)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#42487481)

He might consider a new career as a movie producer — this blog post is fictional.

FTFH?

Re:Possible alternative explanation (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 years ago | (#42487665)

I also started to wonder if the stuff is fictional.

Trusting anti-virus producers (3, Insightful)

maestroX (1061960) | about 2 years ago | (#42487487)

After the rumours that av producers were also producing virii, at least this confirms McAfee antivirus cannot be trusted.
No doubt J McAfee will explain his actions as totally justified and honourable.

Re:Trusting anti-virus producers (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487533)

Viruses. Also, 'virii' has an extra 'i' (if 'virus' was pluralized like that).

Re:Trusting anti-virus producers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487957)

you realize this is english, right?

Re:Trusting anti-virus producers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487709)

You sound silly for writing "virii". :D

Re:Trusting anti-virus producers (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487995)

"Virii" was originally a joke, a hyper-Latinized ersatz plural meant to be used with tongue firmly in cheek.

Then some Asperger's types took it seriously and actually started defending it as a legitimate form.

Please, McAfee, stop posting ./ puffery (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487489)

paysonwelch, just stop using that false name.

We all know you're McAfee.

Nobody else would his "his blog post [is] enthralling.". It's completely moronic, just from the excerpt and the headline alone.

You're sounding like Homer Simpson chanting "I am so smart. S.M.R.T".

Re:Please, McAfee, stop posting ./ puffery (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487507)

You should be checking your laptop for the signs of keylogger right now.

Hmm (5, Interesting)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 2 years ago | (#42487495)

So, let me get this straight: John McAfee is the founding-father of a large anti-virus company, he's worked with Zonelabs on their firewall software and so on, and then in the end he ends up doing exactly the same thing he's tried to protect people from -- namely, installing keyloggers and spying on everything they type on their computers?

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487543)

..., installing keyloggers and spying on everything they type on their computers?

Yeah. And isn't that illegal?

And I guess that makes him a criminal. So however you slice it, that guy should be criminally charged.

Re:Hmm (5, Funny)

CdBee (742846) | about 2 years ago | (#42487549)

It was Ok though - he supplied McAfee AV on each of the laptops

Re:Hmm (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487553)

>So, let me get this straight.
"Gaygirlie", you don't seem to have the best suited nick for the job.

Anyway, the AV business is about making people pay to "secure windows". When did this not sound like a scam?

Re:Hmm (4, Insightful)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 2 years ago | (#42487575)

>So, let me get this straight.
"Gaygirlie", you don't seem to have the best suited nick for the job.

Touché, my dear, touché.

Re:Hmm (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487597)

So then why is there AV software for OS X, Linux desktops and Android? Oh right, because you're full of it.

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487579)

Anyway, are there really people out there dumb enough to accept a computer from ANY source and use it without completely reformatting it and reinstalling their own OS? Whether you got it from John McAffee personally or from Dell or from a shady guy on a street corner or your corner computer store, it doesn't matter. You always, always have to install your own OS, because who knows what sort of crap it might have on it otherwise.

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487681)

I'm guessing about 99.9 percent of people don't reinstall the OS after acquiring a computer.

Re:Hmm (1)

UltraZelda64 (2309504) | about 2 years ago | (#42487769)

I would say that's probably pretty accurate. People just unpackage the system, set it up, turn it on and use it. Furthermore, I wouldn't trust the OEM Windows re-installers either since they tend to just install all that OEM shit right back with the OS. That basically makes it a royal pain in the ass to reinstall Windows in trusted form on a modern computer without buying yet another license to the OS in the form of the official retail version.

Re:Hmm (1)

satuon (1822492) | about 2 years ago | (#42487963)

That's why I always install Linux with the encrypted home folder option checked.

Re:Hmm (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42488049)

Which will be of little help if the BIOS and the network card are crooked.

Re:Hmm (1)

UltraZelda64 (2309504) | about 2 years ago | (#42488061)

Yeah... but I was taking into account the fact that if these people aren't even sophisticated enough to reinstall a copy of Windows, then they sure as hell won't know how anything about Linux.

Re:Hmm (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#42487797)

I'm guessing about 99.9 percent of people don't reinstall the OS after acquiring a computer.

And yet that doesn't change the validity of the GP comment one whit.

Re:Hmm (1)

PRMan (959735) | about 2 years ago | (#42487595)

Well, he does have expertise. Nice to see him stand up to a government that's mistreating him. Hopefully he gives some free laptops out in the US next.

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487633)

better check the BIOS of those. He sounds like a seasoned IT pimp. If he had simply shut up and contacted CIA, I am sure they would have found some use for him. He could be a kingpin of the intelligence-industry-complex.

Re:Hmm (1)

UltraZelda64 (2309504) | about 2 years ago | (#42487671)

Don't you see? It's all a part of the plan. You will need a new license of McAfee anti-virus software to be able to protect yourself from these new pieces of surveillance malware. Norton will not do.

Re:Hmm (1)

14erCleaner (745600) | about 2 years ago | (#42487767)

I sure hope he purchased 75 licenses for those keyloggers. Otherwise the SPA will be on him like a Bond woman on a corrupt Belizian official.

Re:Hmm (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487923)

Faggot.

Re:Hmm (1)

timeOday (582209) | about 2 years ago | (#42488081)

You're looking for consistency in whether someone's actions might benefit you, and not finding it. Instead see if there is not consistency in the person's set of abilities, and willingness to take actions in their own self interest.

Please can we stop it with the John McAfee stories (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487531)

This first one was interesting but seriously; does Slashdot need to 're-blog' everything he says and does?

Re:Please can we stop it with the John McAfee stor (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 years ago | (#42487725)

Sure, why not. At least I want to see how this crazy story continues.

If John could be so kind as to (3, Interesting)

nimbius (983462) | about 2 years ago | (#42487535)

explain how he sidestepped a murder charge from a soverign nation and has since remained unaccountable as to the history of his seventeen year old female companion and alleged methamphetamine production operation, I believe slashdot can finally put "the amazing adventures of John McAfee" back on the bookshelf.

There is nothing about this entire series of unfortunate events that shouldnt warrant immediate extradition to Belize, where he can face his accusors in a court of law and presumably vindicate himself. Otherwise this is an indignant millionaires whitewash campaign to secure his innocence through astroturf and puffery. Unfortunately Mr McAfee wasnt found accused of these crimes in say, the Soviet Union or China, both countries willing to mail a dead millionaire back to his respective embassy for nothing short of a Benny-Hill approach to their criminal justice system.

Re:If John could be so kind as to (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487659)

Uhmm yeah. Thanks for your Langley-sourced propaganda. Last time I checked, Russia poloniumed emigrated ex-KGB members for disloyalty, not the random foreign billionaire-politician.
See what the CIA, SIS, Security Service and the Israeli security establishment did to their defectors/dissidents. Once a CIA man, forever a CIA man, I assume. Now replace CIA by KGB, FSB, SIS, MOSSAD and so on. Still true.

Re:If John could be so kind as to (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487669)

As I wouldnt particularly trust any western court to vindicate me on minor issues I think a man who has royally pissed of the powers that be in a 2nd world country is wise to stay as far away from "justice" as he possibly can. The only difference between multinational corporate bully boys and sovereign nations is that one thinks its above the law and lets everyone know it, while the other knows its above the law and would rather people thought otherwise.

This is why we have a man who had consentual sex with two women, and then was told specifically by a cheif prosecutor he had no case to answer and was free to leave the country holed up in a london embassy being painted as a fugitive rapist on the run from the "law"

Re:If John could be so kind as to (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487687)

He wasn't formally charged, he was just a person of interest that they wanted to question.

Re:If John could be so kind as to (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about 2 years ago | (#42487927)

explain how he sidestepped a murder charge from a soverign nation

I don't believe he was ever charged with murder. They wanted him for questioning, which is not extraditable by itself.

McAfee is not a drug addict (3, Informative)

dnaumov (453672) | about 2 years ago | (#42487537)

As someone who knows many drug addicts and used to be one himself over 15 years ago: John McAfee's blog is not the writing of a drug addict. Either he is as clear from drugs as he says he is or he has someone else write the stuff for him.

Re:McAfee is not a drug addict (5, Funny)

Jaysyn (203771) | about 2 years ago | (#42487625)

I don't know, Philip K. Dick or Hunter S. Thompson could have wrote that in their sleep. :D

Hell, it reads almost like one of Dick's short stories.

Re:McAfee is not a drug addict (1)

Psyborgue (699890) | about 2 years ago | (#42487843)

Jack Kerouac, Baudelaire and Dumas also... There are tons.

Re:McAfee is not a drug addict (1)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#42487645)

As someone who knows many drug addicts and used to be one himself over 15 years ago: John McAfee's blog is not the writing of a drug addict. Either he is as clear from drugs as he says he is or he has someone else write the stuff for him.

Yes, cause all drug users are obviously the same.
Just because he doesn't write like Hunter S. Thompson, Jack Kerouac or Horselover Fat doesn't mean he's not on drugs.

Re:McAfee is not a drug addict (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487781)

Most heavy drug users (i.e. addicts) I've known have written like complete and total crap while on drugs, I suspect that's what dnaumov means. Depending on the drug we're talking writing which is more garbled than an Irishman's speech after two bottles of whisky and plenty of beer or with substances simply an inability to write anything coherent (if you've ever chatted with someone on a massive dose of any serious hallucinogen you should know what I'm talking about, their spelling might be perfect but either order of the words or their choice of words is all wrong or each sentence seems to be completely unrelated to the next).

If McAfee really is really hooked on stimulants/euphorics (like for example Mephedrone, one of the more common substances found in so-called "bath salts") then I'd expect his writing to be a lot less sane. Not the content, the actual writing.

Re:McAfee is not a drug addict (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487685)

I would not be surprised to learn he has episodes of extended non-use. But of course he is living a truely crap life, apparently having sex with hundreds of different women of very shaky morals. Call me a puritan, but I would just point out that STDs can be very, very nasty.

Re:McAfee is not a drug addict (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42488023)

Then use a condom.

Sounds rather self-incriminating to me... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487565)

Or not?

I mean spyware on other people's computers sounds pretty criminal to me.

Re:Sounds rather self-incriminating to me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487719)

Oh my fucking Langley God. Sounds like a catholic nun as compared to what USG does on a regular basis. Bitch Clinton did not just demand collection of fingerprints, she ordered DNA and credit card numbers of essentially every foreign diplomat her people got in touch with to be collected.

Now the US intel/security apparatus shits bricks about DNA of O'Bomba being collected and used to create a "custom virus designed to kill just the Sucker In Chief".

Think about how much insanity you want, Americans. Sometimes less is better than more.

Re:Sounds rather self-incriminating to me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487949)

Oh, the Americans learned from the best: European spy agencies. And the Europeans are still as much up to these tricks as ever, you just don't hear as much about it because they are better at it.

Re:Sounds rather self-incriminating to me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42488075)

I seriously think nobody on the globe thought about "custom killer virus designed to hit specific person" until America came up with that idea. Most European nations are just too broken they can spend money on this kind of pathological fantasies.

A sniper with a rifle in Dallas, though...

Re:Sounds rather self-incriminating to me... (2)

UltraZelda64 (2309504) | about 2 years ago | (#42487787)

Hey, they were free gifts to those people given one. And no one forced any of them to just trust it and not manually wipe and re-install a known clean OS.

Confesses do illegally monitoring people? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487599)

Monitoring powerful people?

Either he's delusional or a criminal, and either way he's being pretty stupid. I wish the guy would get some help -- medical or legal -- and then shut the hell up.

Re:Confesses do illegally monitoring people? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487799)

It could very well be that all of this is the work of a powerful, highly intelligent fantasy. Sounds too much like Tom Clancy.

Now, if it is all or mostly fantasy, what is the objective ? Does he want to smear Belize to make the case "you cannot extradite me to this kind of shitty country ?"

Or maybe, this is just a marketing campaign for his upcoming book "McAfee's adventures in a lawless country full of gorgeous sluts and terrorists. 29.95 on Amazon"

But then, he is connected to wired.com, a known propaganda agent for Zion, CIA and the war industry. Maybe there is much more to McAfee than we know. Maybe he has a "black" history of computer intrusion operations for USG. He also seems to be versed in Humint by sex. Of course, a long shot on my side....

LOL, what next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487615)

A hollow wooden horse? How stupid are these people? I understand if we we're talking about hardware bugs but software???

Then again, most people run on their computer what ever the vendor installed for them... incredible.

Re:LOL, what next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42488017)

Based on the number of IT fuckups of the richest government of the globe, a truly shoddy state of Belize government IT would be entirely rational to assume. German intel recently read all the emails of the Afghan government by means of hacking. And the BND certainly is not he most capable service out there.

This seems pointless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487639)

Why would anyone want intelligence on what the Belize elite is up to? Why bother? They are simply not that interesting.

Murder suspect (1)

burni2 (1643061) | about 2 years ago | (#42487643)

Even that one can think that the Belize authorities are corrupt, but a man (his neighbour) was killed and John Mcafee is/was the main suspect
but everything that slashdot publishes are the desperados-like yet successful attempts of John Mcafee to prevent from being captured and to stand trail.

And why does he publishes these details now, if he is innocent and this is all a conspiracy against him, he could have used these spying capabilities to bust the scam and reveal the real killers with live audio.

When he has such proof of such a conspiracy, he should compile it into a report and release it to the public leaving away his personality issues.
Just clear facts.

Re:Murder suspect (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 2 years ago | (#42487683)

he could have used these spying capabilities to bust the scam and reveal the real killers with live audio.

Why do you so naively assume that he knows who the real killers are?

Oh, no that wasn't very risky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487657)

The fact that it phoned home to him didn't pose any serious risk of getting caught for spying on government officials. Is he smart? No, he is an ass who was just lucky to get away with it.

Re:Oh, no that wasn't very risky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487831)

There are (easy) effectively untracable ways to phone home. E.g. phone home to a server that you've hacked, then download the resulting files using a prepaid SIM. If it's more data, find an open wifi. The only hope the police has is to catch you in-person.

This is the basic stuff, assuming that you're using very direct ways of communicating with yourself. Inserting other protocols in the mix is easy, and can make things much harder to trace. SMTP, IRC (irc via webchat), NNTP, DNS, ICMP, all sorts of instant messaging protocols, skype, ... all can be trivially used to send information and will work on most networks (except NNTP these days, although ...). All but SMTP will effectively bypass any scrutiny. Another trivial way to bypass scrutiny : HTTPS. Since the high ups want access to their webbanking, this is almost always opened (I've been on "secret" government networks that allowed https out, only logging where it connected to). If it's opened by idiots the web proxy has blanket allows for CONNECT requests.

And you don't have to design all this yourself, code that works very well is in easy reach.

Re:Oh, no that wasn't very risky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42488097)

Don't expect much real "security" in a third-world country.

The best method in my opinion is to use google mail or google docs as a data exfiltration method. Even in the west many "IT security professionals" are stupid enough to automatically classify that as legitimate traffic. Plus, lots of people use gmail.

I currently work for a major globo-corp and we can do gmail without any man-in-the-middle attack at the firewall. I could exfiltrate gigabytes of product-related data per day. Security By Muppets.

Hacker (1)

Faisal Rehman (2424374) | about 2 years ago | (#42487705)

The way he show up in news proves that he is hacker.

Dead founder of Webroot, Steven Thomas (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487753)

This guy sounded way more interesting, yet how many people heard about it? There are several news articles remaining on the web about him. I once dug far enough to find something about him needing to build something higher up than he was at the time, and more involving aliens and the military.

Google his name and search for yourself. Was it really a mental disorder or something more?

Dead founder of Webroot, Steven Thomas, more interesting
------------------------

Search Continues For Missing Millionaire

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/search-continues-for-missing-millionaire [thedenverchannel.com]

"The last time I saw him on Thursday, he was having major panic attacks. He was very agitated, aggressive. He was very paranoid. He thinks everyone on the island is out to get him," said his wife, Candis Thomas. "He thinks the military is involved, he thinks that aliens are involved, and he's just been in a real delusion state of being fearful."

"He said he needed to use the bathroom, but never returned. At the time he was wearing a light-green T-shirt, shorts and slippers."

##

Missing Webroot founder found dead
Tragic end in Hawaii

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/07/14/webroot_founder_dead/ [theregister.co.uk]

"Police have recovered the body of missing technology entrepreneur Steven Thomas, the founder of anti-spyware firm Webroot Software[1]."

"Thomas was reportedly suffering from paranoid delusions running up to the time of his disappearance."

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webroot [wikipedia.org]
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Thomas_(entrepreneur) [wikipedia.org]

"he did send a letter to his closest friends that if he turned up missing or dead it was not his fault."

##

http://www.lavasoft.com/mylavasoft/company/blog/in-our-thoughts [lavasoft.com]

##

Millionaireâ(TM)s falling death âis beyond sadâ(TM)

http://archives.starbulletin.com/2008/07/15/news/story03.html [starbulletin.com]

"Hikers found the badly decomposed body of the Lanikai resident, who was reported to have a bipolar disorder, at 12:45 p.m. Sunday below the Pali Lookout, nearly two weeks after his disappearance."

"Police have not yet ruled out foul play, Maj. Alan Bluemke said yesterday, although he emphasized no foul play was suspected. The case remains classified as an unattended death, pending the full medical examiner's report.

According to his wife, Thomas began developing problems in April, had been arrested for running naked in his neighborhood and was diagnosed later with bipolar disorder, also called manic-depressive illness, but had refused medication.

Police had described Thomas as emotionally distraught, and his wife had said he had been displaying suicidal behavior.

Thomas had been involved in real estate and stocks after selling Webroot Software, known for its Spy Sweeper software, in 2004 for $108 million."

##

Mysterious events surround death of former FOUNDER of the company WEBROOT â" GOOGLE about the former FOUNDER of the company WEBROOT, Steven Thomas.

Maybe he was onto something? You have to read many articles about him to get a better picture of how odd the events were surrounding his death. Webroot Software founder Steven Thomas was found dead in Hawaii. Save the articles and store them off-line on read only media because the stories will disappear eventually.

Many articles mention he said he was being harassed by ALIENS and THE GOVERNMENT, and others.

Sounds like MKULtra to me.

##

Webroot founder died from fall

http://www.denverpost.com/headlines/ci_9887901 [denverpost.com]

"In April, he was arrested after he ran naked into a race/walk event in front of his home. More recently, Thomas expressed deep dismay over his investments, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and his family's plans move back to Boulder, according to reports published in Hawaii.

Thomas stayed with visiting family members at a Waikiki hotel in the days before he disappeared, according to news reports. He told them that the balcony of their hotel room was not high enough for what he needed to do, his brother told reporters.

Friends and family members have said Thomas did not exhibit signs of mental-health problems until recently."

##

Webroot creator found dead after going missing in Hawaii

http://www.scmagazine.com/Webroot-founder-found-dead-after-going-missing-in-Hawaii/article/112412/?DCMP=EMC-SCUS_Newswire [scmagazine.com]

"The body of Thomas, who family members said began recently suffering from bipolar disorder and delusions that he was being tracked by aliens and the government, was discovered near the base of a 985-foot Oahu cliff, according to newspaper reports."

##

Millionaire found below Pali Lookout

"He was upset about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and claimed aliens and the government were out to get him, his wife said. He had also reportedly refused medication and medical attention."

http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2008/Jul/14/ln/hawaii807140356.html [honoluluadvertiser.com]

Re:Dead founder of Webroot, Steven Thomas (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487991)

Now the simple explanation is that many people do "too much computers". It can royally fuck up the brain. Just look at those playing 18 hours a day, weeks at a time World of Warcraft and then need serious time in psychiatric ward.

Actually, I do think McAfee als has some of these problems.

We all computer users should watch ourselves and our relation to the non-virtual world.

Poor Intel (1)

mseeger (40923) | about 2 years ago | (#42487793)

The brand name McAfee is getting thoroughly trashed. Now all that remains from the purchase is a bloated digital placebo software.

Free Tools page more interesting! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487813)

http://www.mcafee.com/us/downloads/free-tools/index.aspx [mcafee.com]

"McAfee is committed to your security and provides an assortment of free McAfee tools to help in your software development. Simply select a tool and download it for free."

You may remember most of these tools as coming from Foundstone:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foundstone [wikipedia.org]

"Foundstone is a practice within McAfee Professional Services that provides tactical and strategic computer security services."

"Although Foundstone is owned by McAfee, it stays vendor neutral in order to remain impartial in its services."

McAfee Has keylogers in it that phones home (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#42487837)

McAfee Has keylogers in it that phones home that must be why it's so slow.

Acapulco Kevin (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487849)

I have been writing about this from the beginning of this ignorance.
I do not believe a single word that comes out of John McAfee's pie hole. He wants to distract people from the fact that he was molesting children in Belize, was cooking Bath Salts and probably killed his neighbor. The man is not a folk hero, he is the man you want to protect your children from.
http://john-mcafee.blogspot.com/

Hezbollah (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487869)

I stopped reading after he got into terrorism. If any of this were remotely true he could have called the FBI and CIA and they would have gotten him out of Belize in a heartbeat just to take control of all his spies and keylogging network. Enough with the "jokes" John.

no wonder (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about 2 years ago | (#42487895)

And McAfee wonders why the Belize government is out to get him? This kind of crime easily would carry a very long prison sentence in most countries.

Why is nobody stating the obvious? (5, Insightful)

dills (102733) | about 2 years ago | (#42487951)

This is clearly bullshit.

At every turn, he attaches quantities to resources:

75 cheap laptops
23 women
6 men
8 of the women lived with him
2 people in the Nicaraguan Hezbollah camp
3 people in Mexico dealing with the Zetas

The only "evidence" supporting his story are his "so easy to fake my kids could it" screenshots and audio files.

I think the original assessment stands: This is a guy who has snorted waaaay too much MPDV, is seeing shadow men in bushes, and killed his neighbor in retaliation for his neighbor killing his dog.

He escaped the country via a combination of his charisma, money, and the ineptitude of the Belize law enforcement.

This is all just a retroactive attempt at explaining why the Belize government would want to frame him. Look, it's simple...why would Belize kill his neighbor to frame McAfee, when they could simply just kill McAfee instead?

Paranoid bullshit, and so obviously so.

Re:Why is nobody stating the obvious? (0)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 years ago | (#42488059)

Yeah.

He installed McAffee AV on those notebooks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487967)

Or what kind of key-loggers did he use?

rotfl...

sceenshots with a camera (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42487975)

Looks like he used a camera to take the screenshots ;)
John, there are easier ways.

He puts super perv powder up his (1)

Ranger (1783) | about 2 years ago | (#42488013)

butt [gizmodo.com] .

Look a gift laptop in the mouth (1)

fruitbane (454488) | about 2 years ago | (#42488119)

So, the real lesson here is not to accept and technological gifts from a security guru. Gee, thanks!

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