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GitHub Registers Its 3 Millionth User

timothy posted about a year ago | from the free-hamburger dept.

Programming 64

hypnosec writes "Online version control system GitHub, which is based on Git — the distributed version control system developed by Linus Torvalds — now has over three million registered users, it has been revealed. Announcing the achievement, the code sharing site used by the likes of jQuery, Perl, PHP, Ruby as well as Joomla said in a blog post that the 'three millionth person signed up for a GitHub account' on Monday night."

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64 comments

Wow, it's fucking nothing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618115)

Wake me up when actual news happens. Also FIRST

Re:Wow, it's fucking nothing (1)

cod3r_ (2031620) | about a year ago | (#42618395)

They should have given the guy like a prise or something. Made him semi famous. That would have been cool.

It's a great service (4, Insightful)

stoolpigeon (454276) | about a year ago | (#42618131)

I've started using it for personal projects. It makes it easy for me to work on multiple machines, provides a form of backup by spreading the code around and should I ever do anything that actually interests someone else - they'll be able to join in or use what I've done.

Social Network that *matters* (3, Insightful)

oGMo (379) | about a year ago | (#42618271)

I "joke" that github is my social network of choice .. but it's not really a joke. A lot of real actual stuff happens on github, and it's highly useful.

The distribution features you've mentioned have arguably been provided for awhile by SourceForge (which was great for its time), but nothing beats the sheer speed, simplicity, and focus on the code that github provides. And while git beats the pants off everything else, I dread having to deal with "other" sites (*cough*gitorious*cough*) because they're just not as fast and useful as github. That is, git alone doesn't make github what it is.

I just wish their private hosting was a little less pricey, but hey whatever the market will bear.

Re:Social Network that *matters* (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#42618341)

It's true... it's simple and fast. Little projects that I wouldn't have bothered to put on SourceForge are trivial to push to GitHub. It's a little feature-sparse, but I suppose that's the point.

Re:Social Network that *matters* (3, Funny)

blackm0k (2589601) | about a year ago | (#42618493)

I've joked about the same thing: that github is my social network of choice.

Unfortunately, my less technically-inclined friends took that to mean that I had joined a network exclusively for curmudgeons.

Re:It's a great service (1)

GyroLC (956990) | about a year ago | (#42618583)

I also use it for personal projects for the exact same reasons. Plus, their support for non-command line users with an easy-to-use GUI has made it a lot more accessible.

Re:It's a great service (4, Interesting)

jez9999 (618189) | about a year ago | (#42618611)

I'm gonna repeat my usual spiel here: use Bitbucket. Github's only real benefit is its network graph - I'd like to see Bitbucket implement that. But I jumped ship to Bitbucket a while back so I could get attachments on my issue tracker and never looked back. Free private repos too. And for a "social coding" site, Github doesn't have very much social stuff going on. There's no forum - just some lame web form for feedback that Github never seems to respond to.

Oh and I remember seeing a talk from one of the main Github developers some time ago and he kept saying "fuck" all the time like Beavis & Butthead. Not impressive.

Re:It's a great service (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | about a year ago | (#42619081)

Bitbucket doesn't seem to have an enterprise solution.

Re:It's a great service (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619433)

Isn't the enterprise solution to git to... host an origin on your own damn server? I can't see why any enterprise would want to tack on github to git. It's the only reason I've ever had for not being able to pull from a decentralized VCS because - surprise surprise! - centralization introduces a central point of failure, and Github seems to be down surprisingly often.

Re:It's a great service (1)

skids (119237) | about a year ago | (#42620399)

Isn't the enterprise solution to git to... host an origin on your own damn server?

No. The enterprise solution to git is to have a repo on the most popular site, so that when a random person wants to send a 4-line pull request, they probably already have an account on the service and won't be dissuaded.

Re:It's a great service (1)

grouchomarxist (127479) | about a year ago | (#42622299)

Github is much more than just git. It provides a number of services: issue tracking, update feed, project management, file viewing, etc. that raw git doesn't provide. My employer moved from their previous git-web system to Github Enterprise and it has been a joy to use.

Re:It's a great service (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619547)

check out atlassian stash

Re:It's a great service (1)

hackula (2596247) | about a year ago | (#42619693)

Network graph is probably the worst feature on github. Totally useless visualizations, and if you have ever use it on a real project then you will notice that it take half a decade to load. Personally, I use both, but prefer github a "bit" over bitbucket.

Re:It's a great service (1)

Raumkraut (518382) | about a year ago | (#42620923)

I use the graph to see whose fork of a codebase is most up-to-date, or has potentially useful revisions not merged into the master. I've come across a few projects whose "master" repo is all but dead, and a dozen other people have continued development independently - sometimes having created duplicate bugfixes, etc.

Developers come and go (often without warning), so what I'd *really* like to see is an interface where the codebase is the focus, and no one user or team "owns" any kind of one-true-fork. All forks should be considered fundamentally equal, and judged on their individual merits (recent activity, most activity, most contributors, etc.).
And having issues, pull requests, etc. tied to one single fork is just wrong. If something affects the "main" fork, then it quite likely affects all the others, too, and those forks' maintainers should be allowed to accept or reject those items as it relates to their own fork.

Re:It's a great service (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619895)

But I jumped ship to Bitbucket a while back so I could get attachments on my issue tracker and never looked back.

Github allows attachments on issues now

Oh and I remember seeing a talk from one of the main Github developers some time ago and he kept saying "fuck" all the time like Beavis & Butthead.

Yeah that's definitely a legitimate reason to not use a product.</sarcasm>

Re:It's a great service (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42623957)

He said "fuck"? Wow. I'm sure that affects the quality of the website!

Re:It's a great service (1)

jgrahn (181062) | about a year ago | (#42641707)

Oh and I remember seeing a talk from one of the main Github developers some time ago and he kept saying "fuck" all the time like Beavis & Butthead.

I can't recall either Beavis or Butthead ever saying "fuck" ...

Re:It's a great service (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618635)

For personal projects I either put my complete workspace in my Google Drive or use a git repository that's in my Google Drive.

The latter obviously being the better choice if you want to be able to roll back revisions easily and don't want to run into funny errors that my or may not appear if you use it on different machines.

Re:It's a great service (1)

bcrowell (177657) | about a year ago | (#42621639)

What I like is that it cuts down on the effort required to manage different projects. The 14 projects that I now have on github all used to have different makefiles used for building tarballs and posting them publicly. Each used to have a web page saying stuff like "the current version is 3.1.5," which had to be edited when I put out a new version. Now all of that stuff is automatic. I just do a git tag and a git push, and bam, it's there. I had material on the individual web pages which is now in each project's README.md file on github. When I want to change it, I just edit README.md, and then next time I do a push, it'll be there on github.

It's a shame that github's web interface isn't 100% open source, but many parts of it are (e.g., https://github.com/github/linguist [github.com] ), and there is no major vendor lock-in, either. They're just hosting my git repo. If I fall out of love with them, I still have my repo and can just host it somewhere else.

congratulations! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618201)

I thought it was dumb idea at first -- git is a distributed tool, so why cripple it by depending on a centralized, third party service? But the interface is much nicer than sourceforge (sorry guys, it sucks ass) or google code.

Honestly, when you browse an svn or cvs repo on sourceforge, it's like they didn't give a shit. Yes, I know that's ViewVC. Well, ViewVC is uglier than sin and sourceforge didn't care enough to replace it with something that looks (and works!) better.

So, congratulations, github! I hope success doesn't ruin you. And sourceforge can choke on a choad.

Re:congratulations! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619247)

Sourceforge has new code browser since about 2010 or 11: http://sourceforge.net/p/dosbox/code-0/3812/tree/

Re:congratulations! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42630877)

And it sucks harder than ViewVC and whatever they were using for Git. I migrated a project to Allura this week and found the Git Web interface to be next to useless as it shows the creation date and commit of each file/directory. That's no help as I want to know the latest version of each. Going through the Web interface makes it appear that nothing new has ever been done. I'm now pushing to Github in parallel. I don't know whether it would be better to move the project over to Berlios if SF continues its path to suckdom.

Fuck Github, privacy invading Facebook of code (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618443)

I refuse to use it for personal projects because of the Facebook-like "register with real name" requirement. That refusal is no big deal by itself-- git is a distributed VCS so centralizing it on a single site like Github seems counter to its purpose anyway and I'm happy to run my own Git repos. The bigger problem is I'm required to use Github at work because the company hosts its code there. It's "use Github or lose your job". But it's worse than this: I'm apparently not allowed to enroll a work account and use it, even though the company is paying for hosting and would surely be willing to pay for developer accounts. I instead have to enroll a personal account, then get it added to an ACL for the work repositories. And this is a screw because I've been in this situation at more than one company. And there's supposed to be just one account per person.

In other words Github somehow thinks it's their business to know that I've worked for multiple clients, when I move from one company to another.

I said "fuck it" and enrolled seperate accounts per company anyway, which is against the TOS, so maybe I'll get busted like Aaron Swartz, but Github just sucks too much to go along with what they're demanding.

Re:Fuck Github, privacy invading Facebook of code (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | about a year ago | (#42619057)

The best part about distributed VCS... distributed.

I have 3 push URLs. Granted right now I only pull from GitHub because that's where I like to publish my work. But if it disappeared over night I'd just delete the "url=" for github and I don't know the difference.

Re:Fuck Github, privacy invading Facebook of code (2)

kiddygrinder (605598) | about a year ago | (#42620481)

What requirement, just checked my account on there and i don't even have a real name set.

Ugh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618565)

Please do not use Github as it is non-free software. Please support websites that only run on free software like Gitorious.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618771)

GitHub is free software -- they use Ruby on Rails and the source code is, unintentionally, available.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618993)

No, the generated HTML is "open" not the actual source code running the site on the server side. There's a big difference.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619113)

Please do not use Github as it is non-free software. Please support websites that only run on free software like Gitorious.

Why? A web server and the software behind it is mostly a black box for me anyway. I don't see the need to have full ability to control it.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619573)

Because the 4 freedoms are very important.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42620211)

I love people who confuse GPL with Affero GPL.

Re:Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42622187)

Of which Github's server code is neither.

Re:Ugh (1)

mfnickster (182520) | about a year ago | (#42626883)

Their desktop client app is also not free software. I got an account and then they dropped support for Mac OS X Snow Leopard (10.6) in their client app - now it's Lion or Mountain Lion -only. They refuse to distribute any older versions.

Now, if the client were F/OSS, I could get the latest version and make it work on 10.6, leaving out the Lion-only features if necessary. Instead, I'm stuck with the command-line interface.

GitHub says they did this because they want to provide "the best experience for their users." Well, what about those of us who can't upgrade their OS or don't want to just to use an online service? How many of those 3 million users are still using Snow Leopard? Our user experience sucks now. Thanks for nothing, GitHub.

Don't like it (2, Informative)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about a year ago | (#42618661)

Github offers the least options, has had numerous publicised security issues and seems more concerned with being like facebook than something for real programmers.

Sorry but I'll stick with bitbucket and if I have to switch I'll take sourceforge or one of the many other sites that offer what Github offers minus the attraction of fauxgrammers and brogrammers.

Re:Don't like it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618751)

Bros b4 hoes motherfucker! Github 4 Life!

Re:Don't like it (4, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year ago | (#42619039)

I stayed on Sourceforge for a long time, it has good features. It supports multiple SCMs simultaneously (git, cvs, svn...).

I stopped using it when they started spamming up their download page. It's not cool to be on the download page and accidentally download "Zoom Downloader Free Trial" because it has a giant 'DOWNLOAD' button right on the middle of the screen.

Re:Don't like it (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about a year ago | (#42619467)

I have to agree that Sourceforge was looking really poor for awhile. The same ancient look with more and more ads was really bad. I think they are improve. Admittedly pretty slowly and there is some legacy stuff that's in a questionable state (like the unsupposed API) but at least they're realising they have competition now.

Re:Don't like it (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619043)

Really? Fauxgrammers and brogrammers? Can we please not make software engineering into a hipster trend by isolating and labeling subsets of the developer community? I find the thought of what your silly terms will lead to unprofessional, disgusting, and counterproductive to say the least.

Re:Don't like it (0)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about a year ago | (#42619447)

If you want to believe that then go ahead. I don't try to stop people from having their own opinion and my opinion is the site isn't that fussed about being helpful to those who are more concerned about code than their image. I think their changes to profile pages pretty much prove that. Their fanbase shows it too. In their mind nothing else exists and in reality it's not even the biggest site in their market.

Re:Don't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619069)

Github offers the least options, has had numerous publicised security issues and seems more concerned with being like facebook than something for real programmers.

Sorry but I'll stick with bitbucket and if I have to switch I'll take sourceforge or one of the many other sites that offer what Github offers minus the attraction of fauxgrammers and brogrammers.

Fauxgrammers?

Re:Don't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619153)

A misspelling of "fauxgrammars", a term referring to the abuse of regular expressions over real parser grammars? Otherwise collect his geek card, he's out.

Re:Don't like it (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619223)

The feature that sets github apart from others is fork/pull request workflow(which you can discuss). This lower barrier of contribution significantly.

bitbucket was really late implementing this feature (mid/late last year IIRC). The cost of moving community is very steep (look at how many project are still at sourceforge and google code). I think bitbucket, even though it has better pricing, will be a lost cause.

Re:Don't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619395)

Perhaps it's just me, but I like Mercurial more. Especially on Windows, which still is a much used platform, Git actually sucks because it is very much Linux-oriented. Mercurial is more platform-agnostic and its default GUI, TortoiseHg, provides a cross platform one-does-all tool, which works really well (also) on Windows.

(Posting from Opera on Kubuntu btw, before you get any wrong ideas)

Re:Don't like it (1)

lattyware (934246) | about a year ago | (#42620357)

To be honest, I've worked with Git on Windows and it wasn't that painful. Mercurial is great, don't get me wrong - 99% of the work I do is Python stuff, so it's natural to use Mercurial, but I tend to find myself working with Git more - I've never been a fan of the hard line that Mercurial takes on history modification.

To be clear though, I'll happily use either tool - they are both great.

Re:Don't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42623179)

And don't forget: bitbucket has more version control systems!

It has Mercurial, which I personally find a lot 'friendlier' than Git.
And for the discussion that may follow: yes, they have the same feature set.

How many are sockpuppet accounts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618791)

I create sock puppets all the time on Slashdot, Wikimedia and Socimedia and post as AnonCoward/IP_addresses (even those fancy IPv6 ones to make it harder to rangeblock). Hi to Bsadowski1 and Nawlinwiki the other admins/stewards. if you are obsessively playing with check user toys.

Willy on Wheels!/JarlaxleAtermis/Gibraltarian are all "franchises" of the same vandal group.

Re:How many are sockpuppet accounts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618893)

You mad Tegel? You can;t oversight here!.

Awesome! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42619785)

Most Awesome!
Git is best!

If you use post/use code snippets from GitHub... (3, Informative)

cjjjer (530715) | about a year ago | (#42619899)

User beware...

Taken from http://www.infoworld.com/d/open-source-software/github-needs-take-open-source-seriously-208046 [infoworld.com]

What are the terms under which the code in all those GitHub projects is made available? A precise answer depends on your jurisdiction and would require a lawyer's advice, but it's likely that the answer for most people is "all rights reserved" -- in other words, you have no rights to use the code. GitHub does not include any useful default licensing terms in its terms of service; the most likely scenario is that any use of the copyrighted material in one of those no-license projects is formally a breach of copyright. Under copyright law, code without a license cannot be legally shared, as the default for copyrighted materials is that all rights are reserved.

Brian Doll, GitHub's VP of Marketing, confirmed this arrangement is intentional:

Code without an explicit license is protected by copyright and is by default All Rights Reserved. The person or people who wrote the code are protected as such. Any time you're using software you didn't write, licensing should be considered and abided.

Re:If you use post/use code snippets from GitHub.. (3, Insightful)

mattiaza (2567891) | about a year ago | (#42620103)

This is in no way unique to GitHub. Anything you find and see on the web (code, pictures, videos, poems) is subject to copyright. If the author has not explicitly set a license, you can't use it.

And I don't think GitHub should include any default licensing terms in its terms and conditions. Demanding a license for the users' content is what got people upset about Twitter and Instagram - and no company would publish code on GitHub if they are not in control of the licenses. What GitHub could do is offer a selection box with popular licenses (including "all copyright is mine!") when creating a repository just to remind people.

Re:If you use post/use code snippets from GitHub.. (1)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | about a year ago | (#42623991)

On sourceforge, you have to select a open-source license, which guarantees that all projects hosted can be downloaded, used and forked (but not necessarily combined).

Re:If you use post/use code snippets from GitHub.. (1)

Aighearach (97333) | about a year ago | (#42643087)

I agree this is a problem, I've seen companies put API examples on github without a license. So if I use it in a client's code, and then later I use it in a competing product, I could be in hot water. Whereas if it is BSD licensed I am good. And if it is GPL there are implications too. If I don't know, I can't use it. I complained to github about it and they refused to give any policy about what is or isn't open source enough for to be flagged as such on the site.

2.5 billion net users (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42620121)

twiddles finger
ive had 180 million hits of traffic in a decade from one site ....dont hear me/nor my site making news do ya...and thats the point....

Re:2.5 billion net users (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42621491)

Oh wow! So you're the goatse man? It's a pleasure to meet you :)

Congratulations! You win a free cruise! (2)

teotwawki42 (2746313) | about a year ago | (#42620991)

I really hope that when the 3 millionth user created his account the website blasted, "Congratulations! You are our 3 millionth registered user! you are eligible for a free cruise!"
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