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Kingston Introduces 1TB Flash Drive

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the small-package dept.

Data Storage 170

Deathspawner writes "If there's one thing that each CES can bring, it's a handful or products that manage to drop jaws everywhere. Kingston's latest flash drive series, DataTraveler HyperX Predator 3.0, manages to be one of those. It's aimed at folks who actually need mass storage on the go at speeds that mechanical hard drives cannot offer. Available soon will be a 512GB model, followed by the 1TB later this quarter. The drive features read speeds of 240MB/s and write speeds of 160MB/s — not quite desktop SSD speeds, but much faster than a mechanical hard drive, and with vastly reduced latencies due to it being flash storage. Not surprisingly, pricing has not yet been discussed."

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170 comments

It that a huge (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511089)

porn collection in your pocket or ...

prices (4, Informative)

xorbe (249648) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511093)

Somewhere I saw ~900 Eur for the 512GB model, which is nearly USD$1200

Re:prices (4, Insightful)

loufoque (1400831) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511557)

You mean $800.
Remember, Europe gets fucked pretty badly when it comes to prices of electronic goods.

Re:prices (1)

avandesande (143899) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512185)

Euro is worth more than the dollar, something around 1.3

Re:prices (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42512349)

Well he's saying that a USD$800 gadget in the USA goes for EUR800 across the pond, despite the exchange rate.

Re:prices (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42512595)

Woosh! What he meant was that even if it was 900 EUR which would be more than 900 USD, the price in EUR is usually higher than the price in USD. Same goes for AUD. Games are twice as more expensive in Australia because even if the AUD has caught up with the USD, the numbers in the prices haven't changed so what's 30 USD costs 60 AUD even if AUD > USD.

Re:prices (2)

Delarth799 (1839672) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511569)

Current prices of a 500GB SSD are going to run you right around $380 to $600 right now depending on who manufacturer and where you buy it. This is a tad less than half the size with the same amount of space so I'm not terribly surprised. I would peg the 1TB version of this being around $2000 give or take

Re:prices (0)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511729)

Including VAT?

Re:prices (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42512173)

Actually if you go to Kingston's website and add the 512GB version to your cart, it's $1337.00. Not kidding. Leet speak homage or happy accident?

How many? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511121)

So how many library of congress is that?

Re:How many? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511231)

So how many library of congress in my pants is that?

FTFY

hey! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511137)

Awesome

Buzzword Bingo? (5, Funny)

iYk6 (1425255) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511179)

DataTraveler HyperX Predator 3.0

I laughed for about half a minute at that name. Next year: Mega Terminator X-treme 5x5!!!

Re:Buzzword Bingo? (1)

Deathspawner (1037894) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511199)

It's times like this when I wish I had mod points to use :( (aka: I couldn't agree more).

Chris Hansen eat your heart out (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511245)

Now everyone wants to catch a Predator.

Re:Chris Hansen eat your heart out (1)

SpzToid (869795) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511579)

I'll glady trade you the predator on my back for... a library of congress?

Re:Buzzword Bingo? (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511485)

DataTraveler HyperX Predator 3.0

I laughed for about half a minute at that name. Next year: Mega Terminator X-treme 5x5!!!

Soon followed by the Gargantutron Ultra eXtreme Super Hyperwossname.

Long ago, far away, names were already a complete mockery of the marketing department clowns. They have transcended mere idiocy, surpassed art-form and gone right down the Ultra eXtreme loo.

Re:Buzzword Bingo? (2)

EvanED (569694) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511493)

Reminds me of this standup sketch [youtube.com] ...

Re:Buzzword Bingo? (3, Funny)

Forty Two Tenfold (1134125) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511755)

I see your Dara O'Briain and raise you Bill Hicks. [youtube.com]

Re:Buzzword Bingo? (2)

Darinbob (1142669) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511519)

They're saving Y-8 for croquet.

Re:Buzzword Bingo? (1)

WillgasM (1646719) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511533)

Just call the next one "Cloud". I store everything in the Cloud.

Re:Buzzword Bingo? (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511607)

Just call the next one "Cloud". I store everything in the Cloud.

Cloud's too slow.

Let me know when your local telco upgrades that copper so you can upload data at 160MB/s and also drops usage caps.

Re:Buzzword Bingo? (2)

Curupira (1899458) | about a year and a half ago | (#42513623)

Just call the next one "Cloud". I store everything in the Cloud.

Cloud's too slow.

Let me know when your local telco upgrades that copper so you can upload data at 160MB/s and also drops usage caps.

~Whoooosh!~

Re:Buzzword Bingo? (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512917)

DataTraveler HyperX Predator 3.0

I laughed for about half a minute at that name. Next year: Mega Terminator X-treme 5x5!!!

AT 4G LTE SPEEDS WITH VERIZON 4G LTE, THE NATION'S FASTEST 4G LTE NETWORK, FROM VERIZON, THE LEADER IN 4G LTE.

and the all important $$$ factor (4, Informative)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511185)

According to Engadget it is not something we are all going to bring to work day to day just yet

If you're interested in snagging one of the top two units, be advised that the price of the 512GB edition is a staggering $1,750.00 -- so you'd better get working on impressing that MLB scout next time they're passing by.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/07/kingston-1tb-flash-drive/ [engadget.com]

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

WankerWeasel (875277) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511259)

The Swiss Army knife with a 1TB drive available last year goes for $3000.

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511631)

The Swiss Army knife with a 1TB drive available last year goes for $3000.

I find the older ones amusing. What good is this old memory stick on a knife good for? At least a knife is timeless.

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511361)

Maybe they're making these for movie execs who need to carry the movies they made a profit from on their keys? I guess that's a market, right?

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (4, Insightful)

failedlogic (627314) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511643)

There would be no market. I'm not sure if you're implying this.

According to Hollywood accounting rules, no movies ever make a profit .... so no movies for movie execs to carry around!

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (4, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511371)

According to Engadget it is not something we are all going to bring to work day to day just yet

If you're interested in snagging one of the top two units, be advised that the price of the 512GB edition is a staggering $1,750.00 -- so you'd better get working on impressing that MLB scout next time they're passing by.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/07/kingston-1tb-flash-drive/ [engadget.com]

And in three years they'll be selling them at the office supply store for $30.

Ain't the relentless march of tenchological innovation wunnerful?

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511651)

oh exactly, Does anyone remember what a 10 meg hard drive cost in say 87?

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (2)

sconeu (64226) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511725)

Around 1990, I paid $400 for a 40MB MFM drive.

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511997)

I remember upgrading my PC back around 94.

$250 to move from a 33MHz processor to 66MHz.
$250 to double the RAM to 8MB.

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (2)

sconeu (64226) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512613)

In '92 we paid $3000 for 32MB RAM in a new departmental Unix server.

OT: Your name (2)

sconeu (64226) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512643)

It's a good thing you're bearded. "Beardo the Clean Shaven" just doesn't have the same ring to it!!!

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (2)

jedidiah (1196) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512833)

I paid $400 for my first 1G HD and also paid $400 for my first 500G HD.

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512179)

Around 1990, I paid $400 for a 40MB MFM drive.

Dude! By 1990 everyone was moving to RLL!

Ah, and we once had a stack of old Byte magazines on a shelf in the corner, I leafed through a few for a good laugh. 1980 a 5 MB drive cost $2500, a 10 MB drive cost about $4000.

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42512245)

In the early 90s we paid over $30,000 for a 160MB SSD. And it wasn't even flash, it lost all the data when you turned it off.

http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/det/3043/Anamartic-Wafer-Scale-160MB-Solid-State-Disk/ [computinghistory.org.uk]

Made Windows 3.1 boot really fast though :).

How exactly ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42512509)

... did this make Windows 3.1 boot real fast? If it lost the data when power was removed, you still have to boot from the "real" disk. Even 3.1 did _some_ caching.

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

dkmeans (883158) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511765)

Yeah, about $1200 installed in a "real" IBM PC-XT...

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512531)

Why wouldnt you just get an SSD thats nearly the same size, and about 3 times faster? There are USB-to-SATA docks that are tiny and only about $20.

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

fnj (64210) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512709)

Convenience. Who wants to drag around all that kit?

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (2)

jedidiah (1196) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512861)

The SSD requires power. You can't just plug it into an OTG cable and turn your Android phone into the ultimate Archos replacement.

Plus "nearly the same size" just isn't good enough if you actually care about capacity. It's kind of like being almost pregnant. Your device is either big enough or not. "There is no try".

Re:and the all important $$$ factor (1)

Dahamma (304068) | about a year and a half ago | (#42513005)

Wow, that makes the $1300 Apple charges to upgrade from 128GB to 768GB SSD on their Macbook Pro seem reasonable...

1TB was available before this (4, Informative)

WankerWeasel (875277) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511239)

They've offered a Swiss Army knife with a 1TB drive for over a year now.

Re:1TB was available before this (3, Informative)

kav2k (1545689) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511471)

Came here to remind of that. Here's a hands-on [engadget.com] .

Pricing? (1)

briancox2 (2417470) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511255)

Not surprisingly, pricing has not yet been discussed.

If under $150, this might be my default Linux installation hard drive with a persistent installation. One desktop with consistent programs and data on any computer I use would be very nice.

Re:Pricing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511479)

Yeah, and if under 2 pennies i'd buy these things instead of regular coasters to place my glass on.

150$ is a completely unrealistic price point for these things, you better be thinking atleast 15 times as much, most likely more.

Re:Pricing? (1)

timeOday (582209) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511555)

I tried to do this recently on a 128 GB SD card, thinking it would be sweet to keep my whole operating environment (data and a Win7 VM with MS Office, Project, Matlab, gimp, DeLorme Topo...) all with me on a TrueCrypt volume. Capacity wasn't so much the issue for me, but speed was (I saw at best 40 MB/s read with the Lexar 400x, and 30 MB/s with the Sandisk Extreme 45MB/s - and less for writing). They were fine for storing most data, but too slow for suspending and resuming the VM. The promised specs for these new thumb drives sounds great, and makes me wonder if thumb drives don't have much more advanced onboard controllers than SD Cards do. (My PowerBook Pro has no USB3, and there is no Thuderbolt to USB3 adapter, so there is no practical way to plug a fast thumb drive into it).

Re:Pricing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511641)

Oooh, sorry! Unlike Linux, it's thousands of dollars!

An innocent question, please be gentle... (2)

Nrrqshrr (1879148) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511277)

As a guy with several computers and with the most recent one boasting a mere 100ish GB space (I never really needed more). I have always been curious about something, my own drives cause me quite a lot of time wasted on defragmentation, otherwise I would get meet those pesky bottlenecks way too often for my taste. So I wondered how that much space, 1 TB or more could affect defragmentation. I mean by that, would a regular 1 TB drive start bottlenecking at the same point (of frequency of use and space usage) as a mere 100 GB drive, or does the added space add to the "tolerance" of such a drive?

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (1, Informative)

Alter_3d (948458) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511413)

Defragmentation doesnt affect flash drives, or SSDs. They access data randomly, not sequentially like a HDD

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511431)

SSD's do not need defragmentation. Because of the way the data is stored the physical location of the data on the drive is not a important as on a spinning disk.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (0, Troll)

loufoque (1400831) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511609)

SSDs might not, but the filesystem does.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511799)

Even if it says you're fragmented, just ignore it. Doesn't affect ssd performance.
And with ssd wear leveling your os/filesystem can't even know where the blocks are stored physically.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (4, Informative)

nabsltd (1313397) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511831)

SSDs might not, but the filesystem does.

You don't need to defrag a filesystem on an SSD, because the purpose of defragging is to remove the need for random seeks, which are slow on a spinning magnetic disk.

Since the penalty for an extra random read on even a "slow" SSD is around 0.1ms (with fast drives around 0.03ms), even a horribly fragmented file wouldn't make much difference compared to "read X consecutive blocks". For example, if every block required a separate "read" command because the file was completely fragmented, it would take nearly 100 blocks before you'd hit the penalty for a single extra seek on a mechanical hard drive.

And, nearly all that penalty is for the OS and hardware, because every read on an SSD is really random with respect to where the data really resides (because of the wear-leveling algorithms). So, even if you read 20 consecutive disk blocks, you might be reading from 20 different areas in the flash memory.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (0)

loufoque (1400831) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512387)

Fragmented files take more space on the disk than contiguous ones and require more time to manage them.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512601)

Not always, AFAIK the filesystem will fill up one block completely before moving onto the next one, regardless of where it is located. Wasted space from allocation block size ("cluster size") is only really an issue with lots of files which are smaller than the cluster size.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512575)

No, it doesnt. Fragmentation is only an issue when seek times are an issue. The filesystem really doesnt care how your data is split up.

Regardless, Microsoft, as well as basically every SSD vendor, highly recommends that you do NOT defragment your SSD. You're welcome to argue with them if you like.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511437)

Which OS are you using, what filesystem, and how are you measuring the bottleneck caused by fragmentation?

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (2)

ninlilizi (2759613) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511457)

I think this is more dependant on the filesystem choosen that anything.
Generally things like ext4 avoid fragmentation better than ntfs historically did. Can't speak for all the quirks of the myriad choices out there.
But generally, an intelegient fs would try and locate a new file in an contigeous space as possible.
With a larger volume vs contents there is a lot more empty space to choose from when creating new large files. So bareing the odd application expanding files in a less than inteligent manner or the odd older fs quirk. FAT32 and its ilk being particularly poor here. Then, yes a larger drive could potentially make your life much more pleasent in this area.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512879)

It's not so much the filesystem that decides how fast your drive gets fragmented or how badly; it's the OS's algorythm [whylinuxisbetter.net] for deciding where to put each new file. Up until Microsoft introduced the NFS file system, their method of stuffing the beginning of each file into the first available cluster without checking to see if it were big enough guaranteed that every disk would get fragmented and need regular defragging. (I don't do Windows any more, and don't know how NFS handles this.) Linux uses a different method that both spreads files out across all of the partition and tries to find a big enough spot from the beginning, so that unless your partition is very close to full there will be few, if any fragmented files. I don't know if Linux does that on a FAT or VFAT drive, but I've got no specific reason to think it doesn't.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (1)

mattack2 (1165421) | about a year and a half ago | (#42513493)

Up until Microsoft introduced the NFS file system

Umm, what? Is there another (less common) usage of that TLA?

The most common usage of NFS (citation not provided!) is Network File System, originally developed by Sun. Maybe you mean a specific IMPLEMENTATION of that from MS?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_File_System [wikipedia.org]

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511503)

Unless you're talking about hdd's... I don't think fragmentation matters in ssd drives, there is no read head movement and thus should be no negative impact of seeking data that's scattered around.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (1)

The Mighty Buzzard (878441) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511547)

Wrong question and depends on your usage pattern. A 1TB HDD is almost certainly going to have hardware improvements and perform better than your 100GB, fragmented or not.

The drive in TFA is a SSD, not a HDD, though and never requires defragmentation because it isn't slowed down by fragmentation.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (1)

Dahamma (304068) | about a year and a half ago | (#42513367)

Actually, the drive is Flash USB, not a (SATA) SSD. But in any case, fragmentation can definitely slow down flash drives - and can be even worse than an HDD on writes. Look it up...

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511559)

Flash drives don't get fragmentation the same way traditional mechanical drives do. It handles allocation transparently. You should NEVER defragment a flash drive.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511927)

Get yourself a RAID 10 or RAID 5 or 6 setup and you'll rarely ever notice performance degradation due to file fragmentation. As your seek time approaches 0, fragmentation becomes a non-issue.
But to answer your question, even filesystems on big drives suffer from fragmentation. It's all about efficiently writing to the platters, and having more space available doesn't suddenly make the read/write heads move fast enough to write multiple files on different cylinders or spin the platter faster so that consecutive sectors get written to for the same files.

Re:An innocent question, please be gentle... (0)

hobarrera (2008506) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511953)

Fragmentation is related to the filesystem, not the underlaying hardware.

Fragmentation is not relative to size, but rather to useage: creating/deleting files (the space left between them is too small for new files and can't be used, for example).
In any case, fragmentation is not an issue in most OS, it was only a real issue on DOS. I've no idea about windows though.

Seems it was only a few years ago... (4, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511333)

8GB drives were something to salivate over, because you could store an entire DVD on it.

Now these things are so commonplace I have them littering my desk, giveaways from tradeshows, vendors, etc. You can get them in amusing shapes of Taz, Hello Kitty or Dora the Explorer at the office store.

Finally dipping my toe in the water with an SSD for the desktop machine. It's been running for years on a pair of Seagate 160GB SATA I drives, which are near capacity. I thought about buying a couple of 1.5 TB drives, but reviews are very dismal on mechanical storage drives now. Seems a lot of old manufacturers are being bought up by Seagate and Seagate and Western Digital will soon be the only players left in a "buggy whip" market. Hard to beat the GB/$ deal with hard drives, but with 1 year warranties and a lot of DOA deliveries, plus quite a lot of drives which seem to die within the first year, I'm not super inclined to put my valuable files on them.

Here's hoping by the end of the 2013 we have some good prices on high capacity SSDs and In can move my photos, videos and miscellaneous crap onto new drives.

Re:Seems it was only a few years ago... (1)

BiggerIsBetter (682164) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511685)

Hard to beat the GB/$ deal with hard drives, but with 1 year warranties and a lot of DOA deliveries, plus quite a lot of drives which seem to die within the first year, I'm not super inclined to put my valuable files on them.

IMHO, the current way to go is big old spinning disks configured as RAID on a NAS for bulk storage, and SSD for PC/Laptop/etc drives. Your valuable files are safe enough and you get great OS performance without breaking the bank on big SSDs...

Re:Seems it was only a few years ago... (2)

Kjella (173770) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511837)

I think the only people to care enough to write reviews on mechanical drives these days are those with a bad story to tell because there's absolutely nothing exciting to say. Nobody cares about performance anymore because SSDs has spanked them every which way but they're cheap, big and they work, sure you could get a lemon but I'd take backups of that SSD too. I think your chances of a broken drive was much higher back when they had new tech and doubled in capacity every two years.

Re:Seems it was only a few years ago... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512251)

I think the only people to care enough to write reviews on mechanical drives these days are those with a bad story to tell because there's absolutely nothing exciting to say. Nobody cares about performance anymore because SSDs has spanked them every which way but they're cheap, big and they work, sure you could get a lemon but I'd take backups of that SSD too. I think your chances of a broken drive was much higher back when they had new tech and doubled in capacity every two years.

Approximately 50% of respondents mentioned the drives worked and the were mostly happy, aside from quite a lot of drive noise. ~25% remarked their drives worked for a while. About 15% mentioned at least 1 DOA arriving in their order, whether it was the only one or one or two out of a few or several.

Not quite the expceptions. I've dealt with RMAs before, but the concept of spending a day moving frome one drive to anther and then having it die isn't very attractive. A RAID is the only way I'll go with hard drives.

Re:Seems it was only a few years ago... (1)

avandesande (143899) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512215)

SSD for booting and apps and mechanical drive for media is the way to go

Re:Seems it was only a few years ago... (1)

antdude (79039) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512243)

My father/dad/pa has a bunch of old USB flash drives, memory cards, etc. They ranged from 16 MB (MEGA Bytes) to 1 GB. I wonder what to do with all them. Can I RAID? Hehe.

Re:Seems it was only a few years ago... (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512967)

You could software RAID them, but you'll have 16MB "disks" since you have to go with the smallest size. You could break convention and split up the 1GB drive into 16MB partitions for the software RAID, but you'd be better off with JBOD with all those differently sized drives.

Re:Seems it was only a few years ago... (1)

antdude (79039) | about a year and a half ago | (#42513129)

Oh, you can't use different sizes of each drive as a single drive? Darn. I read that USB2 is slow and doesn't do well. :( Sheesh.

Re:Seems it was only a few years ago... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42513609)

Use Greyhole. http://www.greyhole.net

Re:Seems it was only a few years ago... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42513601)

Get a WD black drive: 5-year warranty, advanced replacement and they pay shipping both ways.

Actually, get two for some redundancy.

Can we have real USB SSDs? (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511411)

I bought a 512GB SSD for $400-ish. It's about time somebody stuffed that kind of drive into a USB stick. It should have mass market appeal so the volume should be much higher than regular SSDs.

Re:Can we have real USB SSDs? (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511657)

I bought a 512GB SSD for $400-ish. It's about time somebody stuffed that kind of drive into a USB stick. It should have mass market appeal so the volume should be much higher than regular SSDs.

Dennis Nedry called, he's got the complete mapped DNA of all the dinosaurs for you. He'll be delivering them as soon as he gets his car out of the mud.

Re:Can we have real USB SSDs? (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512081)

Holy crap, not only did someone make a Jurassic Park reference, but I got it without having to look it up.

You realize it's been twenty freaking years since that movie came out? I remember playing the theme song in my high school band. Sometimes I look at the guy in the mirror and wonder where the wrinkles and gray hair came from.

Then my nine-year-old daughter asks me to get out of the bathroom so she can do her hair before she goes to her mom's house.

"Oh, right."

Re:Can we have real USB SSDs? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512307)

Holy crap, not only did someone make a Jurassic Park reference, but I got it without having to look it up.

You realize it's been twenty freaking years since that movie came out? I remember playing the theme song in my high school band. Sometimes I look at the guy in the mirror and wonder where the wrinkles and gray hair came from.

Then my nine-year-old daughter asks me to get out of the bathroom so she can do her hair before she goes to her mom's house.

"Oh, right."

Yeah. And I remember reading the book, at 3 AM with my heart pounding so hard in my chest that it hurt. Michael Crichton was a hell of a suspense writer -- too bad so little of it survived into the film. Steven Spielberg can be terribly overrated at times.

So any day now someone's going to do it. Clone a mammoth or something. Count on it.

Re:Can we have real USB SSDs? (3, Interesting)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512637)

I've never seen a good movie adaptation of a book. LotR was pretty good, but so much went missing or was different than what we imagined...

The worst I've ever seen was The Postman. It's one of the best sci-fi books I've ever read. I re-read it last month, and there were parts that brought a tear to my eye.

We should clone a mammoth just because we can. I mean, holy shit, a mammoth. We could do it too.

Re:Can we have real USB SSDs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511875)

The USB protocol is not designed for high performance IO to the level where you really are going to see 'real' SSD gains.

Re:Can we have real USB SSDs? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512447)

The USB protocol is not designed for high performance IO to the level where you really are going to see 'real' SSD gains.

True. True.

So it'll give a little tinge of suspense while some weasel stands at a server, dowloading the entire SQL database of all Taxpayers in the US, as the seconds tick by and the weasel begins to sweat as he hears footsteps approaching the door to the server room...

Re:Can we have real USB SSDs? (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512113)

for that same $400 you spent, I was able to get a 60GB SSD for my desktop, and a diskless gigabit NAS drive with a pair of 3TB mechanical drives.....

SSD's are nowhere near cheap enough to use for mass storage. They're fine for installing your OS on, but if you're archiving large amounts of data (say a BluRay/DVD collection, or a CD collection in FLAC) they're overkill.

Re:Can we have real USB SSDs? (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512903)

> for that same $400 you spent, I was able to get a 60GB SSD for my desktop, and a diskless gigabit NAS drive with a pair of 3TB mechanical drives.....

Yet none of that is terribly portable.

It's a flash drive. You're not just paying for the capacity.

Slow large inexpensive flash drive? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511421)

I don't need high performance - I just want a large (1TB+) and inexpensive flash drive - why don't these exist?

Use a Dock? (1)

greenlead (841089) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511513)

Couldn't I just take a desktop SSD along in a dock with USB and eSATA ports and be happier at lower costs? I guess maybe I'd pay about as much, but I probably don't need ALL of that capacity as flash. Maybe a hybrid drive would be good. Lots of data on platters, and the project I'm currently working on cached in flash.

Piracy enablers? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42511633)

Aren't they just encouraging piracy?
What are you going to fill it with? Maybe not those 1TB monsters, but 100GB or even 50GB, what are you going to use them for?

Don't get me wrong, the way I see it, the hardware market exploded in the past 15 years, BECAUSE of piracy; I don't want/expect to see it end anytime soon, but still, how do you justify buying something like that?

Re:Piracy enablers? (1)

Frobnicator (565869) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511751)

Aren't they just encouraging piracy?

"Enabling piracy" is the mindset of a consumer, not a producer.

I produce data. I can easily generate 200GB of data from a multi-day photo shoot. I would LOVE to have that much storage available to me on a stick. Right now I use a small pile of 64GB and 128GB class-10 SD cards. I'd be a little worried about having that much data in a single point of failure, but the convenience factor would be very nice.

Videographers are becoming more commonplace at weddings and other events, and I've heard them complain about the same issue: portable storage space is a pain.

Yes, some people will use them to pirate stuff. That same stuff is available off the interwebz and cards and usb drives already, so it doesn't really open a new vector.

Re:Piracy enablers? (1)

Pubstar (2525396) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512255)

One afternoon of recording gameplay for my clan resulted in me filling up my 1TB drive. It's easy to max out large hard drives in a day without downloading a thing.

Re:Piracy enablers? (0)

jedidiah (1196) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512929)

"Enabling piracy" isn't even the mindset of a consumer.

It's the mindset of a thief.

The mindset of a consumer is to buy stuff to put on that drive.

Re:Piracy enablers? (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about a year and a half ago | (#42511925)

Large raid array for a low cost/medium performance VM environment.

Low cost in about 2 years.

How many flash drives can fit in the size of one 3.5" drive?

Re:Piracy enablers? (1)

couchslug (175151) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512865)

My late wife was an amature nature photographer and easily filled most of a terabyte.

Not everyone has an enormous pir8ted scat porn collection.

1TB OCZ SSD already on Newegg (0)

Tailhook (98486) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512021)

Newegg has this [newegg.com] listed.

So, yeah.

Re:1TB OCZ SSD already on Newegg (2)

WD (96061) | about a year and a half ago | (#42512089)

Apples and oranges. That's an internal, full-size, SATA drive. This is talking about a USB stick.

You ins=ensit1ve clod! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42512759)

FrreBSD went out steadily fucking OF AMERICA irc Sux0r status, *BSD
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