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Intel Leaving Desktop Motherboard Business

Soulskill posted about a year and a half ago | from the retiring-the-pace-car dept.

Intel 219

An anonymous reader writes "As soon as its next-gen Haswell CPUs ship, Intel will start to leave the desktop motherboard business. It will be a lengthy process, taking at least three years, and the company will continue to produce chipsets. The company will be focusing instead on smaller and newer form factors. For one, it will be working on its Next Unit of Computing (NUC) boards, which are 4" by 4". Legacy support for old motherboards and the new Haswell motherboards will continue through their respective warranty periods. 'Given the competitive landscape, it's not a big surprise that Intel is refocusing its efforts on areas that have greater potential impact on future growth. All segments of the PC business are under extreme pressure, with sales slipping and users gravitating toward tablets and smart phones. Focusing on reference designs for all-in-one PCs, Ultrabooks and tablets will enable Intel's partners to more rapidly ship products that appeal to the new generation of mobile users.' AnandTech points out that one of the reasons Intel put out motherboards for so long was to assure a baseline level of quality for its CPUs. Now that the boards coming out of Taiwan are of good quality, Intel doesn't need to expend the effort."

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Overpriced (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668195)

Compared to ASUS and MSI motherboards, Intel ones are (were) overpriced. I can't imagine anyone will miss them.

Re:Overpriced (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668233)

Compared to ASUS and MSI motherboards, Intel ones are much, MUCH better engineered. You get what you pay for.

Re:Overpriced (5, Interesting)

trum4n (982031) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668349)

I have to disagree. Years of using MSI and ASUS has shown great reliability and performance. Every Intel board i have had were total junk. Short lived, cheaply built. Of course, it might have been the processors terrible form factors. Every MSI and ASUS i ever had was AMD powered, and far superior to that LGA crap simply because it had pins and wasn't completely disabled by a little vibration. With my years of experience in the field, i just have to say, i will never buy anything with the Intel badge again.

Re:Overpriced (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668467)

I've also found Intel boards to be very picky about settings, components, and drivers.

Re:Overpriced (4, Interesting)

trum4n (982031) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668541)

Agreed. I've had a brand new system that i just built not boot due to incompatible RAM. It meets all the specs, exceeds some of them, but no good in an Intel board. Drop it in an MSI, works great for years. G.Skill told me it's because they wouldn't pay to be "I7 Certified".

Re:Overpriced (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669057)

Generally, I've found with intel, is that they are very sensitive to RAM voltage, even if it seems the memory would fit - the i7 certified sounds rather silly.
Anyway, do your research before buying any hardware to make sure it is listed as compatible.

The last MSI board I had seemed good, until I tried any two of:
- Run a TV Tuner
- Play an MMO
- Transfer large files over the network (typically local, the internet usually couldn't send me a file fast enough to trigger the issue).

It seemed some combination of multiple high-memory and high-network applications could crash the thing like a charm. Swapped it out for an ASUS, and everything else was the same... Worked like a charm.

Re:Overpriced (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668611)

reliability for a basement dweller spending all day on WoW or rebuilding his PC and for something that produces revenue are two different things

i've used MSI, Abit and Asus since the 1990's and they were OK for home use. not for work use

Re:Overpriced (1, Troll)

trum4n (982031) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668723)

If money was involved, i sure wouldn't trust Intel with it. Infact, as a non-basement-dwelling engineer who just shipped a truck load of Dual 12core Opteron servers, I'll take anything over Intel.

Re:Overpriced (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668991)

yeah, and last i read Opterons suck compared to Xeons

Re:Overpriced (1)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668945)

Because you used them for work.....I have they worked fine.

Re:Overpriced (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669077)

*shrug* of the three, only MSI has every caused me stability issues. Nonetheless, if you are using it for a business, yeah, you want to be a lot more careful, but then agian, you will probably be buying a pre-built from a vendor at that point.

Re:Overpriced (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669725)

That basement dwelling WoW player is actually the one more likely to overpay for newer hardware that's somewhat faster but remarkably more expensive.

Re:Overpriced (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669009)

I have to disagree.

I've used a lot of MSI boards, and generally, they are very unstable. ASUS isn't bad - aside from ease of using their support going downhill, they tend to have solid builds. However, I could crash most of the MSIs I've had on demand, regardless of OS.

Intel boards (like, Tyan), can be picky, but as long as you do your research before you buy the board, and get compatible parts, or make sure you aren't buying it for a system with incompatible parts (typically memory or PSU, even if it fits and is from a usually-good-quality manufacturer, it may not be ideal), you get a solid system. I've never managed that with MSI.

That being said... I would use the most of MSI boards I have had in certain situations - because their crashes were quite predictable, and if I knew a computer's use case wouldn't trigger the crash - why not use it, it's cheap. However, there was one board I literally snapped in half so it wouldn't accidentally or intentionally get put in another machine.

Re:Overpriced (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669279)

He's anon, that alone should tell you he (works for intel/is an intel fanboy).

Re:Overpriced (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668447)

I work for a smallish IT company and we build a lot of workstations.
I can vouch for this. ASUS is ok, MSI is complete junk and Intel is pretty solid.

Re:Overpriced (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668509)

Same. There was something about the lack of spelling mistakes in the manuals and BIOS that did it for me.

Re:Overpriced (2)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668961)

I can vouch for ASUS working fine but keep believing Intel has some magical properties.....

Re:Overpriced (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669109)

I'd add Gigabyte to the list. Shame ABit isn't around, they made solid stuff too.

Tyan is also nice, but expensive and requires reading and only buying from the compatible parts list if you don't want it do die in a cloud of smoke... You get listed compatible parts, they work amazing. You don't, they go boom. I suspect their tolerances are much tighter than the industry standards - any anything outside of the range, but within industry standards, really ticks them off. However, it's a trade off, if you can keep withing tighter tolerances, you can usually stick to more consistent/better results.

Re:Overpriced (1)

justthinkit (954982) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669813)

WHERE do you add Gigabyte to the list? Parent's list included three categories: "Ok", "junk" and "completely solid".

Re:Overpriced (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668583)

You get what you pay for.

So, I guess Aleive brand Naproxin Sodium is three times as effective as generic naproxin Sodium? No, you do NOT always get what you pay for. "You get what you pay for" is a salesman's favorite lie.

Re:Overpriced (1)

arkenian (1560563) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668973)

You get what you pay for. So, I guess Aleive brand Naproxin Sodium is three times as effective as generic naproxin Sodium? No, you do NOT always get what you pay for. "You get what you pay for" is a salesman's favorite lie.

I disagree. Aleve brand Naproxin Sodium is not, of course, three times as effective as generic. It is, however, far more Aleve. You get what you pay for is, generally, true. But you need to be aware of what, exactly, you're paying for, and ask if YOU value it. Generally, the salesman lies about what, precisely, it is that you're paying for.

Re:Overpriced (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669483)

Unless what is in the pill is not only Naproxin Sodium with some kind of coating, but if they add just the right amount of other substances (I really have very little knowledge on what those could be), maybe it makes the brand-name medicine act faster, be easier on the stomach, have longer lasting effects...or whatever might make the potential customers prefer it over the generic or other name brand.

Anecdotal evidence: My mom has a preference for a brand of ibuprofen pills the manufacturer included arginine along with it. The result is a faster-acting pain reliever which is what she wants/needs/expects when she takes that kind of pill. So, yes, better than the generic ibuprofen pill, even if there's less "active component" in the brand name.

Re:Overpriced (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669133)

Depends on the topic.

Spices in the US are the same - as long as it's the same type (dried powder vs. dried powder, whole vs. whole), they are so regulated, it's pretty close to the same no matter what you get.

Some times, there is more money and effort spent in components and QA, in which case, "you get what you pay for" is a VERY safe bet.

Re:Overpriced (1)

Bengie (1121981) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669393)

I agree, that $20 800watt PSU is so much better than that other $120 600watt PSU.

Re:Overpriced (4, Insightful)

TheNinjaroach (878876) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668789)

I tend to think that the high end ASUS boards are the best money can buy. I've always thought Intel motherboards only compete in the OEM sector.

Re:Overpriced (3, Insightful)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669163)

My expericne:

ASUS will give you slightly better performance and flexibility, but is *SLIGHTLY* less stable. Almost nobody will ever notice the difference.
Intel, is going to be more stable, but you have a slight speed loss and not as much flexibility (i.e. O.C., available feature sets).

There are more reliable board than ASUS, that don't have the drawbacks of Intel, but they are generally much more expensive, and often not worth it, so I'm not sure if they'd detract from the 'best money can buy' statement...

Re:Overpriced (1)

citizenr (871508) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668861)

Intel mobo = no OC

Re:Overpriced (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669533)

I agree. I have had many motherboards over the last couple of decades and I have had many problems with Asus and MSI but have never had an issue with Intel.

In terms of top quality I still have to recommend SuperMicro, but those are expensive. I recommend Intel for the average user.

Re:Overpriced (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668289)

Compared to ASUS and MSI motherboards, Intel ones are (were) overpriced. I can't imagine anyone will miss them.

High end Intel motherboards were relabled server boards. Costly, not flashy but stable.
I've still got a couple of Bad Axe's 2 that are still running without a hicup almost 24/24 since 2006.
Wish all Asus/Msi/Gigabyte motherboards were like Intel motherboards.

One word: Competition (1)

x0d (2506794) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668341)

If we have less brands to choose from, the other ones won't have any reason to keep their prices low. So everything will get more and more expensive in no time, while the PC market will continue to shrink.

Re:Overpriced (5, Insightful)

slaker (53818) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668367)

In my experience, Intel's boards seem to be considerably more reliable. I'm sure my sample size is small, perhaps 100 systems per year, but I have had a much, much lower incidence of problems with Intel motherboards than with Asus or Gigabyte, and MSI doesn't even deserve to be mentioned in the same breath with those two.

Intel boards are actually made by Foxconn, so it's possible that this will be a change in name only, but I do also value the fact that I can get an RMA on a motherboard from Intel within two business days. Neither Gigabyte nor Asus offer anything like that level of service and paying a little extra for it is entirely justifiable.

Re:Overpriced (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668679)

I agree with you there, not that I am a fan of intel but asus and msi certainly have quality control issues that need sorted out, foxconn seems to be pretty good at keeping their boards under control and they seem to actually support their products with bios updates for at least a couple months to fix bugs.

Don't buy hardware with skulls on it (1)

xtal (49134) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668779)

My last foray into an Intel motherboard was a
X58 adorned with skulls. It didn't work very well.

I replaced it with an Asus.

The fact intel is making hardware adorned with skulls is confusing enough. An amendum to the don't buy audio equipment named after natural disasters rule of thumb, you shouldn't buy computer gear with skulls on it.

Enthusiast hardware isn't going anywhere, but it will be getting more expensive. Intel is a chip company not a motherboard company after all.

Re:Don't buy hardware with skulls on it (1)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668857)

I have to ask about your rule of thumb: which audio equipment are you referring to?

Re:Don't buy hardware with skulls on it (1)

slaker (53818) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669477)

Typhoon, probably.

But yes, I would not even remotely trust an Intel enthusiast-class system board. Their LGA2011 boards aren't really impressive at all.
That's the point when Asus and Gigabyte and some of the other goofy hobbyist brands actually do make sense. For once.

Re:Overpriced (1)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668781)

I've never seen and Intel board with an AMD socket, so assuming you run Intel exclusively.

paying a little extra for it is entirely justifiable.

That depends on your budget. Besides, no matter what you buy, in a few years the board is obsolete. The newest RAM, CPU (and sometimes even video cards/Power supply) will not work with your board and you upgrade or make do. After a few years, you can't get $20 for it on Ebay anyway. It's basically a frisbee if it hurls.

Re:Overpriced (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669255)

I've never seen and Intel board with an AMD socket, so assuming you run Intel exclusively.

Why would you have to run Intel exclusively? I have run Intel board machines with Intel CPUs, and nothing at all unpleasant happened to the AMDs on ASUS/ABIT/Gigabyte/Tyan's sitting nearby. Do they come out at night and eat the competators CPUs? Was I just lucky this didn't happen to me?

Re:Overpriced (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669617)

I'm not sure if you're trying to be funny or if you genuinely didn't understand, but I'm pretty sure that by "exclusively" the gp was only referring to the fact that you can't mix amd and intel on the *same* motherboard. In fact, that the gp even quite explicitly mentions this notion in the very sentence you quoted (saying he's "never seen an Intel board with an AMD socket").

Re:Overpriced (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669799)

I'm not sure if you're trying to be funny or if you genuinely didn't understand, but I'm pretty sure that by "exclusively" the gp was only referring to the fact that you can't mix amd and intel on the *same* motherboard. In fact, that the gp even quite explicitly mentions this notion in the very sentence you quoted (saying he's "never seen an Intel board with an AMD socket").

Does Macys plug Gimbels?

Re:Overpriced (1)

slaker (53818) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669407)

Yes. I run Intel exclusively. I don't have a problem with AMD CPUs as such, but no one operating in AMD-land is building system boards as generally reliable as are found on the Intel side of the fence. It does indeed help that there's an extremely narrow range of products where AMD is currently competitive for both price and performance at the moment, but I'd still rather deploy a small fleet of Intel-based systems and have the known-quantity experience than the crap-shoot of what Gigabyte or Asus might have for AM3+ this week.

I also like the fact that I can still find new-in-box Intel-branded motherboards even a couple years after production has stopped. This is really valuable if you have any reason to value uniformity in your configurations, which I certainly do.

Re:Overpriced (1)

lightknight (213164) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669801)

AMD / Asus -> Crosshair motherboards. Built to overclock, and do so stably. I tend to use them for all of my builds, as their tolerances are exceptional. If someone needs more power, I just turn on the overclocking. It's like a free built-in upgrade. ;-)

Re:Overpriced (1)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668993)

You got a replacement board in 2 days or the process to RMA the board took 2 days? Big difference.

Re:Overpriced (1)

slaker (53818) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669299)

It's functionally the same thing in my case. I'm close enough to Intel's Louisville RMA depot that they'll have my RMA'd products the day I get authorization and have another one on a truck back to me the next day.

It still speaks very highly of their logistical operation that they process and ship returns that quickly.

Re:Overpriced (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669213)

I'd have to agree.

That 100 systems a year probably puts you over most of the posters here (including myself).

A thought - You might want to look at Tyan if you want a replacement for Intel. They are finicky as hell when it comes to compatible hardware (particularly memory/PSU), but if you stick to compatible stuff, they are very reliable, and the performance is pretty good too.

I will still use my desktop computer (5, Insightful)

Quakeulf (2650167) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668203)

I really need my high-end desktop computer to do my job. How long until something will happen to this market segment will disappear as well? I cannot, for the life of me, see me doing my graphics, game development and 3D on a tablet unless it gets powerful enough for my needs.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668255)

Get serious, a GameBoy is powerful enough for your needs.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

suprcvic (684521) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669219)

Why do I never have mod points when I need them? +1 Funny.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

fredprado (2569351) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668259)

This market segment won't disappear anytime soon, if it will at all.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668515)

I'm a professional photographer. I need vastly more processor power, storage space and screen real estate than any tablet or laptop could ever offer me. So yes, the desktop computer market still makes sense, maybe not for everybody, but at least for specialized groups.

If anyone will ever come up with a 2x eight core, 64Gb RAM, 9.3Tb RAID5, Quadro 6000 and 30" + 24" IPS screens, I'll gladly switch. Until then, you can pry my desktop from my cold, dead fingers. (yes, those are the actual specs of the machine I just built last month, minus the screens which were transferred from the outgoing computer to the new one)

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

Mad Merlin (837387) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669403)

2x eight core, 64Gb RAM, 9.3Tb RAID5, Quadro 6000 and 30" + 24" IPS screens

You dropped $2200*-$4200** on CPUs, but only put 64G ($500) of RAM in the machine? Cheapskate.

  • * Xeon E5-2650 = $1107
  • ** Xeon E5-2960 = $2061

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669527)

It's not the processor, or the memory that's getting the axe. I'm guessing Intel will still make those....it's only everything around those two that is getting discontinued. See? no harm done.

Is this the wake-up call that AMD has been waiting for to get their act together and get back in the game? hmmmm

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

lightknight (213164) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669833)

AMD is currently getting out of the game, and will be unable to take advantage of this opportunity, as their intelligentsia had a vision that said "ARM is the future, let's drop everything and go THATAWAY!" several months ago. That such a large market opportunity has suddenly appeared, and will go unfulfilled, is only further proof that AMD's leadership (or perhaps their previous leadership, seems to be a revolving door there somewhere) needs to be taken out back by the investors, and Old Yeller'ed.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (2)

Ami Ganguli (921) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668269)

There's still a need for the "gamer" PC, and that niche will continue to exist.

But for most of us, there are better alternatives. I just bought one of the Intel Next Unit of Computing [intel.com] systems a couple of days ago. I'm thrilled with it so far. It's totally quiet, mounts discretely on the side of my desk, supports two monitors, and is plenty fast enough for my software development needs.

I don't develop games, but I imagine that most users will be playing games on tablet-like devices in the near future, so a system like mine probably has more gaming horsepower than the average tablet as well.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (3, Insightful)

laffer1 (701823) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668433)

That system only has a core i3 in it. There are reasons some of us need CPU power besides gaming. My desktop spends a great deal of time compiling software. Intel and AMD have made it clear they don't want me as a customer, but the problem is that I have no where else to go.

Intel's on a race to the bottom with ARM. AMD is on a race to extinction.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668507)

Ewww. I already have 16GB ram and 8 cores at 4Ghz and 3 monitors. This would be a serious downgrade. I built it last year and upgraded the CPU last month.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669769)

The NUC is just this years iteration of the ION nettop or Mac Mini.

It's not a real desktop replacement.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

lightknight (213164) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669857)

Only 16GB of RAM? Was the paycheck late?

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668651)

My year old Air stomps all over this thing.

If I want a real PC I don't care how big it is, if I want something tiny I am willing to pay enough to get something better.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

Grizzley9 (1407005) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669559)

I want to like Intel's NUC, but I just can't find a reason for it that isn't better served with other hardware (sometimes cheaper considering all you have to buy for it) and very seldom is form factor the primary concern. Why not just get a mini tower? It needed to come out 2-3 years ago and the Mac Mini beat them by a long shot, plus it needs USB 3.0 instead.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668273)

Ditto. I need to for heavy duty electromagnetic software for RF and antenna design. Other than HP, which I can't stand, who makes high end motherboards for Xeon processors that have multiple PCI slots for GPU accelerators. I fear this will hurt the third party system builders such as Microway. I don't want an HP workstation; overpriced.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668697)

HP makes no motherboards they are buying them from someone else.

Newegg shows ASUS and EVGA both have boards like this. I was a little surprised Tyan was not represented.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668309)

Me too. My desktop is reasonably recent but still sometimes too slow for the tasks I'm using it for: programming, typesetting, gaming. Not instant-reponse and snappy at all, even though I'm running GNU/Linux with XFCE. Computers just can't be fast enough for me.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

Almir43 (1989390) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668469)

So, you *can* see it happening then.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (5, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668531)

There will be a need for high-power professional and enthusiast machines for a long time. You'll still be able to get them - but as they become a niche product and volume goes down, there may be a corresponding rise in price.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (2)

CastrTroy (595695) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669113)

The again, the price of server class machines have been coming down quite a bit, so at some point it might just make more sense to have a server on your desk if you need some serious power. The advantage of using a server is that you get serious room for expansion. Many server models support int the hundreds of gigabytes of RAM, and you also have the ability to have multiple CPUs. Plus you get a real RAID controller, and things like redundant power supplies.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669295)

I'm not so sure because things are getting more inter-connected too so you may be in a situation where you buy a house power box to put in your hows that the tv, phone and table offload work to. Like a private on-live to affair.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (2)

Sockatume (732728) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669843)

An example: once upon a time if you wanted to use a computer you'd sit down at a dumb terminal that talked to whatever monster your institution had in the basement. Then "personal computers" came, and they were slow, riotously expensive per unit computing power, and used this horrible mouse thing to operate, but the big smart machines didn't go away. They just receded to the people that actually needed them, where they remain to this day.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668617)

And there will still be desktop motherboards made. Intel is just going to manufacture them anymore. Asus, ASROCK, MSI, EVGA, etc... will still make intel chipset motherboards.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669055)

With an AMD socket? Intel is also getting out of the desktop CPU market, you know. Unless the OEMs want to try selling boards with Intel's chips soldered on, Intel will effectively be out of the desktop market within a few years.

Re:I will still use my desktop computer (1)

NixieBunny (859050) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669713)

Desktop systems won't go away, since they're used by Intel et. al. to design motherboards and processors, so they know what's up.

They'll just get more expensive as the demand goes down, and they'll only be sold by vendors of professional gear.

I'm probably old (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668245)

because I don't find it comfortable at all to use a tablet for typing up a document on a tablet. Even some websites I visit still aren't properly formatted for tablet use, thus requiring use of a laptop/desktop.

My concern: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668251)

Does this put more credence into the no more LGA sockets rumor?

Re:My concern: (1)

MarioMax (907837) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668293)

Don't expect LGA sockets to go away completely. Maybe low and mid-range chips will go BGA, but high-end chips will likely be LGA for the forseeable future. At least in this humble geek's opinion.

Monopolist voluntarily leaves the field? (2)

Compaqt (1758360) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668291)

For a while, it seemed like Intel would dominate the mboard market.

After all, everything was being integrated onto boards (sound, network, Intel good-enough graphics, etc.). Add to that the processor itself, and you've got great vertical integration.

It's hard to believe Intel would give a better deal to an outsider (Gigabyte, MSI, etc.) than to its internal mboard division, no matter what accounting system is used.

So it's hard to figure this out.

Re:Monopolist voluntarily leaves the field? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668471)

Exactly!

My first thought was monopoly breakup by the government but apparently Intel decided this on its own!? Maybe to dodge monopoly accusation?

It's quite simple, really. (4, Interesting)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668477)

It's quite simple, really. Intel, monopolist or not, can make more money by utilizing its resources elsewhere than in the the desktop market. All of the hype is in the tablet/phone/ultrabook market and that is where they are shifting their resources. It's quite simple, really. The cost to design and produce a board for a tablet is not significantly different than that of a desktop. On the other hand, a tablet board will probably out sell a desktop board 100 to 1 if not more. As such, the ROI on the tablet board is far greater than on the desktop.

For most users, particularly those that are simply consumers of content, the modern PC is overkill, at least in the world of online services where even the fastest consumer internet connection is a bottleneck for the underlying hardware.

Re:Monopolist voluntarily leaves the field? (1)

alen (225700) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668641)

PC's as a market segment are losing money

Intel spent a few years hiding in its margins. PC components have a higher dollar profit than mobile ones. but few people are buying the traditional type of computer these days and so the costs of R&D/Production and other costs outweigh the profits

Re:Monopolist voluntarily leaves the field? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669101)

It's hard to believe Intel would give a better deal to an outsider (Gigabyte, MSI, etc.)

Intel has a reputation to protect. Nobody is really surprised if AssRock cuts corners on your motherboard's capacitors, but if Intel does it, people would be bitching about it for a decade. There are still people who joke about the Pentium FDIV bug!

Not dying, just role diminished (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668313)

It was not log ago every one had a pc. Soon everyone will still have a pc, but since a large swath of the population a tablet fits their needs, not everyone will bother with a traditional pc.

To use a car analogy, suppose cars did not exist. Once invented a large percent of the population found the fit their needs better than the trucks they had driven. Their were still people that truly needed a truck, so they kept them. Truck sales while not dead, where greatly diminished.

Even old P4 Era Intel Boards where the best (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668345)

I work at a computer recycling center, and a few of the local OEMs used Intel Motherboards for everything, They are the easiest to work on and I've never seen a bad part on them since I started working there (4 Years)

Such a shame, I was going to buy intel for my next board

INTEL BOARDS !! WERE !! COMING FROM TAIWAN !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668389)

Which is a hop skip and a jump from Red China !! The Land of the Yellow Scourge !! The Takers of American Jobs !! The People Producing a Polluted Planet !! Enough !! Cheap !! Labor !! Cheap !! Shit !! Boycott Corporations Corrupting China !!

Really. They Mean it. (1)

retroworks (652802) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668409)

This is a long told story (updating announcments made 3 years ago). It's the equivalent of GMC saying they will leave the pickup truck market to focus on sedans due to strong competition from Ford and Toyota (watch for Hyundai to enter the market). It's unlikely Intel would return to PC boards as the market competition becomes more suppliers in a shrinking market, but just as Volkswagon can change its mind and make Beetles again, Intel is not barred from returning except for the decline in volume of demand. This story is "We mean it. We really are going to stop making pickup trucks, because fewer people are buying pickup trucks and other people are making them as well as we do". It's not the end of the pickup truck market and it's not the end of GMC. Ok, got it.

I wanted a desktop computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668441)

I figure Android will take over, but for the moment content creation means a desktop PC running Windows for me. Xara X, Photoshop, Eclipse, and a few other apps.

So I went to do a final upgrade which was supposed to last me till the switch to Android. I wanted something:

1. Fast, i5 maybe i7
2. 4Gb memory, it has to last me a few years
3. Not upgradable, I don't want to twiddle and I don't want a lot of connectors that come loose.
4. 1TB Raid 1, content I create is important, I want a RAID, and at least enough space for videos
5. High res, I see there are 27 inch monitors with 2500 pixels across and it should drive those without problem
6. Windows 7, if its a desktop why would I want some mangled software that is Windows 8?!

I couldn't find one, they were all big towers with slots and RAID1 was only on big towers.
Intels NUC seemed like it would be the solution, but they've crippled it with i3 and no raid, and mobile harddisks.

I think Intel really needs to up it's game. I have a lot of ARM kit and it's all quiet and small and no fuss and I want those features in any desktop PC.

Oh and ditch the fans (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668717)

Or at least just one fan. My current PC has 4 fans in it, one for the PSU, one for the processor, one for the graphics card and one to take the air out of the box. That's ridiculous!

So
7. No fan or at most 1
8. Card reader.
9. I'm in two minds if it needs a DVD drive in it, I don't use them much, but then again some software is still sold on DVD... so yes I guess it should have one.

Can you fit that into a small neat box, 1/10th the volume of a mini tower. That's enough volume for the hard disks & drive, its currently not enough for the motherboard, processor huge heat sinks, big fans and all the empty space a desktop PC contains.

Re:Oh and ditch the fans (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668799)

There simply is not a big enough market for that,

The closest you will get is something like a mac mini. You could also start with a shuttle PC and go from there.

Most people do not care about the volume a PC takes up in an office, it sits under the desk. Hell, I bought a workstation ATX case more than 10 years ago and I intend to use it till the day I can't find a motherboard that mounts on some form of ATX, it is drilled for everything from Workstation ATX to mini ATX.

I disagree (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669189)

Mac mini no Raid1, only mini 2.5" HD, and doesn't run all the software I want. Checking the latest spec I see they can take it to i7 so it is fast. It also means if Apple can do it, then so can Intel.

I see from your comment you are a PC twiddler, but I don't think the number of people who slot things in their PCs (which is why they're all empty spare space and huge cases) outnumbers people who just use it as a PC.

Without the slots and all the dead space to accommodate cards that are never plugged in, why would you have such a big box?

Space is space, it's under the desk because it's so big. If it wasn't so big that problem wouldn't need fixing.

Re:I disagree (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669311)

The mac mini will run Windows 7 fine. Then you can run the software you want.

I am a geek yes, welcome to slashdot. If you want the tiny market device you are talking about you will too have to man up and do it yourself.

It is cheaper to make one case and one motherboard and use it to make the entry level PC and the high end unit.

It is under the desk because that is where the power is. It could be on the desk behind the monitor if that is where the power was. This is not a problem for 90% of users.

Beginning of the end of the homebuilt desktop (4, Interesting)

crazyjj (2598719) | about a year and a half ago | (#42668443)

I have a Terminator-like vision of a dark future where everything is a all-in-one, laptop, or tablet--and all are walled gardens.

Re:Beginning of the end of the homebuilt desktop (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668955)

This all-in-one tablet-esque world would absolutely suck if it's handled in an iPad/iMac sort of way where you really have no room for upgrades other than what you bought and have on the table in front of you. The only way you'd be able to pry my hands off of a desktop tower would be if one of these all-in-one units would be able to put out the processing power I need, amount of monitors I need, and are so crazy ridiculous cheap that if I need to upgrade to a faster model I can do so with extreme sub-100 dollar ease (similar to how I'd upgrade RAM in a desktop or a faster processor). I'm all about mobile devices, don't get me wrong. I have a tablet I rely on quite heavily for my tasks at work and I've been floored at how a tablet has kind of created it's own well deserved place in my I.T. bag of tricks, but in no way shape or form will I be parting ways with a laptop or desktop. My needs for computing scale over a very wide array, so I have uses for each device, especially my desktop. There's also my home server I have running, which I'm not entirely convinced you could scale down any more without losing a substantial degree of functionality. I mean, I could get some ultra slim unit to put in, but wait - I've already done that with a book-sized nettop oriented system, and it sucked, because I had USB drives hanging off of the thing all over the place since the thing was so small I had no room for my flipping storage drives. I bought a new setup which uses a regular ATX tower with a Micro ATX board and a stack of hard drives, and we're back in total nirvana.

My 2c.

Re:Beginning of the end of the homebuilt desktop (2)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669179)

there were homebuilt desktops before intel started "making" motherboards, they will still be around after ... intel isnt the only one making mobo's for intel chips

Re:Beginning of the end of the homebuilt desktop (1)

jader3rd (2222716) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669333)

I have a Terminator-like vision of a dark future where everything is a all-in-one, laptop, or tablet--and all are walled gardens.

I struggle to see how having a major player break up its presence in a market, to multiple competitors, the sign that it's going to be harder to purchase individual parts.

Here's Hoping (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668493)

Here's hoping that the Next Unit of Computing(NUC) is the small form factor powerhouse the industry needs.

Needed:

Small (4X4X2) is reasonable.
Fanless (at least silent)
Powerful (greater than Atom)
Incorporated power supply (if external, small)
Attractive case, not big ugly box.
Minimal wires(bundle the cables)

In other words, Apple Mac Mini. Never mind.

Awww (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668495)

Aww. I loved Intel boards. They were the only ones where there were no spelling mistakes in the manuals or bios. =(

Bye (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42668693)

Don't let the door hit you in the ass on the way out.

Intel and AMD (2)

Mike Frett (2811077) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669013)

I agree with a lot of you that the Intel boards are Rock Solid and Stable; I have a P2 here with an Intel D865PERL that works like a charm. But Intel it seems are trying to completely remove itself from the Desktop market by using CPUs already attached to the Motherboard (Less Options, bad for Hobbyists) and now removing its own boards. I use AMD now, with a Rock Solid M5A97. It was in my price range and I don't regret it.

And here's AMD in the background waving at all of you that they're dedicated to DIYers by continuing the Socket brand and you all act like they don't exist and are running around like Chickens with no heads, yelling "The Desktop is DEAD!". Stop that, you look silly.

tablets need more storage space and bigger screen (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year and a half ago | (#42669049)

tablets need more storage space and bigger screens to replace pc's.

Also need a real keyboard and not a mini slide out one.

And no the Cloud can not replace storage space due to a mix of things like slow ISP speeds , wifi interference, the low caps on 3g / 4g as well the gaps in coverage.
Also the SUPER HIGH roaming fees. And the lag can be high on 3g / 4g as well.

Re:tablets need more storage space and bigger scre (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669749)

if you want a laptop (which is what you've described) then get a laptop.

Makes sense given the integration trends (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669429)

More and more functionality is being crammed into a single chip. So much so that the motherboard business is in a one way road to insignificance. Intel did great by getting out of the memory business when it became commoditized. I say, in retrospect, this move will be seen in similar terms.

Careful (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669435)

It's a dangerous game they are playing. If other manufacturers were to stop making motherboards for Intel processors it would be a major impact on Intel.

The person that made that decision is by chance the former CEO of HP is it?

Dell (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42669563)

What's Dell going to do now?
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