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Ask Slashdot: Best Tools For Dealing With Glare Sensitivity?

timothy posted about a year ago | from the dirty-looks-but-bright dept.

GUI 195

First time accepted submitter der_pinchy writes "For many years I have used a high-contrast desktop color scheme (with green text on black background) and notice more and more software uses a forced color scheme that can make it difficult to use. For web browsing I have always used Opera and its white-on-black user style sheet, but have to constantly tweak it so that certain elements and transparent images are visible. Is there anything to be done with some of the major offenders, like Office or recent versions of Visual Studio? Even recent browsers that support user style sheets still use a forced color scheme on a lot of there dialog controls."

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195 comments

Polarized sunglasses? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year ago | (#42617923)

Would polarized sunglasses help here? They're generally pretty good at cutting down glare.

But, maybe your doctor or optometrist would be better to ask?

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about a year ago | (#42618073)

No. I just tried with a pair on my screen. On this Dell LCD is seems to increase the distance between the text and the glass(plastic)? So whatever polarized coating they use in manufacture, gives all of the head ache and none of the 3D effect.

HOWEVER! Just one lens is fine. So using two rights of lefts will be fine and is the best way to watch a 3D film.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#42618179)

The best way?
By that you mean just as dim and no 3D? That is a very odd definition of best.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (2)

hawguy (1600213) | about a year ago | (#42618941)

The best way?
By that you mean just as dim and no 3D? That is a very odd definition of best.

Actually, that probably *is* the best way to watch most 3D films. Few 3D movies use 3D as more than a gimmick.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#42618995)

So far I have enjoyed Priest, Hobbit and Prometheus. 3D seems about as much a gimmick as color. The big thing I found I had to do was resist the urge to look at what the camera was not focused on. Hopefully one day eye tracking and lytro type cameras make even that possible.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (1)

pipatron (966506) | about a year ago | (#42618221)

No one is talking about 3D film here, and the OP talks about polarized sunglasses, not 3D glasses.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | about a year ago | (#42618431)

And what do you think the technology behind 3D glasses is? Hint: polarization

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year ago | (#42618531)

Poalized dont do anything for glare except on water from direct sunlight.

you need anti glare coatings. And yes It's called going to the eye doctor or turn off the overhead lights.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about a year ago | (#42618655)

And what do you think the technology behind 3D glasses is? Hint: polarization

Or red/blue color blocking, or LCD shutters. (which I guess technically rely on polarization, but that's not how they get the 3D effect - mechanical shutters would work just as well).

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | about a year ago | (#42618733)

Nobody uses the red/blue or color blocking anymore, that is ancient technology now. And LCD shutters use polarization.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (1)

AaronLS (1804210) | about a year ago | (#42618723)

This is like saying all black birds are crows.

1) Some 3D glasses use polarization to achieve this, but lots of sunglasses are polarized and have nothing to do with 3D.
2) In fact polarized sunglasses usually have both lenses oriented in the same direction, instead of being orthoganal, and as such would not work with a 3D display.
3) Even if you were using glasses poloarized for 3D, the discussion at hand still has nothing to do with 3D because the OP seemed to imply he's talking about a regular display. After all Visual Studio is not an app that is displayed in 3D. We are talking about a regular display. Unless you have a 3D display, a 3D application, and have set the display in 3D mode, then as far as those glasses are concerned, they are just regular polarized glasses. Now if the OP misunderstood the original discussion and enabled 3D on his display, if it supports it, then that is a result of the same confusion you have.

As others pointed out, the suggestion has nothing to do with 3D, and has more to do with the fact that polarized glasses are good at cutting down glare, at least for sunlight.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | about a year ago | (#42618799)

All I stated was the technology behind 3D glasses is polarization. I didn't claim polarized sunglasses are the same as 3D glasses anywhere. I wasn't trying to imply anything beyond the fact that most 3D glasses use polarization. Anything else is inference by others, not what was stated.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618447)

"3D glasses" are polarized sunglasses. Why do you think they are two separate things?

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (3, Insightful)

hawguy (1600213) | about a year ago | (#42618811)

"3D glasses" are polarized sunglasses. Why do you think they are two separate things?

It's the orientation of the polarization that makes them different.

3D glasses have the polarization rotated 90 degrees between lenses.

Polarized sunglasses have the polarization oriented in the same direction.

You wouldn't want to wear 3D glasses while driving, because your vision would be different between your eyes - you'd see some reflected light with one eye and not the other.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (3, Interesting)

hawguy (1600213) | about a year ago | (#42618523)

No. I just tried with a pair on my screen. On this Dell LCD is seems to increase the distance between the text and the glass(plastic)? So whatever polarized coating they use in manufacture, gives all of the head ache and none of the 3D effect.

HOWEVER! Just one lens is fine. So using two rights of lefts will be fine and is the best way to watch a 3D film.

Turn your screen 90 degrees and the polarized glasses should take care of 100% of the glare. On most LCD screens, it will make the image go completely black.

Which is always amusing when places use a monitor turned 90% as an information display - one bright sunny day we walked into a fast food restaurant and my wife asked me what I was going to order, while she pointed to the blank screens. I couldn't figure out how she was reading the menu until I remembered to take off my sunglasses.

What I don't know is whether monitor makers purposely chose a polarization direction that works well with glare reducing polarized sunglasses, or if it's just coincidence that the best polarization direction for a monitor also happens to be compatible with sunglasses.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (3, Informative)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about a year ago | (#42618103)

No.

Polarized sunglasses cut glare because reflected light tends to be polarized in one direction. Therefore you can selectively block it out.

Alas, modern flat panel displays all use polarized filters to work. So they don't work too well with polarized glasses.

Re:Polarized sunglasses? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618697)

Interestingly, I've found they could help with a couple of displays I have. When the polarizing filters align, the image looks brighter and the reflections are reduced (at least on my screens).

However, the polarization angle of my glasses never match the polarization angle of the display filter, causing that I either have to turn the display or my head. Both, inconvenient solutions.

first! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42617939)

frist psot!

Re:first! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618309)

did the glare from your monitor blind you to how much of a failure you are?

"on a lot of there dialog controls" (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42617953)

Not only are you a picky little cunt who whines about colour schemes, but you can't even communicate properly in English! Get back to work. Errm, I mean, get back in your mom's basement.

The future's so bright, I gotta wear. . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42617957)

Sunglasses?

LED Screens (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42617965)

Black on white on LED screens gives me major migraines. When will they understand computer screens are not like ink on paper.

Re:LED Screens (2)

Patch86 (1465427) | about a year ago | (#42618207)

Never, I think. I have a Kindle Fire, and was astonished to find that the default colour scheme for reading books was black-text-on-white. It can be changed to white-on-black, but I just can't fathom why anyone would choose the default option if they knew to change it. Surely Amazon employ UI designers?

Re:LED Screens (1)

cellocgw (617879) | about a year ago | (#42618289)

Well, I can't fathom why you think the only color option is binary: #FFFFFF vs #000000 . At least with the tablets chez moi (one iPad, one Onda Android), it's easy to adjust the page background in book-reading apps (Nook, Mantano, etc) to some other color. I find a light parchment, with, yes, black text, to be very comfortable.

Re:LED Screens (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618603)

I only read ebooks on my N7 as black on white, even in the dark. I hate dark backgrounds.

Re:LED Screens (3, Informative)

Spectre (1685) | about a year ago | (#42618885)

Most fonts appear to have smoother edges and more consistent curves when rendered as black-text-on-white background, which is why that is the default ...

Re:LED Screens (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about a year ago | (#42618401)

We have some terminal Apps at work. I have mine with a black background... You will be surprised how many complain about that black background color, saying how hard it is to see. I expect most of the bitching and moaning isn't that it is harder to see, but what they are use too.

Re:LED Screens (1)

der_pinchy (1053896) | about a year ago | (#42618647)

Yea everyone that sees my desktop says "what in the world are those colors?" or "what OS are you using?"
I honestly can't see how people use a white BG. It feels like someone is shining a flashlight in your face.

Re:LED Screens (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618545)

This is yet another Steve Jobs clusterfuck. The original Mac was the first PC that used black on white and idiots have been aping it since.
EMMISIVE DSPLAYS SHOULD NOT HAVE BRIGHT BACKGROUNDS!

Needs more clarification (4, Informative)

Bovius (1243040) | about a year ago | (#42617993)

I'm used to interpreting "glare sensitivity" to meaning the screen is generally too bright for your eyes, but the subsequent comments about needing to use high contrast color palettes has me thinking maybe you mean something else.

Anyway: I stare at a monitor all day, and for quite a while I had some serious dry eye problems because of it. Then about a year ago I bought some Gunnar glasses ( http://www.gunnars.com/ [gunnars.com] ) and my eyes got happier within 24 hours. Wear them all the time now.

Full disclosure: I'm not even kind of affiliated with Gunnar. I just wear their glasses and I like them.

Re:Needs more clarification (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618147)

Yes i got a pair a few months back (got them on sale for like $50, don't think i would have the $200 retail price though) but they work as advertised, i also drive at night with them on, being color blind driving at night is bad enough but the glare from on coming headlights is enough to blind me for a bit, not long, but enough that if a deer were to jump out i would even see it, let alone be able to take evasive action. The glasses reduce the glare enough that i can see the whole time. But as far a siting in front of a monitor they help block a lot of glare from florescent light and generally just make things easier on the eyes.

Re:Needs more clarification (1)

Redlazer (786403) | about a year ago | (#42618327)

I was going to suggest something along those lines.

When I was in college, we had fluorescent lights and super bright LED screens. The intensity was a little much for me, so I wore my sunglasses all the time.

I'd recommend any glasses that are Polarized - that's what's making the Gunnar glasses work in this scenario, although the Gunnar glasses aren't darkened, which could be nice.

Re:Needs more clarification (1)

der_pinchy (1053896) | about a year ago | (#42618365)

With a predominately white background it literally feels like someone is shining a flashlight in my face. I made a tool for windows to switch between my high contrast desktop (green text, black BG and blue controls) and a 'normal' color scheme on the fly when I need to read something. I might give these glasses a try, looks like they could help. I knew a guy at an old job that put a hood over his monitor so he could see it better. A lot of older LCD monitors just dont display well with overhead fluorescent light.

Re:Needs more clarification (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618371)

Got my Gunnars about 18 months ago for continuos computer work after I was diagnosed with eye strain which was causing glare sensitivity. My eyes improved immediately. They use an anti-glare coating which is not polarized so it works with LCDs.

Re:Needs more clarification (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year ago | (#42618547)

Buy cheap glasses from anywhere with a 10% yellow tint and anti glare coatings and get the same thing as "gunnar" glasses for about $29.00 shipped.

That is all they are. Although I prefer the 10% grey as it increases contrast and does not color my world.

Re:Needs more clarification (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618591)

You do realize that all those speciality glasses are doing is what you should be doing anyways, right?
Calibrate your monitor to ~6500K and the need for yellow tint glasses goes away. Modern monitors come from the factory over 10000K which is AWFUL.
Added blue makes whites look 'whiter' and brighter, so they keep turninig up the blue.

Gunnar website (1)

greyparrot (895758) | about a year ago | (#42618725)

I took a look at their website and it was all white on black, which to me is barely legible. I am 71 and normally read black on white with no trouble, but have a lot of issues with the new fad for white on varied backgrounds, such as photographs.

Re:Gunnar website (1)

reboot246 (623534) | about a year ago | (#42618947)

I feel your pain. I'll be 60 next month.

The Gunnar website is more like grey on black instead of white on black. I think they intentionally made it that way to make you think you need their glasses. Kinda like the hearing aid commercials on TV that muffle the sound. :)

I've noticed a lot of photographic software uses the light grey or white on black for the interface. I use DXO, and it's barely visible to me. At least the photos stand out nicely.

No scientific method (3, Informative)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about a year ago | (#42619031)

I looked at the Gunnar Web site and saw no scientific backing of any of their claims. In my opinion, any improvement you'll get from these is 100% due to a placebo effect.

specifically tuned focusing power - It's your eyes that do the focussing. Air does not distort focussing unless it's extremely hot.

DIAMIX lens material is optically pure. - So is air. Actually, air is probably more optically pure than DIAMIX.

IONIK lens tints improve overall contrast and comfort by filtering out harsh artificial light, eliminating UV rays and reducing high-intensity visible light. - So does your eye. You have an iris, lens and your brain automatically corrects for white balance. If your work place behind a computer screen puts you in dangerous UV light, you really need to look at your TFT, since those don't emit UV at all.

iFi lens coatings include an anti-reflective layers to reduce glare - If there was no lens in the glasses, they wouldn't have to put anti-reflective layers on it. The only reflection those layers partially prevent is the reflection on the glasses themselves.

TL;DR Snake oil glasses, you've been conned.

OS? (5, Informative)

lazarus (2879) | about a year ago | (#42617995)

You didn't say what version of Windows you were running, so it's tough to tell what might be available to you from an accessibility standpoint. On the Mac you can invert colours, use greyscale, and alter the contrast of the screen as well as cursor size (in addition to the typical colour schemes, display brightness, etc). It sounds to me like you may be facing an uphill battle if you are trying to do this outside of what the OS supports directly.

Re:OS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618173)

Exactly. Unless you tell the OS that you want high contrast mode, it won't preserve the high contrast for you in all programs because the program won't know about it. Just use a high contrast scheme on the OS but tweak the hell out of it to get what you want. Just copy down all the settings of your current scheme and transpose them into a new scheme. The only real loss is that high contrast (as far as I have found) does not allow transparency without using third party or changing the theme file in an editor.

Re:OS? (1)

der_pinchy (1053896) | about a year ago | (#42618489)

Mostly WIN7 and XP. I made a tool that switches between my high contrast colors and a default color scheme so I can read some text that is black on black. But for a lot of apps there is just no winning. It makes me want to bust out a disassembler and alter the colors manually. I figured people out there would have done that for some of the more mainstream apps.

What to do (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42617997)

Of course there is something you can do. Use software you like, and don't use software you don't like. Or write your own, and make it work the way you want it.

Me too (with fix notes) (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618013)

I've got a similar problem. I've taken to filing bugs with every vendor when I encounter a forced color scheme that dishonors system settings. Fat client apps are very likely to get fixed.

Visual Studio fixes itself if you turn on high-contrast and then load your color scheme on top of it. In Windows 7, saving your color scheme with high contrast enabled saved high contrast enabled to the color scheme. In Windows 8, high contrast is always on when the color scheme is not the default.

Unfortunately, websites tend to not fix their bugs. I get too many "it's a browser bug", and one that was equivalent to "use a screen reader" even after I offered to fix their bug for them.

I suppose you could hack up a 1 bit display driver that only sends green to the monitor, or perhaps with a remote desktop client that does (incoming) -> (gresyscale) -> (green) -> (inverted green).

Re:Me too (with fix notes) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618503)

I've got a similar problem. I've taken to filing bugs with every vendor when I encounter a forced color scheme that dishonors system settings. Fat client apps are very likely to get fixed.

Visual Studio fixes itself if you turn on high-contrast and then load your color scheme on top of it. In Windows 7, saving your color scheme with high contrast enabled saved high contrast enabled to the color scheme. In Windows 8, high contrast is always on when the color scheme is not the default.

Unfortunately, websites tend to not fix their bugs. I get too many "it's a browser bug", and one that was equivalent to "use a screen reader" even after I offered to fix their bug for them.

I suppose you could hack up a 1 bit display driver that only sends green to the monitor, or perhaps with a remote desktop client that does (incoming) -> (gresyscale) -> (green) -> (inverted green).

A worse problem I've found with Windows 8 is that the text of the title bars is always black, even though you can change the colors of your window borders. Like a dark theme? Too bad [microsoft.com] (bottom of the page).

Re:Me too (with fix notes) (1)

Ceriel Nosforit (682174) | about a year ago | (#42618543)

I've taken to filing bugs with every vendor when I encounter a forced color scheme that dishonors system settings.

Mind sharing that template? :)

In return, I give you this:
https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/change-colors/jbmkekhehjedonbhoikhhkmlapalklgn?utm_source=chrome-ntp-icon [google.com]

Re:Me too (with fix notes) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618807)

No template. I take a screen snapshot clearly showing my color theme and the application ignoring it and submit it as a bug along with an explanation for why I use that color theme.

Re:Me too (with fix notes) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618605)

Unfortunately, websites tend to not fix their bugs. I get too many "it's a browser bug", and one that was equivalent to "use a screen reader" even after I offered to fix their bug for them.

It is surprising how often something like this comes up. I can understand that randomly contacting someone out of the blue about their webpage being done wrong, even if done politely, can get some rather impolite responses. No one likes dealing with some cocky nobody bugging you about being wrong, especially if you don't happen to see they are correct. But some of the expectations a select few web page designers come up with is kind of outrageous. I've seen responses that they want you to change your screen resolution just to view their site, or to go in and change registry settings (regardless of what OS and browser you happen to be using...), install a different graphics driver, or change other system settings to view it.

I've even seen simple mistakes on internal webpages that make them nearly unusable, by making text too small to read, including trying to bypass the browser resizing of text. Employees complain they have to copy paste text just to read it, and the only response is the web designer requesting IT department put a maximum resolution limit on employee computers of like 1024x768. Or even once someone asked me to review the front end to their new online store... only to tell me I was looking at it wrong (even though I was using default settings)... which I am sure customers will be willing to put up with.

But the vast majority of sites that don't play well with different color or resolution sizes are because the creator never thought to test or prepare it for such a setup. A much smaller slice are aware of such issues, but too lazy to do things the right way. And only the really "special" web designers actively defend their horrible design choices not working due to the viewer's fault.

Simple (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618019)

Invert the colors in X11 itself: xcalib -i -a

Re:Simple (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618083)

Since he mentioned Office and Visual Studio, I strongly doubt that he is using X.

Re:Simple (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618295)

The fact this was modded -1 demonstrates the problem with the moderation system and the readership on this site.

Not necessarily simple (2)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | about a year ago | (#42618155)

Invert the colors in X11 itself: xcalib -i -a

What would that do to a Wine session, or to a VM running Windows on a Linux host?
If it does what I think (Linux-only here, no VM or Wine), there could be confusing issues in figuring out palettes afterwards in the VM or in a Wine session. The OP mentioned using Office and Visual Studio, so it's likely to be a Windows user.

glare (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618037)

steel wool 0000?,tape

bias lighting (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618047)

If black on white text is too bright then you probably need more light in the room. Your eyes adjust to the overall scene brightness, so if you have a bright screen in the middle of a dark field, because the lights are out in the room, then the screen will appear too bright and fatiguing. Try installing some LEDs on the back of your monitor to illuminate the wall behind the screen. That will increase the overall scene brightness and make the screen seem less harsh without creating reflections on the screen.

What OS / Window manager? (4, Informative)

oneiros27 (46144) | about a year ago | (#42618053)

If it's MacOS X, go into the 'Universal Access' control panel, and there's a 'contrast' slider, and you can force greyscale, black on white, or white on black.

Most X windows managers have ways to do similar things, although in some you have to mess with configuration files.

No idea how to do it in Amiga or Haiku, though.

different (1)

leptons (891340) | about a year ago | (#42618111)

Sometimes being different is difficult. You are an edge case, and a very insignificant one at that.

If you want your own color schemes in everything then you're gonna have a bad time. Software and webpages aren't created for your edge case, these things are created for people who don't have a color scheme preference.

Learning to "go with the flow" will get you better mileage than trying to make everything bend to your edge case.

Re:different (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#42618209)

Only if you want to always have a mediocre experience.

Re:different (1)

leptons (891340) | about a year ago | (#42618305)

A mediocre experience would be what OP has written about his edge case - "but have to constantly tweak it so that certain elements and transparent images are visible." The fixation on custom colors is what is creating the mediocre experience, not the web page that was designed to look a specific way. No designer can create a web page that will look good when a user tweaks the background color and other colors. It just isn't going to turn out well.

Re:different (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#42618377)

A mediocre experience is having to cope with less than ideal display to deal with a poorly designed interface.

Any designer can create a webpage that looks good when a user tweaks the colors. It should be expected in fact, the display layer is under the users control. Degrade gracefully. A webpage that is well designed will be fine in grayscale. A webpage that is well designed can be used by a screen reader. A web page that is well designed can be used via lynx.

Another mediocre experience is when I have to use another persons computer who has Ctrl and Capslock in the place modern keyboards assume. I always change that to the way the FSM intended.

Re:different (1)

leptons (891340) | about a year ago | (#42618711)

>It should be expected in fact

What kind of rock do you live under? You really expect users to tweak the colors of a webpage?? I think you are giving too much credit to the vast majority of users that make up the internet. Not everyone is an uber-nerd. Nobody really cares about changing the color of every webpage, or even a single webpage. The vast majority of users simply do not care or even know that it is possible, and would never think twice about doing it.

>Any designer can create a webpage that looks good when a user tweaks the colors.

Here you are just being plain crazy. Have you ever worked with a designer?? Have you ever created a webpage? It sure doesn't sound like it.

>Another mediocre experience is when I have to use another persons computer who has Ctrl and Capslock in the place modern keyboards assume. I always change that to the way the FSM intended.

Now you're just babbling, or trolling.

Re:different (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#42618803)

Lots of normal users at my company due as they have vision problems. Color blindness impacts about 8% of males in some way as a fine example.

I have created many webpages, I always make sure they degrade as gracefully as possible. Any designer not planning for use of websites by the disabled should simply be terminated. Enabling use by as many people as possible is job 1.

I am not troll nor babbling, I prefer to have Crtl where most people have capslock. This comes from my cutting my teeth on SUN machines. It is also very handy for VIM which I use constantly.

Re:different (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618229)

Thank you for posting the first common sense response to this question.

Re:different (1)

pipatron (966506) | about a year ago | (#42618321)

And if "going with the flow" means having to stop using a computer because it gives you a headache, that's ok? Because developers constantly force their own colour schemes instead of respecting the choice that the user made? Doesn't sound very nice.

Re:different (2)

leptons (891340) | about a year ago | (#42618903)

If you are getting headaches from using a computer, you have more serious issues than the color of a webpage. You should really get that checked out.

The internet, and computer applications as a whole do not give people headaches because of the color schemes used. If this were the case, computers would be labeled with warning stickers - "May cause headaches". This is simply not the case. You are straining so hard to try to make an erroneous point. Just because you get headaches from a specific color scheme on a screen does not mean the rest of us do. I've been staring at computer screens 12+ hours a day for the last 30 years and I've never once had a headache that I thought was induced by the default colors of the applications open on my screen.

Developers aren't "forcing their own color schemes", they use color schemes that are widely accepted as being productive and useful and that work for the majority of people using their products. Catering to an edge case only makes the job that much more difficult if they have to satisfy the functional requirements as well as make it work with any color choice the user wants. It's absurd.

There's a reason for the ADA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618681)

There's a reason for the ADA. He's not the only edge case that has a problem with a lot of websites. His disability is not substantially different than folks who use screen magnifiers; the problem is almost identical. While I'm generally opposed to government rules, making reasonable accomodations for disabilities in a fucking webpage is pretty damn cheap.

Visual Studio (1)

ZeroSerenity (923363) | about a year ago | (#42618143)

You can change your Visual Studio color settings by going to Tools->Options->Enviroment->Fonts and Colors.

If you want something high contrast without the hassle, I use Ragnarok Blue [winterdom.com]. Download the file, go back to VS, Tools->Import and Export Settings and then follow the instructions to find the file.

Re:Visual Studio (1)

ZeroSerenity (923363) | about a year ago | (#42618167)

Forgot to mention but this does work all the way up to 2010, so I would also assume it works for 2012 as well without an issue.

Re:Visual Studio (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618239)

You can do the same thing in Office. Microsoft has pretty first rate accessibility features like that.

Poster is just anti-MS trolling. On slashdot of all places!

(10 bucks says he has never written a line of code, let alone used visual studio)

Re:Visual Studio (1)

der_pinchy (1053896) | about a year ago | (#42618739)

The problem is not the editor but the window frame and controls, They are still very bright.
Office has selectable themes but even with a 'dark theme' they are not high contrast compared to a standard high contrast desktop.

Re:Visual Studio (1)

ColdCat (2586245) | about a year ago | (#42618795)

Unfortunately Without third party/manual edit Visual 2010 won't let you customised completely colors

It's pretty difficult to have at the same time
-black background
-bright text
-selected text readable.

In visual 2010 you could select only font color for language and only background color for selection. If you have bright text you should select dark color for selection, but with dark color for selection it's less readable as background is dark too.

On all previous versions (maybe even visual 1.0 with widows 3 theme ) you can have selected text with bright background and dark text but since VS2010 it's over.

you FAIL 1t.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618163)

don't be afraid Daaren Reed, which irrecoverable

For violent offenders (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618191)

For violent offenders which have US entities, make an ADA complaint to them directly, and if they respond rudely, file an official ADA complaint. If you're a $10M+ company, you can afford to make your website acccessible. Small businesses, on the other hand, tend to respond pleasantly and often make thier websites better.

This has saved my eyes (2)

venir (971650) | about a year ago | (#42618203)

Not sure if this addresses your particular issues, but I use f.lux [stereopsis.com] and it has totally saved my eyes. I periodically lower the settings on it, which continues to help with my eye strain and I'm so used to it I forget it is running most of the time.

Get a proper diagnosis (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618223)

Glare sensitivity shouldn't require anything other than contrast and brightness adjustment on your display. Whatever is wrong with you needs to be properly diagnosed and treated, but it's not glare sensitivity.

vs extension and chrome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618243)

I use a visual studio colorscheme I downloaded somewhere and an extension to make the navigation pane backgroung the same color (sorry I'm being so vague im not home now and wtf why should I need to do this). And for browsing I have two chrome extensions, one inverts the colors and is easier on the eyes but also inverts pics and the other inverts only text but you lose stuff like syntax highlighting for code.

turn on the lights (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618259)

Turn on the lights in your mancave and find a low glare monitor (i.e. not "high contrast"), and you won't need a green on black color scheme to prevent glare headaches.

Your own fault for not using Linux. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618277)

With Linux GUIs, colors, fonts, widget styles, window decoration, etc are generally system-wide. You set them once, and you're good. The freedom you get with e.g. QTcurve (also available for Gnome) is *huge*.

Just grow up and stop sticking to silly toy appliance operating systems. Get a computer OS that's actually *designed* for users who want to use their computer for its real purpose, and not just consume "media" and play with colorful appliances that try to block you from actually using it that way.

Re:Your own fault for not using Linux. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618307)

It's sad that you actually had there a valid point (desktop Linux does allow more efficient color configuration) but ruined it with some toy OS flamebait crap.

Irlem Syndrome (1)

ninlilizi (2759613) | about a year ago | (#42618329)

This I believe is often some level of symptons of Scotopic Sensitivity.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotopic_sensitivity_syndrome [wikipedia.org]

In my own experience, much of the same solutions for this and regular reading transfer to working with panels.... More or less.
I find the backlighting on displays makes glare much worse. Glossy screens are hell. And black text on white backgrounds cause the black text to float and wave slightly bove the background and the intense white has weird larva lamp style swirly plasma like effects throughout it extending maybe a few inches deep into the display at all times.

Configurable color palletes are a must... I myself find green on black the only thing perfectly usuable.
I'd recommend avoiding anything Apple, like the plague. There whole interface style just results in day long migraines for even glancing at for a few mins.

For things where you can't change the interface... Stuff like x.flux and gtk-redshift are quite useful by shifting a long way towards red you remove a lot of the glare... And I swear at one stage there were similar things for colorshifting the entire display somewhere to your prefence which may work better. But currently running the MATE desktop with a dark theme with Greasemonkey scripts to darken commonly used web sites. For outliers and gaming, I run gtk-redshift with a reasonably strong redbalance to fix the effect.

Of course, individual color sensitivities differ... So while I find more red good, you may find less red so instead.

Interestingly, with my percaptual difficulties... I seem to be one of the rare few for which stereocopy has presented the first time in my life the ability to watch films and visit the cinema, enjoy gaming, etc. But only certain 3D techs work this way... RealD is good, IMAX 3D HORRIBLE.... Passive Line interleaved panels horrible because even at a distance of a meter from a 20" panel I can still clearly see the blacklines and individual pixels..... Active shutter bad... Passive polarised projectors easier to watch than the ponies outside my window.

Suggestions (1)

Ceriel Nosforit (682174) | about a year ago | (#42618345)

I have thinking about how to solve the issue programmatically. That is, once and for all. There are a few rules which could be forced upon the window server. Compiz for example has some potential in this direction, so it could be refined.

- When luminance per area exceed a user-set property, invert luminance but keep chroma. Perhaps something ImageMagick or similar could do with ease.

- Be aware of common image formats and be reasonably sure that everything else is typeface. With emerging VR we might have to invent lots of new definitions.

- When it is a typeface, treat it like the user wants text to be treated, perhaps relying on CSS templates and window/tab titles or domain names. AFAIK there is no URL for viewports, so there will be a issue of persistence.

Who the hell decided the web wanted to be white anyway? A white web is bad for mobile.

Check out Solarized (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618467)

Probably not what you are looking for, but this is great and I have it configured for the things I spend all day looking at: urxvt and vim

http://ethanschoonover.com/solarized

Apparently you can configure many other software packages to use the scheme too.

The colors are not particularly attractive, but they are very readable.

ZoomText (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618483)

For Windows check out ZoomText www.aisquared.com/zoomtext/

It's targeted at the visually impaired (yes I've used it) and allows you to control the overall color of your screen no matter the application. You don't have to use the magnification feature if you just want to enhance the colors.

http://www.aisquared.com/zoomtext/tour/enhancements#enhanced_screen_colors

The dyes are amazing. Yellow / Black, Amber / Black, etc...

Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618499)

Are these really the sort of questions which are now considered Slashdot worthy? Maybe I should stop using a search engine and just Ask Slashot to find me the results.

Psychologist? (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | about a year ago | (#42618563)

Perhaps you need someone trained to alternative explanations?

After all, several of the available color schemes were adapted using people trained in adapting color schemes. Maybe someone trained may help you.

Change the theme (1)

jader3rd (2222716) | about a year ago | (#42618567)

For the major offender of VS 2012, type 'color theme ' into Quick Launch and select Environment - General. Then change the Color theme to Dark.
For Office 2013 go to the General options and change the Office Theme to Dark Gray.

Compiz shaders (1)

Derek Pomery (2028) | about a year ago | (#42618597)

They can be applied to any window w/ a key combo, and are fairly customisable.
Here's a custom one applied to Firefox, is one that preserves colours while inverting lightness.

http://m8y.org/tmp/biased-inverted-lightness.txt [m8y.org]
http://m8y.org/tmp/inverted-lightness.txt [m8y.org]

http://m8y.org/tmp/lightness1.jpeg [m8y.org] http://m8y.org/tmp/lightness2.jpeg [m8y.org] http://m8y.org/tmp/lightness3.jpeg [m8y.org]

Arbitrary tweaks of the values. Apologies for the relative unreadableness of the script (variable reuse, bad names) was just a quick implementation of:
http://dbaron.org/log/20110430-invert-colors [dbaron.org]

To be actually usable for routine web browsing.

Eclipse... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618633)

This may vary by version, but in Eclipse, open Preferences and then expand General > Appearance. You can select from a few built-in Themes from there, and you can further expand General > Appearance > Colors and Fonts for even more options. There are about a gazillion different options, including the background, foreground, and highlight color for just about everything that is not an OS control (buttons, scrollbars.)

No answer, but annoyed as well (2)

TheCarp (96830) | about a year ago | (#42618639)

Ever since my apple ][ days, when I had a color monitor, I knew I liked dark backgrounds and light text. At the time, red on black. Now I am happy with a light gray on black

Setting this on terminals is cake. Even putty can be made reasonable quickly.

However... they are the exception. Nearly everything I use regularly really works. Few support changing color schemes at all, and the ones that do, are so limited as to be useless. Pidgin and eclipse both come to mind as having mechanisms (with pidgin I believe its via plugins) to change color schemes, but only in very limited ways. You can't, change the look of many of the utility window parts, like the resources view....so the darker you make the rest, the more jarring those stand outs become.... often making it less appealing than reverting to defaults.

Of course, I have a north facing window that overlooks an old barn that the neighbors put white siding on, so the glare from that can be prodigeous during the day. Room darkening shades, preferably with wooden slats take care of that nicely.

I also highly recomend a light behind the monitor. I stuck an old lamp back there, but have some LEDs that I used to put an RGB LED version in with.... I just need to mess with the controller a bit more.

Multiple options (2)

bananaquackmoo (1204116) | about a year ago | (#42618673)

BUY A DIFFERENT MONITOR

No seriously. There are MANY monitor technologies, and some deal better with glare than others. Matte displays, IPS, high DPI, different backlighting technologies, etc

OR BUY A SHADE (or adjust your external lights):

Adjust your lighting sources or block them out with a shade. You can buy these box-like things that go around monitors to shade the display by blocking lights. That will cut down on glare entirely since there is no external light to cause it.

IF THESE DON"T WORK:

Then you're not talking about glare.

KDE Inverse Colors (1)

devent (1627873) | about a year ago | (#42618683)

So you don't like Black on White but want the background be black?
In KDE I can make all windows or only one selected window inverse the colors.
White will become black and black will become white (and green is red and vice versa)
I tried it for the night when the laptop screen will get too bright.

Go outside more (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42618717)

Let your eyes get used to a wide variety of intensities and environments.

Your eyes are just like any other organ in your body, use them properly or lose them.

Accessibility? (1)

tlambert (566799) | about a year ago | (#42618983)

If this is higher contrast for accessibility issues, while there are OS contrast settings, they will generally not correct for bad accessibility design in web sites themselves. This is a web site design issue.

If a government site, or a site for a government contractor, has accessibility issues, you can force them to fix them via the ADA (American's with Disabilities Act). If it's some other site, and your OS accessibility settings won't handle it, then you need to contact the site maintainers and explain the problem.

Visual Studio has some nice dark themes (1)

cpm99352 (939350) | about a year ago | (#42619015)

I use dark themes in Visual Studio and it was pretty easy to set up. Take a look here [stackoverflow.com] or here [microsoft.com]. This [asp.net] is what I use.

Google is your friend, too.

Great, but... (1)

triffid_98 (899609) | about a year ago | (#42619021)

Rather offtopic, but does anyone else have glare sensitivity issues with these new led tail-lights? Most of them are OK, but some of them are almost blinding at night. I'm almost to the point of going full on Corey Hart after half an hour of stop-and-go behind the things.

"I wear my sunglasses at night, so I can, so I can stand to watch these led tail-lights on certain awful cars.

And yes, I'm a big fan of green on black, fortunately most editors can still be configured that way.
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