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Researchers Use Lasers For Cooling

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the keeping-it-cool dept.

Shark 132

MatthewVD writes "Infrared cameras on satellites and night vision goggles could soon use lasers to cool their components. According to the study published in Nature, researchers in Singapore were able to cool the semiconductor cadmium sulfide from 62 degrees fahrenheit to -9 degrees by focusing a green laser on it and making it fluoresce and lose energy as light. Since they require neither gas nor moving parts, they can be more compact, free from vibration and not prone to mechanical failure."

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I may finally install lights in my PC (3, Insightful)

jackb_guppy (204733) | about 2 years ago | (#42677005)

I seen some cool case mods with glowing lights, now they could actually serve a propose! Neat.

Wow, Singapore !! (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about 2 years ago | (#42677359)

Singapore is a tiny island nation, with a tiny population of 4 million citizens (the actually number of people living on that island is 5+ millions, but with close to 2 millions being non-citizens).

I guess congratulations are in order for that tiny nation for funding these type of advance research !

Perhaps t'is another indication of the shift from the West to the East,

Re:Wow, Singapore !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677689)

Not really, it's an indication that out of a population of 5m or so, that they were able to find the probably less than 0.000000002% of the population and funding to make this happen. A country that size is capable of producing advances, they just don't have the luxury of taking the kind of shotgun approach that nations the size of the US can take.

Even in the US, a college might have 30k students and the research teams are still fairly small.

Re:Wow, Singapore !!l (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678921)

The government has been throwing money at foreign imported talent to do r+d here in Singapore, Mostly they're 2nd rate talent who can't make it to the U.S.

If you burn billions of dollars in a giant inferno, you're bound to find a diamond in the ashes...

temperature in celsius (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678335)

Sorry about hijacking this thread, but nobody seems to have posted the temperatures in a proper scale yet, so here we go:

Researchers in Singapore were able to cool the semiconductor cadmium sulfide from 17 degrees Celsius to -23 degrees

Re:temperature in celsius (1)

Cmdrm (1683042) | about 2 years ago | (#42678453)

A proper scale? Shouldn't it be in Kalvin then?

Researchers in Singapore were able to cool the semiconductor cadmium sulfide from 290 degrees Kalvin to 250 degrees Kalvin

Re:temperature in celsius (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678469)

A proper scale? Shouldn't it be in Kalvin then?

Researchers in Singapore were able to cool the semiconductor cadmium sulfide from 290 Kelvin to 250 Kelvin

Fixed your fix.

Re:temperature in celsius (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678491)

A proper scale? Shouldn't it be in Kalvin then?

Researchers in Singapore were able to cool the semiconductor cadmium sulfide from 290 kelvins to 250 kelvins

Fixed your fix.

Pedants, ho!

Re:temperature in celsius (1)

Cmdrm (1683042) | about 2 years ago | (#42678473)

A proper scale? Shouldn't it be in Kelvin then?

Researchers in Singapore were able to cool the semiconductor cadmium sulfide from 290 degrees Kelvin to 250 degrees Kelvin

Fixed it for myself

Re:temperature in celsius (2)

Cmdrm (1683042) | about 2 years ago | (#42678479)

A proper scale? Shouldn't it be in Kelvin then?

Researchers in Singapore were able to cool the semiconductor cadmium sulfide from 290 Kelvin to 250 Kelvin

Fixed it for myself

Fcuk, I shouldn't comment after flying (Kelvin are absolute units)

Re:temperature in celsius (3, Funny)

ChrisMaple (607946) | about 2 years ago | (#42678729)

No, it should be in Hobbes.

Now we just need to send a rocket to the sun (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677031)

And unlike the Polish one, it won't have to go at night.

Just don't bring along any aliens, even if they look like teddy bears.

Re:Now we just need to send a rocket to the sun (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 2 years ago | (#42677323)

In Soviet Russia, laser puts in the cooler you!

Re:Now we just need to send a rocket to the sun (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677475)

What about friendly broccoli?

Yeap, a bright idea (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#42677051)

So, shining a green laser into some goggles: what can go wrong?

Re:Yeap, a bright idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677125)

Ze goggles, zey do NUTHINK!

Re:Yeap, a bright idea (4, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | about 2 years ago | (#42677331)

Ze goggles, zey do NUTHINK!

I see nothing wrong with the goggles... I see NOTHING! AAAAAHHHHHH

Re:Yeap, a bright idea (2)

rally2xs (1093023) | about 2 years ago | (#42678065)

Are they heavy? Yes? Well then they're expensive. Put 'em back.

Pff (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677061)

Been saying lasers are cool for ages, but do they listen to me? Nooo...

Re:Pff (4, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | about 2 years ago | (#42677339)

Been saying lasers are cool for ages, but do they listen to me? Nooo...

So I'm out with the astronomy club with all our cool glass and tubes and stuff and have people looking at Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, M-13, fun stuff like that there. Someone asks, "Which star is Sirius?" I pull out my laser pointer and show them. Little kid says, "Whoa! That's COOL! Mom! Buy me one!"

I tell the mother, "No, do not buy him one. Laser is not toy. Can blind himself or a friend with it. Under no circumstances should you buy him a laser. Buy him a UV flashlight to look at centipedes or something."

Lasers are cool, but only for grown up kids.

Re:Pff (3, Interesting)

GumphMaster (772693) | about 2 years ago | (#42677793)

These pointer lasers are controlled items in many places because, aside from the obvious general hazard, morons deliberately point them at aircraft cockpits. Only occasionally do the fools get identified [abc.net.au] but it warms the cockles of my heart when they do: I am an amateur astronomer and have also been involved in the airborne end of this stupidity.

Re:Pff (2)

deimtee (762122) | about 2 years ago | (#42677919)

A moron indeed. You need to be a malicious arsehole to point one at a plane, but how dumb do you have to be to point it at a Police helicopter!

Re:Pff (1)

Genda (560240) | about 2 years ago | (#42678203)

It happens, and the answer is flat line on he EEG brain dead.

Re:Pff (2)

mat8913 (2654467) | about 2 years ago | (#42678233)

I liked lasers before they were cool.

Efficiency (2)

kevink707 (1331815) | about 2 years ago | (#42677141)

How efficient is this process? Would it be useful as a general replacement for current refrigeration technology?

Re:Efficiency (2)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#42677209)

I think it only cools things which fluoresce.

Re:Efficiency (1)

phozz bare (720522) | about 2 years ago | (#42679207)

That shouldn't be an obstacle, as current refrigeration technology doesn't directly cool the air in your fridge/home/office either. It would be possible to cool some object using the laser then use the low temperature of the now cold object to cool the surrounding air. However as long as the efficiency is indeed 1.2-2% as mentioned in an adjacent comment this is no replacement for current A/C tech.

Re:Efficiency (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677395)

How efficient is this process? Would it be useful as a general replacement for current refrigeration technology?

Depends on the temperature you start cooling at but between 1.2 and 2% so dont expect to see it in a fridge any time soon.

That wont work.. (5, Funny)

Brad1138 (590148) | about 2 years ago | (#42677145)

It would freeze the water around the shark.

Rubidium (3, Informative)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about 2 years ago | (#42677149)

This has been used to cool rubidium to near 0K in labs for a while. Takes some work (the laser needs to be *perfect*), but I've seen the setup myself at a previous employ at a local University.

Re:Rubidium (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677169)

shh the Asians thought of it first, cause they are superior

Re:Rubidium (5, Informative)

Noughmad (1044096) | about 2 years ago | (#42678465)

No, this is different. What you describe is called Doppler cooling [wikipedia.org] and is basically "slowing down" the atoms/ions.

TFA, on the other hand, talks about using a laser to cause fluorescence in the material. It's a completely different principle.

Re:Rubidium (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678953)

No, this is different. What you describe is called Doppler cooling [wikipedia.org] and is basically "slowing down" the atoms/ions.

TFA, on the other hand, talks about using a laser to cause fluorescence in the material. It's a completely different principle.

Doppler cooling of atoms involves -- as explained by the page you linked to -- (a) the selective absorption of photons opposing the atoms, slowing the atoms down and (b) the essentially indiscriminate scattering of the absorbed photons in random directions, producing zero net (i.e. averaged over events) force, which is also known as fluorescence. The principles involved in the work of TFA and the laser cooling of atoms and ions are in fact very similar.

Re:Rubidium (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42680037)

The cool in Doppler cooling comes from absorbing the photon which changes the kinetic energy of the atom, then fluorescence that does not contribute back to the heating. Here, it is dependent on the semiconductor band structure, and involves absorbing the photon, then a release of another photon and a phonon to cancel out lattice vibrations.

Defeats the purpose (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677153)

The primary purpose of Night Vision goggles is to see clearly in the dark in those times where you can't/won't use a torch. So, in times where you may not want to be seen yourself.
How is it helpful to have the goggles shine with green laser light to cool them off in this situation?

Re:Defeats the purpose (1)

wiredlogic (135348) | about 2 years ago | (#42677181)

The laser shines inside onto the back of the sensor.

Might work ? (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about 2 years ago | (#42677219)

The primary purpose of Night Vision goggles is to see clearly in the dark in those times where you can't/won't use a torch. So, in times where you may not want to be seen yourself. How is it helpful to have the goggles shine with green laser light to cool them off in this situation?

Presumably the system would be completely self contained. Neither the laser nor the fluorescing being visible. Maybe we can think of the fluorescing as a mechanism to conduct heat from the electronic components to the case of the NVG. Of course that would heat up the NVG case but perhaps it is not emitting in the iR anymore than the person's face underneath it. More info is needed.

Re:Might work ? (3, Insightful)

unrtst (777550) | about 2 years ago | (#42677387)

Presumably the system would be completely self contained. Neither the laser nor the fluorescing being visible. Maybe we can think of the fluorescing as a mechanism to conduct heat from the electronic components to the case of the NVG. Of course that would heat up the NVG case but perhaps it is not emitting in the iR anymore than the person's face underneath it. More info is needed.

I've seen multiple posts like this one, and they all seem to be missing a huge point (maybe I'm getting trolled? ... or maybe I'm completely wrong).

From the article (sorry, I read it):
"...starting from 290 kelvin. We use a pump laser with a wavelength of 514 nanometres, and obtain an estimated cooling efficiency of about 1.3 per cent and an estimated cooling power of 180 microwatts."

Where the hell is all the heat going if you stick this thing inside some goggles with the direct purpose of cooling something inside said goggles? That question has nothing to do with the above quote... it's there to drive it home - look at how inefficient this process is!?! I'm sure it's extremely useful and interesting for a great many cases, but I don't see (pun) how this is good for night vision goggles.

I keep picturing a guy on a sailboat blowing really hard on his sail.

Re:Might work ? (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about 2 years ago | (#42677479)

... How is it helpful to have the goggles shine with green laser light to cool them off in this situation?

Presumably the system would be completely self contained. Neither the laser nor the fluorescing being visible. Maybe we can think of the fluorescing as a mechanism to conduct heat from the electronic components to the case of the NVG. Of course that would heat up the NVG case but perhaps it is not emitting in the iR anymore than the person's face underneath it. More info is needed.

I've seen multiple posts like this one, and they all seem to be missing a huge point (maybe I'm getting trolled? ... look at how inefficient this process is!?! I'm sure it's extremely useful and interesting for a great many cases, but I don't see (pun) how this is good for night vision goggles.

I'm not arguing that it would work or even be practical. There must be easier ways to conduct heat, methods that don't add to battery usage. I'm just pointing out that the laser and the fluorescence are internal to the unit, and that only key electronic components need to be cooled not the entire unit. :-)

Re:Might work ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677533)

I keep picturing a guy on a sailboat blowing really hard on his sail.

What the hell are you picturing that for?
Picture the guy aiming a laser at the sail!

Re:Might work ? (1)

darkfeline (1890882) | about 2 years ago | (#42677621)

There's no law of preservation of heat, only preservation of energy. Presumably, part of the heat energy is transformed into light, and part of it is stored into the reactant products. Think of those portable heat packs. "If the pack itself is at room temperature, where does the heat come from?" Also, heat != temperature.

Re:Might work ? (1)

sFurbo (1361249) | about 2 years ago | (#42678499)

It is a "new" way to move heat. In night vision goggles, it could move heat from the sensor to the casing, as only the sensor (and perhaps the optics) must be cold. However, I would imagine a Peltier element being more efficient, and that this mostly makes sense where a) You have no heat sink (mostly in space, I guess) or b) The cooling devices is not in direct contact with what is being cooled (the technique is already used in this way to cool gasses for making Bose Einstein condensates, where the thing being cooled is so cold that having it contact the cooling device defeats the purpose).

Defeats the purpose (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677167)

Why would you want your night vision goggles to suddenly start lighting up with green laser light as they are being used? Most situations where you use NV goggles you don't want to be seen yourself (otherwise, why not a flashlight?) so it seems to be counter-productive.

Re:Defeats the purpose (4, Informative)

aXis100 (690904) | about 2 years ago | (#42677229)

It's only the sensor that needs to be cooled below ambient, other parts can use traditional methods. So, you make the back side of the sensor flouresce, capture that light in a chamber where it is converted back to heat, then dissipate that heat through regular air cooled heatsinks.

In the end it's just shifting the heat whilst working against a thermal gradient - same as a refridgerative system, but without moving parts.

Re:Defeats the purpose (2)

pushing-robot (1037830) | about 2 years ago | (#42677845)

On the other hand, Hollywood prop designers finally feel vindicated.

Re:Defeats the purpose (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42679259)

At last, an explanation for Sam Fisher's "stealth suit".

NOT NEWS (1)

CurunirAran (2811035) | about 2 years ago | (#42677179)

How is this news? Scientists have been doing this to make BECs FOR AGES.

Re:NOT NEWS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677495)

I knew I smelled something delicious [wikipedia.org] coming from the lab this morning!

Re:NOT NEWS (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 years ago | (#42679707)

BECs means Bike Engined Cars to me.

Re:NOT NEWS (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678121)

If you actually read the paper (hah), you will see that the mechanism is pretty different (solid state vs gas).

Use SI units for reporting science (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677217)

The scientists used SI units all the way through in their paper (Kelvin for temperature), and they would have been laughed out of court and certainly not published in Nature if they'd done otherwise.

Why does Slashdot even accept a submission in Fahrenheit when the subject is science? Most nerds understand SI units, and most of the planet is metric. How about trying to be a bit educational for the few that don't? Quote both if you're trying to be helpful, with the SI units as primary for science reporting and imperial equivalents only in brackets.

Re:Use SI units for reporting science (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#42677263)

Why does Slashdot even accept a submission in Fahrenheit when the subject is science?

Because you can't do car analogies in SI units. It just doesn't work.

Metric is fine for car analogies ... (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about 2 years ago | (#42678001)

Why does Slashdot even accept a submission in Fahrenheit when the subject is science?

Because you can't do car analogies in SI units. It just doesn't work.

Metric is fine for car analogies. Contemporary cars need metric tools, even US domestics.

Because retro is cool (1)

davidwr (791652) | about 2 years ago | (#42677271)

In tech circles, english units are the Steampunk of measurements.

Re:Use SI units for reporting science (0)

tsa (15680) | about 2 years ago | (#42677291)

This. But the US probably thinks that together with Lyneria and Muanmar they are the only developed countries on the planet.

Re:Use SI units for reporting science (0)

tsa (15680) | about 2 years ago | (#42677301)

Damn virtual keyboards. Lyberia and Myanmar!

Re:Use SI units for reporting science (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#42677459)

Damn virtual keyboards. Lyberia and Myanmar!

So would you agree that even a laser-projected keyboard [slashdot.org] isn't cool for typing?

Re:Use SI units for reporting science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678049)

BECUZ not everyone is a noid.

instead he's being educational for more (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678211)

He's being educational for those that use Celsius and Kelvin. Did you think of that?

I don't think any scientific journal is going to laugh at anyone for using any particular unit. Scientists don't work that way. Science is not less noteworthy or scientific simple because it is in other units. They surely would have converted the figures to Celsius or Kelvin for publishing though.

Re:Use SI units for reporting science (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 2 years ago | (#42678873)

If it was in Celsius or Kelvin US readers wouldn't know whether to wear a coat or shorts when they went to visit the laser.

Re:Use SI units for reporting science (1)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | about 2 years ago | (#42679941)

Reply to undo wrong mod.

Re:Use SI units for reporting science (1)

gef7 (1789448) | about 2 years ago | (#42679171)

Information which passes via US news redistribution streams is obviously mangled... business as usual!

Re:Use SI units for reporting science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42680057)

and they would have been laughed out of court and certainly not published in Nature if they'd done otherwise.

Unless they were doing a paper in plasma physics, particle physics or some electrical engineering topics and gave temperatures in eV (electron volts)...

Cool! (2)

tsa (15680) | about 2 years ago | (#42677315)

But what cools the laser?

Re:Cool! (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about 2 years ago | (#42677501)

But what cools the laser?

The heat sink with external cooling fins (maybe a low RPM fan ?) that the NVG electronics used to be connect to. :-)

Re:Cool! (2)

gman003 (1693318) | about 2 years ago | (#42677567)

More lasers.

Re:Cool! (5, Funny)

Nationless (2123580) | about 2 years ago | (#42677609)

Another laser, duh.

Re:Cool! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677715)

It's lasers all the way down.

Re:Cool! (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 2 years ago | (#42677835)

But what cools the laser?

The frickin' sharks attached to the lasers!

Re:Cool! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42679523)

I think you'll find they are actually Ill tempered, mutated sea bass.

Awesome (1)

sidevans (66118) | about 2 years ago | (#42677329)

I've been looking for new ways to keep my flux capacitor cool.

Let me get this straight... (1)

AJWM (19027) | about 2 years ago | (#42677389)

... you make the light sensor more efficient by making it fluoresce?

Um, right. Good luck with that.

Re:Let me get this straight... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677649)

Why not? It doesn't need to fluoresce on the same spectrum.

Could this be used for PC cooling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677409)

nt

Sundiver. (1)

bejiitas_wrath (825021) | about 2 years ago | (#42677635)

The novel Sundiver [wikipedia.org] by David Brin did this; they used a powerful laser to suck heat out of the Sundiver craft within the atmosphere of the Sun.

Re:Sundiver. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678067)

That was my first thought too. Amazing that they're now making something similar In Real Life.

Re:Sundiver. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678075)

yeah? and just who many watts would a green lazer have to put out to cool and protect anything entering the corona of a star? and if it did, what would it be measuring? surely not the temperature, pressure or density.

buahahahahahaha!!!!!

Peltier (1)

gringer (252588) | about 2 years ago | (#42677779)

How does this compare with peltier cooling? Is there some obvious reason (e.g. no airflow) why peltier won't work in space?

Re:Peltier (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 years ago | (#42679725)

I think peltier would be inefficient in space...you need power to run it, and you could add heat exchangers to a passive cooling system instead of the solar panels needed to run the peltier cooler.

how about pesn and keshe foundation (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677809)

Nobody give a fucking shit yet right?
this laser coooling is just a hack, an interesting one, but a HACK.

How about NEW EXOTIC tech?! hmmm /.?

(Fuck I should start an account called Mr Bold)

A perfect CPU fan replacement? (2)

Twinbee (767046) | about 2 years ago | (#42677817)

Would it be possible to cool CPU chip surfaces by coating them with this glowing material to achieve the same effect?

Re:A perfect CPU fan replacement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42679639)

Maybe they could be.. I think many people are misunderstanding, portable devices currently use terribly energy inefficient methods like peltier cooling plates that are maybe 10% efficient but have no moving parts and are compact. A house air conditioner is noisy, large, breaksdown, etc but is maybe 40-50% efficient. One can only assume then, this discovery is better than the 10% or has the potential to be... else it would be kind of pointless outside specialized applications.

Laser cooling is handy, but requires precision (2)

drwho (4190) | about 2 years ago | (#42677823)

Handy for things like uranium isotope separation, and also for creating things like Bosenovas. The problem is, that the process is very sensitive to the frequency of the laser. If these guys have found a way to reliably, inexpensively create the right frequency of light to cool anything...then that substance can act as a heat sink to cool other substance. This could open a whole exciting new era of science and technology. But I won't hold my breathe, the proof is in the pudding, etc.

Re:Laser cooling is handy, but requires precision (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678671)

> inexpensively create the right frequency of light to cool anything

I didn't see anything that suggests they could cool anything, just a very few known number of materials with very unique structures that support the anti-stokes deal.

Sundive in 5...4...3...2...1 (2)

Somebody Is Using My (985418) | about 2 years ago | (#42677827)

We have our refrigerator laser, now all we need is a stasis generator, to "control the flow of tune and space through the body of the Sunship, so that the violent tossing of the chromosphere would seem a gentle rocking to those inside." And I'm sure we'll have that any day now.

Yup.

Any.
Day.
Now.

Wait... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42677851)

... so in order to increase night vision, we have laser making night-googles loose temperature via fluorescence, which is light-emission...
Wouldn't it be quicker to just light up the scene instead?

Sharks don't cook their meat (1)

locopuyo (1433631) | about 2 years ago | (#42677949)

Finally they can keep their kills from rotting so they can eat them later.

Please do not use retarded units. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678081)

"from 62 degrees fahrenheit to -9 degrees"
Please do not use retarded units. Learn to SI. It's science after all.

Re:Please do not use retarded units. (1)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | about 2 years ago | (#42679863)

I'm not sure I understand, what is retarded about the units? Has their velocity been reduced?

The article (sensibly) used Kelvin (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678183)

Why did you fell that you have to dumb it down? This is not a yellow press trash site. Ok, ok, not supposed to be a yellow press trash site. So let's at least pretend, shall we?

Now we can have a really cool shark with a laser (1)

q.kontinuum (676242) | about 2 years ago | (#42678239)

No further text

Trolling away! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678497)

Now if only they could of made it from 62 degree fahrenheit to a more scientific unit!

Misread the subject line.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678625)

Thought it read COOKING. Now that would be cool!!!

And before we get to "what could possibly go wrong", we've been using the domestic application of RADAR in our kitchens for decades. Apart from the usual faux pas - pets, sneakers, eggs - there's not been too many problems with that technology...

Re:Misread the subject line.... (1)

ledow (319597) | about 2 years ago | (#42678767)

Well, put some of that semiconductor underneath the base plate, aim a 800W laser at it contained inside the device - depending on the speed the material loses heat at, it might be possible to make a "microwave freezer" that freezes (or at least cools) things in seconds.

Probably pie-in-the-sky because of some physical limit (i.e. it might take hours to cool no matter how much power you aim at it), but the "microwave freezer" has been an April Fool "hoax" on at least one BBC science programme (Tomorrow's World) that I fell for when I was younger and would have LOVED to have a device that did that.

If I can heat a meal to burning temperature in minutes, why can't I do the opposite too - reliably, cleanly, reproducibly, without consuming some resource that I would have to keep buying (except electricity, of course).

The applications of a clean "quick-freeze" device run from not just your freezer and fridge, but down to drinks makers, coolboxes, industrial cooling systems, even processor coolers and air-conditioning. I'm actually quite amazed that in this day and age our most common way of cooling things is still the evaporation/condensation cycle of some gas, or blowing air around it. It just seems too primitive in a "quantum" world.

Re:Misread the subject line.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42680083)

I believe they explained it was 1.2% efficient, so an 800W laser would have the cooling power of POSSIBLY 1W. Most microwaves heat with 1000W+ worth of juice, so it might be slightly more effective with an 800,000W laser, like the ones used on military planes to vaporize jeeps.

A fix for global warming? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42678903)

That's no moon its a.... Cooler

Saucer Lights explained (1)

ayahner (696000) | about 2 years ago | (#42678945)

That must be why the mother ship has all those lights. Cooling lasers. The overlords see in the heat spectrum (or not at all) and so never expected us to detect them. Blaart: It's like the huuuman is looking right at ussss. Pleaotard: Not possible, Overlord Blaartumus. We have the cooling lasers working overtime.

Re:Saucer Lights explained (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 years ago | (#42679739)

I lol'd XD

International system (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42679289)

Please! Please! Use the metric system. Only a minority of slashdot readers can understand those barbaric imperial units.
  "Laser cooling of a semiconductor by 40 kelvin."

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